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1 hour ago, Loose Cannon said:

Does anyone know the sheet loads (and therefore the requirements for blocks) for F242 spinnaker block (back beam corner) screecher (strap to back beam and I imagine the highest load) and the snatch block for a barber hauler for screecher or jib?

Looking to buy some blocks during holiday sales and need to know which ones.

Thanks

What came with the spin kit on the F242 in 1998 were Harken 57 mm swivel blocks if I remember correctly.  Mine never broke even after using winch to grind in the sheet when loaded-I think the spec was 500 pounds swl.  Snatch blocks for barber/twings didn't need to be that big; but that's pretty much the same size I bought since that way I could use them elsewhere if necessary.  Most of the lines back then were 3/8" yacht braid, so you needed the larger blocks.  If you are using smaller lines, you should size the blocks for those lines. 

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In case some of you haven't seen it there is great, searchable, Farrier and Corsair IO forum where lots of folks knowledgeable on these boats hang out.  Farrier himself popped in for all kinds of advice before he died.  Great for specific questions that seem to be raised here on this thread.  Link 

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On 11/22/2019 at 3:22 PM, MultiThom said:

What came with the spin kit on the F242 in 1998 were Harken 57 mm swivel blocks if I remember correctly.  Mine never broke even after using winch to grind in the sheet when loaded-I think the spec was 500 pounds swl.  Snatch blocks for barber/twings didn't need to be that big; but that's pretty much the same size I bought since that way I could use them elsewhere if necessary.  Most of the lines back then were 3/8" yacht braid, so you needed the larger blocks.  If you are using smaller lines, you should size the blocks for those lines. 

Thank you kind sir

if I can go down to 40s I might, but smallerlines means torn up hands, so not sure.  Mostly worried about screecher block loads so the 57s or equivalent make sense there.

 

has anyone used rings instead of snatch blocks for barbers?

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6 minutes ago, Loose Cannon said:

Thank you kind sir

if I can go down to 40s I might, but smallerlines means torn up hands, so not sure.  Mostly worried about screecher block loads so the 57s or equivalent make sense there.

 

has anyone used rings instead of snatch blocks for barbers?

You are welcome.  Do you plan on using barbers a lot?  I only used them for a close reach when I didn't have my screacher available...about a handful of times over 12 years.  Now, I know some better sailors than I am used them a lot when going to weather to get the jib clew "just so"...

But to answer your question, I did use a make shift hauler on one long reach back to the bay from the farralones since I had broken my sprit the day before and didn't have snatch blocks.  I just tied a loop of line around the jib sheet--worked OK since I only had to position it once (no maneuvering).

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This thread explains low friction ring fairleads with lots of pictures.

It's actually more like re-thinking your jib fairlead approach entirely than just adding a barber to the more traditional block-on-track approach.

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Actually I was focused more on a barber for screecher shape upwind and at broader reaching angles than any application for the jib, and what I should do for the screecher block strapped around the aft beam.  Also thinking about what should I do with the block for the spinnaker sheet at the aft crossbeam / ama.

I don't have the boat yet, and so don't know the loads involved on barber and those blocks, and if I can get a better result with rings, great.  If a snatch block for the barber (thinking a ring for the mount to the float like the picture above) and blocks at the turn for the spinnaker and screecher are the way great.  Just want to make sure I have them sized appropriately.

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I've seen lots of F-boats simply lash the screecher block to the aft beam a foot or two outboard of the cockpit with a spectra lashing.

I'm admittedly new to owning an F-boat, but the general rule of thumb I've used on large monos for reaching with large headsails is to move the lead forwards and outwards by equivalent amounts. For example of you move the lead out by 2 feet you also move it forward by 2 feet, or out by 3 feet and forward by 3 feet etc.

Given that I plan to experiment with sheeting between the aft beam about a foot out from the cockpit for windward sailing to the shroud chain plate on the amas for reaching. 

As you might wind up transferring the entire sheeting load to the ring/hauler/block I would suggest the load sizing for all components should be similar.

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We use a low friction ring on the barber hauler for the jib on our F24 Mk 1. I've used a lashing on the beam as suggested above to vary the sheeting on the reacher. Normally I just use a turning block on the ama. I like the barber hauler on the jib, but I think a barber hauler on the reacher would clutter things up in the cockpit. The reacher on our boat isn't designed for going too close to the wind anyway.

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23 hours ago, gspot said:

I've seen lots of F-boats simply lash the screecher block to the aft beam a foot or two outboard of the cockpit with a spectra lashing.

I'm admittedly new to owning an F-boat, but the general rule of thumb I've used on large monos for reaching with large headsails is to move the lead forwards and outwards by equivalent amounts. For example of you move the lead out by 2 feet you also move it forward by 2 feet, or out by 3 feet and forward by 3 feet etc.

Given that I plan to experiment with sheeting between the aft beam about a foot out from the cockpit for windward sailing to the shroud chain plate on the amas for reaching. 

As you might wind up transferring the entire sheeting load to the ring/hauler/block I would suggest the load sizing for all components should be similar.

That seems like an unnecessary thumb rule. Trim any head-sail so that all of the leach telltales are flying and the luff telltales break together. When reaching this usually means barber-hauling the clew downward  and outward. On our boats I have found that the installed pad-eyes are pretty good points to attach a barber hauler, but I have them on a snap shackle so I can move them around as I see fit. I have even moved the barber hauler forward of the beam for wing on wing sailing. Because you are often sheeting in a V-shape the loads can get pretty massive.

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On 11/26/2019 at 9:28 AM, Loose Cannon said:

Actually I was focused more on a barber for screecher shape upwind and at broader reaching angles than any application for the jib, and what I should do for the screecher block strapped around the aft beam.  Also thinking about what should I do with the block for the spinnaker sheet at the aft crossbeam / ama.

I don't have the boat yet, and so don't know the loads involved on barber and those blocks, and if I can get a better result with rings, great.  If a snatch block for the barber (thinking a ring for the mount to the float like the picture above) and blocks at the turn for the spinnaker and screecher are the way great.  Just want to make sure I have them sized appropriately.

One of the nice things about trimarans is you can easily futz around with sheeting points for your sails.  After I'd make a new sprit headsail I'd tie a loop of line between the akas.  About every foot I'd put a alpine butterfly loop so I could experiment with sheeting from this loop or that loop to get the sail to look right while flying.  Then I'd know and not need haulers.  My upwind drifter and cutter (think high aspect ratio high clew screacher) ended up needing to be sheeted in front of the forward aka so I used the lifting eyes.  

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Gotta say this thread is kinda bumming me out.

I sail a Seawind cat and mostly just play around with the traveler and sheets till the boat seems to be balanced and tracking like a freight train.  I do look at the VMG on the chart plotter and try and maximize that, but also sometimes alter course if the sea state is such that falling off or heading up a little makes the boat's motion more comfortable.

While I was kicking around the idea of getting a small fboat, or similar small tri, for sailing out of season when the Seawind is not cruising all this talk about how complicated it can get to single hand some flavor of a C24 I am having second thoughts.  Every time I have been on an Fboat (except when I was on the F39 blasting along at 20 knots plus with a crew of 5) it was much more like on my Seawind with easy sailing and not a lot of drama.

So what say you guys about how easy or hard it is to sail small fboats in lazy mode.

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It's pretty easy! That's literally what they were designed for in the first place!

There's a tendency to overanalyze and complicate things around here.

If you are not trying to squeeze out every last drop of performance, just put some sails up and go sailing and enjoy.

They well mannered and forgiving boats. Reduce sail if you keep spilling your beverage of choice and you should stay out of trouble.

I haven't found maintenance to be much of a big deal either (the trailer takes more effort to keep going than the boat!)

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30 minutes ago, Tomfl said:

Gotta say this thread is kinda bumming me out.

...

So what say you guys about how easy or hard it is to sail small fboats in lazy mode.

You will never be unhappy sailing your fboat unless you race.  Sailing for fun in an fboat is what they are meant to do.  The tacks are easy in breezes up to 20 kts; no need to reef in breezes up to 30 (but nobody sails for fun in the 20s or more-well, hardly anybody).  Going downwind is the most fun and an asymspin is a real kick in the pants to fly (although getting it up and down isn't always the most fun without crew).  Modern furling systems make even that fun.  They are fun toys that you never tire of taking out of the box to play with.

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3 hours ago, Mizzmo said:

That seems like an unnecessary thumb rule. Trim any head-sail so that all of the leach telltales are flying and the luff telltales break together.

When reaching this usually means barber-hauling the clew downward  and outward.

This achieves the exact same thing I was suggesting - reducing head-sail twist to create more lift and therefore go faster. 

2 hours ago, Airwick said:

It's pretty easy! That's literally what they were designed for in the first place!

There's a tendency to overanalyze and complicate things around here.

If you are not trying to squeeze out every last drop of performance, just put some sails up and go sailing and enjoy.

They well mannered and forgiving boats. Reduce sail if you keep spilling your beverage of choice and you should stay out of trouble.

I haven't found maintenance to be much of a big deal either (the trailer takes more effort to keep going than the boat!)

This kind of tweaking is certainly unnecessary, but I find it fun and interesting, and I would only do it when I'm trying to win a race and not cruising around with my wife.

The great thing about sailing is that you can make it as simple or as complicated as you like depending on your preferences and the situation at hand.

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19 hours ago, Tomfl said:

 

While I was kicking around the idea of getting a small fboat, or similar small tri, for sailing out of season when the Seawind is not cruising all this talk about how complicated it can get to single hand some flavor of a C24 I am having second thoughts. 

So what say you guys about how easy or hard it is to sail small fboats in lazy mode.

Any half decent sailor can single hand a Corsair tri (F27 and smaller) in any weather if it’s set up right. Which again just needs the skills of a half decent sailor to do. So pretty easy I would say....

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3 hours ago, Wess said:

Any half decent sailor can single hand a Corsair tri (F27 and smaller) in any weather if it’s set up right. Which again just needs the skills of a half decent sailor to do. So pretty easy I would say....

Airwick regularly wins races single-handed against crewed boats on his F-24 MkII and I've never seen him tweak or barber-haul.  

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I've considered tweakers and barber-haulers and once in a while find I could use them but in the conditions I usually sail it's just not really worth it: racing aroudn here it's more important to keep your head out of the boat and pay attention to what the wind/currents are doing than spend more time fiddling with strings to gain 0.05kt...

Our courses are usually not very long anyway so unless you have a regular crew that is on the ball and able to manage all of it by themselves, I find that the KISS is a pretty good option for me...

As for earlier, I was reacting to Tomfl's post: reading this thread sort of gives the impression that these boats are super tweaky and need constant attention if you want to stay alive, as well as a bunch of maintenance between each sail to stay in working order, which is not actually the case. 

The design brief was to create fun, easy to sail family "pocket cruisers", that are also fast and I think they do pretty much do exactly that.

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On 11/27/2019 at 6:07 PM, Tomfl said:

Gotta say this thread is kinda bumming me out.

Tom,

if a casual cruise is your thing, I can’t think of a boat that is less hassle and more fun than a 242.  Plus there are no haul out fees, Marina storage fees, mooring fees (unless you want them), I just put it on the trailer and park it behind the house. That is why I am buying one. I can sit on the front nets reclining with an adult beverage and remote steering the tiller pilot like it was my bloody Laz E Boy recliner.

that said, MY personal joy also includes putting maximum miles into a day either on an adventure trip, or racing.  I like getting max speed and have won national titles and competed at the world championship level Because I am an anal retentive type A personality - it is fun to me.

So for me, having a barber for the screecher, so I can use it effectively (and then furl it when I go around a corner), is one of the many ways that I can have the rig be most flexible with 3 sails so that I can do all that without the nuisance associated with a monohull racing boat.  I don’t have to switch from the J1 to the J3 or pole out anything with a jockey pole.  I just pull a single line and cleat it and go.

The best part of an F boat is the look on the crew and owners of million dollar boats as they sit on the rail in their big races and I am kicked back with the blender mixing margaritas while blowing bye them with my feet up.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/26/2019 at 11:33 PM, Loose Cannon said:

The only hesitancy on my part is the desire to have a place to hide if it rains or if the waves get big.

The Cabin on the Sprint is certainly big enough to hide in, lay down in, sleep in or even make a baby in.

But you aren't gonna steer the boat from inside there......in 8 years of sailing it I never took refuge. Big waves is when I want most to be up top in control. Rain? The thing is so quick that I am be at the mooring before it is pouring, but with apps you can see storms coming long in advance. 

Dang things is still for sale...and, yes, I've placed two paid ads here in the past and got zero from them (a couple Nigerian offers tho). I can't believe it's not moving for the price (just lowered to $27,500, 2008 Sprint at Bob and Iras). 

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On 12/22/2019 at 1:06 PM, craigiri said:

The Cabin on the Sprint is certainly big enough to hide in, lay down in, sleep in or even make a baby in.

But you aren't gonna steer the boat from inside there......in 8 years of sailing it I never took refuge. Big waves is when I want most to be up top in control. Rain? The thing is so quick that I am be at the mooring before it is pouring, but with apps you can see storms coming long in advance. 

Dang things is still for sale...and, yes, I've placed two paid ads here in the past and got zero from them (a couple Nigerian offers tho). I can't believe it's not moving for the price (just lowered to $27,500, 2008 Sprint at Bob and Iras). 

Sorry to tell you - but there was a 2007 with a carbon centerboard in Alameda for sale significantly cheaper, and it looks to have sold.

I agree with you - they are fantastic boats, particularly for the east coast typical winds, and I dont understand the issue around Mk1s, or sprints in general.

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3 hours ago, Loose Cannon said:

Sorry to tell you - but there was a 2007 with a carbon centerboard in Alameda for sale significantly cheaper, and it looks to have sold.

I agree with you - they are fantastic boats, particularly for the east coast typical winds, and I dont understand the issue around Mk1s, or sprints in general.

I try and keep up with fboats in the 24 foot range and have noticed a real drop in prices from my last serious effort to find one that was a good deal.  Thing is I have also seen a few which may be and example of what you are describing; sort of a one off deal that is not really representative of the market in general.

From what I have seen the $US27,500 is not really an unrealistic asking price; and depending on the boat's condition may be very realistic.  There are some fboats in CA that are sorta in that range.  The thing is I don't really consider the NE to be a good boat market compared to an area like Florida where the boat might well send more quickly.

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19 hours ago, Tomfl said:

I try and keep up with fboats in the 24 foot range and have noticed a real drop in prices from my last serious effort to find one that was a good deal.  Thing is I have also seen a few which may be and example of what you are describing; sort of a one off deal that is not really representative of the market in general.

From what I have seen the $US27,500 is not really an unrealistic asking price; and depending on the boat's condition may be very realistic.  There are some fboats in CA that are sorta in that range.  The thing is I don't really consider the NE to be a good boat market compared to an area like Florida where the boat might well send more quickly.

Couldn't agree with you more. 

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 12/1/2019 at 8:59 AM, Loose Cannon said:

Tom,

if a casual cruise is your thing, I can’t think of a boat that is less hassle and more fun than a 242.  Plus there are no haul out fees, Marina storage fees, mooring fees (unless you want them), I just put it on the trailer and park it behind the house. That is why I am buying one. I can sit on the front nets reclining with an adult beverage and remote steering the tiller pilot like it was my bloody Laz E Boy recliner.

that said, MY personal joy also includes putting maximum miles into a day either on an adventure trip, or racing.  I like getting max speed and have won national titles and competed at the world championship level Because I am an anal retentive type A personality - it is fun to me.

So for me, having a barber for the screecher, so I can use it effectively (and then furl it when I go around a corner), is one of the many ways that I can have the rig be most flexible with 3 sails so that I can do all that without the nuisance associated with a monohull racing boat.  I don’t have to switch from the J1 to the J3 or pole out anything with a jockey pole.  I just pull a single line and cleat it and go.

The best part of an F boat is the look on the crew and owners of million dollar boats as they sit on the rail in their big races and I am kicked back with the blender mixing margaritas while blowing bye them with my feet up.

 

 

Completely agree and from the standpoint of an F-27 as Wess said.  Single hand it a bunch, race it, day sail it, etc. Great all around boat, would expect the 24s to be similar and a touch easier.  Swear by the barbers, both for the jib and the screecher.  Going off the wind with just the jib the barbers bring the shape to where it should be and open up the slot.  My screecher is cut to fly from the cabin top track all the way back for being closer to the wind, but I can keep it there and use the barbers to adjust it easily for bearing off.  When I use the screecher as a small chute (cruising, single hand, chicken chute) I sheet it to the spin blocks and use the barbers to get the shape I want if needed for the conditions/point of sail.  I use Holt snatch blocks to capture the sheets, and run the barber line through an LFR on the float back to the eyes/cleats on the coamings for the original symmetrical spin gear.  Not a racing versus a just sailing thing for me, it's a if I'm sailing then I'm sailing kind of thing.

 

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2 hours ago, kbcH20 said:

 

Completely agree and from the standpoint of an F-27 as Wess said.  Single hand it a bunch, race it, day sail it, etc. Great all around boat, would expect the 24s to be similar and a touch easier.  <snip>

I have found that being long of torso, I could not sit up straight in a 27 or 28, but I can in a 24. That surprised me.  (Also broke my heart as there was a great 27 in south nj at a compelling price at the time).  So for that and other reasons I am going 242 until we either get f22 production to actually happen or I get an f33 and a big truck to tow it with. :)

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Loose,

That is an interesting fact about the F-24 headroom, I would not have guessed that. I am 6'6" so I can't sit up straight in the F-27 either, its pretty close though and hasn't really bothered me. I don't spend much time in the cabin unless I'm sleeping though. We have a good sunshade that goes out when tied up, so most of my time is on the nets or in the cockpit. One thing that does help is removing the cabin sole, that gives me standing headroom under the pop top which is really nice for cooking, dressing, etc.

Ben

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4 hours ago, Mizzmo said:

Loose,

That is an interesting fact about the F-24 headroom, I would not have guessed that. I am 6'6" so I can't sit up straight in the F-27 either, its pretty close though and hasn't really bothered me. I don't spend much time in the cabin unless I'm sleeping though. We have a good sunshade that goes out when tied up, so most of my time is on the nets or in the cockpit. One thing that does help is removing the cabin sole, that gives me standing headroom under the pop top which is really nice for cooking, dressing, etc.

Ben

My ignorance is showing but I thought the cabin sole was a structural component.  I get that it would be great to remove it if you can - less weight, more speed and more headroom - but I didn't know you could without compromising the integrity of the structure.  How long ago did you do that Mizzmo and has everything held up OK?  I know you sail the heck out of the boat so if it worked for you it would likely work for anyone!

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18 minutes ago, Wess said:

My ignorance is showing but I thought the cabin sole was a structural component.  I get that it would be great to remove it if you can - less weight, more speed and more headroom - but I didn't know you could without compromising the integrity of the structure.  How long ago did you do that Mizzmo and has everything held up OK?  I know you sail the heck out of the boat so if it worked for you it would likely work for anyone!

The 242 has no cabin sole, just inside of hull. The 27 has a bilge so to speak with wood drop ins.  The water bladder goes there if you have on.  If not, it is a bit clunky to walk around but you can get a couple inches of height.  The structural grid would remain there.

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I removed the floor also with Ian's approval in F27 #33 and the result was a roomier and much lighter boat.  She won many races as IntrIIgue  in Aus after I imported her from Long Beach.

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Dang I learned of this too late LOL.  That is a great project to improve the boat.  @plywoodboy - did you remove the sole entirely... from sette to sette and from v berth all the way back to the aft cabin?  Do you recall how much weight that strips?  Dang if I ever get an F27 again that is the first thing I am going to do!!  Why didn't you tell me @Mizzmo?  Don't leave us short people out of the loop!!

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I still have the portion of the sole that goes around the daggerboard case and aft to about where the pop top ends if that makes sense. It rests on a mini bulkhead that I dont want to move. I have heard that Ian approved moving the bulkhead back to under the companionway, which would make completely removing the sole feasible. Its kind of nice to have some of the sole in, just so in case the bilge gets wet there is somewhere dry to put your feet. I don't have the sole up in the forward cabin.

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10 hours ago, Mizzmo said:

I still have the portion of the sole that goes around the daggerboard case and aft to about where the pop top ends if that makes sense. It rests on a mini bulkhead that I dont want to move. I have heard that Ian approved moving the bulkhead back to under the companionway, which would make completely removing the sole feasible. Its kind of nice to have some of the sole in, just so in case the bilge gets wet there is somewhere dry to put your feet. I don't have the sole up in the forward cabin.

There is no rush to this obviously but could you send me some pics of what you did and didn't do and any links to Ian's thoughts on the change.  The F27 was such a cool boat I could see us owning one again someday and I would love to add this improvement to our info folder and bag of tricks.  Oh, and good luck with your relo.  Best wishes.

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Wess , there were a few boats in US done like this as well as mine, all detailed on the Fboats site. One in particular was all blue repainted and stripped absolutely everything inside as well as a cassette rudder.

For my F27 boat I did

- double spreader rig

- synthetic cap shrouds with Colligo

- cassette rudder to FM plans

- stripped out all floor including structural from bow to stern. Ian suggested that at bulkheads I glass some unidirectionals across the boat from water line to waterline so the bottom could take the dry weight of the boat on trailer and sand. Boat now is hard to beat and all weights are on MYCQ OMR spreadsheet, 1395 kg ready to race with porta potti, screacher, fast sails.

- the best stereo I could find with speakers cut into the front of the side cockpit lockers to blast inside and outside the boat. Neighbours generally loved us...

Boat was Try to Fly originally and featured in the 55 knots if by land video of the big race over there.

 

Peter H

 

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4 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

Wess , there were a few boats in US done like this as well as mine, all detailed on the Fboats site. One in particular was all blue repainted and stripped absolutely everything inside as well as a cassette rudder.

For my F27 boat I did

- double spreader rig

- synthetic cap shrouds with Colligo

- cassette rudder to FM plans

- stripped out all floor including structural from bow to stern. Ian suggested that at bulkheads I glass some unidirectionals across the boat from water line to waterline so the bottom could take the dry weight of the boat on trailer and sand. Boat now is hard to beat and all weights are on MYCQ OMR spreadsheet, 1395 kg ready to race with porta potti, screacher, fast sails.

- the best stereo I could find with speakers cut into the front of the side cockpit lockers to blast inside and outside the boat. Neighbours generally loved us...

Boat was Try to Fly originally and featured in the 55 knots if by land video of the big race over there.

 

Peter H

 

Thanks Pete.  How much weight do you figure you were able to take out with the floor sole removal?  Likely a decent savings as well from the rudder swap.

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So, didn't the cabin sole change design about the same time as the floats?  I thought the earlier boats had more of a sole and the later boats removed that with the water tank going in the port berth beside the dagger.  The earlier boats I could see removing that, but not sure on the later ones, but could be wrong...

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On 12/23/2019 at 4:20 PM, Loose Cannon said:

Sorry to tell you - but there was a 2007 with a carbon centerboard in Alameda for sale significantly cheaper, and it looks to have sold.

I agree with you - they are fantastic boats, particularly for the east coast typical winds, and I dont understand the issue around Mk1s, or sprints in general.

Yeah, I had seen some others come down in price to about that level.....but, wow, we are talking many 5 boats in the entire country in the age and price range....and maybe 2 in the entire mid-atlantic and northeast.

There is no boat I'd rather have for what I used it for - fun daysailing with family and friends. In fact I was looking forward to maybe sailing it this summer but our property down there (the reason I am selling boat) looks like it may be under contract.

Even adding the price of transportation (it has a trailer), it's salable to the entire eastern seaboard and the finger lakes and even the great lakes...let alone all those lakes in the South, etc. 

My take is that sailing isn't very popular anymore....(more generally). When I sail on the Bay in RI I am generally the only boat within sight....and that's many miles! I know it's that way on the Chesapeake....but, still....some of the best sailing grounds in the world and hardly a soul even on summer weekends. 

Oh, well, someone will come along with an appreciation for value and fun. 

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17 hours ago, craigiri said:

Yeah, I had seen some others come down in price to about that level.....but, wow, we are talking many 5 boats in the entire country in the age and price range....and maybe 2 in the entire mid-atlantic and northeast.

There is no boat I'd rather have for what I used it for - fun daysailing with family and friends. In fact I was looking forward to maybe sailing it this summer but our property down there (the reason I am selling boat) looks like it may be under contract.

Even adding the price of transportation (it has a trailer), it's salable to the entire eastern seaboard and the finger lakes and even the great lakes...let alone all those lakes in the South, etc. 

My take is that sailing isn't very popular anymore....(more generally). When I sail on the Bay in RI I am generally the only boat within sight....and that's many miles! I know it's that way on the Chesapeake....but, still....some of the best sailing grounds in the world and hardly a soul even on summer weekends. 

Oh, well, someone will come along with an appreciation for value and fun. 

I see a lot of fboats in the 24-31 foot range in Florida and there is a real turnover if the price is realistic.  Not saying your price is that unrealistic; rather your market is very limited compared to the one in Florida.  I know it would probably cost me a couple of thousand dollars to arrange to drive my van up to the NE and tow an Fboat back to Florida; not to mention I hate driving on I95 and try and avoid it at any cost.

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10 hours ago, Tomfl said:

I see a lot of fboats in the 24-31 foot range in Florida and there is a real turnover if the price is realistic.  Not saying your price is that unrealistic; rather your market is very limited compared to the one in Florida.  I know it would probably cost me a couple of thousand dollars to arrange to drive my van up to the NE and tow an Fboat back to Florida; not to mention I hate driving on I95 and try and avoid it at any cost.

I have a place down here in Sarasota so I would be tempted myself except I am a spoiled sailor! That is, any hassle factor will turn me off - I don't even want to launch it mast-up like at the Sailing Squadron!

I know this is a little off-topic but maybe someone has a link or two or advice.

Do sailing partnerships in this type of thing work out? I don't need to sell the boat for money so I could imagine a year-rounder down here or someone else sharing the boat with me where they may be responsible for many of the expenses and repairs and getting it out of the water when a hurricane comes, etc, and I would get to sail it 10X a year when I am down in the winter. 

I did dig around as far as price and at 27,500 with a brand new OB and with trailer it's about as low as they go....or lower. Lots of 2010-2014 models at 20K more or 1990's models at the same price (although some are not Sprints, but the cabin model).

Of course a NE boat is generally in much better condition than Florida boats as less sun and less salt (we sail in brackish....almost no salt ever evident) tend to keep them fresh. 

I know, in general, that partnerships suck but if a no-drama and happy human or two can be found it could be a good thing for all. I wouldn't need any money for the boat itself in such a case....(it would remain mine).

Any links or experiences welcome. I assume a lot of day sailors have the same dream I have - just get on the boat and go. We have freedom boat right here with 2 Catalina 21's but it seems silly for me to spend the 8K or so a year for 10 rides on those. The Squadron has rental boats which would be dirt cheap but I would have to launch them. Did I say I was lazy? Well, not really, just that if I go skiing I want to stay slope side! It's always a matter of fun vs. time and hassle to have the fun. 

 

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On 1/25/2020 at 4:59 AM, plywoodboy said:

 

PB161440.JPG

More pics of that beastie racing please.  That is one stonking shot!  is the jib a roller furler?  I cant see that close.  Also are those cabin top tracks for an overlapping jib or does the screecher go there in the light?

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  • 9 months later...

Finally gave up on the boat trapped up in Canada and picked up hull 121 (originally Littlewing) and am trying to squeeze in some sailing before they let the lake level down and the water freezes.  Appreciate all the shared insight on this thread and the Groups.io gang.

 

DSC_0283.JPG

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