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Alternative to facnor flatdeck furler?


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4 hours ago, x-79 said:

Nice, thanks. Do I need to modify all headsails for this one? 

 

1 hour ago, Furkolkjaaf said:

Yes,either hanks or zip

 

As Furkolkjaaf wrote, yes.  The nice thing about the ubi system is the sail performs more like a non furler headsail on a normal headstay and much easier to hoist or drop the sail.  If you mostly cruise and don't change headsails much you'll probably be better off with a more conventional system that uses a foil.  If you race, change headsails often or are just more concerned about getting as much performance as possible it's a great system.  Furling the sail with the ubi furler can be a little quirky sometimes but definitely worth it in the right situation.

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2 hours ago, x-79 said:

I will need to modify all 4-5 headsails then?

Is softhanks the way to go on a rodstay?

Yes, if you want to use your headsails on the ubi furler you'll need hanks or zip.   Whether or not the advantages gained are worth the hassle and expense might be a good question for your sailmaker.  It's definitely a better system for getting the headsail luff and headstay tension dialed in and makes it easier & faster to change out sails.  The foil that is used with most conventional furlers isn't great for performance or trim.  If it's a significant difference depends on your specific situation and uses.

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45 minutes ago, x-79 said:

Many thanks for help. Can someone tell me why this ubi maior system will make sailchange easier than a luff track with two slots for racing?

I have no experience 

With the hanks the sail isn't pinched in a slot or groove like a luff track so it falls super fast, almost no resistance or friction.  Release the halyard and it'll fall on it's own.  Having said that not all luff tracks are created equal.  Some work really well, some require a lot of tugging on the sail to get it down.  Seems like most luff tracks/foils that work with furlers are quite sticky.  Just my personal observation on a limited number of furlers though, ymmv.

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Ok I just spoke with a guy owning a new J112e. Got it delivered with a ubi maior jiber and he changed back to a standard harken furler as he was not happy with the ubi maior jiber. 

Maybe Colligo lightweightfurler, Facnor flatdeck, Bartels and Karver are worth a look as well

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34 minutes ago, x-79 said:

Ok I just spoke with a guy owning a new J112e. Got it delivered with a ubi maior jiber and he changed back to a standard harken furler as he was not happy with the ubi maior jiber. 

Maybe Colligo lightweightfurler, Facnor flatdeck, Bartels and Karver are worth a look as well

What was the problem with the Ubi

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Quote from owner of j112 "...its very sensitive to a few set screws, if they're off my 1 mm up or down the entire Furler stops working, and they easily shift position. And even when in proper form it is very hard to furl, we had to have foredeck crew furl from the front, slow process, no good for racing."

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3 hours ago, x-79 said:

Quote from owner of j112 "...its very sensitive to a few set screws, if they're off my 1 mm up or down the entire Furler stops working, and they easily shift position. And even when in proper form it is very hard to furl, we had to have foredeck crew furl from the front, slow process, no good for racing."

I  have no reason to doubt what the 112e owner had to say however at least in my experience on our boat we haven't had the same issue with the set screw.  The Ubi furler can definitely be a little quirky to use though.  If you don't have enough halyard tension it doesn't work well. It typically also takes more effort to furl compared to a conventional unit but we can furl it from the cockpit.  Our boat is 35.5', maybe on a bigger boat it might be harder to use.

The other issue we had is the line for the continuous furler needs to be a very specific size.  It calls for a 10mm line, if it's just a little too small it will slip, a little too big and there's too much friction.  We had to play around with different 10mm lines to get one that worked well since almost every 10mm line is a slightly different actual size.  Just 1 mm can make a difference with this furler.  It was an interesting process finding just the right line, we found some "9mm" lines turned out to be larger than some "10mm" lines.  

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1 hour ago, Caca Cabeza said:

Just to be clear. The UBI Fuller is eithe no jib or all jib, yes? Nothing in between?

I would think you can still reef the sail like a traditional furler but I haven't tried it personally.  For the most part it still furls like a normal furler, it just wraps around the headstay instead of the rigid foil luff track of a normal furler.  You also have the option of just dropping the sail on deck as if you weren't using a furler.  

Overall it's a nice system but as I mentioned before it does have some quirks and at least for us took some time to get it dialed in and working well.  A traditional furler will be easier to use and less potential problems.  If you don't care too much about the theoretical performance advantages the Ubi system can provide it's probably better to get something else.  It came with my boat and the first few times we used it I hated it but now that we have it working well I'm very happy with it.

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The Ubi Maior jiber is best suited for head sails with little to no overlap. Think Class 40 style but with the option to drop the headsail on deck as opposed to going aloft to unlash it. As for the J/112e comment,  the reason it was hard to furl/unfurl is that the backstay needs to be eased just as with any furler style which others whom have furlers of this style understand. 

The comment about the set screw was a result of the furler being rotated to ensure proper line leads aft. The set screws weren't tightened correctly and as a result caused the ratchet not to work. There holes on the shaft in which they index to and some how they missed the 3mm hole...

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23 hours ago, Hugh Jorgan said:

It typically also takes more effort to furl compared to a conventional unit but we can furl it from the cockpit.  

The other issue we had is the line for the continuous furler needs to be a very specific size.  It calls for a 10mm line, if it's just a little too small it will slip, a little too big and there's too much friction.  We had to play around with different 10mm lines to get one that worked well since almost every 10mm line is a slightly different actual size.  Just 1 mm can make a difference with this furler.  It was an interesting process finding just the right line, we found some "9mm" lines turned out to be larger than some "10mm" lines.  

That's exactly my experience, except that things got much better with a really smaller line (8 mm) - so far no slippage but less friction which makes things "almost" OK. Also - the fact that you can only furl anti clockwise does not help user friendliness

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  • 5 months later...
On 12/27/2018 at 3:30 AM, Psycho Tiller said:

I would think you can still reef the sail like a traditional furler but I haven't tried it personally.  For the most part it still furls like a normal furler, it just wraps around the headstay instead of the rigid foil luff track of a normal furler.  You also have the option of just dropping the sail on deck as if you weren't using a furler.  

Overall it's a nice system but as I mentioned before it does have some quirks and at least for us took some time to get it dialed in and working well.  A traditional furler will be easier to use and less potential problems.  If you don't care too much about the theoretical performance advantages the Ubi system can provide it's probably better to get something else.  It came with my boat and the first few times we used it I hated it but now that we have it working well I'm very happy with it.

What boat do you have?

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28 minutes ago, badia420 said:

Im dying of envy!

in the end would you recommend the UBI Furler? 

if you ever try reefing please come back to us and explain !

Thanks!  We absolutely love the boat and at least for our needs I don't think there's a better option out there.  As far as recommending the ubi furler I guess it depends on your needs.  Like most things it's a compromise but a good option for certain situations.  For someone who's going to keep the sail furled 90% of the time I'd say just go with a standard Harken furler.  For someone who likes the option of dropping the sail on deck quickly and the advantages of a hank on sail it's a good option.  The main drawback of the ubi furler is it takes much more effort to furl the sail.  In really heavy winds you'll probably have to turn very deep downwind to depower the jib enough to get it furled.  

There's also the issue of vertical battens vs horizontal.  If the sail is mainly furled you'll probably prefer vertical battens (at least I do) but vertical battens make it very difficult to drop the sail on the deck quickly.  They make horizontal battens for furling jibs but they don't last long and are relatively expensive if you have to keep replacing them.  They also stick out a little when the jib is furled and can eat spinnakers.  So the ideal situation with the ubi furler would be to have a jib with vertical battens to use when furling and another jib with horizontal battens that wouldn't be furled.  Or another option is to have the jib made with both horizontal and vertical battens and switch out the battens depending on how you're using the jib.

In the end I don't think the perfect furler has been made yet, you just gotta pick your poison!

The way our boat is set up I don't think there would be a time we would reef the jib, we only carry a #3 and the boat is very stiff.  I'd probably reef the main before the jib and if I ever needed the 2nd reef in the main I either shouldn't be out sailing in those conditions anyway or far away from the marina and in survival conditions with the jib completely furled :)

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Hello, for the moment we are sailing with a 140% genoa, a small #3.5 for heavy weather and the idea is to purchase something in the middle to complete.

On race we would switch them up but during cruising and maybe some short crew racing would be ice to furl.

That is why I am researching the "best" furler for that.  I know I want a flat deck in order to have more sail area, and I know i don't want a Facnor, and I got my eye on the structural ones, because I am really confortable with the pilings with soft hanks.

We'll keep looking for the best solution. BTW boat is a Dufour 34P 2006

 

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