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Grain Surfboard Project


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This is not a sailing topic, but it's watercraft and I hope it will be interesting.

I like to surf. I have never been very good, but my three sons are pretty good. Anyhow, for my recent 70th, the three boys and my daughter got me a Grain Surfboard kit. Grain is in Maine, and they build hollow wood boards. They also sell kits that are cut with CNC machines. Here's their homepage: https://www.grainsurfboards.com/

I think they're beautiful, and I think most of you will agree. My oldest son lives locally, and has a custom cabinet making business, and he was the ringleader. So we'll be building this at his place over the winter. I think we're going to need about a thousand spring clamps. My plan is to take some pics as we build this log, and share our progress on this thread. That (and SJB) will put a little pressure on my lazy ass.

They selected the 8' Steamer. I'm more used to a 9' board, but this is supposed to be a better float. That will motivate me to drop 10 pounds, and get out on my paddle board more.

image.png.1236d3875b907204f1d5525260e7311f.png

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Rasper may be referring to the PVC split ring clamp: basically chopsaw Sched40 PVC pipe into rings about 1-1.5" wide & then slit them. Messy but cheap. You can also bulk-buy spring clamps on eBay, which would be my preference. Harbor Freight sells composite clamps with rotating pads, which work very well for non-planar situations, have quite good tension, & I've yet to break one.

My philosophy on clamps: Nice clamps are better than crappy clamps, but more clamps are better than fewer clamps. I keep the immortal Pony spring clamps right at the bench & use them daily; but I also have a drawer full of cheap HF spring & C-clamps that come out when (as this week) I need to glue up a dozen tall corner posts -- cross-clamped on 5" spacing.  Bessey K-clamps are wonderful, but you can buy four Pony pipe clamps or HF aluminum bar clamps for the price of one Bessey K.

curve.JPG.1bba12bd2f67fdcbe47b44d32ba2dee3.JPG

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photo-copied sign for a house party in a little college* town, c1985

"Party tonight !

Dress Plain

and Stain

Your Brain

with Grain"

 

why do I remember these things ? what is wrong with me?

Good looking boards - TONS of places use them here for decoration,  never to be used (and constructed as such)  - goon on you for making them to actually use - I swear like % 95 + of surfing-'stuff'  (lifestyle, apparel, references) are entirely fashion-cues by nonparticipants. .

 

* not in Maine

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3 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Rasper may be referring to the PVC split ring clamp: basically chopsaw Sched40 PVC pipe into rings about 1-1.5" wide & then slit them. Messy but cheap. You can also bulk-buy spring clamps on eBay, which would be my preference. Harbor Freight sells composite clamps with rotating pads, which work very well for non-planer situations, have quite good tension, & I've yet to break one.

That is the idea Dia. I drilled holes in mine so I could put dowel handles which made then much easier to use. I did a not of Corian work back then and they were perfect for that.

This is the general idea but the threaded rod and nuts are overkill. Substitute wooden dowel rod and get on with it.  You will probably need a combination of 2" and 4" pipe for your board.

image.thumb.png.8fd793c241f22fa1c28d5e824b439b70.png

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28 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Old inner tubes wrapped around things multiple times can provide some very good clamping pressure. Handy for weird shapes.

Or an inner tube wedged in place and pumped up with air.

I've used air pillows for clamping work pieces and for lamination. Much easier than vacuum bagging, is not as inherently neat & even though.

FB- Doug

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Bull, making surfboards is a virus.  Pre vac bag days we used to use fiberglass strapping [email protected] 90o to the lamination.  My latest breakthrough is to use palate wrapping tape as clamps.  You can buy it at Uhaul stores.  Epoxy doesn't adhere to it.  I just finished a carbon tube hiking rack with out any sanding.  The tooling consisted of pool noodles and string which I left in for floatation.  The coolest thing about making small craft is all of the nautical concepts are made clear in a primal manner.  I have lost 20lbs. to lower my metacentric shelf.  Have fun, aloha, Guerdon.

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Good evening,

Here is my wood surfboard ( before I waxed it). Built at a week long workshop which my wife gave me as a 25th wedding anniversary present. I don't really surf so it spends most of it's time as a wall display inside our home.

Building it and just hanging out with surfing dudes for a week was great fun.

image.jpg

image.jpg

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The PVC split rings worked for me without having to spend time drilling holes and cutting dowels. Not having "handles" also allows them to get into spots where molds and strips get close together, and space gets tight.  Removable dowels might work, but would they be a hassle to insert and/or fall out at the wrong time?  K.I.S.S. 

getting error message for inserting photo of cedar strip kayak.

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21 hours ago, Bull City said:

With wax?

Beautiful board.

 Yep, with wax.

Thanks, credit must go to Burnett Wood Surfboards, Cape Town, South Africa who presents the week long workshops. 

A lot of time was spent on the principles of board shaping. The rails of the board, just like the chines of a hull is a  biiig thing. Same with rocker.

It was fascinating to learn just how much hull shape and surfboard shape have in common.

Regards from St Francis Bay, home of Bruce Brown, The Endless Summer's Perfect Wave.

 

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4 hours ago, trisail said:

Regards from St Francis Bay, home of Bruce Brown, The Endless Summer's Perfect Wave.

My sons and I have watched that film close to a hundred times... well, maybe 75.

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Thanks are in order to Bull for this thread. I used to shape boards in Huntington Beach back in the sixties, then moved to Kauai and kept breathing foam dust but with much better waves to surf. Gonna order one of these beauties!!!

Thanks Bull!

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17 hours ago, Anomaly2 said:

What does she think will happen? You’ll fall off? Glue yourself to the board?

All of the above, plus cut off a finger or two, crush an appendage with a clamp, or some other reason to visit the E.R.

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52 minutes ago, Bull City said:

All of the above, plus cut off a finger or two, crush an appendage with a clamp, or some other reason to visit the E.R.

is your missus naturally pessimistic or is her worry driven by empirical data?

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2 hours ago, chester said:

is your missus naturally pessimistic or is her worry driven by empirical data?

Data. Sample:

For about three years, 2006-2009, my oldest son and I renovated three old house. On the first one, we built a nice little Craftsman-style shed roof over the kitchen door. Late Sunday afternoon, I was trying to nail the plywood sheathing from a ladder and really smashed my finger with my hammer: an explosion of blood. Emergency Room!! 

Think about what I could do with a draw knife.

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1 hour ago, Amati said:

Sculpting with 30 grit on a belt sander is highly underrated.....harder to draw blood, but connective tissue might stretch some.....

Go for the meaty bits first, if you can see through the haze you can start on the brainbucket.

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

You haven't tried hard enough. Sooner or later, you will smack a digit.

I've smacked lots of digits - just last weekend I put both hands nearly out of commission within hours - I've just never drawn blood with just a hammer.

It always took an edge of some sort.

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8 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I've smacked lots of digits - just last weekend I put both hands nearly out of commission within hours - I've just never drawn blood with just a hammer.

It always took an edge of some sort.

I have cut myself so many times, that's fuck all...but there's nothing like hitting yourself with a blunt object so hard that you bleed.

Signed: survivor.

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10 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I have cut myself so many times, that's fuck all...but there's nothing like hitting yourself with a blunt object so hard that you bleed.

Signed: survivor.

We have been allowed by our Creator to invent many things (to paraphrase LF Herreshoff :))  that can hurt like hell......

 

 

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On 1/5/2019 at 3:22 PM, Bull City said:

This is not a sailing topic, but it's watercraft and I hope it will be interesting.

I like to surf. I have never been very good, but my three sons are pretty good. Anyhow, for my recent 70th, the three boys and my daughter got me a Grain Surfboard kit. Grain is in Maine, and they build hollow wood boards. They also sell kits that are cut with CNC machines. Here's their homepage: https://www.grainsurfboards.com/

I think they're beautiful, and I think most of you will agree. My oldest son lives locally, and has a custom cabinet making business, and he was the ringleader. So we'll be building this at his place over the winter. I think we're going to need about a thousand spring clamps. My plan is to take some pics as we build this log, and share our progress on this thread. That (and SJB) will put a little pressure on my lazy ass.

They selected the 8' Steamer. I'm more used to a 9' board, but this is supposed to be a better float. That will motivate me to drop 10 pounds, and get out on my paddle board more.

image.png.1236d3875b907204f1d5525260e7311f.png

A boy can never have enough clamps.

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I was using a converted vacuum/blower to clean off carbon dust, marveling at my safety grill ingenuity as I hand held the beast.  The grill fell off, my hand went into the impeller it was shredded and mashed in a jiffy,  plus the hand was coated with a glass/carbon glaze.  Not my finest hour.  About a month later I was feeding our fussy cat and refluffed his food, came into the kitchen to wash off my finger.  My sweet child [age 27] freaked out at the sight of flesh falling off my hand.  I cooly completed hand washing.  Cat food finger is now my new nickname.

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What exactly happened to your hand, and at the sink?

2 hours ago, guerdon said:

I was using a converted vacuum/blower to clean off carbon dust, marveling at my safety grill ingenuity as I hand held the beast.  The grill fell off, my hand went into the impeller it was shredded and mashed in a jiffy,  plus the hand was coated with a glass/carbon glaze.  Not my finest hour.  About a month later I was feeding our fussy cat and refluffed his food, came into the kitchen to wash off my finger.  My sweet child [age 27] freaked out at the sight of flesh falling off my hand.  I cooly completed hand washing.  Cat food finger is now my new nickname.

 

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7 hours ago, guerdon said:

I was using a converted vacuum/blower to clean off carbon dust, marveling at my safety grill ingenuity as I hand held the beast.  The grill fell off, my hand went into the impeller it was shredded and mashed in a jiffy,  plus the hand was coated with a glass/carbon glaze.  Not my finest hour.  About a month later I was feeding our fussy cat and refluffed his food, came into the kitchen to wash off my finger.  My sweet child [age 27] freaked out at the sight of flesh falling off my hand.  I cooly completed hand washing.  Cat food finger is now my new nickname.

You refluff your cat's food with your finger...a month after a serious failure with a hand held blower. Fascinating. 

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  • 2 months later...

Things are progressing, albeit very slowly. Tim (my oldest son, the ringleader) and I finished the "rocker table" today. It's kind of like the strongback for building a wooden boat, very crucial to a well-formed surfboard. Next weekend, we will glue up the cedar planks for the deck of the board.

image.png.ff20feaf0b381205780866741481f519.png

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BC

Very impressive.  Looks like a significant investment of time and money (wood, materials) to get to just be able to start on the surfboard.  

 

How many hours did it take to make that rocker table?

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On 1/27/2019 at 3:24 AM, guerdon said:

I was using a converted vacuum/blower to clean off carbon dust, marveling at my safety grill ingenuity as I hand held the beast.  The grill fell off, my hand went into the impeller it was shredded and mashed in a jiffy,  plus the hand was coated with a glass/carbon glaze.  Not my finest hour.  About a month later I was feeding our fussy cat and refluffed his food, came into the kitchen to wash off my finger.  My sweet child [age 27] freaked out at the sight of flesh falling off my hand.  I cooly completed hand washing.  Cat food finger is now my new nickname.

That... is definitely a good reason to change up your account name!

- Stumbling

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8 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

BC

Very impressive.  Looks like a significant investment of time and money (wood, materials) to get to just be able to start on the surfboard.  

How many hours did it take to make that rocker table?

I would guess 4 to 5 hours. Grain supplies the blocks, but you build the ladder-like structure, i.e. the rocker table. You have to wrap each rung in clear packing tape so the top and bottom panels don't stick to it during the glue up, and drill holes for the blocks. Then you have to space them carefully so that they line up with each of the frames. You also have to chase grand children around and misplace tools.

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Bull,  the vacuum mashup was painfully real.  Our cat Basil, is a supreme hunter and jaguar like killing machine.  My wife likes to spoil him with small tins of expensive offal, he gets bored with the old stuff so being the cheapo I am I get an extra days feed buy taking the cans old contents and stirring it with my index finger.  This results in a happy kitty and a finger coated with bits of dead creatures guts.  It actually looks worse than the mashup,  but don't worry, the guts wash off my intact finger and I am still pain free.  Enjoy your woody.  Harbour freight for clamps.  Try cling package tape for release film.  I use fiberglass strapping tape for the tough clamping jobs.  Aloha, Guerdon. 

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

I would guess 4 to 5 hours. Grain supplies the blocks, but you build the ladder-like structure, i.e. the rocker table. You have to wrap each rung in clear packing tape so the top and bottom panels don't stick to it during the glue up, and drill holes for the blocks. Then you have to space them carefully so that they line up with each of the frames. You also have to chase grand children around and misplace tools.

That's why I keep all my tools in one pile.  That way you know where they are all the time.

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3 minutes ago, PaulK said:

That's why I keep all my tools in one pile.  That way you know where they are all the time.

I like that method too. I have two piles though. Little things and big things. Makes it easier to find the little things.

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The first step of actual building is gluing up the top and bottom panels. It's the same process for each. Once you arrange the planks, you dry clamp them, and run masking tape along the seams and across. Then you flip it over to do the gluing and clamping. Unfortunately, I was kind of consumed with worrying and fretting over what were about to do, and I didn't get pics of the taped-up side of the panel. When we do the second panel, I'll do better.

Anyhow here are some pics of of our gluing up process:

Here we have just flipped the panel over. You can't see all the tape. I'm amazed that it held the seams together. There are some strong-backs clamped on to keep the panel stable while you flip it.

IMG_4114.JPG.612f5b5dcd4505e1e8272803dbe7cb03.JPG

Now we have removed the strong-backs and are ready to glue

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You get the glue in the seam by letting a seam hang over the edge of the (dining room) table, and then open it like a book. The tape holds it together. Then you squirt the glue (Titebond III) into the seam. Then slide the panel to the next seam. We started with the middle seam and worked to the outside in one direction and the the other. In that way, the seams were opened only once.

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New we are all clamped up again, have cleaned up the glue, I have stopped hyperventilating, and we have cracked open some beer.

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IMG_4118.JPG

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  • 6 months later...

Bar clamp shortage in Old North State!

Today my son and I got back to work. The task was to glue (3M 5200) the keel & frame assembly to the bottom panel and clamp. Here's what it looked like after clamping. I'll some more when the clamps come off.

IMG_4978.jpg.aedb32de2168904dcb1ba1b22b3fec9b.jpgIMG_4979.jpg.6d180d93a571c203b5089eab004a1cfa.jpg

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Missed the earlier posts about taped glue joints. I do a lot of really funky assemblies that way, including coopered door panels, segmented round posts (tapered and non-), rectangular boxes with beveled corners.... With a bit of practice, you learn just how much pre-tension to put into the tape to allow clamping the assemble w/out opening to tape side of the joint. Stout rubber bands can be useful, too.

pillars.jpg.978c26e5f34b8cba7998a844d4bbd13c.jpg

Clamping 110° obtuse half posts is really hard w/out using tape. Need true stock & good tight joints, tho.

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Tape is my favorite clamp.  For longer versions of the above miters I lay the pieces flat, tip to tip and run clear packing tape down the length of the joint before adding strips of green painters tape across it.  Flip it over, glue it, fold it, and hold it with more tape across the back. 

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Tape is amazing. I thought you would have to have a doweling jig and bar clamps to glue up the top and bottom panels.  My son, Tim, has a small custom cabinet business, so he has lots of clamps. His guys are bitching a little. I think he's going to take off the clamps tonight.

BTW, I have never used that 3M 5200 before. It is some sticky stuff!

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16 hours ago, Bull City said:

Tape is amazing. I thought you would have to have a doweling jig and bar clamps to glue up the top and bottom panels.  My son, Tim, has a small custom cabinet business, so he has lots of clamps. His guys are bitching a little. I think he's going to take off the clamps tonight.

BTW, I have never used that 3M 5200 before. It is some sticky stuff!

It is an interesting choice of adhesive for the kit makers to specify.

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15 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

It is an interesting choice of adhesive for the kit makers to specify.

Good gap filling properties and the elastomeric nature of the 5200 will help dampen vibrations somewhat. We used to cover whole boat hulls with 5200 and then bed C-flex into the mess!  Bull, you don't know what you have been missing...

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3 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Good gap filling properties and the elastomeric nature of the 5200 will help dampen vibrations somewhat. We used to cover whole boat hulls with 5200 and then bed C-flex into the mess!  Bull, you don't know what you have been missing...

Long open time too, I suppose. Forgiving of cross-grain assemblies like this board. And very definitely waterproof. :) But not an everyday bonding choice in the woodworking universe. (About 1/4 the adhesive strength of thickened epoxy, for one thing.)

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3 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Long open time too, I suppose. Forgiving of cross-grain assemblies like this board. And very definitely waterproof. :) But not an everyday bonding choice in the woodworking universe. (About 1/4 the adhesive strength of thickened epoxy, for one thing.)

We tried every combination of glues and adhesive and nothing matched the tenacity of 5200 on wood after you had whacked the C-Flex/glass layer a few times with a ball peen hammer. The epoxies had higher peel bonds to wood but after our low tech 'impact testing' the hard epoxies had shattered to some degree and the 5200 lost very little peel or shear strength. We used to get the 5200 in our own custom color blend in 5 gallon metal pails. Probably used a couple of barrels worth doing the hull of a 60'er in out by the RIgolets in New Orleans. We ended up going to the Yucatan to do the next boat due to cheap labor. And those Mayans are really short and didn't get as much 5200 in their hair as the 6'8" Belizean fellow we hired for that shit job of spreading the 5200 in New Orleans! No way you are even getting that 3M stuff out of dreadlocks...

Open working time was a big factor as you mention.

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40 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

We tried every combination of glues and adhesive and nothing matched the tenacity of 5200 on wood after you had whacked the C-Flex/glass layer a few times with a ball peen hammer. The epoxies had higher peel bonds to wood but after our low tech 'impact testing' the hard epoxies had shattered to some degree and the 5200 lost very little peel or shear strength. We used to get the 5200 in our own custom color blend in 5 gallon metal pails. Probably used a couple of barrels worth doing the hull of a 60'er in out by the RIgolets in New Orleans. We ended up going to the Yucatan to do the next boat due to cheap labor. And those Mayans are really short and didn't get as much 5200 in their hair as the 6'8" Belizean fellow we hired for that shit job of spreading the 5200 in New Orleans! No way you are even getting that 3M stuff out of dreadlocks...

Open working time was a big factor as you mention.

Imagine your clothes went straight into the burn barrel at the end of the day, too. Holy crap is that stuff clingy. It's more like tentacle porn than a caulking session.

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 Diarmuid,

   We had a guy that insisted on riding his motorcycle out to the boatyard in the boonies instead of just coming to the shop and riding with the gang. He made the mistake of pulling up onto a bit of pavement that had some afternoon shade on it and back his fairly nice bike up under the little roof to park it where it would be nice and cool at quitting time. He didn't notice a big wad of 5200 and shop rag that someone had cleaned his 12" notched trowel that was the major tool for distributing the 5200 bonding coat. You wouldn't believe how much acetone we went through on that job but that wad of acetone thinned 5200 and rag got balled up and the latex gloves came off with it and tossed toward the trash bin. It must have bounced off and had laid there on the slab in waiting for the knobby rear tire on the unwitting Biker's Honda. 

    It was probable partially cured by the time the weight of the bike was rested upon it the next comparatively cool morning but there was still enough active uncured gunk to get a good grab on that tire and 10 hours later the incomparable heat and humidity of the Louisiana Bayou country had done the deed and the tangerine sized ball was forever bonded to the tire. Come quitting time it was always a couple of cases of beer for the crew for enduring the environment coupled need for an imaginary antidote for all the toxic materials we were working with. The biker had a couple and then begged of in a rare display of self preservation (for a guy who worked such a nasty job and rode a motorcycle in New Orleans) he said he would see us in the morning for another team building day of slinging 5200 and strode over to his steed. He started it up and donned his riding gloves and helmet while it warmed up and then he revved it up and dropped it down off the kickstand and did a mild burnout to impress the rest of us. 

    That bike looked like a bucking bronco as the rear wheel hopped at every revolution and it was pretty impressive he was able to backoff the throttle and keep it from dumping him the the dredged oyster shell yard surface. He popped up on the kickstand and shut down and got off and the glob from hell was tucked well up under the seat and when he rotated the tire and it became evident just what the situation was he took off his helmet and gave the rest of us an accusing look! As foreman I didn't think that anyone on the crew would be so low as to deliberately sabotage the guys bike, but after all, he was the head 'motivator' of the gang and he had a real knock for chewing out guys who weren't pulling their weight on the team. The whole gang had horrified looks on their faces as I scanned looking for a smirk that would give away a revenge seeking 5200 applicator but who knew what crazed things that spreading that stuff for 10 hours in the heat might do to a soul?

    The Biker pulled out his pocket knife and started trying to pick and prod the waste wad off to no avail so then he took out a nasty looking sheath knife from a hidden boot sheath (who knew?) and started trying to slice the impediment away. I put the last of the beer in the cooler in the truck bed and the guys took my hint that we should prepare for our own exit in case retribution came our way and the the inevitable happened when the tire itself got slashed. 

    The knives got put away and I had to hand it to the biker guy for keeping his cool and we all loaded his bike into the truck for the ride back to the city and I even gave up my usual 'shotgun' seat in the cab in deference to the guy with the ugly mood. We dropped him and his bike at his house before returning to the shop where I went across the street and had the payroll lady cut a check for the guy to replace his tire. 

    Only thing I ever found to be even half way effective on cured 5200 is one of those spiral wound wire survival saws and even that needs copious amounts of WD-40 as a lubricant. I have a story about that too!

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14 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

 Diarmuid,

   We had a guy that insisted on riding his motorcycle out to the boatyard in the boonies instead of just coming to the shop and riding with the gang. He made the mistake of pulling up onto a bit of pavement that had some afternoon shade on it and back his fairly nice bike up under the little roof to park it where it would be nice and cool at quitting time. He didn't notice a big wad of 5200 and shop rag that someone had cleaned his 12" notched trowel that was the major tool for distributing the 5200 bonding coat. You wouldn't believe how much acetone we went through on that job but that wad of acetone thinned 5200 and rag got balled up and the latex gloves came off with it and tossed toward the trash bin. It must have bounced off and had laid there on the slab in waiting for the knobby rear tire on the unwitting Biker's Honda. 

    It was probable partially cured by the time the weight of the bike was rested upon it the next comparatively cool morning but there was still enough active uncured gunk to get a good grab on that tire and 10 hours later the incomparable heat and humidity of the Louisiana Bayou country had done the deed and the tangerine sized ball was forever bonded to the tire. Come quitting time it was always a couple of cases of beer for the crew for enduring the environment coupled need for an imaginary antidote for all the toxic materials we were working with. The biker had a couple and then begged of in a rare display of self preservation (for a guy who worked such a nasty job and rode a motorcycle in New Orleans) he said he would see us in the morning for another team building day of slinging 5200 and strode over to his steed. He started it up and donned his riding gloves and helmet while it warmed up and then he revved it up and dropped it down off the kickstand and did a mild burnout to impress the rest of us. 

    That bike looked like a bucking bronco as the rear wheel hopped at every revolution and it was pretty impressive he was able to backoff the throttle and keep it from dumping him the the dredged oyster shell yard surface. He popped up on the kickstand and shut down and got off and the glob from hell was tucked well up under the seat and when he rotated the tire and it became evident just what the situation was he took off his helmet and gave the rest of us an accusing look! As foreman I didn't think that anyone on the crew would be so low as to deliberately sabotage the guys bike, but after all, he was the head 'motivator' of the gang and he had a real knock for chewing out guys who weren't pulling their weight on the team. The whole gang had horrified looks on their faces as I scanned looking for a smirk that would give away a revenge seeking 5200 applicator but who knew what crazed things that spreading that stuff for 10 hours in the heat might do to a soul?

    The Biker pulled out his pocket knife and started trying to pick and prod the waste wad off to no avail so then he took out a nasty looking sheath knife from a hidden boot sheath (who knew?) and started trying to slice the impediment away. I put the last of the beer in the cooler in the truck bed and the guys took my hint that we should prepare for our own exit in case retribution came our way and the the inevitable happened when the tire itself got slashed. 

    The knives got put away and I had to hand it to the biker guy for keeping his cool and we all loaded his bike into the truck for the ride back to the city and I even gave up my usual 'shotgun' seat in the cab in deference to the guy with the ugly mood. We dropped him and his bike at his house before returning to the shop where I went across the street and had the payroll lady cut a check for the guy to replace his tire. 

    Only thing I ever found to be even half way effective on cured 5200 is one of those spiral wound wire survival saws and even that needs copious amounts of WD-40 as a lubricant. I have a story about that too!

Love your tales.  Surprised the tire didn't peel right off the rim & its shredded rind lie there glued to the concrete.

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7 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Love your tales.  Surprised the tire didn't peel right off the rim & its shredded rind lie there glued to the concrete.

Too much sand on the concrete to bond in that manner. The look of that guy getting bounced off the seat everytime that rear wheel went around is still etched in my mind!

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1 hour ago, Diarmuid said:
4 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

The sign of a coward manager/leader...

    Never suspected that long knife in the boot.

"There's always a long knife in the boot." -- G.J. Caesar

09888df84ced6932f6e02367abe9653b.png

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5 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

The sign of a coward manager/leader...

    Never suspected that long knife in the boot.

Nevertheless, you did the right thing for one of your crew, and I suspect you would have done it, knife or no knife.

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28 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Nevertheless, you did the right thing for one of your crew, and I suspect you would have done it, knife or no knife.

    Yeah, I really admired that guy and he was really a special person. He had a knack of making even a kid that was forced onto our crew by a judge in JV court that would make them take our OJT 'on the job training' internship programs instead of going into lock up pull their weight with the 'team'. These days the kids we got from the courts were barely one step from slavery and those kids had some horrid histories yet Amito the biker guy could gain their respect and somehow ingrain into them how they were part of a team and get them to relish even such shit jobs as grinding fiberglass or smearing 5200 overhead onto the bottom of an old wooden boat while sitting in the oyster shell boat lot wearing a Tyvek suit. Every now and then a kid would just reach a limit and say 'I ain't doing this shit and the judge can just lock me up!' and Amito would walk over and take the 30 lb grinder or the bucket of 5200 from them and tell them that he would cover for their asses and ask if he could bring them a cold drink. He would bring them their choice of a cold beverage and then climb into the molded fiberglass hull or under the 5200 sheathing hull and do their work until they could no longer stand the stink eye that they would get from their fellow OJT guys and then beg Amito to give them back the Tyvek suit and the grinder or the notch trowel and the 5 gallon bucket of 5200 so they could regain their standing on the 'team'. It worked better than threats or anything and Amito was a master of reverse psychology. 

    Much later I asked if he really thought that one of the team had deliberately put that glob of 5200 under his wheel and brought up the chilling look that he gave all of us when he discovered the cause of his aborted departure on his bike that day and he just smiled and sail that he just wanted to make us all think that he suspected any one of us. He sure gave me the chills that time but the whole time I knew him he was the biggest sweetheart of a guy I ever knew, despite the harsh biker demeanor and the jack boots and long knives . 

    As I got to know him better he turned out to be a sort of self styled Buddhist biker and was a high priest in some sort of New Orleans communal family that I was never really able to get very close to but would have loved to know more about their lifestyle and beliefs. 

    That is New Orleans for you...

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

It is a very exotic place.

I'll say!

     The biker/boatbuilder guy in my story was part of a shadowy cult/family that I slowly was able to get a narrow glimpse of in my time with that crew. The overall shop foreman was also in the clan and apparently the high priest of the clan. His brother had worked at the shop too until he burnt himself very badly trying to wash catalysed resin off of most of his body with acetone while standing in  a shower stall when the pilot light to the water heater lit him up. His injury created the job opening that I filled but I was never really accepted into the 'family' despite slowly getting to know many of them and doing a lot of the 'events' that that group inspired or instigated. Having dug up the memories of those guys (and gals) in my storytelling yesterday here, I woke up this morning and was able to find out more in 2 hours of internet searching than I did in 2 years of working, partying and playing with that unique and fascinating fellowship of freaks!

     I found this rather good bit from a blog by a former member which does a good job summarising the life and times that I only got glimpses of.

 

Buddhism in New Orleans

 
Po boy Views
By
Phil LaMancusa
Altered States
Or
Saint Expedite Where Are You?
Kumi Maitreya was an avatar and the last incarnation of the Buddha. If you believe it, it is so.
If you are not aware of whom Kumi was, you are not aware of a slice of New Orleans history that most grownups wish you to ignore. I say that because it was the grownups that had the most trouble with the Maitreyans. Then as now, grownups rule the world.
Incidentally, my spell check just wanted me to change Maitreyans to Martians, truly I have a grown up spell check.
Anyway, Kumi Maitreya was an ordinary Moss St. housewife here, named Geraldine Hooper, when somehow she achieved a state of spiritual enlightenment. Believe what you will; but, she formed a tribe of young followers from the fringes of society that for a time was in charge of the French Quarter. She could, and did, look within people’s souls and tell them the sound of their vibration and give it back to them as their one true name. Names like Ravi, Eldra, Elfren, Amzie, Angelica, Kutami, Dorje (yours truly), and Abraxsas.
She taught that since the Universe was infinite, everywhere (including ourselves) was, in fact, The Center of the Universe. And where exactly would God live? Exactly, in The Center of the Universe, which meant that God lived inside of all of us. Taking that thought a little further, we come to the conclusion that our bodies are temples, we are all ministers and our homes are churches. This latter conclusion had something to do with the law not being able to bust churches just because our ‘sacrament’ was a substance that was illegal in the grownup world (namely, LSD). It all made sense to me.
And so for a time, The French Quarter streets rang with the sounds of “OIA!” (pronounced OH EE AH!!) which is the sound of a positive vibration; and, the symbol of the Cardinal Cross was seen everywhere.
Kumi also taught us that war was wrong, that the Government was in fact our servants and that each of us should have an altar in our living spaces. That still makes sense to me. There was also a lot of drumming and dancing, if I recall correctly.
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"His brother had worked at the shop too until he burnt himself very badly trying to wash catalysed resin off of most of his body with acetone while standing in  a shower stall when the pilot light to the water heater lit him up."

 

JFC!!!

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6 minutes ago, chester said:

"His brother had worked at the shop too until he burnt himself very badly trying to wash catalysed resin off of most of his body with acetone while standing in  a shower stall when the pilot light to the water heater lit him up."

 

JFC!!!

Yeah, the guy had spent a week building a beautiful staircase with a proper landing and OSHA railings all around for the laminating crew to climb up and down into a 35' Lafitte Skiff mold that were were building. The big boss across the street had given him a hard time for all the fine woodworking detailing like dadoes steps and mitered corners on the rails but the guy was a real craftsman and the whole thing was solid as a rock. The OSHA inspectors were astounded and gave the guy big kudos and the boss sort of let up.

    But then when it came to using the stairs, the guy who built it was mixing 5 gallon buckets of laminating resin for the poor souls down in the mold and instead of climb the perfect rise/run treads to hand them the 2/3's filled buckets, he would just hump it up to his shoulder and slide the bucket onto the landing at the top and let them pass it down to the laminators. This went pretty well until he got ahead of the guy on top who hadn't moved the previous bucket and the next one didn't get shoved quite far enough to stay put. It did for a second when the resin sloshed up against the far side but then when the floor mixing guy felt that it was going to stay he took his hand on and looked up to shout at the guy on top to get with the program. That bucket did the reverse slosh and tipped right back toward him and it landed right on his head and three and a half gallons of vinylester and catalyst doused him all over. 

    He grabbed a 5 gallon can of acetone and a box of shop rags and went into the shop bathroom and took off the saturated clothes in a big hurry and stepped naked into the stall and started pouring acetone on his forehead and face using the rags to try and get the worst of the resin off. His brother had come in to check on him and said he would go try and get some vinegar and to go easy with the Acetone. The poor guy had probably rinsed a couple of gallons over his body and there was a growing pile of soaked rags sitting on top of the pile of clothes just outside the stall. He said later that the burning of the catalyst and resin was being replaced by the intense freezing of the rapidly evaporating acetone and he made the near fatal mistake of turning on the hot water of the shower to try and get warmed up while he waited for the less damaging vinegar to continue his clean up efforts.  He said that even the ambient temperature water in the pipes felt great and then he said he heard the distinct 'click' of the thernostatic solenoid relay on the other end of the locker room and the gas burner of the water heater kick in. He knew what was coming next and had taken a couple of steps for the door when the acetone fumes lit up and he came out running across as a fireball.  His brother had just returned and tackled him to the floor and beat the flames out with his leather biker jacket and bare hands but the damage was terrible. The docs said later that his running speed had fanned the flames on his face, neck and torso to the sides and back and had left just a thin area from his groin to his eyes that weren't third degree burns.

     That left him lying face down for months as the burn specialist did skin grafts and he eventually recovered to a degree that shocked the specialists. His Buddhist Brethren from the clan must have done some serious chanting and supplication to the voodoo gods and he went to work on a complete rebuild of a 40' teak junk after about a year of serious rehabilitation. He eventually made it all the way to the Caribbean in the beautifully restored junk and he was an inspiration to me in many ways.

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23 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Too much sand on the concrete to bond in that manner. The look of that guy getting bounced off the seat everytime that rear wheel went around is still etched in my mind!

Weird free-association: Back in the 60's, the local rodeo association used to keep an old (Model A?) car with one or two out-of round tires. They had a pole lashed down on it, sticking out behind with a saddled barrel on the end.  Some drunk cowboy would (try to) ride it in parades.  It disappeared at some point.  I suspect they got tired of too many ambulance runs before the show even started.  

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OK boys and girls, pics after the unclamping. The 5200 did its job.

The next steps involve blocking for the fin boxes, and then installing chine rails, and blocking for the nose and tail, which will form the outline of the board and eventually the rails! Sounds exciting!

Looking from the nose (bow):

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Looking from the tail (stern):

IMG_4984.jpg.41f7e7762ecef901604961b6dfe16f36.jpgIMG_4985.jpg.5d25a112162a66a79371ed986ddbb934.jpg

 

 

IMG_4986.jpg

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  • 6 months later...

Work has continued under the quarantine. Blocking for the fins and leash plug are in. Rails, nose and tail have been blocked up. The next step is to glue and clamp the deck on. Some pics from today:

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_56cc.thumb.jpg.0f977ceb393132f1f73958f76b5ec0f7.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_56cd.thumb.jpg.c41f75ebb1514ac8215881908814124d.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_56ca.thumb.jpg.030453656b8e24e4222ca8c0e87a850b.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_56cb.thumb.jpg.6404047d8812a9a7c86ab23eb83be9f3.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

That was a dry run for fitting the top deck to the board. Today the final glue up. 5200 for the frames to the deck, Titebond III for around the perimeter. Here are ½ of the clamps in our county:

 

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Clamps came off yesterday, and the seams look really good.

The board is 8 feet long. I have a 9 foot foam board, and this cedar board feels about the same weight.

Now comes the shaping of the rails (the edges), which should be interesting, challenging and doable. In the third photo, you can get an idea of how much material will need to be removed.

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2060538260_SGadnhonS9OdsLWLw046w_thumb_5720.jpg.c4ae27b3bc5489fd6f7c4d8ca9ea9e72.jpg

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