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Looking for DIAM-24s in NA


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Hi, I'm thinking a Diam-24 might scratch the itch I've got.

I'd love to talk to the North American Diam-24 owners but I'm having a hard time tracking them down.

I've got Fred in San Francisco's contact info, but I'd love to talk to Steve in New Jersey, Stuart in Comox (he has two!) and somebody in Texas and Florida....

Thanks,

Trevor 

Ocealys Sailing near Brothers.jpg

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I have sailed with Steve Gross on his Diam 24 out of Atlantic Highlands, NJ, in a decent breeze, three up we blew past a 31’ Farrier like it was parked. 

The boat is a lot of fun in protected waters, what in particular did you want to know about it.

Do you want me to direct Steve to this forum, he may not follow it.

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Boardhead,

I’d like to contact him just to play “20 Questions,” mostly about the robustness of the boat, as well as what he felt were the must have options. 

I’d also love to find a used one for sale a bit closer than Brittany.

Thanks,

Trevor

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Trevor B,

I texted him to check this blog cos it’s real late here for me to call him. 

I will be out of touch for a week (going offshore) but will call him if he does not respond.

The boat is quite robust, nothing Mickey Mouse that caught my eye. The Torqueedo motor is a joke but that’s just auxiliary propulsion, a tiny gas outboard would do the job.

I like a lot more reserve float in the ama bows but sail a lot more offshore and the Diam is a flat water boat.

Maybe Steve wants to sell - ask him.

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Trevor,

  I had the chance to walk around one at the boat show a few years ago and worked with the dealer to setup a demo day. The build quality seemed high like most French products, with good stock rigging and everything thought through. Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to actually sail the boat but it had a lot of pros. With a crew of 3 they assembled it off the trailer in about 4 hours. The mast is two pieces joined at the spreader and looks seamless once assembled. Its a carbon stick with vinyl wrap, at least the demo boat was. My friends who sailed it basically said it was like a big F18, similar speeds, no trapeze of course so more comfortable and I suspect higher average speeds as a result. Certainly more suited to coastal distance racing than a beach cat but you would have to check with your local race organizers.

Similar review here: https://www.catsailingnews.com/2017/05/diam-24od-rorc-vice-admirals-cup-2017.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+catsailingnews+(Catamaran+Racing,+News+%26+Design)

One of the downsides I thought was the lack of internal storage for sails and beer but both are manageable. The other potential downside is the need for 3x crew and mooring space for overnight storage. Would I take it over a Melges 24 or Viper 640 for similar $? Heck yes, but really only if there was a place to store it mast up which is what I think has limited market penetration in the U.S.

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8 hours ago, Irrational 14 said:

Trevor - hope all is well. Let me know if you need another contact. Friend of mine knows the builder.

Thanks PG! They're being responsive in France, it's the North Americans that seem to be slow to respond....

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On 1/30/2019 at 9:53 AM, samc99us said:

Trevor,

  I had the chance to walk around one at the boat show a few years ago and worked with the dealer to setup a demo day. The build quality seemed high like most French products, with good stock rigging and everything thought through. Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to actually sail the boat but it had a lot of pros. With a crew of 3 they assembled it off the trailer in about 4 hours. The mast is two pieces joined at the spreader and looks seamless once assembled. Its a carbon stick with vinyl wrap, at least the demo boat was. My friends who sailed it basically said it was like a big F18, similar speeds, no trapeze of course so more comfortable and I suspect higher average speeds as a result. Certainly more suited to coastal distance racing than a beach cat but you would have to check with your local race organizers.

Similar review here: https://www.catsailingnews.com/2017/05/diam-24od-rorc-vice-admirals-cup-2017.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+catsailingnews+(Catamaran+Racing,+News+%26+Design)

One of the downsides I thought was the lack of internal storage for sails and beer but both are manageable. The other potential downside is the need for 3x crew and mooring space for overnight storage. Would I take it over a Melges 24 or Viper 640 for similar $? Heck yes, but really only if there was a place to store it mast up which is what I think has limited market penetration in the U.S.

Yep - that was exactly one on my comments to the guys when I helped them put the boat together for the Naptown show (we launched it at EYC with the hoist - only had to tilt it about 20 degrees to clear the bulkhead.........)  Fun boat but there will never be many of them in the US

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You might want to also consider a SeaRail 19 instead of the Diam to scratch that itch.  A bit slower but needs fewer crew (ie, great for single handing).  Has enough storage for sails and beer; and nigel irens didn't design any slow boats.  The SeaRail folds (but I'm reluctant to motor while folded--really tippy).  Not designed to fly the main hull (rudder in main hull) but so far, it is a good ride.  At only 900 pounds (real weight) it is easy to tow,   You'll save about half on what a Diam will cost and the dealer/owner is centrally located in Illinois.  Not many in existence...mine is hull #12 and is the first folding one.  Has a similar 2 part mast but aluminum.  Mast raising is quick; unfolding is reasonably quick...2:1 main halyard; self tacking jib, roller furled sprit sail (55% SMG-pretty darn flat).  Sail designs by Randy Smyth.  All in all, a good buy at 31K US$ including trailer and sails.

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18 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

You might want to also consider a SeaRail 19 instead of the Diam to scratch that itch.  A bit slower but needs fewer crew (ie, great for single handing).  Has enough storage for sails and beer; and nigel irens didn't design any slow boats.  The SeaRail folds (but I'm reluctant to motor while folded--really tippy).  Not designed to fly the main hull (rudder in main hull) but so far, it is a good ride.  At only 900 pounds (real weight) it is easy to tow,   You'll save about half on what a Diam will cost and the dealer/owner is centrally located in Illinois.  Not many in existence...mine is hull #12 and is the first folding one.  Has a similar 2 part mast but aluminum.  Mast raising is quick; unfolding is reasonably quick...2:1 main halyard; self tacking jib, roller furled sprit sail (55% SMG-pretty darn flat).  Sail designs by Randy Smyth.  All in all, a good buy at 31K US$ including trailer and sails.

It's an idea we considered, along with the Pulse. But the "need for speed" is high.... It's the problem of having sailed fast boats, ha,ha.

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I owned a multi 23 for several years and after watching lots of Diam videos I would contend that the multi 23, though flawed, is better suited to ocean conditions due to fuller bows.  The diam might be a little faster but not when it's upside down.  Pretty sure the Reynolds 33 for 34k could beat them both and is certainly much more comfy.  The Searail looks fun but Multithom gave the.impression that setup/breakdown is unwieldy.

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53 minutes ago, mundt said:

.  The Searail looks fun but Multithom gave the.impression that setup/breakdown is unwieldy.

Yah, for me at 69 years and doing it alone, it takes longer than my previous boats (certainly I'm spoiled).  Most of the extra time is setting up the spinnaker prior to launch (can't do it after launch-well, at least I can't).  

As far as speed goes...yah, SeaRail will likely be about a minute a mile slower than a Diam 24 and probably about 5 kts slower at the top end.  Speed is relative in my experience.  You are only unhappy with your boat's speed when racing one design and a competitor rolls you. The other time you are unhappy is if you can't get where you are wanting to go because the current is stronger against you than your boat can go.  

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I liked the Multi a bunch, but the rig wasn’t up to SFbay conditions, and the centerboard was a slow compromise. Ended up getting rid of it as it was a pain to manage when not sailing.

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Agreed, the multi 23 had many issues, the dyhedral, the horrible build quality of some, though I never broke my mast I did rip the aka out of the main hull, snapped the rudder and dropped the mast due to an improperly spliced shroud. But man, when grinding hard downwind those hulls are pure magic.  Am I wrong to say you could buy 5+ nice beachcats for the price of one similar sized tri?  And Multithom, have you tried a furling code 0 or top down system?

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4 minutes ago, mundt said:

Agreed, the multi 23 had many issues, the dyhedral, the horrible build quality of some, though I never broke my mast I did rip the aka out of the main hull, snapped the rudder and dropped the mast due to an improperly spliced shroud. But man, when grinding hard downwind those hulls are pure magic.  Am I wrong to say you could buy 5+ nice beachcats for the price of one similar sized tri?  And Multithom, have you tried a furling code 0 or top down system?

Yep, I would chase that F25C upwind and slowly be left behind but turn the corner and whoosh!

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10 hours ago, mundt said:

  And Multithom, have you tried a furling code 0 or top down system?

Yah, I converted to a top down system which does work better than the in luff torque rope (Hansen supplied torq rope was garbage).  The "spin" isn't really a spin with 55% SMG (20% camber)...probably flatter than most code 0s but still made of nylon.  The issue with time to set up, though, is the very long bowsprit that must be mounted while in the parking lot (like a beach cat).  Then attaching sheets, furling line securing and lowering and securing to get out of the way--all takes time and typically a couple trips on and off the boat.  Nimble is not my middle name.

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11 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Yep, I would chase that F25C upwind and slowly be left behind but turn the corner and whoosh!

There is a Multi23 listed in BAMA ratings (USA7; Flash) with a rating slower than my boat.  Only reason I mention it is because I thought a multi 23 would be rated faster--especially given that the weight listed is only 50 pounds heavier than my boat.  I suspect it is just a mistake, but maybe you know--can't imagine how that could be right unless it has a short stick.

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That multi 23 rating can't be right. Same boat rated minus 35ish in socal, mine was rated a few seconds slower.  The one that surprised me is the f22.  Why so slow?  We have a newly arrived Pulse in my neighborhood.  Seems nice, especially being able to keep mast up folded.  Thom, can the searail do that?  On my m23 and l7 I built short prods and found I can put a code 0 and reacher up there at the same time no problemo.  I feel like the long prod might be a tiny bit faster but is somewhat overrated.

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1 hour ago, mundt said:

That multi 23 rating can't be right. Same boat rated minus 35ish in socal, mine was rated a few seconds slower.  The one that surprised me is the f22.  Why so slow?  We have a newly arrived Pulse in my neighborhood.  Seems nice, especially being able to keep mast up folded.  Thom, can the searail do that?  On my m23 and l7 I built short prods and found I can put a code 0 and reacher up there at the same time no problemo.  I feel like the long prod might be a tiny bit faster but is somewhat overrated.

I think it is just a typo in the ratings list.  The next boat down is also named Flash and is the same rating--an F242 rated at 69 which is the same listed rating for the Multi23.  

The original SeaRail had a shorter prod (like the Pulse).  If I ever put a fatter spin on it I'll probably fit a shorter sprit at the same time; but it is "comforting" to some race committees that while the boat is only 19 feet, the overall length with sprit is 24 feet.  Race committees are shy about mutlihulls still--we got a bad rep in some clubs since some folks hit committee boats or other competitors.  None recently, but yacht race committees have long memories.

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2 hours ago, mundt said:

 able to keep mast up folded.  Thom, can the searail do that?

Yes.  Install the mast raising lowering gear (just to keep the mast from rotating while you are gone, Tighten the shrouds (gotta do that to fold the boat to get on the trailer anyway), hook the main halyard to the mainsheet.  Park the trailer.  I suspect you can even hoist it to launch retrieve, but I'm not going to try.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Does anyone know if Flash is ever sailed? Last I heard the new owners took it to Ventura. Had a new L7 mast extrusion, could have used a carbon rig, but was a lot of fun if you had a place to keep it, assembled.

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It went to their house for a bit (though they don’t own a tow vehicle) and was listed on eBay. I was in contact trying to make a deal but they only had a small window of time they were available to sell (traveling elsewhere) and it didn’t work out. I couldn’t get a good feel for how much they actually wanted to sell the boat. Because of eBay’s policies I never got a means of truly contacting them, so I can’t offer any follow up. As of last September the boat was still in Ventura.

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1 hour ago, Jangles13 said:

It went to their house for a bit (though they don’t own a tow vehicle) and was listed on eBay. I was in contact trying to make a deal but they only had a small window of time they were available to sell (traveling elsewhere) and it didn’t work out. I couldn’t get a good feel for how much they actually wanted to sell the boat. Because of eBay’s policies I never got a means of truly contacting them, so I can’t offer any follow up. As of last September the boat was still in Ventura.

That's too bad, she was a bit cosmetically challenged with the faded red gelcoat, but I had her pretty bomb-proof (she was even @bhyde proof!). It was just a total PITA to figure out how to dry-sail it.

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A guy came and buffed it all nice and shiny, looked very good.  I felt like mine was relatively easy to move around on the trailer.  I kept mine mast up and ready to go.  It was like a wild pony at the dock and sailing it in tight quarters required lots of attention.  Once out in the ocean it was very fun, except when it broke, which was often. The one named Flash seemed very well built though and the original owner, Jay, is a savage who pushed the boat to redline regularly.

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11 minutes ago, mundt said:

A guy came and buffed it all nice and shiny, looked very good.  I felt like mine was relatively easy to move around on the trailer.  I kept mine mast up and ready to go.  It was like a wild pony at the dock and sailing it in tight quarters required lots of attention.  Once out in the ocean it was very fun, except when it broke, which was often. The one named Flash seemed very well built though and the original owner, Jay, is a savage who pushed the boat to redline regularly.

Yep, problem up here is no real good place to keep a double wide boat on a trailer.

Flash is the boat that I bought from Mike post Jay. Blew the rig out of her crashing off a wave. Hence the L7 section.  Someone should drop a carbon stick in her.

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On 2/12/2019 at 6:23 AM, Raz'r said:

Yep, problem up here is no real good place to keep a double wide boat on a trailer.

Flash is the boat that I bought from Mike post Jay. Blew the rig out of her crashing off a wave. Hence the L7 section.  Someone should drop a carbon stick in her.

I’ve found the Achilles heel of trailer sailing a 23’ tri is raising the mast. The L7 aluminum section?  Heavy but strong.  Did I mention heavy?  Ours broke the raising system, did a header into blacktop. Broke the road surface and the mast.  (Mundt wound up with the sails.) Replaced it with a rotating Gunter carbon wingmast (Forte).  Hoping to try it out next summer when we get finally get moved to San Juan Island.  Colligo, Spectra, flying jib, new daggerboard.  The original daggerboard broke during the raising fiasco.  Hoping the new lower mast (24’ and light, with diamonds) will prove easy to raise for trailer-sailing, and then raise the carbon topmast with the sail attached while in the water.  A mountain gusty lake setup for the Salish Sea.  Will it be stiff enough to control the leach?  Expensive fun.......

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2 hours ago, Amati said:

I’ve found the Achilles heel of trailer sailing a 23’ tri is raising the mast. The L7 aluminum section?  Heavy but strong.  Did I mention heavy?  Ours broke the raising system, did a header into blacktop. Broke the road surface and the mast.  (Mundt wound up with the sails.) Replaced it with a rotating Gunter carbon wingmast (Forte).  Hoping to try it out next summer when we get finally get moved to San Juan Island.  Colligo, Spectra, flying jib, new daggerboard.  The original daggerboard broke during the raising fiasco.  Hoping the new lower mast (24’ and light, with diamonds) will prove easy to raise for trailer-sailing, and then raise the carbon topmast with the sail attached while in the water.  A mountain gusty lake setup for the Salish Sea.  Will it be stiff enough to control the leach?  Expensive fun.......

That sounds nutty. I like it!

we almost killed a guy trying to drop that rig with a little a-frame setup. Then Adrenalin came in with this extending tongue trailer with what looked like a ladder mounted on it cross wise, a long ladder, and an electric winch. Mast twice as big+ as mine and it was down in 15 minutes. 2 guys held it from swaying. Sailed with the D Cat Boys and Girls club. Same thing.  I don’t recall the specifics but the 2 of us had no issues at all. It’s all in the trailer setup. 

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Thanks for the sails Amati, believe it or not they're still in my garage, I'm going to use the originals till I can see through em (kinda like my undies).  And yes, that L7 mast is a bastard.  One of the many reasons I don't trailer the boat much.  I sail it a lot but if I had to play with the mast every time...  Even with a good system the leverage of a heavy section like that creates some very impressive and potentially dangerous loads.  I tore out the base of my mast when it got a tiny bit sideways when lowering.  Like a very big, powerful nutcracker.  Glad my nuts were sucked up into my belly (due to terror) when the base tore out.

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I’ve been working on a raising/lowering system that one person can do (I can supply pics of some of it if anyone likes), but a lot of the problem is that the mast base and the shroud base need to be in the same plane vertically and horizontally*, which Mike provided with line for the L7, which gets fiddly and tangled and inevitably misplaced. (There was a guy who used a Bipod on his Hobie 18, (IIRR) where the the two poles were attached at the jib tracks, and then to a slide on the bolt hole/mast track, which is what I’ve been toiling away at, except with a Battcar (what could go wrong?).  Use the jib halyard for raising with another swiveling bipod for leverage.  I’m using big boat Bimini quick release hardware to attach these things.)

*This plane could be inherent with hull/platform design, but more than a few designers (not Mike I might add, since he actually has done it a lot) tend to get a bit macho about that, for some reason.  Cabin on a tri might get in the way?

The other tense point is the first/last 6-8 feet off the deck for the tip of the mast- and a lot of hurt backs and torn muscles have been given up in sacrifice at that point.  But a vertically adjustable mast crutch can work there. Foot pounds are a bitch. The ladder/trailer/electric winch thing seems like expedition packing at best, and would need some sort of engineering to be reliable.  It’s only $$$$, right? And equipment/trailers/vehicles/storage, etc etc......

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the mast being "rotating" adds to the inherent instability too.  I think an F-27 non-rotator makes the procedure much easier.  As Amati said, using a bunch of lines, even low stretch, on a somewhat flexible platform with a rotating mast, add in some wind, a shaky trailer, or on the water, some innocent bystanders, a creaky back...party party! 

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Rotating mast clearance at the cabin deck requires keeping the mast rotated while raising/lowering (some Hobies and Windrider 17).  If that's not an issue, then a crutch attached to the mast (providing leverage)--some designs just have a hole that the crutch fits in. Can also be an A frame located on the foredeck....I think Corsair 24s or 27s used to use the ama (durmsticks) for the leverage).  On my SeaRail, the front mast rest on the trailer comes out of the trailer and is used as the crutch.  Crutch is stabilized by a fitting on the mast base (slides in, but other systems just attach crutch to the same mast stabilizing lines (temp shrouds).  Temp shrouds pivot in the same line as the mast.  What helps a lot (on Corsairs and SeaRail) is a raised rear mast crutch so that first 10 degrees has reduced forward thrust which is what can break your mast base.  On my Hobie I modified the trailer to install a rear mast crutch to simplify mast raising--the rollers also make it easy to move the mast from trailering position to raising position.  

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I've lowered and raised the r33 mast many, many times to go under a certain bridge.  The main sheet is re-run so it's long enough and then winch and human power are used to handle the business, mast dropping forward, boom serving as gin pole.  Halyards become side stays and a couple lines go to the boom to stabilize it.  It does work, though you don't have to get that lowest hypercritical 25% of the process where the loads seem to increase tremendously.  I think most of the r33 masts were around 45 feet and pretty heavily built and when you're on the water with that baby hanging out over the bow it's quite a special feeling.  The amount of damage that thing could do if any bit failed would be absolutely astonishing.   

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The Corsair sprints have a plate at the mast base that locks the rotation to center while raising. The gin pole then slides into the mast in the same hole the boom goes into, just opposite side. Whole system works great and we raise the beefy aluminum rig in ~15 minutes. 

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7 hours ago, JoeyG said:

The Corsair sprints have a plate at the mast base that locks the rotation to center while raising. The gin pole then slides into the mast in the same hole the boom goes into, just opposite side. Whole system works great and we raise the beefy aluminum rig in ~15 minutes. 

And that keeps the mast from oscillating side to side?  

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On 2/20/2019 at 8:12 AM, mundt said:

the mast being "rotating" adds to the inherent instability too.  I think an F-27 non-rotator makes the procedure much easier.  As Amati said, using a bunch of lines, even low stretch, on a somewhat flexible platform with a rotating mast, add in some wind, a shaky trailer, or on the water, some innocent bystanders, a creaky back...party party! 

For us it was a parade of about 30 1960 Impalas that were driving around the edge of trailer parking lot we were using as a boatyard.  No fins were damaged during the ensuing hilarity.  No one laughed, which was nice. Idaho fun.

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Seems like this would be a great place for dedicated dyneema, more than co-opted sheets and haywards. 

That's what I'm planning for my 42' stick, at least. I've had enough fun and near missed on my various beachcat masts to prioritize almost no stretch for almost no stress.

Randii

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I’d like to see the G32 mast raising system.  The most I’ve heard or seen  is ‘wow!’  & ‘the mast was already up when we arrived’ (!)  

Russell?

 

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6 minutes ago, randii said:

Seems like this would be a great place for dedicated dyneema, more than co-opted sheets and haywards. 

That's what I'm planning for my 42' stick, at least. I've had enough fun and near missed on my various beachcat masts to prioritize almost no stretch for almost no stress.

Randii

It winds up being heaps of line tangling itself into complicated knots, or lots of  baggies that may or may not be labeled, or left in the garage......

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7 hours ago, Amati said:

I’d like to see the G32 mast raising system.  The most I’ve heard or seen  is ‘wow!’  & ‘the mast was already up when we arrived’ (!)  

Russell?

 

There's a part two to this video as well. The original system really can be done by a 12 year old in minutes.

 

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On 2/21/2019 at 8:46 PM, Russell Brown said:

There's a part two to this video as well. The original system really can be done by a 12 year old in minutes.

 

Thanks Russell!  Over the bows, lift the tip out of the red zone manually?  A pickup truck would be ideal, I suppose.  

A few questions? 

How much does your mast with float/wind indicator weigh?

How much difference in height and longitudinal space (I guess you’d call it?) between the mast step and shroud base at the deck is there?  It’s hard to tell during the bridge scene-

At what difference ^^^^^ do you reckon the bright line is to prevent the athwartship (horizontal) mast ‘pendulum swing of death’?

Do you use your running back stays as part of mast raising?

Do you adjust the shroud lengths (iirr, that’s part of self rescuing system for the G32) while raising the mast?

 

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Trevor, I am owner of Diam 24 which sails from Atlantic Highlands ,NJ

I have lightly sailed the boat for two seasons.I had a late start on the first season.

I have been a long time multihull sailor and  enjoy intermediate distance races,10 to 30 miles.I am still learning how to sail the Diam 24.I often go out with only two aboard,not allowed in class racing but works fine for this boat.The only time I felt need for third person was mainsail raising while motoring .In. stronger winds,12 knots or more, when sailing with two,I have learned to tie to a mooring to raise the mainsail.

The boat does fine in wind from very light to 20 knots.I have not sailed in stronger winds above 22.I have never capsized.

Most enjoyable have been day sails with wind in the 10 to 16 knot range and small seas.On the right point of sail from close hauled to broad reach ,you can nicely exceed wind speeds.The boat is very responsive with nice acceleration in puffs.All of the sailing equipment fixed and running rigging has been dependable.It is a well thought out set up.The carbon reinforced beams make for a stiff and sturdy platform.

I have adapted to wearing dry suit on cooler windy days.I can be comfortable in any weather now.

I have missed races that required nearby travel due to light breeze and limited distance ability of electric torqeedo engine.I have also missed multi day venues relating to high wind predictionsThe conditions were okay for sailing there but were predicted and turned out to be bad for the return..I could have  disassembled and reassembled at launch site,but I really do not like that option.

My initial assembly requires a full days time,,but includes many maintenance items.I store on the hard with mast up.Launch time once assembled is about 40 minutes.

I have had at least three pins break on propeller of torqeedo engine.In my case leading to tows back to the launch area.

I would be glad to answer any specific questions.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am in Toronto and interested in getting into this class, if there is some class racing.

Does anybody know what the future direction is with regard to lifting foils, C or J or other?

Looking at the videos of the boat in a blow it looks like they need some lift. The boat is burying the ama pretty hard.

I sailed an F20c for a few years and the C foil lifting only at 50% totally changes the characteristics of the boat.

 

 

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23 minutes ago, pitchpoledave said:

I am in Toronto and interested in getting into this class, if there is some class racing.

Does anybody know what the future direction is with regard to lifting foils, C or J or other?

Looking at the videos of the boat in a blow it looks like they need some lift. The boat is burying the ama pretty hard.

I sailed an F20c for a few years and the C foil lifting only at 50% totally changes the characteristics of the boat.

 

 

Sounds to me like you might want a superfoiler instead.  https://www.superfoiler.com/gallery/

So far, only sailing / racing in Australia.  I'm too old for it, but that looks like fun for the next couple generations.  I like that they still use soft sails.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Trevor,

I am the registered UK repairer for the Diam24 OD class. Unfortunately i am not very busy as they NEVER break. However on a lighter note. The boats are great fun, there are quite a few in the US, So it shouldn't be hard to take one for a spin. I am writing this currently sat in the La Foret where they are built. So if you need any more details please let me know.

Info@marineprouk.com.

Or Contact Muriel at ADH Innotec and she will offer all the assistance you need.

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On March 11, 2019 at 10:46 AM, pitchpoledave said:

Does anybody know what the future direction is with regard to lifting foils, C or J or other?

Looking at the videos of the boat in a blow it looks like they need some lift. The boat is burying the ama pretty hard.

 

 

The Ama hulls are Fish-form and are made to run mostly submerged. It doesn't slow the boat down.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/11/2019 at 10:07 AM, Raz'r said:

Does anyone know if Flash is ever sailed? Last I heard the new owners took it to Ventura. Had a new L7 mast extrusion, could have used a carbon rig, but was a lot of fun if you had a place to keep it, assembled.

She's back on eBay...

M23 Flash

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Unpacked the Diam-24 today. It’s an impressive piece of equipment!

It’s pretty obvious that experienced people were deeply involved in this project from the beginning. 

Now we need to get the bottom painted and get sailing... I’m afraid it’ll probably be at least  a week before we sail due to various scheduling issues.

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Okay, bottom is done and she is sitting in her berth ready to go sailing tomorrow... I will say that a nice bottom job from gelcoat is a major project, even if the areas are pretty small- what a pain 144’ of waterline turns out to be!

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I had to go the bottom paint/end-tie route a year ago and it is quite painful indeed.  Hopefully you'll provide us with lots of nice videos to offset your suffering!

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Amanti, Russel,l is probably busy so I will give you a foggy version of G32 mast raising.  The mast is fixed to the pivot. A small boom extension is added to the base of the boom this is fixed to a lower point on the cabin.  The mast originally weighed @80lbs.  The stays guide the mast up from its cradle on the trailer.  the boom is the gin pole with the mainsheet acting as the rising purchase.  The backstays serve as insurance as you raise/lower it.  Watch the video several times, stoping it until it is clear.  The whole rig is very evolved and not algorithmic.  I could raise a lower mine in about 10 minutes.  Jan, could do it in 5, He and Meade cold be sailing in ten.  The video is real time.  The craft was meant for fun.

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Beautiful sailing in Santa Cruz today with my daughter...

The Boat is getting sorted out and is a ton of fun in moderate air, haven’t sailed in over fifteen yet!

 

 

7B9D0008-E900-4826-AAEB-2DC044A25AA4.jpeg

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On 2/20/2019 at 12:13 PM, Amati said:

32DC9B3F-64F6-4354-9C98-8EB3C421FF60.jpeg

I've been trying to get someone interested in paying for a sliding gunter wing mast combo for a while, I think the rotating wing spar could overcome the supposed deficiencies of the gunter. Let me know if you get fish.

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17 hours ago, Trevor B said:

Beautiful sailing in Santa Cruz today with my daughter...

The Boat is getting sorted out and is a ton of fun in moderate air, haven’t sailed in over fifteen yet!

 

 

7B9D0008-E900-4826-AAEB-2DC044A25AA4.jpeg

I'm only quoting because the boat is so nice, it deserves a second look.  

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Raced it for the first time last night.

12-16 knots of wind, it was the first time we’ve sailed next to another boat so we learned a lot on the first beat about different modes. And remembered that getting stuck sailing through Kelp is slow... as is stopping to clear said Kelp from the daggerboard  

Upwind we’ve got a lot of learning to do but downwind felt really good. Should we point as high as the A-Cats? We were not.

Sorry, no pictures...

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On 21 February 2019 at 3:41 AM, Amati said:

Found a link from another thread

https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/101805757236857703688/albums/5652628353984872065/6029028177969356498?pid=6029028177969356498&oid=101805757236857703688

I think it’s Cyclone and Rushman who are using this approach

from this thread

 

Not sure how I have been mentioned... My experience is limited to Hobie 14,16,18, Farr 9.2, Cole 32 and a 28' trimaran with a carbon wing mast

The trimaran had temporary lowers that restricted the sideways movement from memory, it seemed to work

 

 

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6 hours ago, Trevor B said:

Raced it for the first time last night.

12-16 knots of wind, it was the first time we’ve sailed next to another boat so we learned a lot on the first beat about different modes. And remembered that getting stuck sailing through Kelp is slow... as is stopping to clear said Kelp from the daggerboard  

Upwind we’ve got a lot of learning to do but downwind felt really good. Should we point as high as the A-Cats? We were not.

Sorry, no pictures...

You probably should be pointing slightly lower than the A cats.

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1 hour ago, triple trouble said:

It's a shame the Multi 23 is no longer in production. I've sailed it and the Diam 24 and liked botxh but the M23 a little bit more

Really? Why’s that?

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On 5/5/2019 at 8:03 PM, Trevor B said:

Beautiful sailing in Santa Cruz today with my daughter...

The Boat is getting sorted out and is a ton of fun in moderate air, haven’t sailed in over fifteen yet!

 

 

So great to see. Live it up!

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On 6/7/2019 at 6:28 AM, JoeyG said:

You probably should be pointing slightly lower than the A cats.

Target upwind speed for a floating A-Cat in breeze is 16kts, tacking through under 90 degrees. Foiling is more like 21kts tacking through 110 degrees. Yes this is in 15kts of breeze. Less and expect the A to do close to windspeed, tacking between 90 and 100 degrees. Downwind the suffer until you can stay in the wire consistenly, which is really over 13kts of breeze on average, some of the top light guys can make it work in under 10kts of course.

From what I know the Diam sails like a F18 without trap wires and a drier ride. Very nice bit of kit. I hear there is a fleet for sale...

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