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2 hours ago, mezaire said:

You should build or import the perfect boat from Australia.

Perfect single hander for all ages.  Only 42kg, can home build and be competitive, and comfortable to hike!!

These boats are so good I really think they would take off if someone bit the bullet and took one OS!

 

Is there lofting info for the panels for people outside Australia? A quick scan of the builder's guide and it looks like the fleet must have full size templates?

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2 hours ago, mezaire said:

You should build or import the perfect boat from Australia.

Perfect single hander for all ages.  Only 42kg, can home build and be competitive, and comfortable to hike!!

These boats are so good I really think they would take off if someone bit the bullet and took one OS!

 

Thanks Mezaire.  They look fast and fun.  Generous sized cockpit too.  However, a builder I ain't and importing one to Canada would be hugely expensive.  Cheers.

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6 hours ago, PaulinVictoria said:

How about old school, a Mirror?

+1 That's a brilliant suggestion. 

Cruiseable, raceable, can car-top, separate mast foot positions for single or double handing, spinnaker... cheap or fibreglass (probably not both, though).

What's not to like?

Cheers,

               W.

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6 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

+1 That's a brilliant suggestion. 

Cruiseable, raceable, can car-top, separate mast foot positions for single or double handing, spinnaker... cheap or fibreglass (probably not both, though).

What's not to like?

Cheers,

               W.

Thanks WGW.  I shall research the Mirror.  Cheers.

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5 hours ago, Suilven said:

Thanks Paulinvictoria.  I'll look up the Mirror.  Do these show up once in awhile on Van. Island?  Cheers.

Yep, every now and then. I have an original 1970s kit in my garage waiting to be built. There's a small fleet in Van as well that might know of any for sale, nice thing about the Mirror is you can throw it on a roof rack which makes the ferry cheaper.

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9 minutes ago, PaulinVictoria said:

Yep, every now and then. I have an original 1970s kit in my garage waiting to be built. There's a small fleet in Van as well that might know of any for sale, nice thing about the Mirror is you can throw it on a roof rack which makes the ferry cheaper.

Thanks Paul.  Time for you soon to pick up those tools and build yourself a Mirror...?  Cheers.

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38 minutes ago, Suilven said:

Thanks Paul.  Time for you soon to pick up those tools and build yourself a Mirror...?  Cheers.

Yeah, bought it as a fun father and son project, at this rate it'll be for my son and his kids.

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12 hours ago, Suilven said:

Thanks WGW.  I shall research the Mirror.  Cheers.

A bit of googling suggests there's an owner's group in Ontario(!) and there are active fleets in the UK. You can buy new boats in glass here and in Oz, I think, but it doesn't look like they are sold in Canada. 

 I know it sounds daft but it might be worth looking into shipping one to Van. They are only 10'6 long, the spars fit inside the hull and they are not very heavy- I bet you could put one on an oversized pallet for not too much money...

 I know you said you don't want a wooden boat (answers my "what's not to like?" question!); might be worth trying a wood one to see if you like the boat and then seeing if any of the overseas builders would ship you one? Winder boats in the UK are a top notch boat builder and could probably arrange to supply you at a price... I don't know about the Australian builders. 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=%23&ved=2ahUKEwi6rsjDxuXgAhUXTBUIHSnUBpEQwqsBMAF6BAgFEAU&usg=AOvVaw0VTJzWxrN8ZFOD4xbU2nov

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://mirrordiscussforum.org/documents/mirror_rollcall.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiy94WOyeXgAhUht3EKHZ4nBbUQFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw1zWLaBCgrG0FjA973iPppt&cshid=1551602364494

https://www.facebook.com/groups/16537332977/

Are you anywhere near Hollyburn SC? Might be worth a visit:

http://hollyburnsailingclub.ca

Cheers and good luck!

            W.

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30 minutes ago, WGWarburton said:

A bit of googling suggests there's an owner's group in Ontario(!) and there are active fleets in the UK. You can buy new boats in glass here and in Oz, I think, but it doesn't look like they are sold in Canada. 

 I know it sounds daft but it might be worth looking into shipping one to Van. They are only 10'6 long, the spars fit inside the hull and they are not very heavy- I bet you could put one on an oversized pallet for not too much money...

 I know you said you don't want a wooden boat (answers my "what's not to like?" question!); might be worth trying a wood one to see if you like the boat and then seeing if any of the overseas builders would ship you one? Winder boats in the UK are a top notch boat builder and could probably arrange to supply you at a price... I don't know about the Australian builders. 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=%23&ved=2ahUKEwi6rsjDxuXgAhUXTBUIHSnUBpEQwqsBMAF6BAgFEAU&usg=AOvVaw0VTJzWxrN8ZFOD4xbU2nov

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://mirrordiscussforum.org/documents/mirror_rollcall.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiy94WOyeXgAhUht3EKHZ4nBbUQFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw1zWLaBCgrG0FjA973iPppt&cshid=1551602364494

https://www.facebook.com/groups/16537332977/

Are you anywhere near Hollyburn SC? Might be worth a visit:

http://hollyburnsailingclub.ca

Cheers and good luck!

            W.

Thanks for these ideas, WGW, and for the links.  Turns out the Hollyburn club is just across the Salish Sea from me, 1.5 hours by ferry and some driving.  I'm going to contact them.  Much appreciated.

PS  Whereabouts are you in Scotland?  My grandparents came from Glasgow and Beith, and I've spent time in the Highlands, on the west coast (Troon, Isle of Arran), and the isles of Lewis and Harris.  It's a grand country.

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Meant to add: picture from our club a few years back, Ken in the Mirror is well into his 80s. Barts Bash in damn all wind!

 (am in Central Scotland near Stirling, BTW. The picture is from Loch Venachar Sailing club in the Trossachs.)

Cheers,

              W.

 

10649567_824300104268621_704642792662595

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1 minute ago, WGWarburton said:

 

Meant to add: picture from our club a few years back, Ken in the Mirror is well into his 80s. Barts Bash in damn all wind!

Cheers,

              W.

 

10649567_824300104268621_704642792662595

WGW, thanks for the photo.  If Ken can do it into his 80's, I have no excuse.  The Mirror might be fine for me - inexpensive, light in weight, large cockpit and room for a few dry bags, boom tent, etc.  At first I thought they were a bit odd-looking, with the non-pointy bow, but I'm getting used to the appearance.  By the way, do you know whether the Mirror will sail decently in a very light breeze as well as in wind up to 12-15 knots with a foot of chop?  Are they pretty stable or would I expect to take a swim now and then?  Thanks and cheers.

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1 hour ago, Suilven said:

WGW, thanks for the photo.  If Ken can do it into his 80's, I have no excuse.  The Mirror might be fine for me - inexpensive, light in weight, large cockpit and room for a few dry bags, boom tent, etc.  At first I thought they were a bit odd-looking, with the non-pointy bow, but I'm getting used to the appearance.  By the way, do you know whether the Mirror will sail decently in a very light breeze as well as in wind up to 12-15 knots with a foot of chop?  Are they pretty stable or would I expect to take a swim now and then?  Thanks and cheers.

Yes.  They are a good design.  If you have sailed a Laser you will be comfortable in a Mirror. They sail fine in light winds and are pretty stable.

 I wouldn't necessarily wear a wetsuit for pottering about.  It's a family dinghy designed to be affordable in the days before wetsuits were cheap and readily available. 

Cheers,

             W.

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9 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

Yes.  They are a good design.  If you have sailed a Laser you will be comfortable in a Mirror. They sail fine in light winds and are pretty stable.

 I wouldn't necessarily wear a wetsuit for pottering about.  It's a family dinghy designed to be affordable in the days before wetsuits were cheap and readily available. 

Cheers,

             W.

Thanks W.

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1 hour ago, PaulinVictoria said:

There's a pretty active Facebook group if you're so inclined, https://www.facebook.com/groups/16537332977/

Good little boats, they've made some quite significant trips, e.g. from the English/Welsh border to the Black Sea so you can absolutely cruise/camp on them.

Thanks Paul.  Gonna do more reading about them and join that FB group.  The Mirror sounds like a tough little boat.

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5 hours ago, Suilven said:

Thanks Paul.  Gonna do more reading about them and join that FB group.  The Mirror sounds like a tough little boat.

Very proper and proven little yacht. But s....l....o....w. If you envision more "dinghy cruising" than what you enjoyed about your Laser, it would be a good choice. The Mirror is pretty much the opposite of a Laser/Force 5. So your memories of summer days planing back and forth in the harbour will remain memories. But if you see your time spent being more "dinghy cruising", with a relaxing 2 hour sail to that favorite little cove with a picnic lunch, a bit of vino and an easel to do some sketches, the Mirror would be a lot better. I doubt there are any glass Mirrors within 1000 miles (but you never know), so you may want to keep a lookout for a couple Canadian built boats - the Kolibri and the Echo. 11 foot sloops with lots of room. Note all of these are stayed rigs, so you will need to deal with that if you are using a dinghy rack for storage.

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8 minutes ago, bill4 said:

Very proper and proven little yacht. But s....l....o....w. If you envision more "dinghy cruising" than what you enjoyed about your Laser, it would be a good choice. The Mirror is pretty much the opposite of a Laser/Force 5. So your memories of summer days planing back and forth in the harbour will remain memories. But if you see your time spent being more "dinghy cruising", with a relaxing 2 hour sail to that favorite little cove with a picnic lunch, a bit of vino and an easel to do some sketches, the Mirror would be a lot better. I doubt there are any glass Mirrors within 1000 miles (but you never know), so you may want to keep a lookout for a couple Canadian built boats - the Kolibri and the Echo. 11 foot sloops with lots of room. Note all of these are stayed rigs, so you will need to deal with that if you are using a dinghy rack for storage.

Thanks Bill.  Speed is no longer an issue to me.  A relaxing sail to a nearby island is what I'm looking for.  I like the fact the Mirror's hull is more "enclosed" for getting down inside of.  And the cockpit looks spacious too.  The look of the snub bow takes a bit of getting used to, but it's growing on me.  Sorry to hear they're likely aren't any glass Mirrors close at hand.  I will check out the Kolibri and Echo.  Cheers.

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I wouldn't be too scared to consider a wooden one, they are just stitch'n'glue ply, so very easy to repair if necessary since the entire design was based around an average Joe being able to build one in their front room. You can still buy replacement panels (or a whole kit), and the wood hull is (IIRC) lighter than the glass one. Sadly Mirror Sailing Development in Ontario recently closed their doors.

As for speed, they go OK and will plane (eventually), they are no sport boat for sure, but you can have a lot of fun in them, and there's somewhere to keep your sandwiches.

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10 minutes ago, PaulinVictoria said:

I wouldn't be too scared to consider a wooden one, they are just stitch'n'glue ply, so very easy to repair if necessary since the entire design was based around an average Joe being able to build one in their front room. You can still buy replacement panels (or a whole kit), and the wood hull is (IIRC) lighter than the glass one. Sadly Mirror Sailing Development in Ontario recently closed their doors.

As for speed, they go OK and will plane (eventually), they are no sport boat for sure, but you can have a lot of fun in them, and there's somewhere to keep your sandwiches.

Thanks Paul.  Room for a sandwich is crucial.  :)

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Great boats - like a small Wayfarer. Very roomy with plenty of storage . Used to be very popular in Western Canada. Won't work well with rack storage. 

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1 hour ago, bill4 said:

Great boats - like a small Wayfarer. Very roomy with plenty of storage . Used to be very popular in Western Canada. Won't work well with rack storage. 

Thanks Bill.  Is your comment about rack storage because of the 205 lb weight?

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Note the main will likely be transom sheeted which is less than ideal for single handing. This can be changed. Also - they look very benign and stable, but can be a handful downwind when the wind pipes up.

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If a Mirror and a Enterprise mated they would produce a National Solo a really fun, roomy singlehander.

I bought one a few years ago and was quite impressed by the combo of comfort and sportiness. I thought they were rare but a 1/2 a dozen have popped up on the used market in the last year including a few on the island.WP_20190309_09_22_25_Pro.thumb.jpg.da5706108a82ce2d358043d8b0f917ec.jpg

I took this picture of my old boat this morning. Ended up trading it for a San Juan 21. Sweet deal for both of us.

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3 hours ago, bill4 said:

The weight plus it has a stayed rig meaning you would need to raise and lower the mast everytime you went sailing. 

Bill, right.  I'm in that position anyway as storage will be on a dinghy rack at a local marina, so I'll need to manhandle the boat into the water and then rig it whenever I go out.  I suppose an unstayed rig would be a better bet for that reason.

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2 hours ago, bill4 said:

Note the main will likely be transom sheeted which is less than ideal for single handing. This can be changed. Also - they look very benign and stable, but can be a handful downwind when the wind pipes up.

Bill, is transom sheeting not so good for singlehanding simply because both the tiller and mainsheet are abaft the crew's sitting position rather than one hand (abaft) for the tiller and the other (forward) for the mainsheet?  Also, I hear what you're saying about downwind manageability.  I found a couple of videos of doublehanded crew sailing downwind and they were working hard to keep the boat under control.  Thanks.

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22 minutes ago, wannabefd said:

If a Mirror and a Enterprise mated they would produce a National Solo a really fun, roomy singlehander.

I bought one a few years ago and was quite impressed by the combo of comfort and sportiness. I thought they were rare but a 1/2 a dozen have popped up on the used market in the last year including a few on the island.WP_20190309_09_22_25_Pro.thumb.jpg.da5706108a82ce2d358043d8b0f917ec.jpg

I took this picture of my old boat this morning. Ended up trading it for a San Juan 21. Sweet deal for both of us.

Thanks.  I'll read up on the National Solo.  

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20 hours ago, Suilven said:

Bill, is transom sheeting not so good for singlehanding simply because both the tiller and mainsheet are abaft the crew's sitting position rather than one hand (abaft) for the tiller and the other (forward) for the mainsheet?  Also, I hear what you're saying about downwind manageability.  I found a couple of videos of doublehanded crew sailing downwind and they were working hard to keep the boat under control.  Thanks.

Generally, you always want one hand on the tiller - the aft hand. Then, you have a mainsheet and jib sheet to deal with. If those are both ahead of you, they can be tended to with your forward hand.

But we really need to rewind all this and consider the facilities. If your only option is a dinghy rack, an Enterprise would be a bad call. Dinghy racks generally contemplate smaller, lighter boats like Optis, Laser, Aeros, Force 5's and the like. With nice flat, smooth bottoms, they are easily slid in and out by one or two people. Then, it is best to have a dolly to set the boat on to a) rig and b) roll down to the water. With a Laser (or comparable) you can fit the dolly in the rack with your boat. With a Laser (or comparable), a bottom rack, and a dolly - you can do it all by yourself. 

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1 hour ago, bill4 said:

Generally, you always want one hand on the tiller - the aft hand. Then, you have a mainsheet and jib sheet to deal with. If those are both ahead of you, they can be tended to with your forward hand.

But we really need to rewind all this and consider the facilities. If your only option is a dinghy rack, an Enterprise would be a bad call. Dinghy racks generally contemplate smaller, lighter boats like Optis, Laser, Aeros, Force 5's and the like. With nice flat, smooth bottoms, they are easily slid in and out by one or two people. Then, it is best to have a dolly to set the boat on to a) rig and b) roll down to the water. With a Laser (or comparable) you can fit the dolly in the rack with your boat. With a Laser (or comparable), a bottom rack, and a dolly - you can do it all by yourself. 

Bill, thanks for the rewind.  This is how I used to manage my Laser, eons ago.  The one other possibility for me is that my marina has a bottom rack available, which is only a few inches above dock level.  That would work for a slightly larger boat.  And the water is only 10 feet away.  Any guess as to how much hull weight a reasonably fit 60+ man might be able to manhandle on the dock, when it comes to wiggling a boat out of the dinghy rack, turning it over onto a dolly and then launching it off (or onto) a dock which is about  18" above water level??  I'm thinking perhaps 150 lb max....??  

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23 minutes ago, Suilven said:

Bill, thanks for the rewind.  This is how I used to manage my Laser, eons ago.  The one other possibility for me is that my marina has a bottom rack available, which is only a few inches above dock level.  That would work for a slightly larger boat.  And the water is only 10 feet away.  Any guess as to how much hull weight a reasonably fit 60+ man might be able to manhandle on the dock, when it comes to wiggling a boat out of the dinghy rack, turning it over onto a dolly and then launching it off (or onto) a dock which is about  18" above water level??  I'm thinking perhaps 150 lb max....??  

I would slide it in and out of the rack upright - no need to flip over. If crime isn't an issue, you can leave your boat partially rigged and just put on a top cover. To launch,  I suppose you could lay a piece of carpet over the edge of the dock, back the boat up, lift the bow up off the dolly and slide it in the water over the carpet. It would take some practice to avoid launching the dolly with the boat... And managing the 18" drop while holding the bowline will need some practice too. 

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On 3/10/2019 at 12:15 PM, bill4 said:

I would slide it in and out of the rack upright - no need to flip over. If crime isn't an issue, you can leave your boat partially rigged and just put on a top cover. To launch,  I suppose you could lay a piece of carpet over the edge of the dock, back the boat up, lift the bow up off the dolly and slide it in the water over the carpet. It would take some practice to avoid launching the dolly with the boat... And managing the 18" drop while holding the bowline will need some practice too. 

I've been thinking along these lines and I'm sure I can figure out a launching system that works as long as I keep the hull weight reasonable.  I had begun thinking about getting a Penobscot 14 or a Mirror or something with less speed but more storage and more comfort, but then I'm looking at a wooden hull, and with the need to store the boat on the dock thru the winter rains, the potential for mildew and rot becomes an issue, and that's a can of worms I'd rather not open.  I think a Force 5 might work nicely, but if one doesn't come along soon, perhaps I'll pick up a Laser for this season just to get going.  I just don't want to spend much time in the water, being in my 60's, so some stability is important to me (besides I probably don't look that great in a wetsuit anymore...)  :)  But I suppose if I sail a Laser conservatively, I won't dump it too often.

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10 hours ago, Suilven said:

I've been thinking along these lines and I'm sure I can figure out a launching system that works as long as I keep the hull weight reasonable.  I had begun thinking about getting a Penobscot 14 or a Mirror or something with less speed but more storage and more comfort, but then I'm looking at a wooden hull, and with the need to store the boat on the dock thru the winter rains, the potential for mildew and rot becomes an issue, and that's a can of worms I'd rather not open.  I think a Force 5 might work nicely, but if one doesn't come along soon, perhaps I'll pick up a Laser for this season just to get going.  I just don't want to spend much time in the water, being in my 60's, so some stability is important to me (besides I probably don't look that great in a wetsuit anymore...)  :)  But I suppose if I sail a Laser conservatively, I won't dump it too often.

get a radial rig for windy days. you'll be fine.

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Looking at a Laser Standard right now.  Could work fine for me but if I find I'm working harder and enjoying it less, I can get the Radial rig as well.  I see Intensity Sails sells the Radial sail and lower mast section for approx. $300 US.  Someone mentioned the Radial kit can be bought used.  I'm guessing maybe $150 used. (??)  Are they difficult to find?  Thanks everyone.

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On 3/13/2019 at 1:45 AM, Suilven said:

I've been thinking along these lines and I'm sure I can figure out a launching system that works as long as I keep the hull weight reasonable.  I had begun thinking about getting a Penobscot 14 or a Mirror or something with less speed but more storage and more comfort, but then I'm looking at a wooden hull, and with the need to store the boat on the dock thru the winter rains, the potential for mildew and rot becomes an issue, and that's a can of worms I'd rather not open.  I think a Force 5 might work nicely, but if one doesn't come along soon, perhaps I'll pick up a Laser for this season just to get going.  I just don't want to spend much time in the water, being in my 60's, so some stability is important to me (besides I probably don't look that great in a wetsuit anymore...)  :)  But I suppose if I sail a Laser conservatively, I won't dump it too often.

The Force 5 is a better boat IMHO than the Laser, but they still death-roll easily. More freeboard, more comfort able, easier draining cockpit, but heavier. Of course, if you can't find one, none of that matters.

FB- Doug

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On ‎3‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 5:45 AM, Suilven said:

I've been thinking along these lines and I'm sure I can figure out a launching system that works as long as I keep the hull weight reasonable.  I had begun thinking about getting a Penobscot 14 or a Mirror or something with less speed but more storage and more comfort, but then I'm looking at a wooden hull, and with the need to store the boat on the dock thru the winter rains, the potential for mildew and rot becomes an issue, and that's a can of worms I'd rather not open.  I think a Force 5 might work nicely, but if one doesn't come along soon, perhaps I'll pick up a Laser for this season just to get going.  I just don't want to spend much time in the water, being in my 60's, so some stability is important to me (besides I probably don't look that great in a wetsuit anymore...)  :)  But I suppose if I sail a Laser conservatively, I won't dump it too often.

 More I look at your posts the more I think a Mirror is the right boat... get a cheap one (ie disposable hull) and try it out. Think short-term: a couple of seasons use then bonfire.

 If you like it, get a good one and get someone to tidy it up every winter... or import a fibreglass one- there seem to be enough of them in Canada that you'll easily find a buyer for a glass Mirror.

 Store it upright, with a decent cover, in your low rack. It's light enough to manhandle on shore and the mast is in two parts (Gunter rig), so will be easy to put up & take down yourself. Rig it main-only in the forward step when the breeze is blowing, put the jib up when it's light, get a kite for when you have crew...

 Stable enough and enough freeboard that you won't be soaked every time you sail. Space for sandwiches, flask and binoculars (and VHF?). Can row it if you need to. Buy as a consumable, not as an investment. This is research, not your ultimate goal.

Cheers,

               W.

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3 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

The Force 5 is a better boat IMHO than the Laser, but they still death-roll easily. More freeboard, more comfort able, easier draining cockpit, but heavier. Of course, if you can't find one, none of that matters.

FB- Doug

Thanks SF.  Haven't been able to find a Force 5 I can afford yet.  There is a Laser available near me which I'm going to have a look at, but I hear what you're saying about comfort (I sailed a Laser in my 30's which is ages ago and I'm not as agile now).  I may wait until the inventory increases as spring finally arrives...Cheers.  Steve

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2 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

 More I look at your posts the more I think a Mirror is the right boat... get a cheap one (ie disposable hull) and try it out. Think short-term: a couple of seasons use then bonfire.

 If you like it, get a good one and get someone to tidy it up every winter... or import a fibreglass one- there seem to be enough of them in Canada that you'll easily find a buyer for a glass Mirror.

 Store it upright, with a decent cover, in your low rack. It's light enough to manhandle on shore and the mast is in two parts (Gunter rig), so will be easy to put up & take down yourself. Rig it main-only in the forward step when the breeze is blowing, put the jib up when it's light, get a kite for when you have crew...

 Stable enough and enough freeboard that you won't be soaked every time you sail. Space for sandwiches, flask and binoculars (and VHF?). Can row it if you need to. Buy as a consumable, not as an investment. This is research, not your ultimate goal.

Cheers,

               W.

I like your philosophy here, WGW.  I've been considering a used Laser which is for sale near me, but it is a Laser, not a cruising dinghy.  Since I'm more interested in cruising than in speed, maybe I should just wait until a used Mirror shows up near me.  None so far, but spring is coming and the inventory will increase, I'm sure.  Probably wouldn't end up importing a glass boat, although that could be the perfect long term solution for me.  There's one for sale in Australia but the seller is asking $6500 AUS, and there'd be the shipping too.  Something will show up.  Best, Steve

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4 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

 More I look at your posts the more I think a Mirror is the right boat... get a cheap one (ie disposable hull) and try it out. Think short-term: a couple of seasons use then bonfire.

 If you like it, get a good one and get someone to tidy it up every winter... or import a fibreglass one- there seem to be enough of them in Canada that you'll easily find a buyer for a glass Mirror.

 Store it upright, with a decent cover, in your low rack. It's light enough to manhandle on shore and the mast is in two parts (Gunter rig), so will be easy to put up & take down yourself. Rig it main-only in the forward step when the breeze is blowing, put the jib up when it's light, get a kite for when you have crew...

 Stable enough and enough freeboard that you won't be soaked every time you sail. Space for sandwiches, flask and binoculars (and VHF?). Can row it if you need to. Buy as a consumable, not as an investment. This is research, not your ultimate goal.

Cheers,

               W.

Thanks again W.  Currently trying to get in contact with some folks in Vancouver who sail Mirrors.  Cheers.  Steve

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On 2/4/2019 at 4:32 PM, Great Red Shark said:

Megabyte. Comfy, fast, room for a passenger if so desired.

GRS, I'm looking at a 2003 Megabyte that a friend is willing to sell me.  It's a Mk1 rig.  I read your thread from last year about the horror show you went thru with 3 mast-top breaks.  This concerns me as I contemplate buying the boat I'm looking at.  I understand you were dealing with Forte about a new mast.  How did that turn out for you?   Perhaps the Mk1 masts were better-constructed than the Mk2 masts? (haven't read about any Mk1 masts breaking).

I'm thinking things must've resolved OK for you, because you've just recently recommended the Megabyte as a boat that might work for me.

If I buy the boat and the worst were to happen and my mast top were to break, is Forte the place to go for a replacement?  Was it only the mast top they replaced for you?  What did they charge you?   

Thanks and all the best,

Steven

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The Megabyte is a great boat, but it is quite powerful. They called it "the gentleman's Finn" when it was launched and was intended for sailors too big for a Laser. It never caught on. It would be handful for you in a breeze, that is for sure. 

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Bill, I don't want to get a boat that's going to be too much too handle as I am in my 60s and don't like much drama in my life.  :)

The seller, as well as some bits I've read online, say that its controls allow for easy depowering when required.  I've seen some videos of old guys sailing along quite relaxedly in light breezes, which is what we usually get in summertime in this part of Vancouver Island.  I figure the Megabyte might do well in those conditions as it seems to do well in light air.  However, I hear you about handling the boat in heavy air.  I would tend to sail in moderate conditions.  One thing I appreciate is that the Megabyte has a more spacious, comfy cockpit than the Laser, while weighing the same amount.  However, it does have 100sqft of sail, compared to the Laser's 76.  The seller of this boat is asking $2500  Cdn and the deal includes all gear and a trailer.

One concern I have, and I just messaged Great Red Shark, is that he went thru a huge hassle with 3 broken carbon fibre mast top sections.  However, I think the sections that broke were Mk2 masts.  The one I'm looking at is a Mk1 - perhaps they were better-made as I haven't found any criticisms in the forums about them.

Further comments about the issue you raised of too much power?  I'm listening.  BTW, I'm 5'10" and weigh 180lb.  Thanks!

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With the typical summer breezes there you won't have an issue. I go cruising in the Gulf Islands once or twice a year, and we go in April and and late September as that is when there is generally some decent wind. But - if it does blow up you might be challenged. 

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5 hours ago, bill4 said:

With the typical summer breezes there you won't have an issue. I go cruising in the Gulf Islands once or twice a year, and we go in April and and late September as that is when there is generally some decent wind. But - if it does blow up you might be challenged. 

Thanks Bill.  I'll consider this for sure.  I don't want to have to limit my sailing to only 3 months a year.  The Laser Std. or Radial sounds like it might be the better compromise in that regard, but then there's the wet ride and lesser comfort for the Old Guy set, of which I am a member.  This picking a boat gets complicated when their aren't too many around for sale.  However, something will turn up if I end up not getting the MB once I see it (it involves a trip).  Cheers.

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I suppose I owe this tread a resolution to my bitch-fest of last year.   Yeah,  I was pretty frustrated with the repeat failures of the top tube of my new mast(s) - especially as I had done my best to be VERY careful with them,  and that they all broke at the same spot.

After getting nowhere with Zim,  I took the advice to contact the boss at Forte,  and darnit if he wasn't a reasonable person - fair and no-nonsense,  he offered to make new top section at cost for me to finish off myself ( transfer parts over, bond the sail-track, make alignment-keyway) - and it came through just fine.  Back in business.

TO what do I attribute the repeat breaks ?  Hard to say definitively but the location was just a bit too much of a pattern for me to think otherwise than a possible flaw in the laminate schedule leading to a 'hard-spot' in the very-tapered tube.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
12 hours ago, wannabefd said:

Just spotted this little boat on Facebook marketplace and it is near you.

another Jack Holt design. Lightweight, roomy and set up for rowing.puffin.thumb.jpg.4e790459a9e391594d55bda8f5468a47.jpg

Is that a Pacer hull? If so, it's likely to be plywood. Wonder where the sails came from... 

Cheers,

              W.

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  • 1 month later...

If you can store it on a dolly instead of a rack I'd go with an MC Scow. Nice big cockpit, flat design allows for stepping right onto the boat from a dock, super stable and if you hinge the mast base a real cinch to step the mast alone. The boat is a joy to sail single-handed and is fast if you want it to be or slower if you luff the main a bit. You can sit in the bottom of the cockpit or easily sit on the very wide flat sides. 

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1 hour ago, FD Fanatic said:

If you can store it on a dolly instead of a rack I'd go with an MC Scow. Nice big cockpit, flat design allows for stepping right onto the boat from a dock, super stable and if you hinge the mast base a real cinch to step the mast alone. The boat is a joy to sail single-handed and is fast if you want it to be or slower if you luff the main a bit. You can sit in the bottom of the cockpit or easily sit on the very wide flat sides. 

Thanks FDF and everyone.  I've found a boat that I think is going to be perfect for me.  CLC Skerry.  Stitch and glue construction - Okoume marine plywood glassed and epoxied in and out.  Wood spars.

1 lightweight hull (95 lb) for launching from  the dock

2 simple to rig and sail

3 rows and sails well

4 lots of cockpit space to stretch out and store gear

It's no speed demon, but I need a beach cruising boat and this'll be just right.  Our summer winds are often light and fluky and this boat gets up to hull speed with just a bit of wind.  The builder was unable to complete the finishing touches, and so I've spent some time doing some epoxy, paint and varnish touchups, mounting the rudder and assembling the sailing rig.  I've just moved it from my home to the dinghy rack at a local marina.

Thanks to everyone for all your help and suggestions.  You've been really helpful.  Cheers.

 

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10 minutes ago, Suilven said:

Thanks FDF and everyone.  I've found a boat that I think is going to be perfect for me.  CLC Skerry.  Stitch and glue construction - Okoume marine plywood glassed and epoxied in and out.  Wood spars.

1 lightweight hull (95 lb) for launching from  the dock

2 simple to rig and sail

3 rows and sails well

4 lots of cockpit space to stretch out and store gear

It's no speed demon, but I need a beach cruising boat and this'll be just right.  Our summer winds are often light and fluky and this boat gets up to hull speed with just a bit of wind.  The builder was unable to complete the finishing touches, and so I've spent some time doing some epoxy, paint and varnish touchups, mounting the rudder and assembling the sailing rig.  I've just moved it from my home to the dinghy rack at a local marina.

Thanks to everyone for all your help and suggestions.  You've been really helpful.  Cheers.

 

Interesting choice, sounds kinda like the boat found you instead of you finding it

Let us know how it works out

FB- Doug

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4 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Interesting choice, sounds kinda like the boat found you instead of you finding it

Let us know how it works out

FB- Doug

Thanks Doug.  Yes, it was only a hour away by car.  It just kinda showed up.  :)

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Sorry, late to the thread.   We have club members in their late 70's still sailing.  That said, you should ensure that you perhaps have a waterproof VHF radio or distress device, and a good wetsuit/drysuit if you're sailing on your own.  At the upper age range, boat recovery becomes the biggest concern - it doesn't take long to run out of steam.  I had to help someone last year.  They weren't able to right the boat by the 3rd try, so I jumped in and righted it.  They then didn't have the strength to re-enter the boat.  This was a highly skilled sailor that I hugely admire, but sometimes, shit happens and the next step requires a certain level of strength and endurance.  Your Skerry seems to have a high freeboard (compared to a Laser), so re-entry may be tricky.  As such, you may need to wait for help, which is why you should perhaps dress on the assumption that you may be in the water for an extended period.

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1 hour ago, kurio99 said:

Sorry, late to the thread.   We have club members in their late 70's still sailing.  That said, you should ensure that you perhaps have a waterproof VHF radio or distress device, and a good wetsuit/drysuit if you're sailing on your own.  At the upper age range, boat recovery becomes the biggest concern - it doesn't take long to run out of steam.  I had to help someone last year.  They weren't able to right the boat by the 3rd try, so I jumped in and righted it.  They then didn't have the strength to re-enter the boat.  This was a highly skilled sailor that I hugely admire, but sometimes, shit happens and the next step requires a certain level of strength and endurance.  Your Skerry seems to have a high freeboard (compared to a Laser), so re-entry may be tricky.  As such, you may need to wait for help, which is why you should perhaps dress on the assumption that you may be in the water for an extended period.

Thanks.  The Skerry has high freeboard but is very light.  I've corresponded with someone who said the boat can be righted easily, has good buoyancy and it's quite easy to pull oneself up over the rail near the stern, and then bail.  However, I hear your concerns and am taking safety measures (VHF, suitable PFD, etc.).  As well, as much as possible, I plan to keep my sailing for days with gentle breezes and a stable weather forecast.  Keeping the boat upright is my #1 aim.  Cheers.

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Once I give up my current pursuit of swim sailing, I'm considering a Hobie Adventure as my next boat for my sunset years.  Lots of stability with dual amas that fold flat against the hull for storage.  Mirage drive for days with no wind.  6m2 sail - looks like fun on a windy day.

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