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Just did up a quickie pickled red onions and radishes for my grilled fish tacos tonight. Pick up a head of cabbage, already have an avo and sour cream. Just gotta beat the rain on grilling the fish. Cast iron stove top is the alternative if the rain beats me.  

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Working out in the shop one day I wound up with a big chunk of 5/16 plate steel and thought why not make a pizza/baking steel. I had the TIG machine set up so used that process to stick the handles on

I've been working on my sushi skills. This is all hamachi 

You can take the boy out of Oz but...Aussie style sausage rolls...pork and venison in this instance...fennel a must...

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Well.....1) I didn't beat the rain and 2) didn't like the fish and didn't feel like driving over to the fish market (a whole 10 minutes away!!)....BUT there was some very nice 18 count shrimp so.........a little panko fry up and presto Tacos de Camarones!!

Burp..........

But the clean up is always a PIA...............

 

Taco.jpg

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2 hours ago, Point Break said:

Well.....1) I didn't beat the rain and 2) didn't like the fish and didn't feel like driving over to the fish market (a whole 10 minutes away!!)....BUT there was some very nice 18 count shrimp so.........a little panko fry up and presto Tacos de Camarones!!

Burp..........

But the clean up is always a PIA...............

 

Taco.jpg

After.jpg

The cycelle of lust an surfaitte continiues                                            :)

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So you put bunch of tater tots in the toaster oven as high as it goes to cook them super crispy.

Meanwhile you fry up some bulk sweet italian sausage with some olive oil until just done and throw some flour in the pan with the sausage and cook until the flour is a light brown roux. Heat up some whole milk in the microwave and add that to the sausage pan as needed to get a nice thick gravy stirring and adding fresh ground pepper. It takes a lot of pepper, the right amount of salt and milk to get it right. 

Fry some eggs over easy the way you like them and put them on a warm plate along with the super hot and crispy tater tots. Spoon suasage gravy on the tater tots and put ground pepper and worchestershire sauce on the eggs and eat right away. Make sure you get a perfect bite of egg with sloppy yoke and a gravy covered tater tot!

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1 hour ago, Point Break said:

I do like tater tots.......crispy.........I'll bet you gotta eat fast or the tots get mushy.....I'm up to that.......

Ditto on the tater tots.  But since I'm a baconaholic, I developed a simple dish called "oiglers."  Wrap a dozen tater tots in a half strip of bacon each. Bake at 400°F for 25 minutes.  Pull 'em out, add 2-3 pieces mozzarella or other soft cheese on top of each and bung 'em back in for another 3 minutes.  Bacony cheesy totty goodness.

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11 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Ditto on the tater tots.  But since I'm a baconaholic, I developed a simple dish called "oiglers."  Wrap a dozen tater tots in a half strip of bacon each. Bake at 400°F for 25 minutes.  Pull 'em out, add 2-3 pieces mozzarella or other soft cheese on top of each and bung 'em back in for another 3 minutes.  Bacony cheesy totty goodness.

Dude...............yer killing me here............bacon AND tots..................AND cheese.........ALL 3 FOOD GROUPS IN ONE DISH........yer killing me..............

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14 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Ditto on the tater tots.  But since I'm a baconaholic, I developed a simple dish called "oiglers."  Wrap a dozen tater tots in a half strip of bacon each. Bake at 400°F for 25 minutes.  Pull 'em out, add 2-3 pieces mozzarella or other soft cheese on top of each and bung 'em back in for another 3 minutes.  Bacony cheesy totty goodness.

damn your soul!

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19 hours ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

So you put bunch of tater tots in the toaster oven as high as it goes to cook them super crispy.

Meanwhile you fry up some bulk sweet italian sausage with some olive oil until just done and throw some flour in the pan with the sausage and cook until the flour is a light brown roux. Heat up some whole milk in the microwave and add that to the sausage pan as needed to get a nice thick gravy stirring and adding fresh ground pepper. It takes a lot of pepper, the right amount of salt and milk to get it right. 

Fry some eggs over easy the way you like them and put them on a warm plate along with the super hot and crispy tater tots. Spoon suasage gravy on the tater tots and put ground pepper and worchestershire sauce on the eggs and eat right away. Make sure you get a perfect bite of egg with sloppy yoke and a gravy covered tater tot!

I would call this redneck biscuits and gravy but BnG is kinda redneck to begin with. 

This will be on the breakfast menu very soon.

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11 hours ago, chester said:

damn your soul!

It's already taken care of, I can assure you.  Going straight to the inferno after this.  But I'll be in good company.

Regarding the 'oiglers' (an old Sydney word for a 'thingummybob' or' whatsit'), if you like the bacon cripsy, leave them in 5 minutes longer before you put the cheese on.  I like my bacon medium, but YMMV.  So may your oven.

And if you like your tots cripsy too, shove them in the oven for 10 minutes first on the baking tray while you find the bacon behind the beer bottles, cut it up, bandage your finger and slice the cheese.  Then haul the tots out, wrap them up, and in they go again.

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19 hours ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

whatever you do don't deep fry the tots in LARD

Fixed that for ya...there was a Malcolm Gladwell podcast called "McDonald's Broke my Heart" about how they used to cook their fries in beef tallow...kinda hard to find, but you can lard pretty easily...for the occasional batch of fries or tots I fire up this makes an amazing difference in crispiness and taste...

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35 minutes ago, Grabbler said:

Fixed that for ya...there was a Malcolm Gladwell podcast called "McDonald's Broke my Heart" about how they used to cook their fries in beef tallow...kinda hard to find, but you can lard pretty easily...for the occasional batch of fries or tots I fire up this makes an amazing difference in crispiness and taste...

I remember when McD's changed over from animal fat to vegetable oil in their deep fryers. It was a fast train to disappointmentville.

 

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2 hours ago, Willin' said:

I remember when McD's changed over from animal fat to vegetable oil in their deep fryers. It was a fast train to disappointmentville.

 

Yep. The only thing I bought there were the fries. After the change......meh. I don't bother anymore. Better for me anyway.

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Simple Chow Mein

Here is a very easy, and quick to make recipe for Chow Mein that I cook multiple times a week.

Ingredients

* Noodles (the photo shows Lo mein noodles that I had left over, but I actually prefer Angel Hair pasta)

* Dark Soy Sauce (if you have some, if not, whatever you have on hand)

* Sesame Sauce

* Szechuan Sauce

* ColeSlaw Mix (it's shredded green cabbage & carrots)

* Vegetable Oil

* Dried Hot Peppers if desired. I purchased some that were grown in India. The first time I made this dish I used 5-peppers. I quickly discovered that five of these things could wake up the dead. Needless to say, I now use only one!


Cooking

1) Cook the noodles half-way and set aside. Do not drain the noodles until you need them!

2) Place a wok or skillet on higher heat, and then add some vegetable oil and dried pepper after the oil is hot. Cook for about 20-seconds while stirring.

3) Add the ColeSlaw, and stir. Cook for about 10-seconds or so while stirring.

4) Add the Sesame oil, soy sauce and Szechuan Sauce. Cook for about 20-seconds or so while stirring.

5) Drain and add the noodles to the mix. Cook for about 20-seconds while stirring.

Serve and Enjoy!

 

Ingredients.jpg

Noodles and Pepper.jpg

 

Chow Mein.jpg

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Great stuff everybody! Thanks

I did a  new twist on my Turkey Gumbo recipe the other day, since I didn't have a turkey carcass to make the stock from.

I put a large pack of chicken thighs (skin removed) in the smoker over an oak fire for two hours. I put in a few links of venison sausage on the rack above them so the drippings would baste the chicken. (chicken thighs were well seasoned with Salt Lick Barbecue Rub - gotta get some of that!)

After smoking I pulled the meat off the bone and threw the bones and some onion and celery in a stock pot to make the stock.

The smokiness of the chicken bones made for a wonderfully smokey stock.

From there I pretty much just followed the Turkey and Sausage Gumbo recipe I've posted previously.

(WIllin' - I was listening to Little Feat while I cooked, made me think of you!)

I served it, along with my Seafood Gumbo, at our big annual Mardi Gras blowout. Everyone loved it.

OTH

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39 minutes ago, On The Hard said:

Great stuff everybody! Thanks

I did a  new twist on my Turkey Gumbo recipe the other day, since I didn't have a turkey carcass to make the stock from.

I put a large pack of chicken thighs (skin removed) in the smoker over an oak fire for two hours. I put in a few links of venison sausage on the rack above them so the drippings would baste the chicken. (chicken thighs were well seasoned with Salt Lick Barbecue Rub - gotta get some of that!)

After smoking I pulled the meat off the bone and threw the bones and some onion and celery in a stock pot to make the stock.

The smokiness of the chicken bones made for a wonderfully smokey stock.

From there I pretty much just followed the Turkey and Sausage Gumbo recipe I've posted previously.

(WIllin' - I was listening to Little Feat while I cooked, made me think of you!)

I served it, along with my Seafood Gumbo, at our big annual Mardi Gras blowout. Everyone loved it.

OTH

I'll be on this as soon as we get home. Also can't wait till this year's crop of oysters  are big enough to experiment with oyster/ lobster gumbo. I keep trying to get my wife interested in opening a food cart selling gumbo for a little walking around change. I've even named it Gumbo Mary's which gives me  this great mental image of a big, happy Cajun woman stirring a huge pot of it.  I think it has a better ring to it than Gumbo Cheryl's.

For some reason she'll cook great food all day long for funsies but resists the idea of doing it for money. Go figure.

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1 hour ago, Willin' said:

I'll be on this as soon as we get home. Also can't wait till this year's crop of oysters  are big enough to experiment with oyster/ lobster gumbo. I keep trying to get my wife interested in opening a food cart selling gumbo for a little walking around change. I've even named it Gumbo Mary's which gives me  this great mental image of a big, happy Cajun woman stirring a huge pot of it.  I think it has a better ring to it than Gumbo Cheryl's.

For some reason she'll cook great food all day long for funsies but resists the idea of doing it for money. Go figure.

Ohhhhhhhhhhh.........gumbo..................sigh................

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A full fried "Scottish"...(breakfast)

Fried Bacon,

Fried Lorne sausage,

Fried Mushrooms,

Fried Egg,

Fried black pudding,

Fried Bread

fried potatos (normally were boiled beforehand)

 Baked beans..

And most importantly..... Fried Haggis...

 

A heart attack on a plate...

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On 3/11/2019 at 7:54 AM, The Q said:

A full fried "Scottish"...(breakfast)

Fried Bacon,

Fried Lorne sausage,

Fried Mushrooms,

Fried Egg,

Fried black pudding,

Fried Bread

fried potatos (normally were boiled beforehand)

 Baked beans..

And most importantly..... Fried Haggis...

 

A heart attack on a plate...

Get it in Scotland in a restaurant and free angioplasty is thrown in. 

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So on the trip from Sydney to NZ we caught a bunch of albacore. Offshore, I cooked up a meal of pan seared albacore with peppercorns. That's easy, though I like it better with yellowfin.

Basically take a mix of olive oil and butter and heat it up on medium to high, toss in a  couple of tablespoons of peppercorns. Heat until the peppercorns start to pop like popcorn (this really happens, though they don't flower like popcorn). When the pepper is popping, sear the tuna until it's done the way you like it. Basically this, but with Albacore which wants to be cooked a little longer then yellowfin.

------------

But I have 5-6 pounds of the stuff that we filleted, rinsed only in clean seawater, then vacuum sealed and froze immediately. Should be OK.

Recipe suggestions?

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43 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

So on the trip from Sydney to NZ we caught a bunch of albacore. Offshore, I cooked up a meal of pan seared albacore with peppercorns. That's easy, though I like it better with yellowfin.

Basically take a mix of olive oil and butter and heat it up on medium to high, toss in a  couple of tablespoons of peppercorns. Heat until the peppercorns start to pop like popcorn (this really happens, though they don't flower like popcorn). When the pepper is popping, sear the tuna until it's done the way you like it. Basically this, but with Albacore which wants to be cooked a little longer then yellowfin.

------------

But I have 5-6 pounds of the stuff that we filleted, rinsed only in clean seawater, then vacuum sealed and froze immediately. Should be OK.

Recipe suggestions?

Tacos Pescados..........of course........

I like em grilled not battered...........

get some corn tortillas (Guerrero White Corn is best), an avocado or two, onion, cilantro, cabbage, I like radishes as well, a little sour cream, pico de gallo if you want.............and shove it all together in two tortillas for each taco..........

You can get that stuff on NZL can't you...................;)

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Sunday I went Vietnamese 

Spring rolls with Nuoc Nem (fish sauce, grated carrots water and rice wine vinegar and hot chilies icing sugar, just a bit )

Marinated (garlic, shallots, fish sauce and a bit of sugar) thin sliced beef stir fried wrapped in mustard greens with vermicelli and pineapple spears. These were dipped in a suace consisting of oyster sauce, lemon juice, icing sugar and wasabi paste.  

Lemon grass garlic and red chilies pork belly coated in sesame seeds stir fried then broiled serve on rice with butter lettuce, Thai sweet basil, bean sprouts and rice the finished with a warm satay sauce.  

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Trying my hand at this over the weekend for the GF and me. Yellow tail tuna, cilantro, green pepper, chili oil, spicy mayo and lime juice maki rolls. Maybe avocado. Dunno, I'm still making this up in my head.

Edemame and miso soup for appetizers. I should probably try and find sake too.

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7 hours ago, Point Break said:

Tacos Pescados..........of course........

I like em grilled not battered...........

get some corn tortillas (Guerrero White Corn is best), an avocado or two, onion, cilantro, cabbage, I like radishes as well, a little sour cream, pico de gallo if you want.............and shove it all together in two tortillas for each taco..........

You can get that stuff on NZL can't you...................;)

Most of it, yeah. My wife usually makes her own flour tortillas which are really quite good and easy, though we can go buy some corn ones if we must.

Any particular spicing you want to rub on the fish before you grill it?

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16 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Most of it, yeah. My wife usually makes her own flour tortillas which are really quite good and easy, though we can go buy some corn ones if we must.

Any particular spicing you want to rub on the fish before you grill it?

A little olive oil (@1/3 cup), 1 lime juice, red onion, chili powder (I like ancho), jalapeño or Serrano chili’s chopped, cilantro. Marinate the room temp fish fillets about 15 minutes (no more or the lime will start to “cook” the fish like ceviche and you don’t want that). Buddy of mine adds a little tequila (silver) and orange juice instead of the lime. That’s nice too. I prefer the lime. Then onto the grill. Lightly salt & pepper while grilling (to your taste or skip this...total preference). Flake the fish when done and load the tacos. A good variation on the pico de Gallo is mayo with sriracha mixed in. 

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This is a little hardcore South Texas Mexican, so maybe not for everyone. (Not spicy, though)

 Carne Guisada in an Instant Pot

2 lbs Round steak cut in 1 inch cubes

4 plum tomatoes

2 red bell peppers

1 onion

1 Jalapeno, seeded with rib removed

6 (yes 6!) Cloves of Garlic

2 TBSP Cumin

2 Tsp Chile Powder

2 Tsp Smoked Paprika

2 Tsp each salt and pepper

1 tsp oregano

1 cup of water.

Put everything but the meat in a blender and give it a ride. dump in the instant pot. Add the meat. Pressure cook on high for 20 minutes. Release the steam valve. Set on saute for 30 minutes stirring occasionally. Thicken with a little corn starch if it seems too wet. (mix corn starch with a little water before adding it so it doesn't clump)

Like chili, it tastes even better the next day. Here in South Texas we eat on flour tortillas, but we are staying away from that white flour shit, so I am eating it over riced cauliflower. 

It's pretty damn good.

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paprika chicken...dead simple comes from  Joy of Cooking!

oil and butter in the pan

a finely chopped onion in the pan with 2 teaspoons to 2 tablespoons of sweet red paprika, saute til glossy and red

add 2 cups of chicken stock and a couple of pounds of chicken, simmer for an hour

2 tablespoons of flour mixed in a cup of sour cream, stir into sauce til smooth...done

serve over pasta or rice.

I use chicken breast, two tablespoons of paprika one of them being smoked paprika and add a couple of cups of frozen peas at about a half hour.

 

it's good

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"The Joy of Cooking" is one of my 3 kitchen bibles.

The second is "Bangkok to Bali in 15 minutes".

The other is "The Breath of the Wok".

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3 hours ago, chester said:

paprika chicken...dead simple comes from  Joy of Cooking!

oil and butter in the pan

a finely chopped onion in the pan with 2 teaspoons to 2 tablespoons of sweet red paprika, saute til glossy and red

add 2 cups of chicken stock and a couple of pounds of chicken, simmer for an hour

2 tablespoons of flour mixed in a cup of sour cream, stir into sauce til smooth...done

serve over pasta or rice.

I use chicken breast, two tablespoons of paprika one of them being smoked paprika and add a couple of cups of frozen peas at about a half hour.

 

it's good

Oh I am going to have to try this 

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Joy of Cooking was my college graduation present. That thing is beat to hell but for base recipies, it's great. Make something once and then add to it for your personal tastes or leave as is if the original floats your flavors.

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11 hours ago, austin1972 said:

Joy of Cooking was my college graduation present. That thing is beat to hell but for base recipies, it's great. Make something once and then add to it for your personal tastes or leave as is if the original floats your flavors.

I know!  I got mine probably as a wedding present (first wedding, :rolleyes:) in 1982.  I looked on wiki, that year meant it was the 1975 edition and the last by the original author's line.  that edition lasted until 1997.  our copy is beat up, spine broken and falling apart but I still pull it out.  wiki says:

The 1936 edition differed from other commercial cookbooks of the era by its retention of the author's folksy comments and anecdotes, and its new layout for the recipes.[8]:153–154 Instead of listing the ingredients for a dish at the top with preparation directions following, the recipes in Joy (1936) were presented by narratives, with the ingredients indicated as the need for them occurred, with each placed in boldface on a new indented line — thus preserving a conversational style throughout the recipe. This method came to be known as the "action method".[9] 

I really like the action method! :D recipes are given in a time linear way...use this much of this now....

we also have a beat up copy of a cookbook put together by the ladies of st.peters parish where my wife (current, :D) grew up.  you know the ones, small spiral bound books the local ladies contributed to.  this is also from the 70's and puts on full display the use of canned goods in family  cooking at the time....there is almost nothing a can of mushroom or tomato soup can't serve as the base for!  :D

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Or cream of mushroom! Maybe we're talking the same thing.

Another book to cook from is Bobby Flay's Throwdown. Good recipes.

But, as a go-to for base recipes, nothing beats The Joy. The spine on mine is blown out too but I have printouts of various folks' family recipes shoved in there too. I'm not allowed to share though.

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1 hour ago, austin1972 said:

Or cream of mushroom! Maybe we're talking the same thing.

Another book to cook from is Bobby Flay's Throwdown. Good recipes.

But, as a go-to for base recipes, nothing beats The Joy. The spine on mine is blown out too but I have printouts of various folks' family recipes shoved in there too. I'm not allowed to share though.

Yep, I meant cream of mushroom soup...campbell's!

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I found an astoundingly good boneless duck breast recipe in the SILVER PALATE cook book, but it originally called for chicken breasts..... I adapted it to boneless duck breasts and it's an 100% winner every time.

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Back in the 70s on sunset blvd was a place called Power Burger. They did these pita bread  chili cheese burgers .I had a craving for one so.. I had  some chili that I had just made previously but  then had to make some pita bread.. Then grind up some meat.. Then grilled up a couple cheeseburgers and stuffed them into the pita with the chili ... Damn good!!.. Put it on the menu for  a daily special.......  As for the bacon... That's not on the menu!  Lol! 

IMG_20190315_200955.jpg

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16 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

I found an astoundingly good boneless duck breast recipe in the SILVER PALATE cook book, but it originally called for chicken breasts..... I adapted it to boneless duck breasts and it's an 100% winner every time.

Just tried The Silver Palate's Chicken Monterey recipe last week.  It's a good one.

Edit:  I sauteed the zucchini with onions and served it on the side, and I put the orange zest in the sauce with the chicken.

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We're so lucky here in Palo Alto CA.  Schaub's in the Stanford Shopping Center is a veteran butcher, widely known for its black "Fred's Steak," a large chunk of tri-tip marinated for 3 to 4 days in a secret set of ingredients.

Throw one of those babies on the grill and slice - the girls curl up their toes. I'm looking forward to warmer weather.


Image result for schaub fred's tri-tip

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3 hours ago, austin1972 said:

How long did it take you to make start to finish? Takes me 11 days. I gave it up since my local store makes awesome bacon for $5/lb.

First of all the only bacon here is imported from Australia and it's the Armour Brand .sells for about $10 a kilo and only one shop on the island sells it. And I'm not down with the Armour Brand.  From start to finish.  11days is not really too long. The curing time can be about 5-7days depending on size  because longer and it gets saltier. I do about a week  cure  ( I use raw sea salt raw sugar  maple syrup for extra flavor .. never use pink salt ..i couldn't find it if I wanted to anyway..)  then after curing.. 1day dry 1day smoke 1more day dry  .thats around 8to 10days total depending on  size ..so 11days is OK too 

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23 minutes ago, captpiratedog said:

First of all the only bacon here is imported from Australia and it's the Armour Brand .sells for about $10 a kilo and only one shop on the island sells it. And I'm not down with the Armour Brand.  From start to finish.  11days is not really too long. The curing time can be about 5-7days depending on size  because longer and it gets saltier. I do about a week  cure  ( I use raw sea salt raw sugar  maple syrup for extra flavor .. never use pink salt ..i couldn't find it if I wanted to anyway..)  then after curing.. 1day dry 1day smoke 1more day dry  .thats around 8to 10days total depending on  size ..so 11days is OK too 

If you do an EQ cure where everything is determined by weight it doesn't matter how long you leave it in the cure it can't get any saltier...mine usually go in for 14 days, I pull and let the pellicle form in the fridge for 48 hours, then either cold smoke or hot smoke before vacuum sealing...I have a constant rotation going...a 3-4lb belly just going in and just coming out of cure constantly...playing with additives a lot...the Capt. Morgan's and honey batch was well received and will be repeated...

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4 hours ago, P_Wop said:

We're so lucky here in Palo Alto CA.  Schaub's in the Stanford Shopping Center is a veteran butcher, widely known for its black "Fred's Steak," a large chunk of tri-tip marinated for 3 to 4 days in a secret set of ingredients.

Throw one of those babies on the grill and slice - the girls curl up their toes. I'm looking forward to warmer weather.


Image result for schaub fred's tri-tip

I know the place. My buddy lived in Palo Alto....he is in Noe Valley now...........and we've had exactly that critter. Excellent!

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7 hours ago, Grabbler said:

If you do an EQ cure where everything is determined by weight it doesn't matter how long you leave it in the cure it can't get any saltier...mine usually go in for 14 days, I pull and let the pellicle form in the fridge for 48 hours, then either cold smoke or hot smoke before vacuum sealing...I have a constant rotation going...a 3-4lb belly just going in and just coming out of cure constantly...playing with additives a lot...the Capt. Morgan's and honey batch was well received and will be repeated...

Thanx for the tip! .. I followed an EQ  recipe I saw online  the first time per Kilo ratio but I felt it was too salty  I don't know if it was the salt  (I think  I used table salt) or time  in the brine because it sat in the cure for  a bit more than a week  but after that . I went back online found some other like "healthy" site. it  stated that the longer it sat in the brine the saltier it would get.  It also said to use sea salt.  So I went to the local market and got sea salt.. Which is kinda dirty so   I cut back half on the salt  I used about 75grams because after I weighed it I had to add water and strain the dirt out..  for roughly a  2.5 kilo weight  belly before I cut the skin off .. Then I cured it for just  a week.  This one was definitely better than the one before it..  But it's still a learning process.  

 

Anybody have any tips for dry sausage or salami ? 

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7 hours ago, captpiratedog said:

Anybody have any tips for dry sausage or salami ? 

I have a jerky recipe. Don't tell anyone! :)

10 oz. Worcesteshire

10 oz. Soy Sauce

3/4 cup lemon juice

1 cup brown sugar

10 oz. Teriyaki Marinade sauce

1 tsp. Old Hickory Smoked salt

1 tsp. lemon pepper

4 Tbs. Crushed red pepper

Heat all ingredients in sauce pan for about 5 minutes or until the sugar dissolves.

Let it cool while you slice the meat. The meat should be slightly frozen to make slicing easier. I highly recommend a meat slicer. You'll slice it about 1/2 in thick by 1 inch wide. Length doesn't matter. Use a shoulder roast with all fat trimmed or venison. Getting the fat removed is really important as it'll turn.

Shove that shit into the marinade and put it in the fridge for 24 hours, covered with plastic wrap.

Take it out, pat dry and put on a dehydrator at 135 for 10  hours.

Let set back in the fridge for a day and boom, you have great jerky.

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21 hours ago, austin1972 said:

I have a jerky recipe. Don't tell anyone! :)

10 oz. Worcesteshire

10 oz. Soy Sauce

3/4 cup lemon juice

1 cup brown sugar

10 oz. Teriyaki Marinade sauce

1 tsp. Old Hickory Smoked salt

1 tsp. lemon pepper

4 Tbs. Crushed red pepper

Heat all ingredients in sauce pan for about 5 minutes or until the sugar dissolves.

Let it cool while you slice the meat. The meat should be slightly frozen to make slicing easier. I highly recommend a meat slicer. You'll slice it about 1/2 in thick by 1 inch wide. Length doesn't matter. Use a shoulder roast with all fat trimmed or venison. Getting the fat removed is really important as it'll turn.

Shove that shit into the marinade and put it in the fridge for 24 hours, covered with plastic wrap.

Take it out, pat dry and put on a dehydrator at 135 for 10  hours.

Let set back in the fridge for a day and boom, you have great jerky.

I used to make jerky all the time on the boat.  I'd hang it on a line from the shroud to the back stay or fore. It would dry out in a day in the breeze  One time on the hook I went ashore for a bit.  When I returned the damn seagulls were having a party!  I chased them away and only had about a few pieces left.  After that when I'd dry it I'd make sure to stay aboard 

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On ‎3‎/‎16‎/‎2019 at 8:15 AM, austin1972 said:

I have a jerky recipe. Don't tell anyone! :)

10 oz. Worcesteshire

10 oz. Soy Sauce

3/4 cup lemon juice

1 cup brown sugar

10 oz. Teriyaki Marinade sauce

1 tsp. Old Hickory Smoked salt

1 tsp. lemon pepper

4 Tbs. Crushed red pepper

Heat all ingredients in sauce pan for about 5 minutes or until the sugar dissolves.

Let it cool while you slice the meat. The meat should be slightly frozen to make slicing easier. I highly recommend a meat slicer. You'll slice it about 1/2 in thick by 1 inch wide. Length doesn't matter. Use a shoulder roast with all fat trimmed or venison. Getting the fat removed is really important as it'll turn.

Shove that shit into the marinade and put it in the fridge for 24 hours, covered with plastic wrap.

Take it out, pat dry and put on a dehydrator at 135 for 10  hours.

Let set back in the fridge for a day and boom, you have great jerky.

How much meat in approximate pounds do you use? What kind of packaging do you use when you put it back in the fridge (just a Ziploc) and do you leave it in there or remove and seal with Foodsaver bags?  I have been experimenting with making jerky lately and have had the most success using flank steak.  The marinade sounds really good.

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6 hours ago, Yuck Fou said:

How much meat in approximate pounds do you use? What kind of packaging do you use when you put it back in the fridge (just a Ziploc) and do you leave it in there or remove and seal with Foodsaver bags?  I have been experimenting with making jerky lately and have had the most success using flank steak.  The marinade sounds really good.

I do a couple of pounds at a time. You can always jump up the recipe if you want to make more. I just put it in freezer bags. Flank steak would work well but they have recently decided it's pretty special stuff price-wise.
I prefer a cross grain cut when I slice the meat.

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1 hour ago, Max Rockatansky said:

Spearing lions at Long Island Bahamas. Best as ceviche/sushi. Her recipe: marinate filets in lime juice, soy, sesame oil

360E98CC-022E-443E-8416-166DE3AA9762.jpeg

 

 

Had lionfish on Salt Cay, they had a deal at (the only) restaurant on the island such that if you seared one and brought it in they would cook it up and only charge for the sides.......and the booze.........it was pretty darn convenient as the dive boat landed right there. Walk up and drop off the critter and by the time the gear was rinsed etc lunch was ready!! It was pretty ordinary grilled though. Kinda meh. The picture below is from the restaurant patio. That was a good couple weeks.

DSCN0529.jpg

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On ‎2‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 7:47 AM, tybee said:

Linguine with Asparagus, Shrimp, and Scallions


Anchovy and asparagus may seem a little odd, but here the anchovy brings what bacon or pancetta would to the asparagus and shrimp: it underscores and brings up their flavors, but isn’t allowed to dominate.


Serves 4 as a main dish or 6 as a pasta course
1 pound asparagus, preferably fat-stemmed
2 bunches (about 2 dozen) slender scallions
1 ¼ pounds medium to large shrimp, peeled and deveined
Salt
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 large cloves garlic, lightly crushed, peeled, and minced
¼ to ½ teaspoon hot red pepper flakes, to taste
1 pound linguine
1 teaspoon anchovy paste or 2 small anchovy fillets packed in olive oil, patted dry and minced
2 tablespoons finely chopped flat leaf (Italian) parsley
1 tablespoon finely chopped oregano
1. Bring 4 quarts water to a rolling boil in 6-8 quart pot. Wash and trim cut end of asparagus. Peel tough parts of stems (lower third) with vegetable peeler. Cut off tips and set aside; cut stems in 1-inch lengths. Trim scallions and thinly cut on diagonal into 1-inch-long pieces, separating white and green parts. Cut shrimp into 2-3 pieces.
2. Stir in small handful salt and asparagus stem pieces into boiling water. Cook 1 minute and lift out with skimmer. Keep water simmering.
3. Put oil and garlic in large, heavy-bottomed skillet or frying pan over medium-high heat. Sauté until garlic is fragrant, about 5-10 seconds after it begins sizzling. Add hot pepper flakes to taste and white parts of scallions and toss until scallion is translucent and garlic is barely beginning to color, about 30 seconds. Turn off heat.
4. Stir linguine into boiling water. Cook, stirring occasionally, until al dente using package suggestions as rough guide. When pasta is almost done, reheat skillet over medium-low heat.
5. Add shrimp, anchovy, asparagus stems, and asparagus tips to pan, raise heat, and season with salt if needed. Tossing constantly, cook until shrimp are just curled and pink. Add herbs and scallion greens and turn off heat. Toss well.
6. Drain pasta, immediately toss with sauce and serve. This sauce should not be served with cheese.

NOTES:

i tend to double the amount of asparagus, i like rotini instead of linguine and, for the sea food averse,  you can substitute boneless/skinless chicken thighs (suitably cut up) for the shrimp

serve with a very chilled sauvignon blanc

Rockte the boxxe tounitte with thisse oune.  Thack you.                           :)

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Tonight it is Redfish on the half shell

Redfish have a very heavy skin and scales. You cook the filet skin side down on the grill with seasonings, lemon and butter on top. It doesn't get any simpler...or better

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44 minutes ago, On The Hard said:

Tonight it is Redfish on the half shell

Redfish have a very heavy skin and scales. You cook the filet skin side down on the grill with seasonings, lemon and butter on top. It doesn't get any simpler...or better

 

IMG_0001.jpgCat Cay, Bahamas

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8 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Laste nite made a killere creame of mushoom soupe with fresh ciabatta breade.

Tonite ist ham quiche and ceaser salade.                                    :)

I made a ham and cheddar quiche last night,  About 15 minutes after it went in the oven, the electricity went off for an hour.  Needless to say, that didn't end well. 

I use the Moosewood Cookbook recipe, but with 5 eggs instead of the 4 that the recipe calls for.

What's your quiche recipe, please?

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19 hours ago, On The Hard said:

Tonight it is Redfish on the half shell

Redfish have a very heavy skin and scales. You cook the filet skin side down on the grill with seasonings, lemon and butter on top. It doesn't get any simpler...or better

Redfish eating was closed last summer due to red tide.  May open back up on May 1.  Fingers and toes crossed.

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11 hours ago, Fat Point Jack said:

Redfish eating was closed last summer due to red tide.  May open back up on May 1.  Fingers and toes crossed.

Unfortunately, living inland and being a terrible fisherman anyway, I am relegated to buying farm raised. But it is surprisingly good. Even more surprising is that they apparently adapt to fresh water readily.

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You're living well Snags!  Looks like I'm grilling chicken again tonight....sigh....

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Last night's simple thing. 

Thick skin-off local fresh Salmon fillets. Butter, olive oil, lemon juice, pepper, parsley warmed together in a saucepan. Salmon pan-fried in very hot brown butter, get a char all over with the middle still near raw. Plate the salmon, add the sauce to the pan juices, pour over the fish.

With perfect shoestring fries and a basic salad. 

 

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On 3/15/2019 at 3:42 PM, P_Wop said:

We're so lucky here in Palo Alto CA.  Schaub's in the Stanford Shopping Center is a veteran butcher, widely known for its black "Fred's Steak," a large chunk of tri-tip marinated for 3 to 4 days in a secret set of ingredients.

Throw one of those babies on the grill and slice - the girls curl up their toes. I'm looking forward to warmer weather.


Image result for schaub fred's tri-tip

Whenever we ask one of the local butchers for a tri tip they comment "You must be from the west coast. Only people from California eat that."

Frickin' amazing to me that the locals don't get it.

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12 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

You did throw a hunk of sausage in there for flavor, right??? 

Hahahahaha!...Shithead musta dropped in close to 5-7lbs of Conecuh sausage (Alabama's gift to the world) plus assorted cloves of garlic, sticks of butter, onions, oranges, spuds etc. etc. in each pot...the couple years he spent at school/fishing in Lousiana paid off big time:lol:...

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9 hours ago, Grabbler said:

Hahahahaha!...Shithead musta dropped in close to 5-7lbs of Conecuh sausage (Alabama's gift to the world) plus assorted cloves of garlic, sticks of butter, onions, oranges, spuds etc. etc. in each pot...the couple years he spent at school/fishing in Lousiana paid off big time:lol:...

When we paddle out to Caper's Island off the coast of Charleston - we fish for redfish on the way out, grab some oysters, and once we're there, net some shrimp and from the pon in the middle of the island, some crawfish - makes for a great low country boil... 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

That venison looks good, but won't crack into my top 2.

Chicken Fried Venison with Cream Gravy (South Texas favorite)

Seared Backstrap with Port Wine and Shallot reduction (simple and Oh So Good!)

 

Going down the road to my favorite BBQ joint at lunch and getting a pound of brisket off the lean end!! 

image.png.917365778b16233ffca60139545c3a4d.png

 

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Ok, y'all might find this weird but:  we slow cooked a beef roast last week with small potatoes and carrots...the most basic "sunday pot roast".  but i couldn't wait for my wife to get home where we would have plated it so...I put a bed of lettuce on a large tortilla or wrap, squashed some potatoes and carrots on that, put tender beef on that, mixed a couple of tablespoons of au jus with a big shot of horse radish and poured that over everything and then wrapped it up...voila, pot roast burrito! :D

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5 hours ago, chester said:

Ok, y'all might find this weird but:  we slow cooked a beef roast last week with small potatoes and carrots...the most basic "sunday pot roast".  but i couldn't wait for my wife to get home where we would have plated it so...I put a bed of lettuce on a large tortilla or wrap, squashed some potatoes and carrots on that, put tender beef on that, mixed a couple of tablespoons of au jus with a big shot of horse radish and poured that over everything and then wrapped it up...voila, pot roast burrito! :D

Juste lette me no, wherre an when..... I be theire.  I coude brigge wine.          :)

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I'm not much of a food guy and certainly no connoisseur so you all may already know this, but wifey came home a while back with a tenderloin tail cut, which I'd never heard of before. It's basically the narrow end of the tenderloin, from whence the filets are sliced,  only at 1/8 the price of filet mignon, equally tender but as flavorful as any strip steak. She found them at Sam's Club and we now are thinking we need a small freezer just in case these prices are temporary or just a fluke.

I was expecting to take her out for a big blow out fine dining dinner for her birthday tomorrow night, prolly costing near $200 with wine and tip ( big for Maine, probably not so big for most of you), when she asked if it was OK to just stay home and have her cook some tenderloin tail, asparagus and a great salad.

Gawd I love that woman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or am I about to get played? 

 

Hmmmmm.

 

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