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Deck Replacement?


PinkSpinnaker

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Has anyone here ever replaced an entire deck? I do not mean the core, I mean the whole deck. Searching the forum seems to bring up no results. I know limited details on the boat except that it needs the deck replaced and it has a new deck to be put on it. Thanks!

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It could be an opportunity. There have been a number of threads/story about replacing the deck, deck house, cockpit on an older boat and giving it a new lease on life.

 
Much depends on your ability and how much you are willing to spend to achieve you goal. It will probably cost way more than the boat is worth, but if it is a labor of love rather than economy, it may be worth it.
 
More information needed. What kind of boat? What is your ability? How bad is the deck and do you like the current design? Do you have a place to work? And a bunch of other questions I haven't thought of yet.
 
A lot more information needed before any kind of realistic evaluation can be made.
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It would have to be an amazing boat for that to be worth the effort. I have done some deck re-coring and the tear off is some of the filthiest work. There is some special kind of funk that likes to grow inside wet deck wood. Is this a tupperware boat where you can separate the seam all the way around and just put a new top on it? You'll need a lift of some sort or have to build frames to get the new top bit in place and hold it there.  Seller is probably bailing because they finally realized the scope of the project and now want to make it someone else's problem.

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I recall someone did an all new deck and house on an old SC50. Probably simplifies things if one pulls a mold off the whole thing before sawing starts. Sounds like a project that might create much dust.

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After a very busy off-season with new electrics, lines, soft spot fixes, faired keel & etc.,  I'm completely in your camp.  Time for some sailing, and damned if I want to do anything more than run a hose down the deck every couple weeks. 

There are guys in every boatyard, however, that completely disagree.  They may not admit that they feel that way but after 5 years on the hard, their nearing-completion-this-year-no-really-I-mean-it boat that was rebuilt more or less from the ground up puts the lie to their protest.  I look at the boats and the guys and think, "just paint the fucker and drop it in the water, willya?"  But no, there's always "just one more job then we're pretty close." 

Different strokes for different folks I guess.

 

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22 hours ago, sailorman44 said:

It could be an opportunity. There have been a number of threads/story about replacing the deck, deck house, cockpit on an older boat and giving it a new lease on life.

 
Much depends on your ability and how much you are willing to spend to achieve you goal. It will probably cost way more than the boat is worth, but if it is a labor of love rather than economy, it may be worth it.
 
More information needed. What kind of boat? What is your ability? How bad is the deck and do you like the current design? Do you have a place to work? And a bunch of other questions I haven't thought of yet.
 
A lot more information needed before any kind of realistic evaluation can be made.

Boat-Wavelength 24, Ability-Not well enough to take a deck off. Apparently the deck that is on it is absolutely shot in every way possible. The obvious answer here is no way in hell should this be taken on. I was just mulling over the idea considering the circumstances. There have been plenty of threads on recoring and cabin top removal, except this is the whole deck, with a whole second deck to replace it. Not much information on that because it is not something normal people even consider. The reality of this boat is it should meet a chainsaw, but thats always a shame to see that happen.

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S20's have been done numerous times with good results.  If it is just a swap, it's not that difficult or costly(compared to a new wavelength).  3000 was the quote for a new deck 9n the 20, but that was about 10 yrs ago when new decks could be had.  If you use the old hardware, rubrails, pulpit, lifelines etc, it might be worth it.  

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Does anyone still have the deck mold? I replaced my Adams 10 deck with one that had been used to make a new mold. Depends how the deck/hull join is done. In my case it gave me lots of opportunity to create a new deckhouse to my needs.

 

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On 4/4/2019 at 8:19 PM, PinkSpinnaker said:

Boat-Wavelength 24, Ability-Not well enough to take a deck off. Apparently the deck that is on it is absolutely shot in every way possible. The obvious answer here is no way in hell should this be taken on. I was just mulling over the idea considering the circumstances. There have been plenty of threads on recoring and cabin top removal, except this is the whole deck, with a whole second deck to replace it. Not much information on that because it is not something normal people even consider. The reality of this boat is it should meet a chainsaw, but thats always a shame to see that happen.

How does a deck become shot to the point it is beyond repair? This is not a job I would want for sure.

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On 4/4/2019 at 5:25 PM, Gouvernail said:

Do you have another brand new unused deck?? If so, it is not that big a deal to  install it. 

It sounds like it comes with a new one in op.

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On 4/4/2019 at 8:25 PM, Gouvernail said:

Do you have another brand new unused deck?? If so, it is not that big a deal to  install it. 

The boat is for sale, yes the owner has a new unused deck for the boat. I was wondering how big of mess it would be with the hull/deck tabbing.

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11 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

How does a deck become shot to the point it is beyond repair? This is not a job I would want for sure.

Well, for starters its balsa.  was balsa. Now its more like soaking wet paper towls. I would imagine unsealed mounting holes from long since removed hardware caused it. Spider cracking throughout does not help either. 

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41 minutes ago, PinkSpinnaker said:

 I was wondering how big of mess it would be with the hull/deck tabbing.

A BIG mess.

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On 4/6/2019 at 8:05 PM, PinkSpinnaker said:

Well, for starters its balsa.  was balsa. Now its more like soaking wet paper towls. I would imagine unsealed mounting holes from long since removed hardware caused it. Spider cracking throughout does not help either. 

Have you contacted Shock??  They aint so reliable since Tom got out, but maybe they will have some tips so it might be worth a shot.  For those of you not in the know, the wavelength boys followed the Santana 20 fellas in designing a deck that was specifically built to be swapped out with the old deck.  The new one has an open transom and is comfy and more ergonomic.  Makes the boat seem more modern while keeping weights and sailing characteristics the same.  Heck, I don't know if you reached out yet, but that deck might be worth some dosh for the right Wavelength owner.  They aint making them anymore and i will guarantee some OD guy is drooling over a new deck for his first love.  At least that is how it is in the 20 fleet...  

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If the hull to deck joint on the 24 is anything like the joint on a Santana 30/30, and I'd suppose they are, I don't think this would be all that tough to do.  On my 30/30, The metal toe rail was bolted through the hull to deck joint ever 4 or 6 inches if I recall correctly.  All the fastener under the deck were easy to access as there wasn't much in the way of interior in the way.  Pretty sure same is true in the WL24.  Toe rail had a gray plumbers putty like substance as bedding, so that released the toe rails and came off easily.  The deck at that point is just sitting on inward turned section of the hull.  I'd bet wedges would pop the joint, but if not a grinder should make short work of it (being careful not to grind into the hull ).  Same thing with tabbing around bulkheads to deck.  Its only a couple layers of glass thick.  It should be pretty easy to cut/grind off from under the deck...

 

If I had a place to do the work, where storage was reasonably priced, and I could rig some weather protection, I'd consider doing it...

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