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Yacht Security PNG


Broken

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I will be heading off to Northern PNG soon, and was thinking of running a electric fence around the toe rail of the yacht, (the sort you get on a farm) to keep unwated visitors off the boat of a night time when at anchor. This is just one part of the overall package. One chap I know did this at his house after being robbed seven times in eight months. It stopped the break ins and the house was spoken of as bewitched after installation.

 It's non lethal and should be a first line defence. Has anyone done this or similar? Just batting ideas around as I will be solo so thoughts or feedback but lets drop the electrolysis thoughts for the moment. Yacht is GRP and toe rail is the perfect height to reach for if you paddled up in a canoe.

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Slocum just sprinkled tacks on his deck.

Since any unwanted boarders will probably be barefoot, spreading Lego bricks on the deck would work well.

Has the added benefit of partially crippling the MoFo's as well.

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That could take a while, no internet until Indo or Timor. I am sure some one has done this before.

1 hour ago, Moonduster said:

Can you spell electrolysis?

 

From  spelling bee to word association, this word follows another in common vernacular "off"

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I have used a battery powered electric fence controller to keep the River Otters off my low floating dock. Works very well. Good to keep other creatures off too. I have a small solar panel keeping the 12 vac battery charged.

Having tested it myself I can say it is rather effective, doesn’t hurt you but damn uncomfortable when it zaps you. 

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4 hours ago, Broken said:

That could take a while, no internet until Indo or Timor. I am sure some one has done this before.

From  spelling bee to word association, this word follows another in common vernacular "off"

Well actually no Broken none of us has done this before.

Mostly because we don't know what "this" is.

Maybe you should broaden the perimeter via depth charges and mines?

Is that the sort of thing your looking for?

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Why ? 

PNG would have to be one of the most dangerous places you could possibly visit. It's right up there with Senegal.  These days the raskols are armed with Uzis and Kalashnikovs.

 

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14 hours ago, kimbottles said:

I have used a battery powered electric fence controller to keep the River Otters off my low floating dock. Works very well. Good to keep other creatures off too. I have a small solar panel keeping the 12 vac battery charged.

Having tested it myself I can say it is rather effective, doesn’t hurt you but damn uncomfortable when it zaps you. 

Now you just need an electromagnetic field or something to keep the iPhones from sinking :-P

 

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The worst cruising story I followed on my ssb/ham rig about PNG was when I was in Vanuatu.

It was about older couple that had been cruising for many years, they were very experienced, and the husband always dove on the anchor to check it, after setting it.

Unfortunately this time, and with his wife watching from the bow as she always did, after diving in he resurfaced tangled with a large salty doing a death roll and was gone.

The local villagers got involved and helped to find the missing husband as they knew where the local salty stashed his catches.

The cruising community in that area, immediately jumped into action to help the poor wife who was now shattered and stuck in PNG on their boat. 

So, not only is it fairly dangerous on land, its also dangerous in the water....      

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The problem with PNG is that a village or area that was safe one week can be very dangerous a month later. It was the one place we decided the area was too dicey to visit.

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On 4/20/2019 at 6:17 AM, savoir said:

Why ? 

PNG would have to be one of the most dangerous places you could possibly visit. It's right up there with Senegal.  These days the raskols are armed with Uzis and Kalashnikovs.

 

From what we're reading, that is true to a point, and other parts not so much.

There are some parts you avoid, and some that are reportedly safe. We've talked to friends that have had some good experiences there.

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When friends in Australia were planning to visit PNG I helped them compile a Google map of PNG with known incidents over the past 5 years. Colour coded as to nice places. serious incident theft, and violent attacks (green/yellow/red dots). The whole country was a mishmash of colours before long. I wasn't just consulting noonsite but also cruiser's blogs, news reports and whatever else I could find. There was no clear pattern unfortunately except some of the outer islands were safe one year - and then a bunch of red or yellow incidents the next. 

I'm not trying to suggest you not go to PNG, but if you do go, you really have to have your wits about you, take as much precautions as possible, and be prepared for a potential violent confrontation. There are lots of cool places to go that this is not the case, and we chose some of them to visit.

Here's the long out of date map:

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?msa=0&ll=-12.931076899259041%2C148.00781299999994&spn=24.143467%2C43.022461&mid=1tlWMonDGLq3MQMMcuYbgnU6f0u0&z=5

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The few big boats that go there generally take security personnel equipped with tactical boat hooks . Talked a skipper of one boat that had all night watches running at anchor with spotlight going full time and most anchorages they would have canoes circling just out of spotlight range . Mostly being nosey or wanting to trade but you just can’t take any chances . Gotta remember most folk over there are pumped up on betel nut too making them unpredictable 

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

From what we're reading, that is true to a point, and other parts not so much.

There are some parts you avoid, and some that are reportedly safe. We've talked to friends that have had some good experiences there.

On the other hand you have reports like this.  OP wants to go to the area around Wewak which might just be the most dangerous town in the whole country.

https://www.osac.gov/Pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=22022

or this

http://www.looppng.com/png-news/armed-robbery-dominates-plea-cases-73153

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What would be the allure of a place like that? Just curious.

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Guess I won’t be going there anytime soon.

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1 hour ago, woahboy said:

What would be the allure of a place like that? Just curious.

Very little IMO. Got offered a job in Port Moresby back in the 80's. I asked if it included a pistol and a concealed carry permit. I was serious too. Wasn't taking the job regardless though and the answer was no anyway.

I spent a fair bit of time working in the Solomon Islands. Better by far though I wouldn't wander about Honiara after dark.

Ex-pat houses usually had high chain-link fences around them to slow down burglaries and the like.

Why bother? Australia is far more civilised as long as you don't piss off the Border Force clowns by overstaying your visa.

FKT

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4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Very little IMO. Got offered a job in Port Moresby back in the 80's. I asked if it included a pistol and a concealed carry permit. I was serious too. Wasn't taking the job regardless though and the answer was no anyway.

I spent a fair bit of time working in the Solomon Islands. Better by far though I wouldn't wander about Honiara after dark.

Ex-pat houses usually had high chain-link fences around them to slow down burglaries and the like.

Why bother? Australia is far more civilised as long as you don't piss off the Border Force clowns by overstaying your visa.

FKT

 

Chain link ? You forgot the razor wire. Every white man's house is surrounded by it.

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6 hours ago, woahboy said:

What would be the allure of a place like that? Just curious.

Read the entries from my friends on S/V Field Trip.

There are some very nice locations there, and some very warm and welcoming people. At least according to them, and others that have spent months traveling the region.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Why bother? Australia is far more civilised as long as you don't piss off the Border Force clowns by overstaying your visa.

Australia is a lovely country, but it's not the best one for cruisers to visit by a long shot.

We enjoyed our stay there, but cruising visitors are a rounding error in how you all do things. There is literally zero done to encourage us or make it more welcoming. Which is fine - but there is a reason that most international cruisers don't stick around Oz all that long. It's expensive. It's not...unfriendly...to cruisers, it is just utterly indifferent to us. No one gives a damn if cruisers come or not.

It's also not terribly easy to see by boat, except the coasts.

Living and working in a country is a very different prospect than visiting by yacht.

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1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

Australia is a lovely country, but it's not the best one for cruisers to visit by a long shot.

We enjoyed our stay there, but cruising visitors are a rounding error in how you all do things. There is literally zero done to encourage us or make it more welcoming. Which is fine - but there is a reason that most international cruisers don't stick around Oz all that long. It's expensive. It's not...unfriendly...to cruisers, it is just utterly indifferent to us. No one gives a damn if cruisers come or not.

It's also not terribly easy to see by boat, except the coasts.

Living and working in a country is a very different prospect than visiting by yacht.

Fair summary - we *don't* care if you come here or not. Economically you're not even a rounding error in the tourism income stream. Even I don't care, frankly. If you turn up where I live and are nice people, I'll help you if I can, lend you a mooring, probably a car etc etc. But if nobody comes, I'm fine with that too. Currently got a French Canadian couple and a NZ single-hander about the place.

And of course it isn't easy to see other than the coast. It's a huge place and sparsely populated.

WRT PNG the islands to the north would be a great cruising ground I think, if you were well provisioned. One problem is malaria, I was always very careful when I was working in the Solomons. Robbery etc would be a hell of a lot more of a concern around the cities than out in the sticks.

FKT

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5 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Australia is a lovely country, but it's not the best one for cruisers to visit by a long shot.

I have been following the Free Range Sailing vlog for about a year. From watching Troy & Pascale sail the remote Kimberley coast in the West all the way round to Thursday Island  in the NE, I would have to opine that you missed the best bits of cruising in OZ - that would rank with the some of the best cruising destinations in the world IMO.

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1 hour ago, Jim in Halifax said:

I have been following the Free Range Sailing vlog for about a year. From watching Troy & Pascale sail the remote Kimberley coast in the West all the way round to Thursday Island  in the NE, I would have to opine that you missed the best bits of cruising in OZ - that would rank with the some of the best cruising destinations in the world IMO.

Agreed but it's only for people who really don't want to move from marina to marina and/or be near good reliable comms other than an expensive sat phone of some type.

Also that area has big tide ranges and a lot of dangerous animals.

Plus the climate sucks for ~6 months of the year or more coincident with cyclone season, and it's a long haul to somewhere outside the zone.

I spent a lot of time at sea in that area back in the 1980's. I loved it. There was almost nobody at all there back then, by comparison it's overrun with people nowadays.

Most overseas cruisers arrive/clear in from Bundaberg south, many never venture further south than Brisbane, some to Sydney, very few to Tasmania. Almost nobody tries crossing the Great Australian Bight, visiting Albany and the islands, heading to Perth and either continuing north or heading NW towards Cocos, though it can be done. They head north and go through Torres Strait to the Indian Ocean or New Caledonia and parts NE from there. They see a small strip of Australian coast and think they've seen the place.

But that's not the question asked. Personally, I wouldn't visit Bougainville or go into Rabaul except if I really had to. The islands west of there, probably, malaria issues aside. The electric fence energiser strikes me as being a bit too clever by half. Sure it'll likely deter the casual thief but it'll really piss off the determined one with a gun. You need to think through what you're trying to achieve. Personally, I'd rather just go somewhere it isn't needed.

FKT

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8 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

Australia is a lovely country, but it's not the best one for cruisers to visit by a long shot.

We enjoyed our stay there, but cruising visitors are a rounding error in how you all do things. There is literally zero done to encourage us or make it more welcoming. Which is fine - but there is a reason that most international cruisers don't stick around Oz all that long. It's expensive. It's not...unfriendly...to cruisers, it is just utterly indifferent to us. No one gives a damn if cruisers come or not.

It's also not terribly easy to see by boat, except the coasts.

Living and working in a country is a very different prospect than visiting by yacht.

Expensive ?  Well you will hang around in Pittwater.  That place be millionaires row.

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6 hours ago, savoir said:

Expensive ?  Well you will hang around in Pittwater.  That place be millionaires row.

I'm not interested in turning this into an anti-Australia rant, because I like the place and enjoyed my visit there. But I think you're not being accurate with this statement.

But may be that I am not unique in my perspective on how expensive Australia is...that is the general (and accurate) perception in the cruising community of the country. As a place to cruise, relative to a lot of places, it is quite expensive. And with the way the USD has been running against the AUD, it's been cheaper than usual as late.

But it really has fuck-all to do with where you stay. Anywhere on the coast is prime, and it's tough to be anywhere but on a coast in a boat.

But yes, this is the country where it was cheaper to take a week's vacation to NZ and come back in than renew my visa in country.

Spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars in visas, inspections, biosecurity fees and clearances is not the norm visiting countries. My first time coming into Brisbane with three people in cost over $1000 AUD in fees & medical expenses (Will was headed back to Uni so he could use the $20 e-Visa with no medical), our first visa renewal a year later was $1,035 AUD in fees PLUS another $900+ AUD in mandated medical exams and X-rays (in case we caught TB since arriving in Oz after our last pre-visit X-Rays for the entry visa in New Caledonia, I suppose?). Then they only granted us six months on that renewal instead of the year we asked for, and the next one would have cost almost $2,300 for three people not including any more medical requirements.

That's just the paperwork to enter and stay in the country.

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8 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Most overseas cruisers arrive/clear in from Bundaberg south, many never venture further south than Brisbane, some to Sydney, very few to Tasmania.

Our inability to get our arses down to Tassie is going to haunt me forever.

We've talked about a return to Australia some day to visit by plane, train & caravan so we can get out west and see some of the outback. The place is in many ways too damned big to see by boat.

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2 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Our inability to get our arses down to Tassie is going to haunt me forever.

We've talked about a return to Australia some day to visit by plane, train & caravan so we can get out west and see some of the outback. The place is in many ways too damned big to see by boat.

The Ghan from Adelaide to Darwin is a great trip. It's a fun way to see the Outback and if you want, you can get off in Alice Springs and caravan around all you want, then get back on and finish the trip or go back to Adelaide.  Katherine Gorge is spectacular, except for the occasional salties in areas, so it's worth finishing the trip going north.  If we had more time, I wish we could've spent more time in the NW territories but personally, I would want a guide of some kind to help us avoid all the poisonous and man-eating creatures lurking in that area.  

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2 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

I'm not interested in turning this into an anti-Australia rant, because I like the place and enjoyed my visit there. But I think you're not being accurate with this statement.

But may be that I am not unique in my perspective on how expensive Australia is...that is the general (and accurate) perception in the cruising community of the country. As a place to cruise, relative to a lot of places, it is quite expensive. And with the way the USD has been running against the AUD, it's been cheaper than usual as late.

But it really has fuck-all to do with where you stay. Anywhere on the coast is prime, and it's tough to be anywhere but on a coast in a boat.

But yes, this is the country where it was cheaper to take a week's vacation to NZ and come back in than renew my visa in country.

Spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars in visas, inspections, biosecurity fees and clearances is not the norm visiting countries. My first time coming into Brisbane with three people in cost over $1000 AUD in fees & medical expenses (Will was headed back to Uni so he could use the $20 e-Visa with no medical), our first visa renewal a year later was $1,035 AUD in fees PLUS another $900+ AUD in mandated medical exams and X-rays (in case we caught TB since arriving in Oz after our last pre-visit X-Rays for the entry visa in New Caledonia, I suppose?). Then they only granted us six months on that renewal instead of the year we asked for, and the next one would have cost almost $2,300 for three people not including any more medical requirements.

That's just the paperwork to enter and stay in the country.

Actually he *is* accurate - Pittwater is one of the places where the millionaires live. It's also overcrowded with boats IMO but I'm spoilt - I was hanging out there 50 years ago so my perspective is different.

You're also correct - Australia is expensive. It's a First World country, I really don't understand why you'd expect it to be anything *else* frankly. I mean, think about it. Our minimum wage is *substantially* than the USA and miles above the Pacific Islands - Papeete possibly excepted, anywhere with the French isn't known to be cheap. New Caledonia is way more expensive than Australia, for example. A roast chicken in New Caledonia was $27, here it's $10-12. Food at least 20% more expensive.

Now WRT biosecurity, I hear what you say but frankly I don't care. I mean, I *really* don't care, in fact I actively support it. If you don't like it, don't come. We're a trading nation, we have been successful in keeping out certain pests and diseases and we're pretty determined to keep it that way. We're not making special exemptions for cruising boats. The same rules and fees apply to Aussie boats returning from overseas so nobody is picking on foreigners here. Tasmania has an extra level of quarantine inspection on top of that because we've managed to keep more pest species out and once again we're serious about it staying like that. A recent small fruit fly infestation caused a major response and extermination campaign. If it got established some of our markets would have gone.

As for visas et al, once again we're about on a par with the USA. An Aussie can pretty easily get a 3 month visa for the USA, try getting a 12 month one or a 2 year one, see how you go with paperwork, applications, costs etc. And given your most recent hassles with the French WRT French Polynesia, you're thinking WE are bad? Well, it's true, we are, but we're not the only ones.

I understand that a lot of countries are a lot more lax. That's fine, they're not the ones people are desperate to get *into*. How many well developed First World countries have you entered by boat and attempted to stay in for over 2 years?

As for the bureaucracy, shrug, some of it is idiocy without a doubt. They used to make me have an annual TB test as part of my job until the doctor decided it was medical abuse and refused to do it. You basically have to go with the flow. Try lobbing into LAX as a foreigner then tell me our border people are bad and keep a straight face. The only country on the planet who's strip-searched my first wife is the USA, and she's a world-renowned scientist. On her latest visit the Chinese gave her a personal escort.

Now travelling in Australia with a boat as a starting base means you're going to see little except the coast unless you leave your boat for quite long periods. This place is *big* and sparsely populated. Aussies have the same problem. You do need a lot of time to get about, 2-3 years certainly isn't unreasonable. We're not going to start issuing long-term visas though, there aren't enough people like you that come here on their own vessels and we'd need a way of distinguishing economic migrants from cruising yachties. Too hard.

What cruising yachties have to realise is that from the Australian POV, we're somewhere between mildly interested and utterly indifferent to you people. Economically, you're not worth any money. Politically, you don't exist. Socially, there are too few of you to make an impact outside a very restricted circle of people you meet. I and my friends host visitors but *we* are the noise level group even amongst the sailing types here.

So as I said, I agree with you, and I'm not taking it as criticism of Australia, just how it was from your POV. I hope I've given a bit of background from mine. It's a pity you didn't get this far south, you would have enjoyed Tasmania. Currently I have a spare mooring for visitors too.

FKT

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3 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

I'm not interested in turning this into an anti-Australia rant, because I like the place and enjoyed my visit there. But I think you're not being accurate with this statement.

But may be that I am not unique in my perspective on how expensive Australia is...that is the general (and accurate) perception in the cruising community of the country. As a place to cruise, relative to a lot of places, it is quite expensive. And with the way the USD has been running against the AUD, it's been cheaper than usual as late.

But it really has fuck-all to do with where you stay. Anywhere on the coast is prime, and it's tough to be anywhere but on a coast in a boat.

But yes, this is the country where it was cheaper to take a week's vacation to NZ and come back in than renew my visa in country.

Spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars in visas, inspections, biosecurity fees and clearances is not the norm visiting countries. My first time coming into Brisbane with three people in cost over $1000 AUD in fees & medical expenses (Will was headed back to Uni so he could use the $20 e-Visa with no medical), our first visa renewal a year later was $1,035 AUD in fees PLUS another $900+ AUD in mandated medical exams and X-rays (in case we caught TB since arriving in Oz after our last pre-visit X-Rays for the entry visa in New Caledonia, I suppose?). Then they only granted us six months on that renewal instead of the year we asked for, and the next one would have cost almost $2,300 for three people not including any more medical requirements.

That's just the paperwork to enter and stay in the country.

 

Not being accurate ?  Did you see the price of a beer at the Newport Arms ?  What about the price of fish and chips at Palm Beach Wharf ? Ouch !

As for the rest of it, you should have trashed your passports and claimed asylum.  Just toss in a few words of Spanish like taco, don julio and hasta la vista baby. The customs guys fall for it every time and the Australian government pays all the medicals AND you get a free t shirt.  What's not to like ?

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43 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Actually he *is* accurate - Pittwater is one of the places where the millionaires live. It's also overcrowded with boats IMO but I'm spoilt - I was hanging out there 50 years ago so my perspective is different.

You're also correct - Australia is expensive. It's a First World country, I really don't understand why you'd expect it to be anything *else* frankly. I mean, think about it. Our minimum wage is *substantially* than the USA and miles above the Pacific Islands - Papeete possibly excepted, anywhere with the French isn't known to be cheap. New Caledonia is way more expensive than Australia, for example. A roast chicken in New Caledonia was $27, here it's $10-12. Food at least 20% more expensive.

Now WRT biosecurity, I hear what you say but frankly I don't care. I mean, I *really* don't care, in fact I actively support it. If you don't like it, don't come. We're a trading nation, we have been successful in keeping out certain pests and diseases and we're pretty determined to keep it that way. We're not making special exemptions for cruising boats. The same rules and fees apply to Aussie boats returning from overseas so nobody is picking on foreigners here. Tasmania has an extra level of quarantine inspection on top of that because we've managed to keep more pest species out and once again we're serious about it staying like that. A recent small fruit fly infestation caused a major response and extermination campaign. If it got established some of our markets would have gone.

As for visas et al, once again we're about on a par with the USA. An Aussie can pretty easily get a 3 month visa for the USA, try getting a 12 month one or a 2 year one, see how you go with paperwork, applications, costs etc. And given your most recent hassles with the French WRT French Polynesia, you're thinking WE are bad? Well, it's true, we are, but we're not the only ones.

I understand that a lot of countries are a lot more lax. That's fine, they're not the ones people are desperate to get *into*. How many well developed First World countries have you entered by boat and attempted to stay in for over 2 years?

As for the bureaucracy, shrug, some of it is idiocy without a doubt. They used to make me have an annual TB test as part of my job until the doctor decided it was medical abuse and refused to do it. You basically have to go with the flow. Try lobbing into LAX as a foreigner then tell me our border people are bad and keep a straight face. The only country on the planet who's strip-searched my first wife is the USA, and she's a world-renowned scientist. On her latest visit the Chinese gave her a personal escort.

Now travelling in Australia with a boat as a starting base means you're going to see little except the coast unless you leave your boat for quite long periods. This place is *big* and sparsely populated. Aussies have the same problem. You do need a lot of time to get about, 2-3 years certainly isn't unreasonable. We're not going to start issuing long-term visas though, there aren't enough people like you that come here on their own vessels and we'd need a way of distinguishing economic migrants from cruising yachties. Too hard.

What cruising yachties have to realise is that from the Australian POV, we're somewhere between mildly interested and utterly indifferent to you people. Economically, you're not worth any money. Politically, you don't exist. Socially, there are too few of you to make an impact outside a very restricted circle of people you meet. I and my friends host visitors but *we* are the noise level group even amongst the sailing types here.

So as I said, I agree with you, and I'm not taking it as criticism of Australia, just how it was from your POV. I hope I've given a bit of background from mine. It's a pity you didn't get this far south, you would have enjoyed Tasmania. Currently I have a spare mooring for visitors too.

FKT

 

I have been hauled out to the back room at LAX for a search ( plus SF, Houston, Toronto and Shannon ) more times that I can remember. 12 - 15 would be about right. BJ has no concept of what a horrible degrading experience it is because he bats for the home team and will probably never have to do it. It's such fun to sit in a room full of Mexicans for an hour or more. Miss the connecting flight ? Tough titties, those TSA sociopaths don't care and there is nothing I can do about it other than stump up the money for a hotel room and try again tomorrow.  

Last time I ran foul of those dirtbags they cut the term of my brand new totally legitimate US visa in half which cost me a paltry $6,000. Such fun.

The United States isn't just indifferent to foreign cruisers, it is downright hostile.

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On 4/19/2019 at 11:54 AM, fastyacht said:

Now you just need an electromagnetic field or something to keep the iPhones from sinking :-P

 

Hey! I have not dropped a cell phone overboard in a number of years......however that gal who works with you could have used that force field!

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25 minutes ago, kimbottles said:

Hey! I have not dropped a cell phone overboard in a number of years......however that gal who works with you could have used that force field!

Haha. That was a fun day. Even with the phone in the water.

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6 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

What cruising yachties have to realise is that from the Australian POV, we're somewhere between mildly interested and utterly indifferent to you people. Economically, you're not worth any money. Politically, you don't exist. Socially, there are too few of you to make an impact outside a very restricted circle of people you meet. I and my friends host visitors but *we* are the noise level group even amongst the sailing types here.

So as I said, I agree with you, and I'm not taking it as criticism of Australia, just how it was from your POV. I hope I've given a bit of background from mine. It's a pity you didn't get this far south, you would have enjoyed Tasmania. Currently I have a spare mooring for visitors too.

That's pretty much what I said up-thread.

We liked Australia.

My point to Savoir is that hanging in Pittwater isn't what makes it expensive, it's expensive everywhere.  It's expensive to get into the country, and stay in the country relative to other cruising destinations. Yes, I assume the US is every bit as expensive, though I don't know the details. From talking to other non-American cruisers, it can indeed be an expensive pain in the ass and is only getting worse, though I think YMMV which what flag you fly. In Oz though I didn't see any appreciable difference in the price of things like meat & veggies away from the city when we traveled outside it. Maybe we didn't get far enough out.

Eternal regrets over not making Tasmania. It was on my list of "really, really want to do" for Australia but the schedule fuckery I was dealing with plus maintenance issues killed it.

Next timed, maybe.

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6 hours ago, savoir said:

 

Not being accurate ?  Did you see the price of a beer at the Newport Arms ?  What about the price of fish and chips at Palm Beach Wharf ? Ouch !

As for the rest of it, you should have trashed your passports and claimed asylum.  Just toss in a few words of Spanish like taco, don julio and hasta la vista baby. The customs guys fall for it every time and the Australian government pays all the medicals AND you get a free t shirt.  What's not to like ?

$5.00 for a schooner at happy hour, I think a pint runs around $10-12 normally. Those prices affect me very little, as I don't hang around bars and I don't tend to go places that are that over priced very often. I think we went to Palm Beach Wharf or something up there once for a $14 burger with a $15 view. Those places don't really affect my cost of living when I cruise through a place, as they are discretionary and easily avoidable. You don't mention the $10 lunch special at Chilli Sha Sha in Newport, a place you'd be much more likely to find me than a waterfront tourist trap. There are half a dozen places there with cheap lunch specials, and a good number of the evening places there have special nights you can work around. Cheap? No...but again, it's discretionary spending so it doesn't really affect the cost of place.

The price of a dozen eggs, a kilo of mince, or an avocado seems mostly the same wherever we were, that's what sets your cost of living.

 

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5 hours ago, savoir said:

 

I have been hauled out to the back room at LAX for a search ( plus SF, Houston, Toronto and Shannon ) more times that I can remember. 12 - 15 would be about right. BJ has no concept of what a horrible degrading experience it is because he bats for the home team and will probably never have to do it. It's such fun to sit in a room full of Mexicans for an hour or more. Miss the connecting flight ? Tough titties, those TSA sociopaths don't care and there is nothing I can do about it other than stump up the money for a hotel room and try again tomorrow.  

Last time I ran foul of those dirtbags they cut the term of my brand new totally legitimate US visa in half which cost me a paltry $6,000. Such fun.

The United States isn't just indifferent to foreign cruisers, it is downright hostile.

I don't disagree with you.

I'm an American and I don't want to visit the U.S. I can't imagine why most foreigners would want to at this point. Our border security is horrendous to deal with, and only is getting worse.

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46 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

 In Oz though I didn't see any appreciable difference in the price of things like meat & veggies away from the city when we traveled outside it. Maybe we didn't get far enough out.

It gets more expensive not less. So does fuel. Freight costs aren't cheap.

Diesel currently $1.60/litre.

OTOH fish are free if you can catch them and there's no salt water licence bullshit in Tasmania (yet).

FKT

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PNG is tragic. I’ve worked there. It is a beautiful place, but the violence is random. 

If that electric fence hurts a local villager you won’t be able to go ashore.

I don’t think PNG is for you if this is your leading question.

 

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13 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

It gets more expensive not less. So does fuel. Freight costs aren't cheap.

Diesel currently $1.60/litre.

OTOH fish are free if you can catch them and there's no salt water licence bullshit in Tasmania (yet).

FKT

I got a nice little plastic card for that in NSW.

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