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My Song fell off a cargo?!


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That's gonna hurt! 

While it was being transported aboard a cargo, from the Caribbean to the Balearics it seems that Pierluigi Loro Piana's My Song, Baltic 130 (40 meters), fell into the sea: it happened Saturday night, in the Mediterranean. For now we have no other details to accompany the impressive photo that came to us from one of our sources.

https://www.giornaledellavela.com/2019/05/27/esclusivo-la-superbarca-di-40-metri-my-song-e-caduta-dal-cargo-che-la-trasportava/?fbclid=IwAR2O74tKksc9L0DKteTNhAKw2XihWb-yE9qdYK5difzXy4dB_dw4Hv8NKRY

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A couple of things to bear in mind before any of the haters start throwing more shit around; 1. Plenty of talented and committed people have put a lot of work into building and maintaining this b

These toys employ a lot of us, directly or indirectly. When billionaires decide to spend their money in a way that puts it into the yachting industry we should embrace it and not bitch. Would you pref

[Interviewer:] Welcome, thank you for joining us in what must be a trying time. [Peters & May Spokesman:] It’s a great pleasure, thank you. [Interviewer:] This ship that was involved in

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My Swan Song jumped ship.

My first reaction upon reading superyacht was "good, one fucking superyacht less", but she seems to have been rather nice and very (Italian) stylish. Keen racing owner too, so hopefully she can be recovered and rebuild, but it doesn't look very promising in that picture.

 

 

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She looks quite a bit down by the stern, and her bilgepumps might not even be switched on. Not looking good unless they get a salvage ship to her soon.

In any case she is going to miss her own Lora Piana regatta in Porto Cervo.

https://www.superyachttimes.com/yacht-news/loro-piana-superyacht-regatta-2019-lineup-announced

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That’s got to be a write-off!!

There were a couple of posters here from Peters and May and Severnstar I think, wonder if they’ll drop by with thoughts on this one? 

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Nothing ever falls off cargo ships; practically no one has ever hit a container.  A crew must have been delivering this boat and made up a story after they lost the rig and abandoned it.  Bermudians should prepare dock space for when it turns up there.  

 

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2 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

My Swan Song jumped ship.

My first reaction upon reading superyacht was "good, one fucking superyacht less"

These toys employ a lot of us, directly or indirectly. When billionaires decide to spend their money in a way that puts it into the yachting industry we should embrace it and not bitch. Would you prefer they just left it in a bank volt?

That side, was a beautiful yacht with some really innovative features. A lot of very talented and passionate people worked on the project and I feel sorry for them and all involved for seeing her come to such an end. And I feel for the owner, he put a lot of time, passion and money into the project and it was looking to have produced just what he wanted for years to come.

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It happens more often? ...at the beginning of 2019, a motor boat, a Monte Carlo Yachts 70, had flown down from the deck of the ship that was transporting it from Europe to Miami for the Florida boat show, and had sunk in the middle of the Atlantic.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Apparently God decided he had too much money.

Do you believe in unicorns and fairies as well? 

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5 hours ago, Chimp too said:

These toys employ a lot of us, directly or indirectly. When billionaires decide to spend their money in a way that puts it into the yachting industry we should embrace it and not bitch. Would you prefer they just left it in a bank volt?

That side, was a beautiful yacht with some really innovative features. A lot of very talented and passionate people worked on the project and I feel sorry for them and all involved for seeing her come to such an end. And I feel for the owner, he put a lot of time, passion and money into the project and it was looking to have produced just what he wanted for years to come.

 

I counted at least 20 crew, on deck, in the photo of the boat under full sail!!!

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4 hours ago, Al Paca said:

The front is still on.  It can't be that bad.

Are you shore its still on and the frount didn’t fall off ??

 

Its always a good thing to watch this again, it’s a classic 

 

pulpit 

 

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11 hours ago, Chimp too said:

These toys employ a lot of us, directly or indirectly. When billionaires decide to spend their money in a way that puts it into the yachting industry we should embrace it and not bitch. Would you prefer they just left it in a bank volt?

Does this sort of boat benefit the industry in the long run?  From my experience in the industry I tend to think that big boats may distort the industry; clubs, the industry and media put the emphasis on them and therefore turn their attention from smaller boats. Big boats also reinforce the stereotype that the sport is only for the rich. One of my clubs had a very hard time persuading local government that the typical owner raced a 1960's 24-25 footer and therefore couldn't afford a vast hike in mooring fees. Around here, the expressed attitude is sometimes "if you have a boat you can afford any further costs because you are all rich", and that means that public facilities are being withdrawn.

She was a nice boat, though.

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2 hours ago, pulpit said:

Are you shore its still on and the frount didn’t fall off ??

 

Its always a good thing to watch this again, it’s a classic 

 

pulpit 

 

I wonder if it’s semi submerged state is because there is a cradle still strapped to it...

 

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1 hour ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

Particular Average, or General Average?

More Likely:

Institute Time Clauses: Perils of the Sea, or possibly Jettison depending upon circumstances and coverage. ie) cradle failure, the  yachts insurers will Hold Liable the  person/company responsible for the building and possibly others that installed the cradle on the ship if they can prove the failure causative.

Particular Average may also apply but really depends on the type of coverage extended.

General Average applies when the master of the Ship jettisons cargo to save the ship, or deliberately runs the ship aground to save the ship while losing or sacrificing some of the cargo -not sure this is the case here.

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Pretty sad course of events. One can only imagine how many man hours went into the boat? The failure of a bolt or cable? Wouldn"t you want the thing tied down in a manner so that if one fitting failed the others would hold it? Let's hope the insurance cover is up to the cost of replacement? This could be the next story in the saga?

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4 hours ago, Curious said:

Does this sort of boat benefit the industry in the long run?  From my experience in the industry I tend to think that big boats may distort the industry; clubs, the industry and media put the emphasis on them and therefore turn their attention from smaller boats.

On the other hand, a boat like this will have cost something like €50m or so, which is all money that goes into design, engineering, building, components and every aspect of our industry. It will be a big enough contract to some suppliers to keep them going and employing more people for a few years. Clubs and sailors is a tiny part of this.

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So, getting back to the event, did she have her rig still up when she was aboard the ship?  I'd expect so, since the regatta is next week and big boat rigs don't just go in and out like a Melges 30.  She must have landed on her side or inverted and lost it all when she hit the water.

And what was the weather doing?  Looks a bit breezy from the pics.  A Mistral?

A big spanking for somebody or somebodies for failure in lashing down.  Not good.  "Back in the day" we used to weld the cradle to the ship's deck.  Do they do that now?

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8 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Back in the day" we used to weld the cradle to the ship's deck.  Do they do that now?

Yup. And the lashing points are usually welded to the deck too (for straps/wires/etc)

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6 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

So, getting back to the event, did she have her rig still up when she was aboard the ship.  I'd expect so, since the regatta is next week and big boat rigs don't just go in and out like a Melges 30.  She must have landed on her side or inverted and lost it all when she hit the water.

And what was the weather doing?  Looks a bit breezy from the pics.  A Mistral?

A big spanking for somebody or somebodies for failure in lashing down.  Not good.

Yep somebody at the insurance company is gonna have a head ache.

Too many things unconfirmed  at this point to jump to conclusions.

In saying that losing a 140' boat over the side does seem to point to the cradle or the lashings being likely problematic, have sailed a few boats across that stretch of water and it can be very snotty especially if it was/is a mistral.

Feel for the owner,  that was a pretty looking boat.

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2 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Yup. And the lashing points are usually welded to the deck too (for straps/wires/etc)

Right.  Thanks.  So one possible answer might be that the cradle itself failed under wind load.  I wonder.....

Well, we will find out in time what broke.

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Cradles for boats that size are generally splashes (hull forms) on top of containers, this negates the need for a full size dedicated cradle, allows easier stowage of cradle when not in use, trucking of parts of cradle to say another yard for refit and sometimes utilises the boat's own workshop/sail containers for the base. Not sure of that is the case here, but very likely. I am not explaining away the cause of loss over side, just painting the picture of how it was loaded. a Maxi 72 cradle is a big bit of gear to ship around but manageable compared to a dedicated full cradle for a 140' boat.

re Weather, we left the Mahon 52 event right after sailing on Saturday to escape expected weather that would have held us there until Tuesday/Wednesday. as it was the front stalled and we never saw the wind expected, made for a pretty nice quick trip back to Mallorca overnight. There was a Mistral blowing further up in the Med, where I can only assume the boat was lost.

I believe the boat was being transported rig up as lifting that thing out is a major undertaking, as noted above, not a Melges 30 rig easy in/out with a very big crane needed as well as expertise on site to oversee the lift. Another factor being actual time spent breaking down the rig and stowing for transport, to all be repeated at the other end of the delivery when re stepping.

Again I claim no further knowledge about the incident other than what has been gleaned and postulated above, but have been on and around large yachts and raceboats for some time including worldwide/international shipping/trucking of them in various states.

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Yup, one question is whether she was rig-up as the early rumours stated.

At least some lawyers shall be able to fund a new yacht of their own ;)

As for me I somehow wonder about current Maxis crossing on a cargo deck and being confined to day races :unsure:

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4 hours ago, Chimp too said:

 which is all money that goes into design, engineering, building, components and every aspect of our industry......Clubs and sailors is a tiny part of this.

Your industry, I guess. Not mine and for most of us here, sailing is our sport or hobby, not our industry. Clubs and sailors are what it is all about, the industry only exists because we collectively choose to spend our money on it.

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13 minutes ago, dogwatch said:

Your industry, I guess. Not mine and for most of us here, sailing is our sport or hobby, not our industry. Clubs and sailors are what it is all about, the industry only exists because we collectively choose to spend our money on it.

Hate to say it mate, but yacht racing and clubs is a tiny part of the overall industry. It doesn’t drive it and it doesn’t pay for it. The big investors do. Without them a large chunk of the companies that sailors and clubs rely on wouldn’t exist.

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

Yup. And the lashing points are usually welded to the deck too (for straps/wires/etc)

And there is a required minimum number of tie downs on each sides. We go for 12 per side and 4 to the cradle itself. And we are only 68ft. Hard to tell in the photo because often the straps are doubled up to the same ring on the ship deck. 

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Apparently still afloat 10 hours ago, and we may expect the excitement of a salvage operation.

11209763_459379767560211_599362081961894
 
Alan Morton
One of my rescue pilot spotted SY My Song adrift 40nm SSE of Minorca this afternoon during a rescue mission with an insurance officer
Like · Reply · Mark as spam · 10h
 
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From the news:

''according to what an informed source told us, the cargo ship Brattingsborg of the company Peters & May, after losing the 40-meter boat in the early hours of Sunday 26 (in a storm from the northwest force 8 in the Gulf of Lion), remained in area, by order of the local Coast Guard, to "guard" the boat after having tried in vain to recover it. But from 14.00 on, visual contact was lost with the wreck of My Song: Brattingsborg left for Genoa at 17.''

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Where was My Song going from and to??  I would think it'd be a helluva lot more cost effective to sail her, on her own bottom, rather than put on the deck of a merchant ship??

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10 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

Where was My Song going from and to??  I would think it'd be a helluva lot more cost effective to sail her, on her own bottom, rather than put on the deck of a merchant ship??

 

It had a deadline, a regatta. And it might be cheaper to ship also, and less wear and tear....ooops. 

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27 minutes ago, NORBowGirl said:

 

It had a deadline, a regatta. And it might be cheaper to ship also, and less wear and tear....ooops. 

 

In '84, we left Bermuda to go to Hawaii on the new Frers 80' "Boomerang" for the Clipper Cup, which we won, IIRC?  Other crews doubted we would get to Oahu in time, but it was 20-something days, IIRC?  Cockpit was full of spare fuel bladders...

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8 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

In '84, we left Bermuda to go to Hawaii on the new Frers 80' "Boomerang".  Other crews doubted we would get to Oahu in time, but it was 20-something days, IIRC?  Cockpit was full of spare fuel bladders...

:)

I guess shipping most often is considered both cheaper and safer than sailing, over a long distance. I think more boats sink while they being sailed, than when they are being shipped. 

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The rig was up and that is one MF of a rig.

My spidey sense tells me that the whip from that rig broke the tie downs or deck fittings as the mother ship rolled in the storm. 

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1 hour ago, Mambo Kings said:

Rarely cheaper to move by transport ship but it’s a race boat and they were dry sailing it to the next event.

Not so sure with a boat like that, delivery crew, wear and tear versus the shipping cost.......in theory.

Anybody have a number $$$ for the shipping?

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That ship was not designed for yacht transport as the purpose built ships. Common practice for the Capt and crew to stay aboard on yacht transports. That could be a bit tricky 20-25' above the ships deck. 

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2 hours ago, NORBowGirl said:

:)

I guess shipping most often is considered both cheaper and safer than sailing, over a long distance. I think more boats sink while they being sailed, than when they are being shipped. 


For a lot of insurers sailing transit may take it thru gaps of coverage while if you pay to ferry it as cargo, coverage is much easier to obtain. 
 

9 hours ago, Chimp too said:

On the other hand, a boat like this will have cost something like €50m or so, which is all money that goes into design, engineering, building, components and every aspect of our industry. It will be a big enough contract to some suppliers to keep them going and employing more people for a few years. Clubs and sailors is a tiny part of this.

Maybe you guys can STFU about a loss and go sit on a proletariat sybian. 

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1 hour ago, TQA said:

The rig was up and that is one MF of a rig.

My spidey sense tells me that the whip from that rig broke the tie downs or deck fittings as the mother ship rolled in the storm. 

I second that one. It's physics, the rig is a big crowbar! Rig loads up and it's Force x Distance, pry's the hull off the cradle. Again, we are not talking a Melges 30 rig, there are several thousand pounds(?) of weight aloft. When that moves a few feet up that it makes a big different downstairs without the keel pushing back against water.

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55 minutes ago, Greyhound37 said:

That ship was not designed for yacht transport as the purpose built ships. Common practice for the Capt and crew to stay aboard on yacht transports. That could be a bit tricky 20-25' above the ships deck. 

Neither are most of the 7 Star...(Spleithoff) Ships, yachts are carried as deck cargo, almost always with a regular cargo, with Spleithoff paper products, in the holds. Have done more than one trip to a port unload a race boat to allow cargo which is the Line's bread and butter, to be discharged. From under the hatches.  The purpose built and crew carrying ships were originally heavy lift semisub ships for moving barges, cranes and oil platforms. Dockwise has since expanded the business to allow purpose built ships to do most of the work. Yachts have full power/water hook ups for transits if needed, newer ships have internal crew accommodation/lounges, however, yachts need to load carefully as every time a ship unloads hold is flooded down, so smaller and less deep drafted yachts can end up being on and off stands/cradles more than one a trip. It's a trade off. 

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15 minutes ago, TANGO QUEBEC said:

Neither are most of the 7 Star...(Spleithoff) Ships, yachts are carried as deck cargo, almost always with a regular cargo, with Spleithoff paper products, in the holds. Have done more than one trip to a port unload a race boat to allow cargo which is the Line's bread and butter, to be discharged. From under the hatches.  The purpose built and crew carrying ships were originally heavy lift semisub ships for moving barges, cranes and oil platforms. Dockwise has since expanded the business to allow purpose built ships to do most of the work. Yachts have full power/water hook ups for transits if needed, newer ships have internal crew accommodation/lounges, however, yachts need to load carefully as every time a ship unloads hold is flooded down, so smaller and less deep drafted yachts can end up being on and off stands/cradles more than one a trip. It's a trade off. 

Good to know

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Statement from Peters & May:

Yacht transporters Peters and May has confirmed that an investigation in now underway following the loss of the Baltic 130 MY SONG, which fell from the deck of the transporter MV Brattinsborg on 25 May. Attempts to salvage the Baltic 130 are ongoing.

Statement by CEO David Holley in reference to MY SONG loss

This press release is in response to the ongoing media speculation in reference to the loss of sailing yacht MY SONG in the Mediterranean.

We would not normally comment on cargo incidents but given the high-profile nature of this yacht and the media interest we feel that we need to formally give some clarification. There are several individuals passing judgement on what may or may not have happened and we will attempt to offer some clarity, albeit at an early stage of the investigation. Our reputation is second to none and we will not have it tarnished by unqualified individuals passing judgement without facts in hand. I will add that I am disappointed that confidential photographs were leaked to the media.

We were informed of the loss of a yacht from the deck of the MV Brattinsborg at approximately 0400hr LT on 26th May 2019. The yacht is sailing yacht MY SONG. Upon receipt of the news Peters & May instructed the captain of the MV Brattinsborg to attempt salvage whilst 3rd party salvors were appointed.

The vessel maintained visual contact with MY SONG until the air and sea search was initiated. As of 0900hr BST on 28th May 2019 the salvage attempts are still ongoing. To ensure the safety of the remaining yachts, Peters & May have instructed the carrying vessel to continue her planned voyage to Genoa. No other yachts have been affected by this incident.

A full investigation into the cause of the incident has been launched, however the primary assessment is that the yacht’s cradle (owned and provided by the yacht, warrantied by the yacht for sea transport and assembled by the yacht’s crew) collapsed during the voyage from Palma to Genoa and subsequently resulted in the loss of MY SONG overboard. I will add that this is the initial assessment and is subject to confirmation in due course.

As a leading yacht transporter for the past 40 years we take great pride in what we do and go above and beyond all standard operating procedures to ensure safe transit of all yachts carried by us. We have procedures in place to respond to this kind of incident, although we hope that they are never required.

This incident is more than regrettable, however the transport of yachts on cargo vessels continues to be one of the safest and most cost-effective solutions when carried out by a reputable company such as Peters & May.

More information will be made available in due course but in the meantime, I request that everyone respects the sensitivity of this issue to all parties concerned.

If this statement is published it should be published in full and any questions directed to press@petersandmay.com.

 

Source: Yachting Monthly Facebook page

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7 hours ago, Chimp too said:

Hate to say it mate, but yacht racing and clubs is a tiny part of the overall industry. It doesn’t drive it and it doesn’t pay for it. The big investors do. Without them a large chunk of the companies that sailors and clubs rely on wouldn’t exist.

I don't remember mentioning "yachts". As a dinghy sailor who belongs to a dinghy-orientated club, I doubt we are very dependent on the industry that relates to superyachts. There's an awful lot of such sailors and clubs out there.

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Yeah. The crippling troubles of the rich. Stop the presses, a rich man has an unexpected setback! I'd be upset about an Opti or FJ falling off the rack at my YC...not My Song.

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17 minutes ago, El Boracho said:

Yeah. The crippling troubles of the rich. Stop the presses, a rich man has an unexpected setback! I'd be upset about an Opti or FJ falling off the rack at my YC...not My Song.

 

If he is not fully insured against this loss, then he has far more money, than brains!!  Just sayin'..

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32 minutes ago, dogwatch said:

I don't remember mentioning "yachts". As a dinghy sailor who belongs to a dinghy-orientated club, I doubt we are very dependent on the industry that relates to superyachts. There's an awful lot of such sailors and clubs out there.

Trickledown 

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31 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

If he is not fully insured against this loss, then he has far more money, than brains!!  Just sayin'..

Not necessarily.

Insurance is a business decision. Insurers make money on insurance or they would not stay in business. Insurance offers the choice of a certain cost (the premiums) versus potentially no cost or much higher but infrequent/low probability cost.  

The more risks you have to insure and the greater your net worth the more you start to look like your own insurance company and can self insure as a rational decision.

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This ^^^ 

Loro Piana will be far more distressed about having to retract the invitations to the on-board swank galas his staff had meticulously planned. That bragging opportunity has been lost and cannot be easily replaced.

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3 hours ago, dogwatch said:

Care to name a few recent examples of trickle down? It's pretty easy to think of examples of trickle up.

Do you think the development of carbon spars, lightweight rigging, electronics etc would have been developed if the sole market was dingys? Like many ‘sports’ most development is driven by the wealthy. Either for competition or their own pleasure. Sailing is no different. 

The reality is it is a two way street. The rich help our sport and we help them by keeping their toys sailing. Neither side is any better or morally correct than the other. 

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4 hours ago, JMore said:

Statement from Peters & May:

Yacht transporters Peters and May has confirmed that an investigation in now underway following the loss of the Baltic 130 MY SONG, which fell from the deck of the transporter MV Brattinsborg on 25 May. Attempts to salvage the Baltic 130 are ongoing.

Statement by CEO David Holley in reference to MY SONG loss

This press release is in response to the ongoing media speculation in reference to the loss of sailing yacht MY SONG in the Mediterranean.

We would not normally comment on cargo incidents but given the high-profile nature of this yacht and the media interest we feel that we need to formally give some clarification. There are several individuals passing judgement on what may or may not have happened and we will attempt to offer some clarity, albeit at an early stage of the investigation. Our reputation is second to none and we will not have it tarnished by unqualified individuals passing judgement without facts in hand. I will add that I am disappointed that confidential photographs were leaked to the media.

We were informed of the loss of a yacht from the deck of the MV Brattinsborg at approximately 0400hr LT on 26th May 2019. The yacht is sailing yacht MY SONG. Upon receipt of the news Peters & May instructed the captain of the MV Brattinsborg to attempt salvage whilst 3rd party salvors were appointed.

The vessel maintained visual contact with MY SONG until the air and sea search was initiated. As of 0900hr BST on 28th May 2019 the salvage attempts are still ongoing. To ensure the safety of the remaining yachts, Peters & May have instructed the carrying vessel to continue her planned voyage to Genoa. No other yachts have been affected by this incident.

A full investigation into the cause of the incident has been launched, however the primary assessment is that the yacht’s cradle (owned and provided by the yacht, warrantied by the yacht for sea transport and assembled by the yacht’s crew) collapsed during the voyage from Palma to Genoa and subsequently resulted in the loss of MY SONG overboard. I will add that this is the initial assessment and is subject to confirmation in due course.

As a leading yacht transporter for the past 40 years we take great pride in what we do and go above and beyond all standard operating procedures to ensure safe transit of all yachts carried by us. We have procedures in place to respond to this kind of incident, although we hope that they are never required.

This incident is more than regrettable, however the transport of yachts on cargo vessels continues to be one of the safest and most cost-effective solutions when carried out by a reputable company such as Peters & May.

More information will be made available in due course but in the meantime, I request that everyone respects the sensitivity of this issue to all parties concerned.

If this statement is published it should be published in full and any questions directed to press@petersandmay.com.

 

Source: Yachting Monthly Facebook page

Early days........... but they’re sounding pretty damn sure it’s down to the boat and crew.  They’ll be eating some shit if it’s something else!  Think I’d have waited a day or two before issuing that part of the response. 

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8 minutes ago, Gissie said:

Do you think the development of carbon spars, lightweight rigging, electronics etc would have been developed if the sole market was dingys? Like many ‘sports’ most development is driven by the wealthy. Either for competition or their own pleasure. Sailing is no different. 

The reality is it is a two way street. The rich help our sport and we help them by keeping their toys sailing. Neither side is any better or morally correct than the other. 

This!!

There’s more than one Olympic dinghy sailor in NZ that seriously benefited from the technology, equipment and materials  available for their carbon masts, booms, rigging and sails on the back of what was developed to serve the super yacht and America’s cup markets....and that was 20 years ago. 

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1 minute ago, mad said:

Early days........... but they’re sounding pretty damn sure it’s down to the boat and crew.  They’ll be eating some shit if it’s something else!  Think I’d have waited a day or two before issuing that part of the response. 

The sad net result will be cradles that will become so over engineered and such a pain in the ass , insurance premiums will get so stratospheric that shipping will not be a economic and boats will go on their own bottoms.

Still think we will discover something simple occurred that lead to the failure of the cradle, something broke free got washed down the deck and impacted a cradle leg or something like that,  it will be several months before anything comes out mean while I wonder if Baltic just got another order.

And yes nearly everything at a club level can be traced to the big boats trying it first from methods of construction, rigging, right down to crew solutions for sail handling the list is long.

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3 hours ago, jesposito said:

1 less big platform for a bunch of over paid Cat 3 Hacks to go sailing on;)

Yes, but next you'll be complaining about the overpaid Cat 3 hacks showing up as trimmers and tacticians on your local beer can circuit.

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There are some sad fucks here with their attitude bitching about the mega rich and their toys. (Nothing new about this on SA)

Why can't they just appreciate serious boat porn and morn it's lost.

 

RIP My Song

 

Baltic_Yachts_MySong_L-5.jpg

 

2017-Superyacht-Design-Awards-My-Song-wi

 

superyacht-my-song-27346.jpg

 

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT7xdbBmQHmtq0aCP-rYsv

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29 minutes ago, mad said:

Early days........... but they’re sounding pretty damn sure it’s down to the boat and crew.  They’ll be eating some shit if it’s something else!  Think I’d have waited a day or two before issuing that part of the response. 

Captain & crew of ship no? 

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6 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

I believe Captain of the ship has final responsibility. Have they the rules ?

I’m not arguing that point, merely pointing out that the statement may be a little premature. 

Shipping law hasn’t been mentioned yet, but feel free. 

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Early days........... but they’re sounding pretty damn sure it’s down to the boat and crew.  They’ll be eating some shit if it’s something else!  Think I’d have waited a day or two before issuing that part of the response. 

Agreed. They imply that they made the statement in response to speculation about the incident and to stop false information spreading. They also say they are unhappy about the incident being discussed before the facts are known. Yet they seem to blame the equipment and crew of My Song and seem to imply that they themselves are not at fault. Curious to make quite a strong statement so soon. 

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8 minutes ago, JMore said:

Agreed. They imply that they made the statement in response to speculation about the incident and to stop false information spreading. They also say they are unhappy about the incident being discussed before the facts are known. Yet they seem to blame the equipment and crew of My Song and seem to imply that they themselves are not at fault. Curious to make quite a strong statement so soon. 

To me they seem to be just stating some facts about the cradle

6 hours ago, JMore said:

owned and provided by the yacht, warrantied by the yacht for sea transport and assembled by the yacht’s crew

and that it appeared to have failed

 

Whether it failed due to negligence in assembly, manufacturing fault, something related to ship or the ships navigation has not been speculated and thus no blame has been attributed.

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19 minutes ago, JMore said:

Agreed. They imply that they made the statement in response to speculation about the incident and to stop false information spreading. They also say they are unhappy about the incident being discussed before the facts are known. Yet they seem to blame the equipment and crew of My Song and seem to imply that they themselves are not at fault. Curious to make quite a strong statement so soon. 

Well, don't forget that they may be looking at a crumpled cradle still welded and lashed to the deck, and/or be talking to their own people who saw what happened.  Just becuase us chuckleheads on the interwebs are speculating doesnt mean the people on the ship are doing the same...

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105 tons, 7m full draft but shipped with keel partly retracted to approx 4m draft. Owner supplied the shipping cradle. Cradle failed. $50+m yacht probably lost. Move along. nothing to see here.

Unbelieveable amount of uninformed conjecture and bullshit being published here and on social media by the armchair experts.

 

 

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, NORBowGirl said:

It had a deadline,

More confirmation that a calendar is the most dangerous thing to have aboard ship.

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55 minutes ago, Flatbag said:

Unbelieveable amount of uninformed conjecture and bullshit being published here and on social media by the armchair experts.

You're not from around here are you?

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Well it is a forum you know, and seems like a lot more than just armchair experts on this thread. Very informative stuff from those of you in the big boat moving biz.

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2 hours ago, mad said:

Early days........... but they’re sounding pretty damn sure it’s down to the boat and crew.  They’ll be eating some shit if it’s something else!  Think I’d have waited a day or two before issuing that part of the response. 

 

1 hour ago, JMore said:

Agreed. They imply that they made the statement in response to speculation about the incident and to stop false information spreading. They also say they are unhappy about the incident being discussed before the facts are known. Yet they seem to blame the equipment and crew of My Song and seem to imply that they themselves are not at fault. Curious to make quite a strong statement so soon. 

This David Holley, CEO of Peters and May, is a complete and utter douchebag!!!

He is the one who is ultimately responsible, period. It does not matter whether "My Song" signed off on the craddle or not, they are the shippers and have the experts and have the obligation to approve the whole process.

And then complain about the pictures being published... WTF, it's 2019 and people have phones and internet. Or did all crew and passengers sign a NDA, Mr Folly?

And Mr. CEO Folly, whatever you say, I will decide for myself where I comment on and discuss here on SA, and I will also decide what I quote from you stupid statement. Who the hell do you think you are?

I sincerely hope that Mr Piana sues the hell out of Peters and May, and also Mr Folly personally for defamation.

Fiji Bitter, ex-client of Peters and May.

PS.

And BTW Mr Folly, did you say, and I partially quote from you statement, "Upon receipt of the news Peters & May instructed the captain of the MV Brattinsborg to attempt salvage whilst 3rd party salvors were appointed." ?  Really, you "instructed" the Captain? You have a contract with the Captain, and you can also tell him how to run his ship ?

And besides, how the hell do you salvage that superyacht? Tow it, lift it back on deck and sink it in the process, step the mast and sail it to Genoa perhaps? What a fucking joke.

 

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