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My Song fell off a cargo?!


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A couple of things to bear in mind before any of the haters start throwing more shit around; 1. Plenty of talented and committed people have put a lot of work into building and maintaining this b

These toys employ a lot of us, directly or indirectly. When billionaires decide to spend their money in a way that puts it into the yachting industry we should embrace it and not bitch. Would you pref

[Interviewer:] Welcome, thank you for joining us in what must be a trying time. [Peters & May Spokesman:] It’s a great pleasure, thank you. [Interviewer:] This ship that was involved in

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12 hours ago, P_Wop said:

No news since July.  But I assume anything of intrinsic salvage value has been removed.

Is the shell of the boat still in Palma?  Or has it already met the evil chainsaw giant and gone on to the great dumpster in the sky?

Any local info?

Taken by a friend in Palma

B51C2531-44B4-4CED-9ECE-8F5599302711.jpeg

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1 hour ago, JL92S said:

Taken by a friend in Palma

B51C2531-44B4-4CED-9ECE-8F5599302711.jpeg

When the buffer just won't do.

BTW, I've always thought the title of this thread sounds like an old, really bad, three bottles in, Hank Williams tune.

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Man, that is sad.  A few years ago my company operated a marine terminal at Pier 80 in San Francisco. Stopped by one day and while having a drive around the place saw a couple of Oracle guys cutting up Sayonara. That was sad, she looked to have been kept in great shape.

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21 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

That Sayonara act was truly an horrific move of a sociopath, nothing more, nothing less.

 

I'd like to know more about this.  So rather than sell his boat for someone else to enjoy, Larry had it cut up?

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13 minutes ago, Shu said:

I'd like to know more about this.  So rather than sell his boat for someone else to enjoy, Larry had it cut up?

But at least he paid a ton of money to have it stored indoors in pristine condition for years before chainsawing it. 

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23 hours ago, longy said:

I wonder if any attempt was made (officially) to strip hardware/engines etc out of boat? From the hole in the side they may have pulled diesels out for re-build.

Yould guess that Yes, the photo shows a motorised furling unit next to the pile of rubbish - that has clearly but carefully snipped off as they hacked off the bow.

At the very least, (several) metric tonnes of copper aluminium and lead will be recovered.:)

Its the hundred or so tonnes of landfill produced that will sour the taste, and highlight with sharp relief how unsustainable our favourite sport really is.:(

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3 hours ago, Shu said:

I'd like to know more about this.  So rather than sell his boat for someone else to enjoy, Larry had it cut up?

I don't really know more than what I read about it at the time, but here is a surprisingly good and informative SA front page article:

http://fast.sailinganarchy.com/tag/sayonara/

 

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27 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

I don't really know more than what I read about it at the time, but here is a surprisingly good and informative SA front page article:

http://fast.sailinganarchy.com/tag/sayonara/

He was deeply disturbed about his Sydney-Hobart experience.  He once described it as the only event in his life over which he had little or no control. 

The boat languished, although fully maintained, for a few years until he (helped by his 'personal advisers') decided to end chapter and remove the albatross from around his neck.

Actually not a bad thing to do.  It's been done many times before by wealthy owners, for various reasons.  Westward, Britannia, you name 'em.

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11 hours ago, Boink said:

Yould guess that Yes, the photo shows a motorised furling unit next to the pile of rubbish - that has clearly but carefully snipped off as they hacked off the bow.

At the very least, (several) metric tonnes of copper aluminium and lead will be recovered.:)

Its the hundred or so tonnes of landfill produced that will sour the taste, and highlight with sharp relief how unsustainable our favourite sport really is.:(

At least the amount of landfill should stay under 100t: https://www.balticyachts.fi/yachts/baltic-130-my-song/ 

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14 hours ago, P_Wop said:

He was deeply disturbed about his Sydney-Hobart experience.  He once described it as the only event in his life over which he had little or no control. 

The boat languished, although fully maintained, for a few years until he (helped by his 'personal advisers') decided to end chapter and remove the albatross from around his neck.

Actually not a bad thing to do.  It's been done many times before by wealthy owners, for various reasons.  Westward, Britannia, you name 'em.

Or he could have done what the rest of us do and sold it. Rumor has it that offers had been made to him on the boat while it was being stored and all were declined.

Tough life when the only event that you had little to no control over was a sailboat race.

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2 hours ago, Moonduster said:

rather than sold to some unsuspecting buyer was a good thing.

Why do you assume the buyer would be unsuspecting, is that how you sold your  delam duster?   ^_^

Sorry, I know how painful that must have been for you. But for people with a heart and feelings for beautiful boats it is equally painful to see the Sayonara being butchered.

Besides, I remember it like Longy said, that it was repaired, and anyway core failure can always be repaired. Hell, Nandor Fa replaced an entire core and outer skin on his Imoca, and look how they cut up and splice 100 footers like a piece of cake.

No, this was more like a sad case of assisted suicide, rather than justified euthenasia. Or more like murdering your ex because she might go of with someone else. 

 

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5 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Why do you assume the buyer would be unsuspecting, is that how you sold your  delam duster?   ^_^

Sorry, I know how painful that must have been for you. But for people with a heart and feelings for beautiful boats it is equally painful to see the Sayonara being butchered.

Besides, I remember it like Longy said, that it was repaired, and anyway core failure can always be repaired. Hell, Nandor Fa replaced an entire core and outer skin on his Imoca, and look how they cut up and splice 100 footers like a piece of cake.

No, this was more like a sad case of assisted suicide, rather than justified euthenasia. Or more like murdering your ex because she might go of with someone else. 

 

FB, always the asshole. 

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2 hours ago, mad said:

Its just a fucking boat, get over it.

Exactly. How is this rich person's toy an important or meaningful thing for sailors to weep over.

Gypsy Moth going up on a reef...that was worth crying over.

Hydroptere abandoned in HI was worth worrying about...etc....

Of the many meaningful sailboats to emote over...My Song does not move me. It was a lovely boat but not an important boat.

 

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20 minutes ago, savoir said:

The only interesting thing about this whole episode is whose insurance company gets told to write the check.

I wouldn't want to be hanging by the balls waiting to see any cheques written. There is clearly multiple liability and so multiple insurers involved. 

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

I wouldn't want to be hanging by the balls waiting to see any cheques written.

I'm going to guess they wouldn't have given permission to destroy the "evidence" unless the major chunks of liability had been sorted...

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

I'm going to guess they wouldn't have given permission to destroy the "evidence" unless the major chunks of liability had been sorted...

Those with an equitable interest in the vessel and having a ongoing liability which is normally owner/owner insurer/financier are not at the behest of anyone save for a court direction. Reports, evidence, making evidence available , destroying etc having regard to claims against or from third parties is their choice and not contingent upon settling liability/claims with those third parties. 

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24 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

evidence available , destroying etc having regard to claims against or from

Interesting. 

Not my area of expertise, but if I were (for example) the shipper, it'd be tempting to say "we assert the cradle failed, we believe we can prove it based on the pattern of damage on the hull.  Oh.... what, you've destroyed the hull?  Well, then, it's going to be hard for you to prove us wrong, isn't it?"

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15 hours ago, sledracr said:

Interesting. 

Not my area of expertise, but if I were (for example) the shipper, it'd be tempting to say "we assert the cradle failed, we believe we can prove it based on the pattern of damage on the hull.  Oh.... what, you've destroyed the hull?  Well, then, it's going to be hard for you to prove us wrong, isn't it?"

If I were any of the involved insurance companies, I’d simply agree to save the bits of hull that may actually be evidence for now. It’s a lot cheaper to toss a few sections in a shipping container as opposed to storing the whole damned thing!  

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18 hours ago, sledracr said:

Interesting. 

Not my area of expertise, but if I were (for example) the shipper, it'd be tempting to say "we assert the cradle failed, we believe we can prove it based on the pattern of damage on the hull.  Oh.... what, you've destroyed the hull?  Well, then, it's going to be hard for you to prove us wrong, isn't it?"

Yes.  But I believe there have been teams of surveyors crawling over the wreck for months, so I'm pretty sure they would have collected, collated and presented all the available evidence by now.  Plus evidence from the remains of the dead cradle, which should tell its own story.

We will probably never know the apportionment of blame, damages, restitution etc., as this stuff is usually kept quite private.

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Who would have paid for demolition and disposal?  The only total loss we had at our facility sat untouched until the insurance company had finished their investigation.  Once the insurer had finished their process we were then told to dispose of the wreck with disposal paid by the insurance.

Once the claim had been made the boats owner had no further involvement.  Is the process different in Europe?

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On 10/4/2019 at 7:01 AM, sledracr said:

Interesting. 

Not my area of expertise, but if I were (for example) the shipper, it'd be tempting to say "we assert the cradle failed, we believe we can prove it based on the pattern of damage on the hull.  Oh.... what, you've destroyed the hull?  Well, then, it's going to be hard for you to prove us wrong, isn't it?"

 

7 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Yes.  But I believe there have been teams of surveyors crawling over the wreck for months, so I'm pretty sure they would have collected, collated and presented all the available evidence by now.  Plus evidence from the remains of the dead cradle, which should tell its own story.

Boys, 

I think that all the insurance companies involved would be very happy to have the boat cut up now. They would all investigated the boat and the damage.

 

The boat would be costing lots of $$$$$ in hard stand fees alone to just sit there. If you stop and think about it, even at $2 per foot per day that’s $266 per day, $931 per week, $4034 per month. I’ve been told by mates that have skippered boats in the Mediterranean that hard stand fees on super yachts are crazy expensive and $10 per foot per day is common. After all you need big equipment to handle boats of this size. 

 

It’s going to be cut up anyway. I think all involved would be happy to cut costs anyway they can so cutting it up now makes sense.

 

Pulpit

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11 hours ago, Little Wood Boats said:

Once the claim had been made the boats owner had no further involvement.  Is the process different in Europe?

The "making" of an insurance claim world wide does not terminate the owners equitable interest in the vessel. That only occurs when they transfer that interest. For instance insurer declares a write off with owners consent.

If there is any issue of owner liability and third parties/insurers are involved no insurer is going to let the owner/their insurer off the hook until settled. This case complex as vessel was not in the control of the owner at time of incident but a carrier and there is a question of owner liability it appears.

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Moving on after this sad story... Any suggestions for My Song V?

what are you going to choose in Mr Loro Piana shoes?

some hypothesis considering the racer spirit of the owner :

  • An improved Baltic 130 from same molds as My Song IV
  • Brand new project from R/P and Nauta 
  • Clubswan 125
  • Wally cento
  • Going smaller like a Maxi 72 or a more gentle Botin 80
  • What else?

I see option 1 as the fastest and more suitable. After some years on the water they know what was ok and what need to be reviewed.

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17 minutes ago, The Weatherman said:

Moving on after this sad story... Any suggestions for My Song V?

what are you going to choose in Mr Loro Piana shoes?

some hypothesis considering the racer spirit of the owner :

  • An improved Baltic 130 from same molds as My Song IV
  • Brand new project from R/P and Nauta 
  • Clubswan 125
  • Wally cento
  • Going smaller like a Maxi 72 or a more gentle Botin 80
  • What else?

I see option 1 as the fastest and more suitable. After some years on the water they know what was ok and what need to be reviewed.

I doubt that Swan will be involved in the next new boat. Has there been any talk of him even wanting to have a new boat?

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I previously suggested the J-class Svea, redesigned by Andre Hoek, my next favourite designer...  Seems still for sale.

Should be fun for the AC in Auckland (seriously), and comes with an amicable owners organisation (maybe by now).

Asking only 16 million, 

My 2 cents...

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He's currently racing a Club Swan 36 in the Nations Trophy here in Palma.....

Fuck going with a Cento - all of the boats are now out of class so they're just very expensive rating gambles.....

Swan are looking into an 80ft option for the Club Swan range - as I understand it would have some sort of c-foil similar to the 36 and come under the same One Design controls as the 50s and 36s. It appears to be gaining traction with a lot of potential owners from the Maxi 72, Wally and Superyacht fleets who are fed-up with the arms-race in the 72s and Centos etc.....

On the flip side there is also a group owners trying to resurrect the 'Maxi' fleet of 70-90ft custom racers with a Botin 85 launching early next year and the 93ft Highland Fling being refitted...

Also - I went looking for My Song this morning but couldn't find any sign of it in STP... either I missed her or she's all gone....

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On 10/4/2019 at 6:52 PM, pulpit said:

The boat would be costing lots of $$$$$ in hard stand fees alone to just sit there. If you stop and think about it, even at $2 per foot per day that’s $266 per day, $931 per week, $4034 per month. 

Odd math that.  

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17 hours ago, Cirdan said:
On 10/5/2019 at 11:52 AM, pulpit said:

The boat would be costing lots of $$$$$ in hard stand fees alone to just sit there. If you stop and think about it, even at $2 per foot per day that’s $266 per day, $931 per week, $4034 per month. 

 

17 hours ago, Cirdan said:

Odd math that.  

Cirdan,

it may seem odd math’s the per month price. Remember that is 52 weeks in a year so divide that by 12 months is how I worked it out. 

 

Anyway, my point was even at $2 per foot the costs add up very quickly for a boat of that size. As I also stated I’m told the marina hard stand costs are lots more than $2 per foot per day. 

 

Pulpit

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39 minutes ago, pulpit said:

 

it may seem odd math’s the per month price. Remember that is 52 weeks in a year so divide that by 12 months is how I worked it out. 

If the $266/day is correct, then

-- weekly would be $266 * 7 = 1862  (remember there are 7 days in a week)

-- montly would be $266 * 30 = 7980 (assuming 30 days in a week, on average)

-- yearly would be $266 * 365 = 97,090

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So has there been any substance grafted to the rumour about the failure to reballast the ship following significant partial offloading of other vessels, onwhat had been a sucessful delivery across the pond up til that point.

The signifiicant dynamic alterations and the desire to push the delivery through the (unfavourable) weather window to keep to schedule will drag the shipping operator firmly into the culpable group.

The Lawyers will be the only winners here......

CPI Inflation increases have never been a more slippery and redundant expression than when referencing insurance premium increases.......:blink:

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  • 7 months later...
  • 2 months later...

I feel sorry for billionaires, first they dont have as much money as you think. A US or financial billion is a paltry 1000 million while a true billion is one million million. So even if you had 100 billion you're kind of being cheated on the PR front because you're not that rich. Take My Song for example, who knows how much it cost but lets say 20 million,  if you only had one lousy billion then you can buy just 50 of them. life is really fucking tough for an entry level billionaire.  

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2 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Behind a 'kin pay wall :-(

Looks more like the insurance companies are behind paywalls!

Zero surprise there, although my view still is that Peters and May are 90% at fault, but obviously their insurance comp is putting up a fight.

 

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On 10/4/2019 at 6:52 PM, pulpit said:

If you stop and think about it, even at $2 per foot per day that’s $266 per day, $931 per week, $4034 per month. I’ve been told by mates that have skippered boats in the Mediterranean that hard stand fees on super yachts are crazy expensive and $10 per foot per day is common.

This is just my stupid uninformed opinion but

The minute the phone rang at the insurer's office they knew that putting it into the 'loss' column would cost seven figures, and they put the lawyers to work (at hundreds an hour, each) figuring out how to get as much of that as possible into the other guy's column.

Ten large for a month of storage is a drop in that bucket for any party involved in the incident, from the owner to the shipper to the insurer(s). 

When you're talking multimillion-dollar assets, whether it's real estate or boats or fucking collectible watches, someone (usually a team of someones) with actual expertise has cost-benefited and consulted lawyers on every single step. There's a process and it's being followed and watched by multiple people along the way, and every step is running up and down each organisation's ladder. 

The idea that one guy making 180k writing contracts on $10-million yachts at Lloyd's sets time aside in his day to call some other guy making 100k at the shipper and they call the consultant/lawyer guy who makes 110k working for the multi-Billionaire owner and they all say, 'yeah, what's important is saving ten grand, get moving with the cutter right away,' is laughable. It's a rounding error. On the subject of yard fees you couldn't even get a single one of the respective shot callers to read to the end of the sentence.

Eat the rich.

Also in case it hasn't been posted here, YachtHarbor confirms it was likely the cradle, and includes pictures.

https://yachtharbour.com/news/end-game--40m-regatta-superstar-my-song-is-‘beyond-repair--3270

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8 minutes ago, Breamerly said:

This is just my stupid uninformed opinion but

The minute the phone rang at the insurer's office they knew that putting it into the 'loss' column would cost seven figures, and they put the lawyers to work (at hundreds an hour, each) figuring out how to get as much of that as possible into the other guy's column.

Ten large for a month of storage is a drop in that bucket for any party involved in the incident, from the owner to the shipper to the insurer(s). 

When you're talking multimillion-dollar assets, whether it's real estate or boats or fucking collectible watches, someone (usually a team of someones) with actual expertise has cost-benefited and consulted lawyers on every single step. There's a process and it's being followed and watched by multiple people along the way, and every step is running up and down each organisation's ladder. 

The idea that some shit making 180k at Lloyd's calls some other shit making 100k at the shipper and they call the consultant/lawyer shit who makes 110k working for the owner and they all say, 'yeah, what's important is saving ten grand, get moving with the cutter,' is laughable. It's a rounding error. On the subject of yard fees you couldn't even get a single one of the respective shot callers to read to the end of the sentence.

Eat the rich.

Too right, 

Yard fees are right up there with the costs running the office copier

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3 hours ago, Laser1 said:

Knowing a few really rich pricks who have the money disease, I can tell you with 90% certainty that this is just another game to win.

Despite what people like to think, that billionaires are like you and me but with serious coin, they are not. There is a such a thing as the money disease, it gets into the psyche of some people and literally hollows them out as human beings. They look like you hand me on the outside but they are nothing like you and  me on the inside. There are exceptions of course but not many. 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, toad said:

Ten large for a month of storage is a drop in that bucket for any party involved in the incident, from the owner to the shipper to the insurer(s). 

And furthermore, it's even less money when viewed as a marginal cost, which is how the money men tend to think. The ordinary monthly cost of owning that thing was probably several thousand dollars (Euros, pesos, lira, baht, kroners, whatever). So the marginal cost of storage - maybe a few grand more than they would have otherwise spent - likely is even less of a care.

Heck, compared to the amount the billionaire owner's accountants had budgeted to pay to fly the crew to the race, house them, pay their salaries, buy flowers and champagne and have a man standing by for a photo and helicopter the owner in and out and on and on and on - compared to that, the owner would probably be saving money if he paid to have it stored for a year in a heated hangar. So I'm pretty sure he's being genuine in the articles that quote him describing his pain as emotional (rather than financial).

And again, I guarantee you he gives absolutely zero damns about the yard fee.

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4 minutes ago, toad said:

Despite what people like to think, that billionaires are like you and me but with serious coin, they are no

Right.

Also worth noting though that a suit doesn't mean 'evil prick' automatically. It's more of a placeholder - reserving the right to take it to the courts if private settlement is unsuccessful. May go nowhere.

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8 minutes ago, Breamerly said:

And furthermore, it's even less money when viewed as a marginal cost, which is how the money men tend to think. The ordinary monthly cost of owning that thing was probably several TENS OF thousands of dollars (Euros, pesos, lira, baht, kroners, whatever). So the marginal cost of storage - maybe a few grand more than they would have otherwise spent - likely is even less of a care.

Heck, compared to the amount the billionaire owner's accountants had budgeted to pay to fly the crew to the race, house them, pay their salaries, buy flowers and champagne and have a man standing by for a photo and helicopter the owner in and out and on and on and on - compared to that, the owner would probably be saving money if he paid to have it stored for a year in a heated hangar. So I'm pretty sure he's being genuine in the articles that quote him describing his pain as emotional (rather than financial).

And again, I guarantee you he gives absolutely zero damns about the yard fee.

Changed the order of magnitude for you.  

Unless you aren't counting the Captain, the non-racing deck hands, the chef and the provisioner and the program manager and the support boat captain and crew that carries and delivers all the food and wine and boat toys and linen and laundry and spares to keep guests happy and moving.  

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2 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Changed the order of magnitude for you.  

Unless you aren't counting the Captain, the non-racing deck hands, the chef and the provisioner and the program manager and the support boat captain and crew that carries and delivers all the food and wine and boat toys and linen and laundry and spares to keep guests happy and moving.  

Aye. I meant the cost of having it dockside only. But yes, we're jousting on the same pony, or whatever.

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AFAIAC someone who owns a sailboat that size and has it shipped instead of sailed to its next port deserves whatever happens to them.

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13 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

AFAIAC someone who owns a sailboat that size and has it shipped instead of sailed to its next port deserves whatever happens to them.

You just don't understand the logistics behind superyacht management   

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I was on board a 120ft Dubois crossing from Newport to Palma. Ended up in Halifax after losing the boom and the mainsail over the side. Then about 3 hours out of Halifax on return to Newport had the Genoa shred itself after a crew member sailed too low and 'gybed'. 

If that whole fucking debacle isn't a good example of why superyachts get shipped places rather than sailing I don't know what it...

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12 hours ago, Breamerly said:

were the sails made of cotton candy?

There's a bit more of an explanation needed here but yeah, I was pretty surprised when it happened;

We left Halifax with light winds, as we were heading out of the bay we were on port with the wind aft of the beam and had the Genoa out. There was a bit of a left-over swell from a low pressure we had let pass that was coming from the S (we were heading SE so it was a bit of a cross-swell). 

Not long after we started the watch schedule the general alarm goes again and it turns out the mate had gone too low and gybed the Genoa but it re-filled at the exact same time the boat was at the end of a swing to leeward on the cross swell. The result was a reall 'snap' as the sail filled to leeward on port as the boat started to come back to windward on the next swell and it just popped the Genoa in two... I don't remember how old the sails were but they were one of the 2 major superyacht brands.

It got even more ridiculous when, whilst running DDW to try and wrap a halyard around the remainder if the furled sail, we got hailed by the Canadian Navy as apparently we had just strayed into a live firing zone...

The look on the skippers face at this point, having spent the previous 2 days explaining the boom/mainsail situation, was a picture. We ended up motoring back to Newport with the staysail bladed out on centreline for some stability.

Boat ended up stuck on the dock for ages as variois lawyers argued responsibilty for the boom breakage.

On the plus side I was back in Newport for the opening night of Mission burgers....

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10 hours ago, NZK said:

There's a bit more of an explanation needed here but yeah, I was pretty surprised when it happened;

We left Halifax with light winds, as we were heading out of the bay we were on port with the wind aft of the beam and had the Genoa out. There was a bit of a left-over swell from a low pressure we had let pass that was coming from the S (we were heading SE so it was a bit of a cross-swell). 

Not long after we started the watch schedule the general alarm goes again and it turns out the mate had gone too low and gybed the Genoa but it re-filled at the exact same time the boat was at the end of a swing to leeward on the cross swell. The result was a reall 'snap' as the sail filled to leeward on port as the boat started to come back to windward on the next swell and it just popped the Genoa in two... I don't remember how old the sails were but they were one of the 2 major superyacht brands.

It got even more ridiculous when, whilst running DDW to try and wrap a halyard around the remainder if the furled sail, we got hailed by the Canadian Navy as apparently we had just strayed into a live firing zone...

The look on the skippers face at this point, having spent the previous 2 days explaining the boom/mainsail situation, was a picture. We ended up motoring back to Newport with the staysail bladed out on centreline for some stability.

Boat ended up stuck on the dock for ages as variois lawyers argued responsibilty for the boom breakage.

But were you having fun?

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48 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

But were you having fun?

Well yeah kind of, it was definitely one of the more interesting trips (there's more below). Spending a few days in Halifax was awesome, would probably never have seen it otherwise.

7 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

NZK. How did u loose the boom.  Did it vanish spontaneously or get misplaced by accident.  
 

Seems careless to misplace such a large piece of kit.  

OK. There's quite a story to this and I've just popped a beer so...

TLDR: boom cracked and sheared off just behind the vang. Jettisoned it and the mainsail overboard because it was in-boom furling and no safe way to get either on the deck.

Long version;

I was pleasantly asleep in my luxuriously appointed guest cabin enjoying the 4000 thread count sheets (estimated) when the general alarm goes. The boom (carbon, in boom furling) had cracked just behind the vang. The compression load was 'sawing' the crack and had split the mandrel so we couldn't furl. 

Winds were mid-teens from just behind the beam with a reasonable long period swell. Wind was increasing, apparently the on-watch had been talking about reefing when this happened. Hindsight would suggest that conversation was about 15mins late...

We decided the best bet was to cut the main halyard and the hydraulic lines in the boom so it would go over the side and take the mainsail with it (clew was lashed to boom with Dyneema strop).

Got the engineer leashed up and sent him onto the coachroof with an angle grinder. There was already hydraulic oil everywhere so he was in a bit of a 'bambi on ice' situation as the roof was just polished paintwork.

Hydraulic lines cut and outboard boom section swings into the water taking a few stanchions with it. Unfortunately the Dyneema lashing was stronger than the clew patch which tore itself off the main but not before peeling half of the luff out of the mast track. With the boom gone we now watched as the rest of the main peeled out of the track and was left flying off the headboard. I'm pretty sure everyone just stood staring at this for a few seconds before signing a collective 'fuck!'. 

We talked it over and agreed going up the rig to cut the main off was too risky - no helmet etc on board and only one other mast head halyard so we couldn't rig a tracing line to stop from swinging out away from the mast (mast was too big to grip around). 

So we spent the next 4 hours going downwind trying to roll the boat and dip the bottom of the main in the piss so the friction would drag it down the track. Finally got the main to catch just before dusk -  pretty lucky because I did not fancy having that thing hanging off the rig at night.

That trip taught me a lot about the assumptions I'd been making about a boats offshore preparedness - we came out OK but could have used a lot more kit for thst situation. I definitely had a lot more questions when joining other boats....

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7 hours ago, NZK said:

Well yeah kind of, it was definitely one of the more interesting trips (there's more below). Spending a few days in Halifax was awesome, would probably never have seen it otherwise.

OK. There's quite a story to this and I've just popped a beer so...

TLDR: boom cracked and sheared off just behind the vang. Jettisoned it and the mainsail overboard because it was in-boom furling and no safe way to get either on the deck.

Long version;

I was pleasantly asleep in my luxuriously appointed guest cabin enjoying the 4000 thread count sheets (estimated) when the general alarm goes. The boom (carbon, in boom furling) had cracked just behind the vang. The compression load was 'sawing' the crack and had split the mandrel so we couldn't furl. 

Winds were mid-teens from just behind the beam with a reasonable long period swell. Wind was increasing, apparently the on-watch had been talking about reefing when this happened. Hindsight would suggest that conversation was about 15mins late...

We decided the best bet was to cut the main halyard and the hydraulic lines in the boom so it would go over the side and take the mainsail with it (clew was lashed to boom with Dyneema strop).

Got the engineer leashed up and sent him onto the coachroof with an angle grinder. There was already hydraulic oil everywhere so he was in a bit of a 'bambi on ice' situation as the roof was just polished paintwork.

Hydraulic lines cut and outboard boom section swings into the water taking a few stanchions with it. Unfortunately the Dyneema lashing was stronger than the clew patch which tore itself off the main but not before peeling half of the luff out of the mast track. With the boom gone we now watched as the rest of the main peeled out of the track and was left flying off the headboard. I'm pretty sure everyone just stood staring at this for a few seconds before signing a collective 'fuck!'. 

We talked it over and agreed going up the rig to cut the main off was too risky - no helmet etc on board and only one other mast head halyard so we couldn't rig a tracing line to stop from swinging out away from the mast (mast was too big to grip around). 

So we spent the next 4 hours going downwind trying to roll the boat and dip the bottom of the main in the piss so the friction would drag it down the track. Finally got the main to catch just before dusk -  pretty lucky because I did not fancy having that thing hanging off the rig at night.

That trip taught me a lot about the assumptions I'd been making about a boats offshore preparedness - we came out OK but could have used a lot more kit for thst situation. I definitely had a lot more questions when joining other boats....

Have also crewed on a 120 Dubious....it had a half size Dacron delivery main to avoid the above type of scenario . Worked a treat and was good up to about 30 knots with a stay sail combo ...looked shit tho 

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6 hours ago, 44forty said:

Have also crewed on a 120 Dubious....it had a half size Dacron delivery main to avoid the above type of scenario . Worked a treat and was good up to about 30 knots with a stay sail combo ...looked shit tho 

Was that used with an in-boom furling set-up?I know they're more common on boats with slab reefing mains but not seen one used alongside an in-boom furler - we should have reefed earlier, not exactly a strenuous maneuver when it's just pushing buttons...

 

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1 hour ago, NZK said:

Was that used with an in-boom furling set-up?I know they're more common on boats with slab reefing mains but not seen one used alongside an in-boom furler - we should have reefed earlier, not exactly a strenuous maneuver when it's just pushing buttons...

 

No it wasn’t . I imagine it would be a bastard to have alongside a boom furler , not really necessary anyway if you have push button reefing :(

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On 8/10/2020 at 2:50 AM, 44forty said:

Have also crewed on a 120 Dubious....it had a half size Dacron delivery main to avoid the above type of scenario . Worked a treat and was good up to about 30 knots with a stay sail combo ...looked shit tho 

a friend sailed on a Swan 112 for some years. when doing deliveries over the atlantic they were always reefed with a staysail. when going slower than 10 knts start the engine! (deleveries were done with a crew of 5 or so.) 

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21 hours ago, daan62 said:

a friend sailed on a Swan 112 for some years. when doing deliveries over the atlantic they were always reefed with a staysail. when going slower than 10 knts start the engine! (deleveries were done with a crew of 5 or so.) 

Yep same here ...target speed was 10 knots/100 miles a day , crew of 6 , 3 watches 

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4 hours ago, alphafb552 said:

Sat down for a three course meal, cigars and brandy followed by a solid 8 hours sleep no doubt!

Union rules?

Yeah that’s it 10 hours on , 14 off ! .   Sorry my bad it’s Been nearly 20 years since I did that shit ....240 miles a day 

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8 hours ago, 44forty said:

Yeah that’s it 10 hours on , 14 off ! .   Sorry my bad it’s Been nearly 20 years since I did that shit ....240 miles a day 

 

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