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Adhesive for Harken furler repair


Bull City

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I've got a Harken jib furler. It was on my boat when I bought it and I suspect it's 15 years or so old. The top or cover (see below) is a 6" disc-shaped piece of black plastic. It is made in two halves and secured to the spool/drum with 4 screws. The other day, it cracked. The fracture is across the seam, which is not glued, so I have two pieces. The furler is usable, but I'd like to fix it.

I've sent an inquiry to Harken regarding a replacement part. I don't think they make this model anymore, so I may need to try a glue fix.

Is there a reliable adhesive for this, or is it futile?

Thanks.

furler.png.519a3d9db39d1bcfb0dfb3f33ff3320f.png

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Another option might be to take the parts to a local machine shop and ask if they have an apprentice who needs some practice.  Stainless or milled aluminum that could be painted could be an answer.  I did that on a boat I has with some out of date broken or missing fittings.  Man did the apprentice want to show his boss what he could do!

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45 minutes ago, Razorblade_Romance said:

If its 15 years old it will be a MKIII furler, the precursor to the current model.  Harken still make top plates for these.  You just need to identify what Unit size you have to identify the right part number.  Manuals found at the below:

https://www.harken.com.au/article.aspx?id=18799

 

This is the way to go. Although I’d use the American web address

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1 hour ago, Razorblade_Romance said:

If its 15 years old it will be a MKIII furler, the precursor to the current model.  Harken still make top plates for these.  You just need to identify what Unit size you have to identify the right part number.  Manuals found at the below:

https://www.harken.com.au/article.aspx?id=18799

 

I hope you're right about Harken still making the part. I've got a manual. It is a Mark III Unit 00AL. 

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Harken got back to me with the part number and price: new spool $50. Order placed.

Now I'll have to re-place it without dropping stuff in the water!

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F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K :angry:

Received the new spool the other day, and went to replace the old one this morning. Simple job, requiring only two Allen wrenches, right? Remove two bolts and take off the line guard, remove four more and take off the spool, just like on page 53 of the manual.

Wrong.

The line guard came off easily, however, the Allen bolts for the spool just free-wheeled and there was no way hold onto the nut and back out the bolt. It's counter sunk in the body of the spool. At one time it may have be glued in place so that the bolt could be tightened, but no more. I called Harken, and Rick told me that this sometimes happens, and the only fix is to cut the bolts. He recommended a rotary cutter like a Dremel. Of course, I did not think to bring my Dremel. 

The threaded hole on the new spool looks like it molded in the plastic, so the next owner probably won't have this problem. And I'm going to use an anti-seize.

Fortunately, my calendar is open tomorrow.

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35 minutes ago, Bull City said:

F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K :angry:

Received the new spool the other day, and went to replace the old one this morning. Simple job, requiring only two Allen wrenches, right? Remove two bolts and take off the line guard, remove four more and take off the spool, just like on page 53 of the manual.

Wrong.

The line guard came off easily, however, the Allen bolts for the spool just free-wheeled and there was no way hold onto the nut and back out the bolt. It's counter sunk in the body of the spool. At one time it may have be glued in place so that the bolt could be tightened, but no more. I called Harken, and Rick told me that this sometimes happens, and the only fix is to cut the bolts. He recommended a rotary cutter like a Dremel. Of course, I did not think to bring my Dremel. 

The threaded hole on the new spool looks like it molded in the plastic, so the next owner probably won't have this problem. And I'm going to use an anti-seize.

Fortunately, my calendar is open tomorrow.

Hey, you didn't drop your tool box or new parts in the water, which is what I was expecting to read after I saw the first line of your post.

So far, you're still on the standard old-boat project trajectory. Have a beer, it's all good.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K, F**K :angry:

Received the new spool the other day, and went to replace the old one this morning. Simple job, requiring only two Allen wrenches, right? Remove two bolts and take off the line guard, remove four more and take off the spool, just like on page 53 of the manual.

Wrong.

The line guard came off easily, however, the Allen bolts for the spool just free-wheeled and there was no way hold onto the nut and back out the bolt. It's counter sunk in the body of the spool. At one time it may have be glued in place so that the bolt could be tightened, but no more. I called Harken, and Rick told me that this sometimes happens, and the only fix is to cut the bolts. He recommended a rotary cutter like a Dremel. Of course, I did not think to bring my Dremel. 

The threaded hole on the new spool looks like it molded in the plastic, so the next owner probably won't have this problem. And I'm going to use an anti-seize.

Fortunately, my calendar is open tomorrow.

Yeah the current old nuts are molded in like the new ones. Another option is to melt the plastic around the bolts to get them out or you can cut the plastic around them out, it’s a little easier to cut then the ss bolts. 

Also consider yourself lucky they still have the spools for the furler. 

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2 hours ago, mgs said:

Yeah the current old nuts are molded in like the new ones. Another option is to melt the plastic around the bolts to get them out or you can cut the plastic around them out, it’s a little easier to cut then the ss bolts. 

Also consider yourself lucky they still have the spools for the furler. 

Excellent point regarding availability of parts. I must remember to count my blessings, meager as they may seem sometimes. :)

For me, melting the plastic sounds like a risky proposition: either me, or the boat, or both of us would get burned.

No cutting the plastic sounds like a very good approach. I have a Dremel oscillating tool. Rick from Harken told me that the material under the spool is metal. Thanks for that idea.

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Is slightly brutal to the drum but I have resorted to pounding the blade of a slotted screwdriver alongside the inserts/nuts and then twisted the screwdriver to provide some purchase.

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Yesterday, I attacked the old spool with my Dremel oscillating tool. I used the wood/plastic blade and made plunge cuts parallel to the bolt, just above and just below. With some coaxing from needle nose pliers, the four bolts finally came out. 

MGS, you're right about the old nuts. They were molded into the plastic, but for some reason (old age?) they came loose and free-wheeled. BTW, I tried cutting one of the bolts out of curiosity - not fun.

It's a little concerning that at some point it became necessary to destroy the spool in order to remove it, because there are a couple of instances where you would need to remove it: (1) in order to replace the furling line, and (2) if for racing, you wanted use just the foil.

I am happy to report that I didn't drop anything in the water.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

It's a little concerning that at some point it became necessary to destroy the spool in order to remove it,

Sounds like a Vietnamese village.

Like most fittings on a boat, unscrewing them and cleaning the threads every so often will keep them removable. A drop of Tef-Gel or lanolin or similar will help a bunch too.

It's what should be periodic maintenance but it seldom to never happens and subsequent owners are always the ones who pay the price.

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26 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

It's what should be periodic maintenance but it seldom to never happens and subsequent owners are always the ones who pay the price.

What struck me was the realization that when we re-launched the boat in May 2015, someone must have taken the spool apart to install the new furling line. Thinking about it, maybe we didn't do the tef-gel. Self inflicted wound.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

What struck me was the realization that when we re-launched the boat in May 2015, someone must have taken the spool apart to install the new furling line. Thinking about it, maybe we didn't do the tef-gel. Self inflicted wound.

I think you can replace the furling line without removing the spool. 

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38 minutes ago, mgs said:

I think you can replace the furling line without removing the spool. 

image.png.e6b117fec0b4e40a819f04db2fa9c76d.png

 From the holy manual:

428624453_furlingline.thumb.png.528ab27871aca30b055db6f1e5e3cbf1.png

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On 7/3/2019 at 10:59 AM, SloopJonB said:

It's what should be periodic maintenance but it seldom to never happens and subsequent owners are always the ones who pay the price.

I think I will leave instructions in my last will & testament for my executor to do this.

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