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Hard dinks, nesting dinks, and why we like them


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On 8/4/2020 at 7:54 PM, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Not sure if this has been asked here or on another thread...

Could a non nesting dinghy be turned into a nester with careful planning, adding a couple of bulkheads and connecting hardware then cutting it in two?

What are the risks (other than ruining a perfectly good dinghy)?  What would careful planning look like?

 

Sure. Friends with an El Toro (like a Sabot pram) did exactly that. Just put some 1/8" scrap between the bulkheads as spacers to give the saw blade a spot to fit in. 

Use scrap cardboard to recreate the shape of the smaller part of the hull (tape to existing hull). Carefully remove, turn it 180 and see how it fits. Note that the bulkheads don't have to be right in the middle. You could take a 9' dinghy and shorten it 3-1/2' for example.

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It depends on the build quality. We've sold lots of prototypes for 7- 9000 dollars with rigs and foils. I think a really carefully built PT 11 should be worth $10,000, but that seems a bit nuts. It's

somersault 26 Newick

I built a tender for when I was a full time liveaboard. I had a couple of neighbors in the anchorage build variations on my original with varying degrees of success. I ran the cabinet shop for the lar

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10 hours ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Matthews Dinghy. TYD#263

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A non-nesting hard dinghy with inflatable bumpers that do NOTHING(!?) for sailing unless the boat is heeled.  Not intended for rowing or outboard?  What's the point?

Newbie sailor training wheels?

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18 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

In defense of inflatables...  https://truekit.nz/  This one is "from $1,999.00 NZD".  Looks great to me, especially for a small "yacht".

 

I looked closely at these but the local dealer advised strongly against dog claws on the inflatable floor.

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 9/15/2020 at 4:22 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

This seems minimalist. 

IMG_1573.thumb.jpg.15b2298684ea35250c473e343f1f1e35.jpg

Is this a Richard Woods Duo?

I was thinking of building one, but a few inches shorter, to fit in my car. It's narrow enough, but it's still a bit too long.

Why mess with a roof rack?

 

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13 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

What kind of dinghy?

Nesting sailing.  Will get a pic next time I see him I think he might be on FB but I'm not so not sure.  His is the prototype and ply.  He's making out of honeycomb and glass now, added about 10lbs, I think 120 total.  He is building for $2500 another $1000 ish for all the pieces sail kit etc.  It's a hell of a good deal for a professional built boat.

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On 9/15/2020 at 4:22 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

This seems minimalist. 

IMG_1573.thumb.jpg.15b2298684ea35250c473e343f1f1e35.jpg

I like this but the bulge over the bow seems to preclude storing it upside down on the foredeck. The bow needs to nest inside, and at the same height as the gunwhales...well optimally, anyway.  I guess with enough wood or foam blocks on deck, you can overcome anything.

During my recent vacation, I had to store my Dyer 9 on the foredeck of my 33 footer for the first time, due to torrential rains. We actually sailed with it stowed that way. It fits just barely. I wouldn't have it an inch longer.

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On 9/15/2020 at 4:22 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

This seems minimalist. 

IMG_1573.thumb.jpg.15b2298684ea35250c473e343f1f1e35.jpg

I'll take the blame for that thing... It is indeed a Richard Woods Duo, more or less. Don't look too closely, she was built in a couple of weekends out of the scrap pile and only meant to last for a season of cruising. She's now on year 4!

She was built for cruising aboard our Bristol 27, and served my wife and I well from Maine down to the Chesapeake. With the thwart resting on the coachroof and the bow/stern resting on the foredeck, the V wasn't an issue at all. I'd do it differently if she was going to be stored flat on the deck though, but no chance finding that sort of space on a B27! It does serve a very practical purpose though, as the extra buoyancy made it much easier to keep the inside of the boat dry when throwing the fwd half in the water. Same with the little buoyancy compartments in the stern - they make dropping her over the side easy and dry. I made a removable seat that fits between the compartments for a passenger.

She's perfectly sized - slides right in the back of a ford focus and also sits transversely in the cockpit of our powerboat. She's lightly built and no sweat to get on the boat or carry around on shore single handed. 

She rows remarkably well, and hops up on plane nicely when towing. She isn't the most stable craft though, hence the name. Overall, I'd say she's a perfect little boat if space is a concern but a bit small to be a general utility dinghy.

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On 7/25/2019 at 7:56 AM, Rasputin22 said:

Everybody loves Nesting Twinks, right? Especially after a few Hard Drinks...

Wise man say: “Be careful what you wish for - it may come true.”

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Here is another one that is very close to the functionality of the PT-11, but allot faster to build and with a 'basic'  kit price that appears to be significantly less. The designer has also made plans and lofting available separately. https://www.bedardyachtdesign.com/designs/tenders/ozona-x-nesting-pram/

 

 

 

 

 

ozona1.jpg

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Edited by 2flit
correct images
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That's a nice looking dinghy but how do you figure "a lot faster to build" than a PT11? Looks to be similar complexity, but it's a plywood only kit, without the pre-made solid wood components included in the PT11 kit. 

Still, a nice option.

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On 9/18/2020 at 11:36 PM, andykane said:

That's a nice looking dinghy but how do you figure "a lot faster to build" than a PT11? Looks to be similar complexity, but it's a plywood only kit, without the pre-made solid wood components included in the PT11 kit. 

Still, a nice option.

Build time is estimated to be far less than the PT-11. They are 100 professional hours for the Ozona nester versus 190 hours for the PT-11.  For the amateur build it's...  150 hours versus 300 . Maximum hours to do a Bristol amateur  build are not really addressed well and I suspect,  highly variable.  I'm in contact with an amateur Ozona builder now asking about their hours. I'll report back if it's way out of the estimated range. 

We have a PT-11 and love the boat, they are fantastic.

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On September 17, 2020 at 11:36 AM, Will S said:

I'll take the blame for that thing... It is indeed a Richard Woods Duo, more or less. Don't look too closely, she was built in a couple of weekends out of the scrap pile and only meant to last for a season of cruising. She's now on year 4!

She was built for cruising aboard our Bristol 27, and served my wife and I well from Maine down to the Chesapeake. With the thwart resting on the coachroof and the bow/stern resting on the foredeck, the V wasn't an issue at all. I'd do it differently if she was going to be stored flat on the deck though, but no chance finding that sort of space on a B27! It does serve a very practical purpose though, as the extra buoyancy made it much easier to keep the inside of the boat dry when throwing the fwd half in the water. Same with the little buoyancy compartments in the stern - they make dropping her over the side easy and dry. I made a removable seat that fits between the compartments for a passenger.

She's perfectly sized - slides right in the back of a ford focus and also sits transversely in the cockpit of our powerboat. She's lightly built and no sweat to get on the boat or carry around on shore single handed. 

She rows remarkably well, and hops up on plane nicely when towing. She isn't the most stable craft though, hence the name. Overall, I'd say she's a perfect little boat if space is a concern but a bit small to be a general utility dinghy.

Was that the one you were towing in Castine-Camden a couple of years ago?

Hey, do this place favor and post a couple of pics of your new boat in the cool boats thread. It may be a power boat, but it's one of the coolest boats I've ever seen.

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  • 1 year later...

My latest fastening system idea (for my nesting Two-Paw 8) involves throwing in the towel on retrofitting a system/hardware that someone has already come up with (since the system I’ve seen was panned by many here as potentially bad —the way it’s installed would probably let water migrate into the plywood).  Instead, I think I may experiment with anti-rattle latches on the gunwhales and the lower party of the upper hull chine.  And keep the two 1/4” bolts in the bottom.  
 

So, the anti-rattle latches would pull together/secure the two halves of the boat —theoretically easily— which would quickly line up the two bolt holes on the lower part of the middle bulkhead (allowing you to put those bolts in easily).

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Sailed with this Trinka dink for year’s. Had a 2 hp Honda outboard for it, it rows and sails well. It’s a bit heavy though. 

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D9302010-E876-454D-8359-E000C73D92C2.jpeg

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Our PT11 is about 8 years old now. The varnish now needs a touch up or two and if I were smart, I might drill a drain-hole in the bottom of the seat so that water doesn't collect when stored upside-down on-deck.  Still, after all these years if we are stopped anywhere for more than 5 minutes someone has put the rig in and gone for a sail. 

Now...

AM-JKLWEqi3ane5LFjbduU4ilQZ5vrnNRHNDMyEV

Then..

AM-JKLW8yyrkf7UEsi_81OyOJf1GOADwdPSfYrLI

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PT11 looks narrow. Is it tippy?

I mean, for an athletic young guy I'm sure it's no big deal. For people pushing 50 with slower reflexes, it might be tippy.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

PT11 looks narrow. Is it tippy?

I mean, for an athletic young guy I'm sure it's no big deal. For people pushing 50 with slower reflexes, it might be tippy.

I resemble that remark. <_<   Not really.  It's got a 4' 2" beam, which is narrower than the Dyer 9'. I've never flipped the PT, but I have capsized the Dyer (wife was not amused, rest of harbor very amused).  I'd say less tippy than a Dyer. Once the PT chines go in the water, it stabilizes. The Dyer starts out stable and then just keeps going.  The PT11 also doesn't swamp like the Dyer. 

Pushing 50 yr old dude with slow reflexes...

AM-JKLWhCen9UFI3ZbLcRi8lWJLLhx_gnzs2i9KI

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I've been pushing to get back to 50 for almost 20 years and it hasn't been working.

Still would love to have a PT11, seems like the perfect dinghy (other than cost). 

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5 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

That one reminds me of the NN10: http://www.nestinglite.com/NLDsite/Prices/NN10/nn10.html

I almost bought a used one 6 years ago and regret not doing so.  I test rowed it and decided to pass (some features were pretty crude up close).  I thought about it more and went back to the next day to buy it and it had already sold.

I've seen the PT11 up close and it's a much smarter boat, but the NN10 still has some appeal to me as an inexpensive option.

The NN10 website hasn't been updated in years and I don't know if they are actually available anymore.

The NN10 has very low freeboard, the Journeyman seems improved there.

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I like the way that the transom bench works on that Journeyman.  It pops in for rowing/motoring and out of the way for sailing.  When sailing there are floatation tanks that it looks like you can lean against port and starboard.

This shows the bench and the floatation tanks underneath.

journeyman%20dinghy.jpg?ph=8c25490c91

 

This shows the seats in use:

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Kolibri came with a Dyer Dhow which was wonderful to row, but I really didn't want to haul it to Hawaii on the foredeck. It's just a bit too big for a boat that is 29' on LOD. I sold the Dyer Dhow to a neighbor who regularly uses it for rowing in the nearby wetlands. I used the cash to buy my current "dinghy"...an iRocker All Around 11' SUP.

Once I get Kolibri to Oahu next summer I plan on building a nesting dinghy. Not sure which one yet, but this thread has been incredibly useful for identifying some great candidates. I may also consider one of the "True Kit" inflatables. 

image.thumb.png.1632a7d7dcc83ed45a7f5b1001c15f65.png

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9 hours ago, Alex W said:

I like the way that the transom bench works on that Journeyman.  It pops in for rowing/motoring and out of the way for sailing.  When sailing there are floatation tanks that it looks like you can lean against port and starboard.

This shows the bench and the floatation tanks underneath.

journeyman%20dinghy.jpg?ph=8c25490c91

 

This shows the seats in use:

Is that nice little beach a Puget Sound secret? :D

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I have always found that stepping onto the side of an inflatable was easier than stepping down onto the floor of a hard dink.  I am not sure if something shaped like this would have enough stability but I like the fact that the rail provides seating

Reverso: The boat of the future is here

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Bidding on Leo's sailing dinghy has reached $10,400 in a single day!  Funds for charity but wow.  Tally Ho!!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/154635471006

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Bidder
Bid Amount Bid Time
Highest Bidder
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$10,400.00
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Starting price
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2 Oct 2021 at 10:26:14am PDT

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPPGWtHEQO0&ab_channel=SampsonBoatCo

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On 10/1/2021 at 7:46 AM, gkny said:

I have always found that stepping onto the side of an inflatable was easier than stepping down onto the floor of a hard dink.  I am not sure if something shaped like this would have enough stability but I like the fact that the rail provides seating

Reverso: The boat of the future is here

Where did that come from? Any more info about it? I think for stability you want hard chines. That looks moderately stable to me.

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10 hours ago, mckenzie.keith said:

Where did that come from? Any more info about it? I think for stability you want hard chines. That looks moderately stable to me.

This is the Reverso Air sailboat.  Most of the nesting dinghys have very vertical sides and next by reversing the forward section and having the bow nest to the back of the aft section.  This boat has flared sides and more of a wedge shape.  It nests by with each section in its assembled fore and aft position.  There are four sections of about 3' length.  It creates a pretty high stack but a shorter 9' dinghy done in two sections might not create that high a stack.

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1 hour ago, gkny said:

This is the Reverso Air sailboat. 

To save anyone else from having to look this up: https://www.sailreverso.com/small-sailboat

The web site appears to be short on specs, I haven't located its weight yet, only this:
"The largest section weighs 37 lb (17.2 kg)". 

 

By comparison, the entire True Kit inflatable mentioned a year ago weighs 35 kg for the 3.5 meter (11.5 feet) version, and fits in a bag deflated - in much less space.  I like it!

Navigator_Specs_1200x.thumb.png.ae54400a7aae3def041c8e9eccf83b56.png

SZO70890_1000x.jpg.ed1c73e4977d552fa6cb28e11585a3b6.jpg

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47 minutes ago, Alex W said:

That says it is 125lb/57kg for the hull.

That's almost 50 lbs. more than the 3.5 meter True Kit (35 kg = 77 lbs.).  125 lbs. is not light!

Looks like the True Kit 3.5 has far greater capacity as well: 1,543 lbs. (700 kg) vs. only 396 lbs. (180 kg) for the Reverso.  That's almost four times greater load carrying ability for the inflatable!!

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I don’t really see them as comparable boats. The True Kit is a motoring dinghy, the Reverso is a sailing dinghy.  I doubt that either rows all that well. 

The Reverso looks like a Laser that comes into 4 hull sections. It is reasonably light for that and probably more fun to sail than most take apart boats. 

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1 hour ago, ProaSailor said:

Looks like the True Kit 3.5 has far greater capacity as well: 1,543 lbs. (700 kg) vs. only 396 lbs. (180 kg) for the Reverso.  That's almost four times greater load carrying ability for the inflatable!!

Yeah but it's a deflatable. It's not a nesting dinghy. It's not a hard dinghy.

Totally different class of dinghy.

You'd need to compare it with other deflatables, not hard/nesting dinks.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

I don’t really see them as comparable boats. The True Kit is a motoring dinghy, the Reverso is a sailing dinghy.  I doubt that either rows all that well. 

Reality check.  If I wanted a new dinghy for my 35' sailing catamaran (which I don't since I had to sell the yacht years ago), the True Kit 3.5 would do the job better than any nesting hard dink I've seen so far.  The ability to carry four to seven adults out to the anchored boat in one trip would be the primary criteria.  You are speculating about how well it rows, as I would be if I said the rigid bottom and "catamaran" tube configuration probably row better than typical old style inflatables.  But for me, rowing ability is well below other criteria like quality, low weight, price and compact stowage for long passages.  An extremely low priority would be the ability to sail the dinghy.

Out of deference to this thread's title, I'll stop mentioning it but let's not lose sight of why inflatables are popular.

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That’s fine, but that isn’t this thread. 

For my family of 4 the hard 10’ rowing dinghy with a tiny 250w electric outboard is much better than any inflatable.  We love poking around quietly and looking at the wildlife.  Our distances are rarely long and going fast has no appeal.  
 

My kids also love sailing in it with me. It’s no rocket, but it’s a great way to spend an hour or two. 

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No knock on those who need a utility RIB or inflatable to meet their needs. Which is probably most long distance voyagers. 

It comes down to use and preferences. I love rowing and sailing small boats, and quiet. I don't care for outboards, noise, or going fast in powerboats, and I don't tend to go places where those features would be a priority. I don't anticipate the need to carry many people or heavy loads.  I have no long distance voyaging in my likely future, but hope to do casual cruising as a couple. Rowing around a quiet shoreline, or a sail about the anchorage is a capability I'd love to have.   Boats that row and sail well and have reasonable stability and capacity will be longer than I can carry intact on deck, so nesting designs have inherent appeal.  This thread is rich in resources and ideas. 

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5 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

No knock on those who need a utility RIB or inflatable to meet their needs. Which is probably most long distance voyagers. 

It comes down to use and preferences. I love rowing and sailing small boats, and quiet. I don't care for outboards, noise, or going fast in powerboats, and I don't tend to go places where those features would be a priority. I don't anticipate the need to carry many people or heavy loads.  I have no long distance voyaging in my likely future, but hope to do casual cruising as a couple. Rowing around a quiet shoreline, or a sail about the anchorage is a capability I'd love to have.   Boats that row and sail well and have reasonable stability and capacity will be longer than I can carry intact on deck, so nesting designs have inherent appeal.  This thread is rich in resources and ideas. 

This

It's a matter of priorities and planning. My wife and I cruised part time for 6 years and full time for 3, around the eastern US and Canada. We had a dog with us full time. I dislike outboards and carrying gasoline aboard, so we used a rowing dinghy. I made it a priority to be able to anchor close to dog-walkingn (he was also trained to "go" aboard but he didn't like it), having a shallow draft boat helps.

It does take extra time and care and planning to not rely on a planing dinghy; but it's not difficult.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

This

It's a matter of priorities and planning. My wife and I cruised part time for 6 years and full time for 3, around the eastern US and Canada. We had a dog with us full time. I dislike outboards and carrying gasoline aboard, so we used a rowing dinghy. I made it a priority to be able to anchor close to dog-walkingn (he was also trained to "go" aboard but he didn't like it), having a shallow draft boat helps.

It does take extra time and care and planning to not rely on a planing dinghy; but it's not difficult.

FB- Doug

That goes against the cult of the one true RIB, which in extreme cases results in 30+ foot boats having davits and a huge RIB hanging off the back. 

With  the exception of Maine, people treat you strangely when you use a hard dink. It's like you are wearing a hair shirt or something.  

 

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11 minutes ago, Elegua said:

That goes against the cult of the one true RIB, which in extreme cases results in 30+ foot boats having davits and a huge RIB hanging off the back. 

With  the exception of Maine, people treat you strangely when you use a hard dink. It's like you are wearing a hair shirt or something.  

 

I think you're overgeneralizing a bit.

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2 minutes ago, IStream said:

I think you're overgeneralizing a bit.

Quite possibly. We'll see when I get out there.  I have had people "tut-tut" me and say things like, "It works because you're not really cruising".   Maybe I'll come to the same conclusion? 

What I see in the boats that come to SE Florida during the semi-annual migration is almost exclusively large-ish RIBs.  I'm sure the more offshore oriented boats went direct.   

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The pattern I've noticed is that the folks who generally anchor in snug harbors and who seek out isolation and quiet, tend to prefer rowing and therefore prefer hard dinks.

The folks who find themselves anchoring far from services they need or who want to anchor in one place and use their boat as the hub for a bunch of destination spokes that may be some distance off need a high speed inflatable. 

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

Quite possibly. We'll see when I get out there.  I have had people "tut-tut" me and say things like, "It works because you're not really cruising".   Maybe I'll come to the same conclusion? 

What I see in the boats that come to SE Florida during the semi-annual migration is almost exclusively large-ish RIBs.  I'm sure the more offshore oriented boats went direct.   

Kevin Boothby might have something to say about the "not really cruising" remark.

Let me tell you that I LOVED using my Dyer this weekend instead of the Achilles inflatable. I didn't pack the trolling motor or battery. When not racing it, I stowed the sailing rig and rowed my wife and I quite swiftly to shore every time we wanted to go.  Blissful silence *and* a reasonable turn of speed and I never broke a sweat.

BTW, we sailed across some very large wakes kicked up by very large, inconsiderate yachts in close proximity and the Dyer only shipped a few drops of water.  If I build the little bow cover, it'll stay 100% dry for sure.

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21 minutes ago, IStream said:

The pattern I've noticed is that the folks who generally anchor in snug harbors and who seek out isolation and quiet, tend to prefer rowing and therefore prefer hard dinks.

The folks who find themselves anchoring far from services they need or who want to anchor in one place and use their boat as the hub for a bunch of destination spokes that may be some distance off need a high speed inflatable. 

Need? Maybe, but lots of those people would find more joy in getting the exercise of rowing and the fun of a dinghy that rows and sails well. I think that around half the fun of cruising happens in the dinghy. A dinghy that rows and sails well can be really fun.

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29 minutes ago, IStream said:

The pattern I've noticed is that the folks who generally anchor in snug harbors and who seek out isolation and quiet, tend to prefer rowing and therefore prefer hard dinks.

^^^^ this

I have never understood the attraction of sailing in peaceful quiet to a beautiful place, with the journey's soundtrack consisting only of wind and wave and crew swearing ... and then wrecking the peace of the beautiful place by sitting two inches from a screaming outboard.

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2 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Kevin Boothby might have something to say about the "not really cruising" remark.

Let me tell you that I LOVED using my Dyer this weekend instead of the Achilles inflatable. I didn't pack the trolling motor or battery. When not racing it, I stowed the sailing rig and rowed my wife and I quite swiftly to shore every time we wanted to go.  Blissful silence *and* a reasonable turn of speed and I never broke a sweat.

BTW, we sailed across some very large wakes kicked up by very large, inconsiderate yachts in close proximity and the Dyer only shipped a few drops of water.  If I build the little bow cover, it'll stay 100% dry for sure.

They were referring to the fact that I wasn't a liveaboard with liveaboard dinghy needs and that I would "learn" once full-time. 

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We cruised from Vermont through the Bahamas with a rowing dink, and towed it the whole, twice. 

Apparently we still haven't learned. :) 

1238302928_EggemogginReachsunsetfullresolution.(1of1).thumb.jpg.384dbe71cf57fa6d52fef32b26cea53d.jpg

When our son was about 9, we nearly succumbed to the inconvenience of an inflatable and engine.

We dragged our feet for a season or two,... and eventually, he got over it. He has since forgiven us. 

444877185_NAMOrigging2.thumb.jpg.2d4a0d03a6a9301df014bfb59b6a07ed.jpg

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@Kris Cringle That cloud formation is stunning.

Keep posting photos. They help keep the trip fresh in my mind.  My wife and I still mention you frequently in our conversations, months later.

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

That goes against the cult of the one true RIB, which in extreme cases results in 30+ foot boats having davits and a huge RIB hanging off the back. 

With  the exception of Maine, people treat you strangely when you use a hard dink. It's like you are wearing a hair shirt or something.  

 

Why Maine? Do they shave with a Hedgehog?

hair shirt | undercoversmurf15

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

With  the exception of Maine, people treat you strangely when you use a hard dink. It's like you are wearing a hair shirt or something.  

Hard dinghies are pretty common in Puget Sound too (but hair shirts would also probably fly with the axe throwing crowd).  Inflatables and RIBs are still more popular, but about 25% of the boats on my dock (36 and 38' slips and mostly cruising sailboats) having rigid dinghies with Ranger (Minto), Gig Harbor, and Walker Bay as popular brands.

If my 4 year old had to pick one boat to keep it would be our Gig Harbor dinghy, not the keelboat.  He loves going out in it.

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Oh- I settled on a name for the Dyer. I gave up searching for an antonym for Alacrity and went with a synonym- "vim" (no caps).  As in "vim and vigor." 

Def: Energy, enthusiasm.

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1 hour ago, Russell Brown said:

Need? Maybe, but lots of those people would find more joy in getting the exercise of rowing and the fun of a dinghy that rows and sails well. I think that around half the fun of cruising happens in the dinghy. A dinghy that rows and sails well can be really fun.

I'm not a purist. I've owned and see the attraction of both.

I recently sold my Walker Bay 10 with oars and 2.5hp Suzuki and bought a Craigslist Avon with a 15hp outboard. I was having a hard time getting my teens out on the sailboat but now with the promise of zooming around at the destination, it's much easier to get them out on the sailboat for a cruise. It's also a hell of a lot easier to get the dogs to shore without an accident when their eyeballs are turning yellow.

I've fantasized about building a PT-11 but that's going to have to wait until the kids are out of the house. 

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12 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Oh- I settled on a name for the Dyer. I gave up searching for an antonym for Alacrity and went with a synonym- "vim" (no caps).  As in "vim and vigor." 

I like it.  As a head's up, you'll get a lot of people assuming that you are a software developer and really like vim the code editor.  It's a pretty minimalist and elegant choice that fits well with a Dyer...

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Posted (edited)

Heh.  Many in technology will confuse that with the [url=https://vim.org]text editor software.[/url]

This summer I experimented with two dinghies.  One is an 8' fiberglass rowing dinghy that I bought for $150 and put on a "repair and weight loss" program.  Came to the conclusion that it is too small, so I'm selling it:

mNJDHilentDrCmPbs8DBpxrbwfsqJX0vxSYvkO4HFlQcqCq5JYj_NCLWdVhOtpFWR8PAPM0xzIrQntz0nBm56zuemcdzQxAPhVq1Kz8IeLtjNBiphK4Rs_JYk3aYAwtXiOfuVSGKegYNOqU3CePhT34P7Osv6_HFk7iSBjSIjhkLiXdIIGfr77dxvAbJWzQV2QIxiWLxCrCMUec6y_3dUapp9DANxcEnCE53uVFZAqnBW8T_1yEMVAJFy1IezX5YZSvQ5qpZkdjlWEoiB-loOhf18MkmsZFfr3fCy79GtDoHQZu1e0D_RREPqh4wopTdSPklA0NSu6HNIgUFOl8reybRwSrZyAkKnEw1yfUDyRbMDhPhohx_mdp5Np8ArYDGFmsUOIj3kcIh8Vf5G0-2_Hhkx1_NDMNTUF_DUBC-lcXn-giREV8PfHze7UvhPQ4rO7oIVpc0qSJDFkbB-zkIMPciw76sTA6oPDVXCIt9RDadTOPDVMeabaJTbGR9DyoVfRzBKpjBJ9-vyHcJp0cBpgyxtB--GJCgE3bbjU1mmdZguMzPrbyZgKm6yIRc8cbjcu1_BPlfbvv5gT0c0pycJNQLvzhYRQ9VG4EkIVoK8DEEaqWcHqLxGDR3p5pwNSY5FMFExH8i507ne_Ij_KFfyY9M2MFraH3CJkbWVv1KCq_3nyJL3nzeMdb_mO-hkqBsAmb-oNgdrUGd0Rs2YHhWzmnU=w1253-h939-no?authuser=1

 

The other one is a 14' aluminum planing boat, which we recently towed for a week on a houseboat charter.  It rows OK for what it is with 7'10" spruce oars.  :

9swkptpcEfZcFfMnIuhQuHIUPgtg604NfNZhr5PJ627td55ZtwtmY4566DAwV8-Icn_BJ4zWcouQTP6vVgXVolMGzP1lMOtTK64pec2YhDms4DYz-30qFf_1u5D7uoHYpuHd2hLswdKYdpjAuR2eM9Z6QpReA1wGKOcbBu7qWPp0VG1yZRWp1x8QO2F35fOZnhFsEh5WXfxQ2Q0LmXPxFR7yDv5xW2lrMLAewaVdvOYtG7GvnbtYAkF1G1b-XWLm6GUGrUCZl2oCB_6hrVNgnhBPEiI9zuObYDIifJWmS6SquaKWtx8uK7wiCzwfYmBIVWihclo3suMzyiRabEBZ2nJqTeI0UGev6PpA_sgSTNadgONWLqI-BdBBkloLuQeDqpaNkHnC5Gq7u3DPVr-2De1pnc9hnl87_2M1Yaptk6Y9sns1Ogx1feHeRB17gjU3x_m74bWOGqG_tlrbZQJUQNdxWxjpb6KNn7rg5nd0ddS6Fqc63YM7nx11ky5HUqUC1i20-ntHJi4D5E60YNOBWbEmnd0G1F5pmJcF-ye5bJy99nBcA9EESIroEP3-MhZvKIuNFBT2GPlDjdnCFfAQBKXECEgmy2rLCj9IYXyZ2NuIddQPPZ7NFWPMvl8g9p3535BvR-6x_z3VN0hq0C050Dq19PBHYB36nnqoc-gXHe8UyFvouxLIHaxjseCHIIeSC-L0QHvebeWoIoGE06sKzRuQ=w1253-h939-no?authuser=1

 

58Ef20JACDcv9AhpDLdlxkK0KwP5nieLwNxP7mVLl87fRXEOAVga8Za6qiMoyaCOBSq7dE1qhy7winXHuqPuhmnzhG9OzOTlgvBjrzVdUTqX23o5CjiN4X5o-uj-51-56P5LFVsZZ-I37TvsucT7PHLl2oQb8CQnaKU55Q68AW6k9YPMqmlcxz6Hyi3kkg7DabxPXfsKlRwHYTnxdxCbuO_JopWbXJDUNwOSHiUgDkQtvc2VK9b5EPydfwszFVeStgGW4bf2vzct1FUaNmnvmGT5Aot8GtmLj9MP4k8mKNhjY2AkhqKq1V9ta4hc4H0HkzEFuP1tTVvN9QynYghpWgXJQpvkJogcDpLxtefbkHpWcngT1DyBbzLUCKpehDMHSIhwRTBr6Sh4AApabIDiB-lFIu9bI9kRjCxQsWWUuuYJ0XUdR5gCH0MwaKqxVVuhuT2QVvP76JvUpovupsgD45M680WOC_0ieTwy2tZKF6K3ZhOD0sJSTM6QMq_Wpjhza8UqjstEa7YwiJfC13ee57eA5dWuKfzpq73nSt4OjpGF1va6HiElP-uYgrWAzN7Nbim7nV0GoOVoe80ukrqkkql3ZABfd-UxjWfM7ur20luyFPlhKs45g5W-eYAILkvdv7NlaUembno9iK-bhOAVxq_NXxFODnoCtrUEQr8cWVnyolimaEiV1nDRhPBQlbR-yhN7nt8TIenAuX3P5fneuBS4=w1253-h939-no?authuser=1

 

DtbJo-q6Gu4IbCTBoDIFCXpDkeIqXscs16apV3GXvebe1Wm4R7TO4d7aSznfu8FtoirxHIFGXE9dftH1ti2Zr98jTG6SLNKENHoTNI-8RTsZnvxk4svvcaK1rUa25h-JNUrFlE4PNlK8p12C6A6QAhXYZTeClg4I2nngoohyJl0YkC0IuWiFZszlChIbYwx3iKrczEAeFZgNcJ1AH5kWoht3N0FLCcYsLWMasZ5DHD412KDo5hMGLShs033C4c4Eyu0iZKRlsxNoGTqQhI3gjee6ZtHsD7qNpVtFAIO4xmMCY0tYXzNJRsiK39n8E3kVfK6eyOFSoCKU6xRF5RAmK6SNn-dnrxd8VtsyjLQWvSh2tnZjl9e0C1cdlgdUyG9bJNB6GM7jazq7lPpmHteA35anTfZNvyeq3QBaO1bh9BR5N1SxNTUJvM-pXFH_v-GSRQJnDIxpjdQL0YJiqTNf_UEFcYBq7HltnM3cwaiD6G0yCXkQ0UqUsDvdTSob0S9rNgD6Z3OhKh9BUsVP9-F0aEYH9B9iY054GdXFeTloluHLzD8Un63OARhkNp4FtWorV1l_BDUvt0WuSFHmOiiEa-3Rpduu9AomJJYs75NiApcG4oC2SF0Sif0iVlxvVA1Uh0jGR88DkekSjZh9ok-sxWeVABLHW-RCbVhzaivRkBp5CMpjjCZBjVEd4UyUyJdRNMIEN7gGDQgYHDHigy5O0WbF=w1253-h939-no?authuser=1

 

Edited by 2airishuman
corrected aspect ratio in photos
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@2airishuman LOL...your daughter is "not amused."  That aluminum craft is neat!

I started off with a Howmar Hauler 8' which looks deceptively similar to a Dyer Midget to the uninitiated:

https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f152/howmar-hauler-sailing-dinghy-400-a-203693.html

It was neither stable nor light, nor did it row particularly well.  Its capacity was also too little.

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21 minutes ago, Alex W said:

I like it.  As a head's up, you'll get a lot of people assuming that you are a software developer and really like vim the code editor.  It's a pretty minimalist and elegant choice that fits well with a Dyer...

LOL, yeah I got that. I've used VIM in my work on occasion. It's so popular that it crowds out the actual word "vim" in search engine results.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

LOL, yeah I got that. I've used VIM in my work on occasion. It's so popular that it crowds out the actual word "vim" in search engine results.

It has good lineage. People will think you are the tender to this.

VIM.jpeg

953736_0_100820101054_1.jpg

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Oh- I settled on a name for the Dyer. I gave up searching for an antonym for Alacrity and went with a synonym- "vim" (no caps).  As in "vim and vigor." 

Def: Energy, enthusiasm.

 

2 hours ago, Alex W said:

I like it.  As a head's up, you'll get a lot of people assuming that you are a software developer and really like vim the code editor.  It's a pretty minimalist and elegant choice that fits well with a Dyer...

 

1 hour ago, Ajax said:

LOL, yeah I got that. I've used VIM in my work on occasion. It's so popular that it crowds out the actual word

"vim" in search engine results.

Or they will think you have an English charwoman's dinghy named after the famous cleaning product...

"Vim scouring powder, one of the first products created by William Lever, first appeared on the market in 1904, an offshoot of Monkey Brand scouring soap. The name is thought to derive from the colloquial English word "vim" which has the same meaning as the Latin vis, vim ("force", "vigour")" - Wikipedia

I don't know if it is available in the States, but it is a staple in cleaning closets in Canada and the UK. Works well on gelcoat stains too.

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On the "why we like them" aspect of the thread title, I too am trying to understand the popularity of RIBs.  I have formed these conclusions:

  1. RIBs are readily available for purchase.
    1. In contrast, nesting dinghies are only available as plans, kits, or bespoke from custom builders.
    2. Regulatory compliance makes it difficult to build small planing boats that are not inflatable because of horsepower limits based on transom width and overall length and the requirement for level flotation when swamped.  Inflatable boats are exempt from these requirements.
    3. Whatever the reason, utility boats are not readily available in sizes smaller than 12', which is too large for most cruising sailboats to carry.
  2. RIBs are lighter than production utility boats of comparable capacity.
    1. Achilles HB-310AL 10'2" (3.1m) Aluminum RIB, 112# bare hull
    2. Lund A-12 sunfish, 12' aluminum utility, 164# bare hull
    3. Trinka, Walker Bay, etc. 10' dinghy typically 125-135# bare hull
  3. Many cruisers stay in busy anchorages or moorings where they are reluctant to move the (big) boat for fear that they will lose a preferred location.  Some cruisers do not want the extra work associated with moving the (big) boat (and then re-anchoring it) to run errands even when it is feasible.  Whatever the reason, they then use the dinghy for access to areas where the mother ship could conceivably be used, and need the ability to cross distance.
  4. Cruisers in the Bahamas, coastal Florida, and the Florida Keys, especially those with deeper draft keels, find that usable anchorages are widely spaced, again leading to a need to cross distance.  In some cases this is exacerbated by inlets/bridges that can only be crossed during specific tidal conditions
  5. Some cruisers frequent areas where suitable transient dockage is unavailable at any price, leading to greater reliance on the dinghy for cargo, compared to ICW/Chesapeake/Great Lakes/River cruisers where availability of dockage is not usually a limitation. 
  6. Some cruisers prefer exploring shoreline with a powerboat rather than under sail or oar, just as some people prefer a motorbike to a bicycle.
  7. There are some cruisers who see the ability of a 10hp dinghy to serve as a tow for the mothership as a significant asset.
  8. RIBs have better initial stability than most other hull shapes, and less experienced spouses/guests may ascribe greater safety to them based on this "feeling" of stability while boarding.
  9. Many cruisers believe that RIBs are safer in heavy seas than hard dinghies.
  10. RIBs are self-fendering, to an even greater extent than hard dinghies with integral gunwale fendering.

I believe the case for a rowing/sailing-oriented dinghy goes something like this:

  1. It is not practicable to row or sail an inflatable because of the flex inherent in the sponsons.  Therefore, a RIB leads to dependence on an outboard motor, with these knock-on effects:
    1. Outboard motors are susceptible to theft, with long-term cruisers averaging a loss of one outboard motor every two years, even when measures are taken to secure the motor and ports with known problems with theft are avoided.
    2. The received wisdom is that the outboard should not be left on the dinghy overnight.  The time and effort involved in hoisting the outboard to the rail of the mothership at night, and then reinstalling it on the dinghy in the morning, undermines the time and effort savings from motoring rather than rowing.  (Davits overcome this at the expense of windage, cost, and aesthetics)
    3. Outboard fuel must be managed.  It is flammable, requires space, must be purchased from time to time, etc.
    4. Outboards are mechanical devices that are prone to failure.
  2. Production quality of RIBs is uneven and warranty service poor across all vendors.  While some vendors are better than others, and hypalon is better than PVC, there are stories of RIBs coming apart during the first two years of service across all makes and with both materials.  It is rare for warranty service to be satisfactory when this occurs particularly when it is not possible to return the dinghy to the location where it was originally purchased.
  3. Sponsons are more susceptible to damage from fish hooks, animal claws, nails and other fasteners, and sharp rocks than the hulls of hard dinks.  Field repair of damage to sponsons is not always successful, particularly with larger tears, increasing the likelihood that a RIB will have to be abandoned and replaced during a cruise.  In contrast, hard dinks can generally be repaired even in cases where the damage is serious.
  4. Even well-made RIBs have a relatively short maximum service life and require periodic replacement, making them essentially disposable products with low resale.  When combined with the problems with outboard theft and other factors on this list, the total lifecycle cost of operating a RIB is high.
  5. Nesting dinghies use less foredeck space than a deflated RIB and are less work to nest than a RIB is to deflate.
  6. Hard dinghies that are rowed have favorable regulatory treatment compared to RIBs, at least in some jurisdictions.  For example, in some Great Lakes states, hand carried craft propelled by oars are guaranteed shore access on all public lands by statute.  In most jurisdictions rowed vessels are not required to carry navigation lights.
  7. By virtue of their shape and light weight, some hard dinghies are feasible to portage or cartop, opening up the possibility of access to inland areas that would otherwise be inaccessible.
  8. Rowing and sailing are enjoyable activities in their own right.
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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

@2airishuman LOL...your daughter is "not amused."  That aluminum craft is neat!

 

Younger daughter is camera shy.

I get a lot of comments on the aluminum boat.  It's a 1960s Crestliner that came up for sale locally.  It looked awful due to a couple of really bad paint jobs that were falling off.  On older aluminum boats usually the rivets are loose or pulled out and there are bent areas etc but aside from the paint it was in really good shape.  I had it sandblasted and rolled a bunch of primers on it in accordance with Interlux's instructions, then their aluminum-safe antifouling on the bottom and two coats of Perfection on the topsides.  There's a battery under the bow decking and a VHF antenna that uses the bow decking for a ground plane.  I can fit either a trolling motor or the 9.9 on the stern, but not both at once.

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57 minutes ago, 2airishuman said:

Trinka, Walker Bay, etc. 10' dinghy typically 125-135# bare hull

Dinghy weights are all over the place.  The Trinka and Walker Bay are on the heavy side.  Here are a few more:

  • Gig Harbor Navigator 10 (what I have) is 90lbs FG, 75lbs kevlar
  • Dyer Dhow 9' is 105lbs
  • West Marine's 10' plastic dinghy is 100lbs and $750
  • Ranger Minto 120lbs

Hard dinghies are hard to find new and ready to go (I think Gig Harbor usually has quite a long waiting list).  On the other hand they last a long time, so you can usually find used ones to buy.

 

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