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They've been around for a couple seasons now. they were running a really sweet charter deal last year, and they're running a sale now ;)

 

Cape-31-July-August-special.png

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Do the sails have to be paneled? Looks like North so would make sense to keep costs down. Limiting instruments and learning from driving costs up that killed the C&C 30 would be good. Cost of the boat is the cheap part of sailing so keeping the running of the boat and Pro's down to a reasonable number is the important part. Hopefully they can be sailed with less than 8 people too. 

Looks fun to me.

 

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  • 11 months later...

It rates 1.13 in IRC for those interested. The C31 in the UK has nearly cleaned up in most of the races it enters. The team racing it is very good but even so it’s very fast. The more powerful hull shape and larger keel fin seem to work well in the Solent chop

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She looks pretty Good, great Rocker......and even though Chine Its a great look with Plump stem and the bevelled Gunwale.  and the big ply bulkhead looks like the Cape is going through the sound barrier......

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image.png.6d8b0fc62e3807b65d4d1ff87e7f624b.png

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On 8/15/2019 at 5:25 PM, Murphness said:

Will these do some near shore overnight races or are they mostly inshore OD? 

 

On 8/21/2019 at 5:01 PM, Mark Mills said:

Most of the current class activity is inshore. but they are happy coastal racing.  Some do the Mykonos race in SA which is 65 miles up the coast from Cape Town.

mostly day racing, Mykonos is a bit of a once off as it is downwind day 1 and then inshore day2.

 

BUUUT

this is a gonna be 4 up and  take 6/7 days i guess. 

https://rcyc.co.za/capetosthelena/seascape-powered-by-yanmar/

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On 4/18/2021 at 11:39 AM, shebeen said:

 

mostly day racing, Mykonos is a bit of a once off as it is downwind day 1 and then inshore day2.

 

BUUUT

this is a gonna be 4 up and  take 6/7 days i guess. 

https://rcyc.co.za/capetosthelena/seascape-powered-by-yanmar/

AFAIK this is a modified 31 that was originally damaged by a dehumidifier fire. The boat you show as entered is actually now on the water in the UK as one of the growing fleet there.

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It was nice to see 3 boats racing in the Solent at the weekend. Rumour has it 14 boats in total have been sold to the UK including g the ones already delivered. The RYA have allocated 20 sail numbers for a UK C31 fleet

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2 hours ago, JL92S said:

It was nice to see 3 boats racing in the Solent at the weekend. Rumour has it 14 boats in total have been sold to the UK including g the ones already delivered. The RYA have allocated 20 sail numbers for a UK C31 fleet

At this point in time the fleet will be 8 boats in a few months, there is a lot of interest however so this could change quite soon.

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23 hours ago, Major Tom said:

capeperformancesailing@gmail.com  

Sorry, this is the builders address, the UK and USA agent is Dave Swete who has sold 9 boats into the UK and has big plans for the USA and the Caribbean. Contact dave@swetesailing.com

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2 hours ago, ryley said:

Good luck Ed - looks like around $265k all up and delivered.

Thanks. Dave Swete has set up a great schedule for the Caribbean and we are lining up a great US Circuit too. He has done a great job and Sail22 will help execute it. Any North American owners should check out the Cape31us.com website and send an email to be included in the first boats.

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Here is to another expensive 30 something that all the pros will hop on and all the rich owners will love... for about 36 months.  

The Melges 32 and C&C 30 are looking for a third for bridge at the retirement home.

$265 all up and I am guessing $120k for a used Cape 31 in 2025...
 

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All new boats cost more than used ones. Hey same for cars too. We are establishing a Pro limit and have a great team together that knows how important it is to keep the rules strict to make sure there is a level playing field. We hope you can pick up a Cape31 for less in 4-5 years and plan to still be building new ones too. It’s our jobs to make this great boat also a great class. Its about the people as much as the boat and we plan to make that happen. 

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At this level you really can't complain about the cost...

Owner-driver?:
"An 'owner driver' rule will be enforced for all US boats as well a 2 pro sailor limit. (there are caveats for the owner driver rule if for example an owner does not want to helm their own boat, a suitable Cat 1 driver may be approved by Cape 31 US."

So, is that 3 pros allowed if I don't want to drive? enforced for all US boats as well a 2 pro sailor limit. (there are caveats for the owner driver rule if for example an owner does not want to helm their own boat, a suitable Cat 1 driver may be approved by Cape 31 US

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2 hours ago, Liquid said:

At this level you really can't complain about the cost...

Owner-driver?:
"An 'owner driver' rule will be enforced for all US boats as well a 2 pro sailor limit. (there are caveats for the owner driver rule if for example an owner does not want to helm their own boat, a suitable Cat 1 driver may be approved by Cape 31 US."

So, is that 3 pros allowed if I don't want to drive? enforced for all US boats as well a 2 pro sailor limit. (there are caveats for the owner driver rule if for example an owner does not want to helm their own boat, a suitable Cat 1 driver may be approved by Cape 31 US

The rules will get fine tuned by the first 6 US owners. You will have more say if you commit to an early build slot. The current rules are based on what the UK is doing but we need what works here so there may be some small differences.

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  • 3 months later...

The class had its own start in Cowes  week and there were 5 different race winners during the event. More boats are on the way and there are also a bunch going to Ireland.

 

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With up to four Cape 31heading to Cork Harbour and Howth, the South African inspired racer from the drawing board of Mark Mills looks set to be part of the Irish one design scene in 2022. Boasting high-performance features such as an innovative ramp deck, an all-carbon keel fin, and a Southern Spars carbon rig, the light but powerful 31 has been impressing sailors on both sides of the Atlantic. Last week, Cork sailmaker Barry Hayes sailed the Cape 31 on the Hamble last week, and Afloat asked him for his first impressions.

Cork sailmaker Barry Hayes spotted on a Cape 31 on the Hamble last weekCork sailmaker Barry Hayes (centre) on a Cape 31 on the Hamble last week

Is it easy to sail?
It is super easy. The deck layout is super simple and easy to use. All the lines and systems are well thought out with the right rope in the right place and easy to hand.

The Cape 31 has a very clean deck with cross sheeting. Cars are set onboard all the time.The Cape 31 has a very clean deck with cross sheeting. Cars are set on board all the time

How about the performance? 
It’s a weapon downwind, but very stable like it has two rudders (but only has one); the grip and stability are incredible. Upwind it’s the same very quick; the sheeting angle is squeaky tight max in you can’t fit between the jib and the mast. 
It's a super-efficient sail plan with lots of power. 

The sheeting angle up wind is really tightThe sheeting angle upwind is really tight

Will it sail well on IRC?
Well, I think it’s proven that already in Cowes week. It’s got an excellent rating, and it can sail to it. But sailing against other IRC boats up the first leg will take a bit of getting used to. You will need to sail at their angles and speed for the first beat. After that, you're gone, and you can sail it as fast as you like. And the faster, the better! So just hang on in there until the windward mark, and away you go.

Well thought out control line arrangements at the mastWell thought out control line arrangements at the mast 

Is it easy to control the power in the boat?
Yes, the stability and sail area allows you to control the boat. There is an excellent main sheet set-up and jib sheeting system, which is cross sheeted. Having the kite sheets send jib sheets along with the outboard sheet all going to the same spot makes it so easy to trim and power up and depower.

How about the halyards? None of them come to a winch?
They don’t need to. The main is 2:1 and set down below at the base of the mast, inside the boat. The jib halyard is 2:1 and loads of power in it. So it doesn’t need a winch. The kite halyard is super easy and just 1:1.

How about spinnaker hoisting and dropping?
This is the best part about the boat. The kite is up and down in 5 seconds, super simple with no one pulling the kite Into the bow hatch. It’s pulled down with the retriever line into the forward hatch, which goes directly to the stern where the line pops out, and the tactician pulls the kite down. The bow main guides it into the hatch, but that’s all. This is by far the best part of the boat.

The spinnaker goes down the bow hatch with a take down system on it. The hatch is nicely roundedThe spinnaker goes down the bow hatch with a takedown system on it. The hatch is nicely rounded

The spinnaker inside the boat on the take down systemThe spinnaker inside the boat on the takedown system

Below see three quick vids showing the big kite of the Cape 31, then the spinny takedown system from the stern and thirdly, closing the hatch

Is there much for the rest of the crew to do then?
Yes, everyone has a role from bow to stern. From trimming the jib downwind in 20 kts to the spinnaker takedown, everyone has a job. It’s full-on fun sailing.

Down the main hatch is the bulkhead which the mast base is set onDown the main hatch is the bulkhead which the mast base is set on.

How does the flat deck on each side of the cockpit work out?
It’s excellent, so easy to walk directly up and down the deck. Having the jib sheets so low and not in the way with the cross sheeting makes it easy.

Is this a boat for anyone?
If you're not going offshore or doing ISORA, this is an excellent option for anyone looking at one Design racing and club IRC racing! Having the one design restriction in place totally controls how the fleet works worldwide. Limited crew and limited sails really keep the costs down. You need to bring your runners and leave your boots at home; it’s not that type of boat. You wouldn’t have time to get them on…

You like the boat. Is it a game-changer?
Yes, I think it is. Mark [Mills] did an excellent job finding a very fast boat, simple to sail, can sail in IRC and complete. With crew and sail limits. It’s not easy to do in this day and age. Job well done, I think...

Cape 31 deck planCape 31 deck plan - The low freeboard aggressively chined hull shape that maximises stability in a breeze but enjoys low wetted surface when upright. Plans courtesy Mills Design

Cape 31sail plan - the new design accommodates a socketed deep carbon keel fin and a powerful sail plan, developed with North Sails South Africa and set on a Southern Spars Cape Town carbon rig Plans courtesy Mills DesignCape 31sail plan - the new design accommodates a socketed deep carbon keel fin and a powerful sail plan, developed with North Sails South Africa and set on a Southern Spars Cape Town carbon rig Plans courtesy Mills Design

 
Published in Cape 31
 
 
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At A Glance – Cape 31

LOA 9.56 m
Draft 2.45m
Beam 3.1 m
IRC Rating 1.15

Yacht Builder Mills Design
Model Cape 31
Performance LevelPerformance Racer

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17 hours ago, Major Tom said:

How about the halyards? None of them come to a winch?
They don’t need to. The main is 2:1 and set down below at the base of the mast, inside the boat. The jib halyard is 2:1 and loads of power in it. So it doesn’t need a winch. The kite halyard is super easy and just 1:1.

This is interesting. I assume there's a jib cunningham (under deck?) to fine-tune the halyard tension? From what I've seen they don't run zeros so no need for a tackline winch either.

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On 9/24/2021 at 3:13 PM, Snowden said:

This is interesting. I assume there's a jib cunningham (under deck?) to fine-tune the halyard tension? From what I've seen they don't run zeros so no need for a tackline winch either.

There’s no Cunningham on the jib. Sometimes you can use the leeward primary to adjust halyard tension. 1 boat has a zero but they’re not class legal

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13 hours ago, JL92S said:

There’s no Cunningham on the jib. Sometimes you can use the leeward primary to adjust halyard tension. 1 boat has a zero but they’re not class legal

interesting, cheers. I would have guessed you always needed a winch to get the right halyard tension but I guess 2:1 + getting it done ahead of time before the runners come on is enough?

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Toko 3 had a zero when they were working her up, so did Squirt get that zero? I'm assuming they didn't find it useful enough to make it UK class legal, but could make an appearance if they race IRC (are any doing HWS?)

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8 hours ago, JonRowe said:

Toko 3 had a zero when they were working her up, so did Squirt get that zero? I'm assuming they didn't find it useful enough to make it UK class legal, but could make an appearance if they race IRC (are any doing HWS?)

Squirt is the old Toko 3. The downwind sail inventory has already increased from an A1.5 and A2 to include a smaller A3 so they don’t really have space for an A0 and some teams don’t really have the budget either. 

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Had a look on the way past after when checking on the mini, was Ran's stick in? If so it'd been removed by the time I got there. The boys had chocked up all the cradles to stabilise it until it could be rectified, and cosmetically only one poor boat had any major visible damage although I suspect I just couldn't see Rans damage. Tough stick in the Cape 31, it was holding up the fast 40 by the look if it.

A sad day for Hamble yachting.

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Ran currently has the keel, rudder and rig removed. Effectively she stopped the dominos going any further. Another Cape 31 is the other side of her and then it’s the large Swan, that thing toppling over doesn’t even bear thinking about…

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Understand the domino effect once the first one tipped over but, why weren't these boats strapped to there cradles at least to prevent shifting?  On the GP 42 the cradle frame strut went through the hull like a knife. We store our boat on its trailer, mast in, and the first step is to strap it down which also adds "ballast" .

 

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3 hours ago, Golfinaspen said:

Understand the domino effect once the first one tipped over but, why weren't these boats strapped to there cradles at least to prevent shifting?  On the GP 42 the cradle frame strut went through the hull like a knife.

 

The cradle you see embedded in the GP42 is the cradle of the neighbouring boat... 

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Not quite sure why we're talking about another boat on the Cape 31 thread, but certainly in the Solent the appeal of the Cape is that it performs well both on IRC and has a sizeable fleet for one design regattas, a competitor like the Code 10 lacks the fleet and certainly in my experience, canting keel boats tend to be penalised on IRC and theres not enough "small canting keel" boats around to have a like for like fleet?

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