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I looked at them several years ago when I was searching for my current boat, a Seawind.  Also did a lot of online research on them.  There are/were a couple of online groups for Telstar owners.  Telstars were at the bottom of my price point.  They are fairly light weight and to my mind under canvassed.  Not all that fast.  Fairly easy to trailer.  I read some complaints about leaks between the joint between the deck and hull; but have no personal experience with that.

Without knowing more about how you intend to use a boat it is not easy to assess if they fit your needs.  Basically they are coastal cruisers; probably suitable for the Bahamas.  Would not think they would be good for a place with serious wind and waves.  I looked at two of them.  One was in Green Cove Springs on a trailer.  It opened up easily on the trailer and seemed like it was in decent shape, but a little over priced for what it was.  The other one was in St. Pete in the water; where it had been since the owner died over a year ago.  Definitely needed a bottom job.  The lawyer who was handling the estate sale told me to bring a car battery if I wanted to start the engine.  Thing was it still would not start; I assumed the carb need cleaning for starters.  Sails were a mess, all running rigging needed replacement, probably some of the standing rigging as well.  Even with the lawyers insisting that all offers would be considered I did not make an offer.  I was not looking for a project boat.

If you have more questions ask away.

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thanks for the input, Think I might just look at a corsair at Finish Line in stuart,fl.

which is right up the street from me. 

The Telstar is in Conn. 

did you ever get a boat?

I had a olson 30, j-30 , j-37 all of which i raced on long island, 

had a Gemini , which was Ok but sold it a year ago, 

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4 hours ago, garuda3 said:

thanks for the input, Think I might just look at a corsair at Finish Line in stuart,fl.

which is right up the street from me. 

The Telstar is in Conn. 

did you ever get a boat?

I had a olson 30, j-30 , j-37 all of which i raced on long island, 

had a Gemini , which was Ok but sold it a year ago, 

While I like Steve Marsh some folks have a different opinion.  Same goes for Don at Windcraft which is in the Panhandle.

I have a Seawind, most likely double the price of the Telstar or an fboat.

The Telstar is kinda like a Gemini light.  It can be taken apart and put on a trailer but construction quality is similar.  Both are what I consider coastal boats.  While I am a huge fan of fboats and am kinda in the market for a smaller folding multihull there is a big difference between a Telstar and an fboat.  Even something like a C36 or C37 (not to mention a C31) does not have the ability to cruise like the Telstar does.  On the other hand an fboat can sail circles around a Telstar.

Without knowing what you want to do with the boat it is not easy to suggest the best fit.  For anything more than a weekend of cruising I would pick the Telstar over even a C31 (close call there), it just felt bigger below.  But if I was going for more than a couple of weeks none of the boats you seem to be interested in would be suitable for me.  That is why I got the Seawind.  I can cruise for a couple of three months with out needing to reprovision.  For just plain fun sailing the fboats would be my first choice.  Maybe my biggest question is your price point.

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again thanks for the input, 

I think ( living in Jupiter ) cruising is limited , so probably mostly ICW and some day sailing off shore

You mentioned fboat ? 

I was going to cruise the G 105mc , to NY and back , but health got in the way.

Also found cruising the islands , moorings or sunsail is the best way to go , fly into an island (s) sail for a week then fly home,

also slips are really $$$$$$$ here , if you can get one.here

Where you sail out of ?

Bill

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fboat is a kinda generic term to describe the foldable trimarans designed by Ian Farrier.  He first sold plans then hooked up with Corsair which produced the C24, C27, C28, and C31 from his designs (this is all from memory and may be faulty).  He left Corsair (lots of conflicting claims about this) and Corsair produced the C36 which was not designed by Ian and did not fair well with bulkheads separating from the hull going hard to weather at which point Ian started to really bash Corsair; which produced the C37 which seemed to solve the bulkhead issue.  Boats like the F39 seemed far superior (if well built) than the C36 and C37.  Corsair has also produced several other boats that are similar to Ian's designs but not designed by him.  In any case fboat is basically an Ian designed or inspired trimaran.  Most folks agree that Ian is responsible for producing designs that made small foldable trimarans as popular with the public.  There are more small tris produced by Corsair than any other tri builder.  They are easy to sail, faster than most anything except hard core one offs, hold their value well, and nothing except a much more expensive and rare Dragonfly is as easy to take apart and put together so trailering them and storing them in your yard is a realistic option.

Here is a link to the fboat page with lots of good stuff including how to inspect a used trimaran.

Simply based on resale value I would recommend a C24 (or it's derivatives) unless you intend to spend a lot of time on the ICW sleeping on the boat in which case the Telstar might be a better option.

 

In hurricane season my boat is well up the St. Marks River near Tallahassee, but come October 15 (using my ships calendar which is always +/- a month) I will be heading down island.  While I understand the attraction of chartering there is also something to be said for having your own boat which you can take to places to distant for charter.

 

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7 hours ago, garuda3 said:

what about a condor 30 or 40?

Not a lot around.  Can't remember if the first ones or the later ones were better or worse but there was a QC issue and some boats had much better quality than others.  Price is often very attractive.  Never seen one in person or a vid of them being taken apart and put back together.  Bigger and more comfortable than a Telstar of most of the fboats.

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I owned a 26, 8 meter, 28 Telstar, f 27, and a Condor 40.

The 26 were great boats, and were even big enough to live on, the 8 meters did have gelcoat problems, not as fast, but an even better live a board. The 28s are just plain horrible.

F27s are so cheap right now, they are the best deal on the planet, but are campers.

Condors, incredible tris, but god i hate balsa core

Cheers

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thanks for the input , I did see a dragon fly 25 in stuart for a good price?,

I'll look for any f-27 , there's also a condor 40 on the west coast of florida , price seems ok?

I really think I need a bigger " escape pod" , if the market tanks 

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I also had a Dragonfly 25, sails wonderful,  some core issues on cabin top, also a camper, TWO DIFFERENT MODELS.

I know where a decent f24 is for $21/ $22k.

All boats have pros and cons,  Farriers pay back in storage, and simplicity.

IF THE MARKET TANKS.?, TRY WHEN

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On 8/14/2019 at 10:47 AM, garuda3 said:

 

I really think I need a bigger " escape pod" , if the market tanks 

If you are looking for an escape pod, why are you looking at tris?  Tris (generally) are toys that are fun to sail but are barely habitable; Cats can be lived in for longer periods (ie, escape) but aren't as much fun to sail once they have habitability (the beach cats are fun to sail).  It's a weight thing, if you are going to inhabit, you need "stuff"; "stuff" weighs you down.  A big monohull is also a good escape and weight doesn't affect performance as much, so if you like leaners, and don't care how long it takes to get there...

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59 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

If you are looking for an escape pod, why are you looking at tris?  Tris (generally) are toys that are fun to sail but are barely habitable; Cats can be lived in for longer periods (ie, escape) but aren't as much fun to sail once they have habitability (the beach cats are fun to sail).  It's a weight thing, if you are going to inhabit, you need "stuff"; "stuff" weighs you down.  A big monohull is also a good escape and weight doesn't affect performance as much, so if you like leaners, and don't care how long it takes to get there...

I agree in general.  Maybe some of the older tris like those from Brown or Cross could carry a bigger load; but the newer ones all suffer a lot if over loaded with stuff.  The Brown/Cross types do have a speed advantage over most monohulls; even if it may not be all that big.  Problem with 'don't care how long it takes' is if you wanna get out of Dodge you usually wanna do it fast.

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2 hours ago, Tomfl said:

 Problem with 'don't care how long it takes' is if you wanna get out of Dodge you usually wanna do it fast.

Size matters.  A 49 ft monohull will have an average SOA of about 9 kts.  Granted, that's a big monohull, but I'm lazy and didn't want to take the square root of something between 36 and 49 in my head.  An F27 goes about 75% of TWS to weather and probably 90% of TWS off the wind.  SO, in 10 kt breeze the SOA is comparable to the mono downwind but lags behind a little going to weather.  The 49 footer carries a BUNCH of "stuff"; the F27 is limited to about 1500 pounds or so of "stuff".  Which would you prefer to use to get outa dodge?  Of course, then there's costs....F27 is pretty inexpensive (30-40K) compared to a Hunter 49 (~240K).  Of course, you can get a used 36 footer for about the same cost as an F27, but the F27 would be much quicker outa Dodge (and you couldn't carry as much stuff in the 36 footer, but still more than the F27).  

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Wow is there a lot of misinformation in this thread from folks that I am guessing have never sailed the boats they are commenting about.  Yikes!!

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On 8/16/2019 at 7:25 PM, MultiThom said:

Size matters.  A 49 ft monohull will have an average SOA of about 9 kts.  Granted, that's a big monohull, but I'm lazy and didn't want to take the square root of something between 36 and 49 in my head.  An F27 goes about 75% of TWS to weather and probably 90% of TWS off the wind.  SO, in 10 kt breeze the SOA is comparable to the mono downwind but lags behind a little going to weather.  The 49 footer carries a BUNCH of "stuff"; the F27 is limited to about 1500 pounds or so of "stuff".  Which would you prefer to use to get outa dodge?  Of course, then there's costs....F27 is pretty inexpensive (30-40K) compared to a Hunter 49 (~240K).  Of course, you can get a used 36 footer for about the same cost as an F27, but the F27 would be much quicker outa Dodge (and you couldn't carry as much stuff in the 36 footer, but still more than the F27).  

Think I agree about a Escape pod, love to get a Neels 45+ but lot of $$$$,

so I think a older hunter 40+ or a bene=slo is the way to go , hope the market won't tank 

but with golden hair in the WH , one stipud tweet and all bets are off,

anymore said And I'll go to PA

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