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Screw work. I'd rather crack a cold one, sit out on the deck and finish this post. Gosh, and it is not even 4:20. Before moving to AT, I like Nicolas Andrieu's (Team Charal) quote in Seahorse Mag

Very interesting interview by Voiles et Voiliers (the mainstream sailing magazine in France): as usual Michel Desjoyeaux has very strong opinions and he is not afraid to put them out there! So he

Starboard foil installed today. shape as expected on previous posts. From Armel Tripon Skipper FB https://www.facebook.com/ArmelTriponSkipper/?__tn__=%2Cd%2CP-R&eid=ARA-iEhfDcU

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14 minutes ago, JonRowe said:

I thought the rule currently prevents the full on scow though with the rules surrounding bow girth at various points? 

 

1 minute ago, Miffy said:

there’s a max beam allowed measured from the front of the bow so if you want a scow you sacrifice effective waterline

Isn't that in class 40?

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AA.7 Boat issued with first MC after 1st May 2013. The maximum beam of the forward section of the hull, measured 1000 mm behind the forward most point of the hull used for the determination of hull Length, shall not be wider than 1120 mm.

https://www.imoca.org/mediacenter/uploads/cr-imoca-2021-v21.pdf?version=a2ce6172

 

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What I would really like to see is what the boats would look like in an "open" class defined by weight :

Like what would the boat look like in an "open eight tons" class for instance.

(with the same monohulls rule)

Of course that would be really tough to define (sails/no sails, tank full, not full, food, no food, etc), manage for the projects (if you have a few kg too many, what do you cut ? ), and measure, so not going to happen, but still, how would VG boats  look like in that case ?

Edit : in fact that such a class could exist with the principle that designers would aim below the max as much as possible, weight each boat before the start, and add the corresponding missing mass to the class rule, (20, 30, 100, kg)

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I suspect a lot of existing hull's ability to be blunted will also affect whether their existing watertight bulkhead is positioned appropriately to actually take an impact. Blunt the bow & create the scow and your effective waterline entry shifts backwards; suddenly the forward bulkhead isn't really going protect you from hitting a whale anymore. 

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The August issue of Seahorse Magazine has some nice photos of L'Occitane in action plus an article on "Elevating Imoca" that reports on VPLP research on the topic of fully flying Imoca boats with and without rudder elevators. Encourage you to read it. Once I finish reading it, I may try to highlight the key findings here.

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12 hours ago, JonRowe said:

So you do a full scow bow with a proboscis that meets the rule requirement then widens out behind that measurement point. Unless there's also rule that limits the sheerline to a convex curve when viewed from above.

Given that it's a foiler it doesn't matter too much if it's effectively an IMOCA 57 as a result - L'Occitane has sorta proven that.

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9 hours ago, yl75 said:

What I would really like to see is what the boats would look like in an "open" class defined by weight

Pretty sure it would evolve into very long and narrow boats. At least above a certain weight threshhold where crew weight isn't important anymore.

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59 minutes ago, DickDastardly said:

So you do a full scow bow with a proboscis that meets the rule requirement then widens out behind that measurement point. Unless there's also rule that limits the sheerline to a convex curve when viewed from above.

Given that it's a foiler it doesn't matter too much if it's effectively an IMOCA 57 as a result - L'Occitane has sorta proven that.

The rules use this definition of hull length:

Quote

Hull length: The shortest distance between the two perpendicular planes situated on the centreplane and the floatation waterplane, when the boat is at rest, with zero heel and in lightweight configuration, passing through: - the aft most point of the hull, with its hull appendages , - and the forward most point of the hull. A pushpit, pulpit, stanchion, antenna mast and its antennae, wind turbine, solar panel and hydrogenerator(s) shall not be included in the hull length.

Theres a minimum and maximum value, as well as a maximum LOA, and its used to define both the bow width rule above, and a few things like the watertight bulkheads (but not interestingly the crash box), so my reading is that your trick wouldn't pass this rule, as the hull length would be to bow as it lies in the water and not the overhang.

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52 minutes ago, JonRowe said:

The rules use this definition of hull length:

Theres a minimum and maximum value, as well as a maximum LOA, and its used to define both the bow width rule above, and a few things like the watertight bulkheads (but not interestingly the crash box), so my reading is that your trick wouldn't pass this rule, as the hull length would be to bow as it lies in the water and not the overhang.

Occitane has a bow overhang and as I understand it measures the full 60 feet.  The proboscis would be hull, not sprit.  It would indeed look a bit like an inverted human nose and be narrower than the maximum at the measurement limit point and there would be an inflection point in the sheerline behind that measurement point and the real front of the scow would be back there. 

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10 minutes ago, DickDastardly said:

Occitane has a bow overhang and as I understand it measures the full 60 feet.  The proboscis would be hull, not sprit.  It would indeed look a bit like an inverted human nose and be narrower than the maximum at the measurement limit point and there would be an inflection point in the sheerline behind that measurement point and the real front of the scow would be back there. 

I get what you're suggesting, I respectfully disagree that the rule will allow it, or that it's needed.

L'Occitane and all of the foilers, sail way more bow up than they are measured at, the advantage of a scow can be had without the need for a strange bow shape to try to cheat the rule, after all you're after volume in the water not in the air...

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4 hours ago, mathystuff said:

Pretty sure it would evolve into very long and narrow boats. At least above a certain weight threshhold where crew weight isn't important anymore.

Like what max length and beam ?

Clearly with the foils, you don't need that much power from the beam, but still, and then you can have structural issues with a too long boat

 

And maybe the question should be for an 8 tons class with foil, and one without.

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20 hours ago, Miffy said:

I suspect a lot of existing hull's ability to be blunted will also affect whether their existing watertight bulkhead is positioned appropriately to actually take an impact. Blunt the bow & create the scow and your effective waterline entry shifts backwards; suddenly the forward bulkhead isn't really going protect you from hitting a whale anymore. 

Forward bulkhead is usually in line with the J2 foundation, so probably farther aft than a blunting will affect.

 

This is notably different from the "crash box" that's in the bottom of the bow (see Malizia's nosejob, where they were cutting the foam).

 

HW

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9 hours ago, yl75 said:

Like what max length and beam ? 

Clearly with the foils, you don't need that much power from the beam, but still, and then you can have structural issues with a too long boat 

  

And maybe the question should be for an 8 tons class with foil, and one without. 

It's a cool hypothetical question, but coming up with an answer that's anywhere close to reality would take a lot of analysis and brainstorming by people more qualified than me.

If the only rules are 8tons and one hull

My first line of thought is something like a mod 70 mainhull with giant foil equipped deck spreaders and the longest canting keel you can engineer.

That boat would be a nightmare to ride and handle.

The real optimum might be way crazier and out of even DLs imagination.

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2 hours ago, Haligonian Winterr said:

Forward bulkhead is usually in line with the J2 foundation, so probably farther aft than a blunting will affect.

 

This is notably different from the "crash box" that's in the bottom of the bow (see Malizia's nosejob, where they were cutting the foam).

 

HW

I said what I said because of l'occitane. Play with the bow entry to create a scow and the hull’s waterline and entry shifts dramatically behind the crash box. 

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On 8/25/2020 at 7:21 PM, JonRowe said:

I thought the rule currently prevents the full on scow though with the rules surrounding bow girth at various points? 

yes but it's a pretty generous limit. Pretty sure it's 1.5m wide 1.5m behind bow, or something like that. 

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On 8/26/2020 at 9:39 AM, Varan said:

The August issue of Seahorse Magazine has some nice photos of L'Occitane in action plus an article on "Elevating Imoca" that reports on VPLP research on the topic of fully flying Imoca boats with and without rudder elevators. Encourage you to read it. Once I finish reading it, I may try to highlight the key findings here.

Morning, Varan. Any news to share from that Seahorse Mag article?

Elevating Imoca
For some months the VPLP office has been running a discreet study of future Imoca foiling options for the class. And now LUCA RIZZOTTI has seen the results....

Cheers.

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How much speed has been gained in four years?

by Vendee Globe 27 Aug 05:08 PDT

Generation 2020: up to ten knots faster in reaching conditions

"So now we are in an era of proper foiling, or full flight and the IMOCA monohull is no longer in touch with the water except on its leeward foil, part of the keel, rudder and transom. So the wetted wet surface area is very much reduced. Less resistant to forward movement means simply means more speed!

Depending on the profile and shape of the foils these new prototypes can maintain twelve to fifteen knots of speed. Compared to a conventional daggerboard monohull, they go faster tight reaching (two to three knots more) and upwind for the same VMG, but are much faster in crossed, reaching winds (five to ten knots or more) and broad reaching (three to six knots faster), while maintaining good VMG downwind, more than 145 degrees to the true wind direction."

Good article, comparing 2020, 2016 and retro-fitted generation IMOCA 60 boats.

https://www.sail-world.com/news/231070/How-much-speed-has-been-gained-in-four-years

yysw292259.jpg

yandy289822.jpg

yandy289639.jpg

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On 8/27/2020 at 12:26 PM, Sailbydate said:

Morning, Varan. Any news to share from that Seahorse Mag article?

Elevating Imoca
For some months the VPLP office has been running a discreet study of future Imoca foiling options for the class. And now LUCA RIZZOTTI has seen the results....

Cheers.

Sorry.. overwhelmed with work as of late, but after a quick first read, here are my first impressions..

Imoca, ready to take off, "but never quite letting go of the ground."  The article talks about the 30 boats ready to start this rendition, and not wanting to fuck with success. But, there is always the but, "But you watch them sailing in this rather inelegant attitude...", then to quote Cayard, "but why do they all have to drag their arse across the oceans?"

Good questions. Then on to the topic of elevators... "but is it right for the class?"

Okay, enough lead in, now for the meat...

Verdier developed the full foiling Super60 for the VOR and has run simulations using ETNZ design tools, but his 60 was rejected. The advantage of elevators in his opinion, are to provide stability, prevent hobby horsing and allow foiling upwind (50 to 55° TWA). It would likely result in narrower hulls, but easily retrofitted into existing boats by removing the ass end water ballast plus some hull reinforcement for the higher impact velocities. Best bang for the buck he says. Cheapest way to obtain a substantial gain in performance. 

Sam Manuard agrees... "the ability to decouple trim from heel - which gives you a broader and flatter stability curve... less strain for the autopilot and nav system"

The article continues to emphasize that all this is especially true in rough downwind conditions. Then it compares stern sections between VPLP, Manuard and Juan K's designs, with the goal of minimizing drag and promoting liftoff.

Then onto the VPLP study requested by Imoca president Antoine Mermod. One constraint was that the elevator surface must be small enough to allow it to kick-up in event of contact with an UFO. Their simulations showed an average speed above 40kts! Wow. With incredible stability and little heel.

VPLP propose symmetrical sections with zero lift at neutral incidence to provide stability and eliminate dynamic adjustments. In 16kt TWS, their simulations showed the bow would touchdown 7x less often versus existing configurations. 

When combined with simple Dali foils, a huge performance and stability increase can be had for what is currently being spent on larger more complex foil sections. Smaller main foils also means more boats can fit in the harbor.

The article wraps up with comments from Charal's technical director, who is keen to try elevators. Don't be surprised if you see elevators appear in the 2022 RdR.

Much thanks to Seahorse Magazine for another outstanding article. Best magazine on the planet, imho. I encourage y'all to subscribe. I will definitely be rereading this article (without pecking into my phone).

Enjoy.

 

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The August issue included interviews with Jeremie Beyou (JB) and Alex Thomson (AT) regarding recent mods to their boats. JB reported their mods centered around balancing the boat better, changing the volume of ballast tanks, bulb weight, change in foil shapes to get the boat to lift her bow more and keep it lifted, plus the new bow. The goal was to be able to hold their target speeds longer by improving the attitude of the boat. (You cannot have an unhappy boat:unsure:)  JB said the new foils are slightly shorter and can retract farther to reduce drag. They expect to foil all of the time, except in light weather. At 80° TWA and 11kts TWS, they expect to be sailing at 17 kts. Since they can be extremely fast in lighter breezes, their goal is no longer to look for 35kts of breeze in the deep south. 

JB also noted that the upper part of the keel was reinforced to avoid what happened on hugo boss, that they ordered a spare mast, and that the V1 foils can likely be used as spares (they are checking them with the new housings to be sure).

When asked about hugo boss's foils, JB replied that HB's V1 foils were optimized for running and his were more versatile. "It is not sufficient to be the fastest running." Versatility is needed for the many transition zones.

When asked about the bow, he stated that the banana shape was to facilitate passage through wave and promote lift off. The old wave piercing bow upset the speed and tracking of the boat too much.

Next will be the interview with AT, but I have to get back to work, so it will have to wait a bit, sorry.

 

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Screw work. I'd rather crack a cold one, sit out on the deck and finish this post. Gosh, and it is not even 4:20.

Before moving to AT, I like Nicolas Andrieu's (Team Charal) quote in Seahorse Magazine regarding their new bow... "Our objective now is to climb over the water rather than cut through it."

Okay, when AT was asked to compare the new Hugo Boss to its predecessor, he noted that the biggest limitation is the physical condition of the skipper, hence the enclosed environment in the new boat. When further asked if the new Imocas can exceed 600nm in 24 hours, he replied "I actually believe the previous Hugo Boss was capable of that." He also talked a bit about their new hull shape being an evolution of Charal's, both being very rounded to minimize drag rather than provide stability, unlike other designer's shapes. The foils provide the stability.

Like JB, he noted these boats no longer need 25-30kts of breeze, so strategies will change. Sea state, he says, is one of the biggest impacts on performance. "What you actually need is flat water and moderate breeze... The ideal scenario in the ocean is when you have the high pressure ahead of you and a low pressure coming in behind you, and they're all moving at the same speed as you are." He expects routing to change, with more northerly options, but generally all options are within a few hundred miles of each other, so likely not a big change.

Asked about helming, he says he does very little. It just consumes too much energy and concentration. 

Seahorse then asked his opinion of allowing rudder elevators for The Ocean Race. AT noted a number of concerns, cost, reliability and safety. "I think it is certainly something that we should be thinking about and working towards but we're not ready just yet."

Then the discussion went on about the repairs surrounding the TJV incident and collision avoidance. They were fortunate that unlike other Imocas, the damaged area was under the cockpit floor with several watertight compartments, otherwise they likely would have abandoned the boat. He also noted "we've made some progress with finding a product that could be developed for the front of an Imoca keel to detect underwater objects." Interesting. He believes the TJV strike was a whale, so they have incorporated WhaleShield, a low frequency transmitter whose frequencies are audible to whales. They hope it will serve as a warning that they are near. Could backfire if it turns out to be a mating call.

When asked about what is next, "I am not thinking beyond this Vendee Globe... Nothing beyond that matters right now."

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On 8/26/2020 at 10:16 PM, Miffy said:

I said what I said because of l'occitane. Play with the bow entry to create a scow and the hull’s waterline and entry shifts dramatically behind the crash box. 

Very good point, I hadn't considered the changed geometry with the l'Occitane shape. I wonder if the class would consider an amended rule due to the amount of time the new boats are spending with the middle of the boat being the first impact zone.

 

HW

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It's not just the scow bows. IMOCA foilers are presenting their under bellies as well as the initial impact point of anything floating in their path.

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On 9/1/2020 at 10:55 PM, Varan said:

Seahorse then asked his opinion of allowing rudder elevators for The Ocean Race. AT noted a number of concerns, cost, reliability and safety. "I think it is certainly something that we should be thinking about and working towards but we're not ready just yet."

Confirmation of no T-Foil Rudders... Also confirmation of The Ocean Race Europe. An interesting read.  

https://www.imoca.org/en/news/news/the-imoca-general-meeting-has-chosen-the-way-forward-with-a-full-race-programme-for-the-2021-2025-cycle

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Lots happening:

2nd September: final date for registering for the Vendée Globe
9th - 13th September: Défi Azimut, Lorient
17th September: Vendée Globe press conference in Paris
17th October: Opening of the Vendée Globe Village in Les Sables d’Olonne
8th November: start of the Vendée Globe, Les Sables d’Olonne

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13 hours ago, Miffy said:

The often repeated agenda that "IMOCA class is struggling to be relevant" because xyz keeps being proven false. The class owner governance system works.

Who ever said that IMOCA is struggling to be relevant? 

The Class structure has it's issues, particularly when Block voting occurs, but it definitely gives the owners the real voice. There are some real stalwarts of the class that have done a good job on trying to slow the natural, steady increase in budgets. 

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baiedemorlaix_2020-Sep-10.thumb.jpg.a4773d603ad79f76d775729edc989222.jpg

From twitter, but does anyone else think that ladder looks ... less than ideal... in a seaway?

(And whats going on with those hydros on the back, on top of the kick up rudders? no kick up rudders?)

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2 hours ago, JonRowe said:

baiedemorlaix_2020-Sep-10.thumb.jpg.a4773d603ad79f76d775729edc989222.jpg

From twitter, but does anyone else think that ladder looks ... less than ideal... in a seaway?

(And whats going on with those hydros on the back, on top of the kick up rudders? no kick up rudders?)

The rudder casings are separate to those kick-up hydro-gens. The kick-up portion of the rudder is inset forward of the transom.

That ladder looks like it's removable and installed when not sailing for easy access to roof/rig for shore crew.

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Both JuanK sister boats have this really high coach roof/deck transition that seems like a young skipper’s boat that could get really difficult/dangerous if you’re trying to manage sails or go forward for a daily boat check in some sea state. 

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11 hours ago, JonRowe said:

baiedemorlaix_2020-Sep-10.thumb.jpg.a4773d603ad79f76d775729edc989222.jpg

From twitter, but does anyone else think that ladder looks ... less than ideal... in a seaway?

(And whats going on with those hydros on the back, on top of the kick up rudders? no kick up rudders?)

If the boat's heeled over enuff that you lift the windward rudder, the hydro is not going to be in the water either. And re- using the existing rudder structure is a weight savings, nothing else back there to attach to.

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2 minutes ago, longy said:

 

If the boat's heeled over enuff that you lift the windward rudder, the hydro is not going to be in the water either. And re- using the existing rudder structure is a weight savings, nothing else back there to attach to.

Adds an interesting step in lifting up the rudder after the gybe tho.To lift up the rudder, you have to lower the hydrogenerator - otherwise the rudder linkages are going to be in the way.

 

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Looking at it again I think I interpreted the ladder all wrong - it does seem like the only access point in/out of the cockpit to go forward which does seem like a risky call especially as it leads straight onto the solar panels which are slippery little f*ckers when wet. I guess in most situations now the boom wouldn't be far off centreline so you could grab onto that as you climb out...

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A few words from AT camp:

Quote

 

Alex Thomson Racing has completed the final service of the HUGO BOSS boat ahead of the highly anticipated Vendée Globe, which begins in less than two months’ time.

The service – something which takes place before any major yacht race – involved the team checking and servicing the boat and each of its components, in order to ensure that it is safe to sail around the world on November 8th.

As well as servicing the boat, the team also undertook a 90 degree test, a process which assesses the yacht’s righting moment upon its return to the water.

With less than two months to go until the start of the race, Alex and the team will spend the remaining weeks on the water training before departing for the race village in Les Sables D’Olonne, France.

“The final service went well and we feel in good shape” said Thomson. “Our new foils have arrived from Persico in Italy and they are now in. These version two foils are really a development of version one so they will actually look the same. But we’ve made some small refinements that should give us that little bit more in terms of performance and reliability.

“During the service we also made some other modifications to the boat and, since getting back out on the water, we can already see those changes have made a big difference. We’re seeing significant performance increases of up to 10% so we’re very happy so far! Now, time is everything for us, and we need to spend every available moment on the water before we leave for France next month”.

 

 

source:

https://www.alexthomsonracing.com/blog/2020/09/11/final-service-of-hugo-boss-complete-ahead-of-vendee-globe/

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Bit strange to see them sail with both foils out, windward foil in the water looks draggy at the end of video but probably not a sailing mode.
It looks like they are just filming promotional images and making sure not to show the boat sailing at full potential (same for 3 and 2 months to go videos), not a single clip with the boat flying despite wind apparently strong enough and it's hard to believe HB won't be raised higher than that over the surface.

After announcing leaving with 67 days of food, mind game is fully on for HB.

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35 minutes ago, Lakrass said:

not a single clip with the boat flying despite wind apparently strong enough and it's hard to believe HB won't be raised higher than that over the surface.

 

Probably the only time the boat can be filmed by a rib is when it’s leaving or returning to the dock while things are getting setup and systems checked. Hugo Boss is a mature sponsor at this point and it seems like Alex’s days of walking the sails or jumping off the keel are over. He’s also not showing images of his boat pointlessly pitching high and riding high for the cameras. 

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I'm of two of minds with, Thomson and Hugo Boss, even at this late stage. The boat looks wicked, fast.

Alex himself looks in great shape and definitely ready to go racing. But....there is a but. And I'm not even sure what the "but" is.

Jinxed?

 

 

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If it looks fast, it is fast, etc but is it faster? I think AT is in with a solid chance at winning the VG, but he's yet to finish a race with this boat, so the unknown unknowns is a long list...

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Posted in SAAC, by Stinger. 

Lots of interesting stuff in this Seahorse article about Gurit's composit structural engineering for 12 of the teams entered in the 2020 VG.

‘The structure around the foil is pretty complex and some of the design loads are of the same order of magnitude as those we have in the keel. So in effect we've added an extra righting moment producing appendage that puts a big additional moment into the boat. The result is that you've got a second major structural element to deal with on a similar scale to that of the keel and yet we are not really doubling the weight of the keel support structure in these boats. Instead, we're integrating the foil support structure into the keel support structure so that some of the elements are serving a double purpose in order to avoid adding more mass to the boats.’

https://seahorsemagazine.com/current-issue/160-content/october-2020/947-maintaining-altitude

 

 

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12 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

I'm of two of minds with, Thomson and Hugo Boss, even at this late stage. The boat looks wicked, fast.

Alex himself looks in great shape and definitely ready to go racing. But....there is a but. And I'm not even sure what the "but" is.

Jinxed?

 

 

There's always been a cloud of uncertainty over AT/HB in every campaign. I think the core of it is reliability of both the boats and Alex himself; he's undoubtedly very skilled and experienced now and the new gen boat looks amazing but the appendage impacts/failure and sailing into an island are all incidents that have been more frequent with AT than other competitors such as Beyou and why I think there is always the uncertainty. Bad luck/jinxed or result of team/sailor actions?? Not really sure at this point but still can't shift the question marks...

Saying that it would be great to see him get a win - there are a lot of people who have invested major time and effort into the HB program over the years who deserve the result just as much as Alex...

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On 9/16/2020 at 1:55 PM, Lakrass said:


Bit strange to see them sail with both foils out, windward foil in the water looks draggy at the end of video but probably not a sailing mode.
It looks like they are just filming promotional images and making sure not to show the boat sailing at full potential (same for 3 and 2 months to go videos), not a single clip with the boat flying despite wind apparently strong enough and it's hard to believe HB won't be raised higher than that over the surface.

After announcing leaving with 67 days of food, mind game is fully on for HB.

 0:37 The propellor shaft no longer has that small shroud that all other IMOCA's have. I think they've slightly re-profiled the bow a-la Apivia. V2 foils are a bit more pointy and seem to have a slightly more constant chord. 

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On 9/16/2020 at 7:55 AM, Lakrass said:

not a single clip with the boat flying despite wind apparently strong enough and it's hard to believe HB won't be raised higher than that over the surface.

 

I think there's an misconception that flying = speed.

Take a look at the footage from the Azimut speed runs.  Arkea was practically airborne, and L'Occitane was flat.  Guess who was going faster?

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4 hours ago, Raptorsailor said:

Charal has V3 foils

 

Interesting. The foil two-step - two steps forward, one step back.

That's a surprise, alright. These V3 foils are quite different to the V2 ones. In fact, they appear much closer to the original V1 shaped foils Charal sported, notwithstanding their actual chord shape. Their span appears quite a bit shorter (although in that pic they are fully retracted) and the angles much more obtuse/abrupt again. The foil tips are hugely elongated, but are without the uptip (cue DL) bend on the V1 foils.

See V1, V2 and V3 foils below:

I get giddy just trying to follow these foil developments!! ;-)

50BF98EA-8620-48E7-B93C-BDB1539FDC35.jpeg.e70afdfd115b698b1d991b79c7990b43.jpeg

FB_IMG_1590447020460.thumb.jpg.0b40af4682a0c5a706c4c8435736ac41.jpg

Screen Shot 2020-09-18 at 7.56.10 AM.png

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On 9/16/2020 at 5:55 AM, Lakrass said:


Bit strange to see them sail with both foils out, windward foil in the water looks draggy at the end of video but probably not a sailing mode.
It looks like they are just filming promotional images and making sure not to show the boat sailing at full potential (same for 3 and 2 months to go videos), not a single clip with the boat flying despite wind apparently strong enough and it's hard to believe HB won't be raised higher than that over the surface.

After announcing leaving with 67 days of food, mind game is fully on for HB.

Poor Alex, he's like the Michael Andretti of the solo sailing world... all the talent and money needed to win the big one but none of luck.

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1 hour ago, Swimsailor said:

Poor Alex, he's like the Michael Andretti of the solo sailing world... all the talent and money needed to win the big one but none of luck.

The race hasn't even started, cool down, however I'm still not sure about these constant curve foils

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3 minutes ago, yl75 said:

The race hasn't even started, cool down, however I'm still not sure about these constant curve foils

Just wait until one week into the race and they’re not even out of the doldrums (if there are any at all this year) and ppl going nuts over who is where and what. 

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26 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Just wait until one week into the race and they’re not even out of the doldrums (if there are any at all this year) and ppl going nuts over who is where and what. 

I think if he can get to the doldrums without deciding to do something different as he usually does he's in with a big chance if he doesn't break anything. 

34 minutes ago, yl75 said:

 I'm still not sure about these constant curve foils

He's not the only one with them, besides most of the other foils must flex enough under load to have a shape similar to those of HB. Why not cut out the middle man. 

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43 minutes ago, Varan said:

Everybody has their favorites, but I like these guys, the boat they are reviewing and its skipper.

 

 

Looking forward to seeing L'Occitane performing in high latitudes. The design looks quick enough.

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13 hours ago, Swimsailor said:

Poor Alex, he's like the Michael Andretti of the solo sailing world... all the talent and money needed to win the big one but none of luck.

put it into perspective. We who speak English, know Alex but it is only the one sailor amongst 99% French sailors so we think "how unlucky he is". 

Expecting the same person winning in such races is not realistic. It is not about luck but statistics. 

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Im loving this from the Seahorse article;

Over the last 20 years average speeds around the world have increased by around 30 per cent, with top speeds increasing by around 50 per cent, while structures have become lighter. And as the push for performance continues, the current crop is capable of performing a balancing act like no other, challenging the laws of physics and defying conventional thinking of what it is like to sail a racing boat.

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On 9/18/2020 at 12:46 AM, yl75 said:

The race hasn't even started, cool down, however I'm still not sure about these constant curve foils

Well, if you look at Charal's V3 foils, smooth out the kinks into a constant curvature and you end up with HB's foils. So maybe they are not that different after all ...

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1 hour ago, minca3 said:

Well, if you look at Charal's V3 foils, smooth out the kinks into a constant curvature and you end up with HB's foils. So maybe they are not that different after all ...

At least the bit that does the heavy lifting, anyway. ;-)

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On 9/26/2020 at 1:48 AM, cifrian said:

Very interesting arrangement to climb the mast more safely. The mainsail has a luff rope where you can secure a sail feeder to prevent wild swings around the mast.

 

120278259_2111895112276379_1196760252290581833_o.jpg

So in this shot it is still helmed & crewed down below - but come the race, absolute trust in your AP is paramount....... Not ever a 5 min job by any means. Balls of Titanium only need apply. And Sam is not lacking in that respect.

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5 hours ago, Boink said:

So in this shot it is still helmed & crewed down below - but come the race, absolute trust in your AP is paramount....... Not ever a 5 min job by any means. Balls of Titanium only need apply. And Sam is not lacking in that respect.

There is someone onboard, but Sam may well be practising doing this while the autopilot is driving, it would be better training.

I'd expect the person we can see to be driving the drone thats taking the photo... although equally it could be someone else higher up the mast with a camera

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Funny how much they're parading sustainability/green when they're gonna own two imoca 60s and none of which will be raced for any event for nearly 2 years. What's the PR pitch? Full speed ahead on personal ambitions with rich ppl money = sustainable. 

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