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@yl75

Just from knowing how hard he has had to work to keep HB on board with only having to pay running costs. The running costs for an IMOCA Ocean Race team are going to be a magnitude higher. 

Success in the VG had never been the reason for HBs sponsorship. 

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Screw work. I'd rather crack a cold one, sit out on the deck and finish this post. Gosh, and it is not even 4:20. Before moving to AT, I like Nicolas Andrieu's (Team Charal) quote in Seahorse Mag

Very interesting interview by Voiles et Voiliers (the mainstream sailing magazine in France): as usual Michel Desjoyeaux has very strong opinions and he is not afraid to put them out there! So he

Starboard foil installed today. shape as expected on previous posts. From Armel Tripon Skipper FB https://www.facebook.com/ArmelTriponSkipper/?__tn__=%2Cd%2CP-R&eid=ARA-iEhfDcU

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On 10/8/2020 at 3:52 PM, Haji said:

Yes, it does seem a bit silly.  OTOH, think of what this level of $ does for a great number of folks in the boating biz.  And, getting a billionaire's $ into the IMOCA game gets us one step closer to someday actually have a seriously funded US Vendee Globe program.  It's too late for me of course (too old and on to other things), however it sure would be nice to see it happen someday.

Considering American Magic is done, they certainly could have used most of those folks to build a new boat, yay American IMOCA.

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  • 2 weeks later...
2 hours ago, Haligonian Winterr said:

Reduces size and weight of stringers, and increases stiffness in a monolithic panels. Same technique used on the Comanche forward of the keel.

 

HW

Was also in the previous Hugo Boss and a bunch of other IMOCAs that predate Comanche. Lots of discussion last time around about it.

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My outside view on this, is that Alex and ATR have pushed and are still pushing the boundaries of what ocean racing is and what it takes and means to win. Technology, design, complete and utter focus and not caring (much) what the others are doing. The fact that there are other competitors in the race may not matter to him - he will push every button, watch the numbers and sail to the numbers only. It is fascinating to observe this mind-set. I am sure the others are going down that path, but I dont see it as much as ATR are doing. As someone else has said, it is like an AC campaign - but with just one person. I will be glued to the tracker for sure come race day

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14 minutes ago, ttc546 said:

My outside view on this, is that Alex and ATR have pushed and are still pushing the boundaries of what ocean racing is and what it takes and means to win. Technology, design, complete and utter focus and not caring (much) what the others are doing. The fact that there are other competitors in the race may not matter to him - he will push every button, watch the numbers and sail to the numbers only. It is fascinating to observe this mind-set. I am sure the others are going down that path, but I dont see it as much as ATR are doing. As someone else has said, it is like an AC campaign - but with just one person. I will be glued to the tracker for sure come race day

No matter what happens in the VG - I hope Alex remains involved in IMOCA in some capacity even if he's not racing anymore. He's been part of the skippers that pushed the class forward and brought a diff international presence to imoca that I feel won't be properly acknowledged and missed until he's gone.

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1 hour ago, Potter said:

Only if there is more than one team... 

One team with two boats can do a great job talking about sustainability while two Americans talk about how important it is to be green while burning money and pretending covid doesn’t exist. 

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2 hours ago, Potter said:

Only if there is more than one team... 

12 teams are already in 2 years before start even if you consider that nobody else will take part and a third of those 12 don't make it to the start, that is still enough boats to make an interesting race. IMHO after the VG, new teams will find sponsorship. The dynamic is much better than it was before previous VOR.

https://www.theoceanrace.com/en/teams.html

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35 minutes ago, sailseaplymouth said:

11th Hour seemed to set off on their transatlantic with no port foil, anyone know why or what happened to it?

549F9446-3EF6-4CA0-A153-4B6C0E645E5B.jpeg

They had been trying a new design for the port foil that differed quite a bit. Foils are expensive and heavy bits of kit (around €600-700k) and they will have worked out that most of their routing will have shown them sailing on a port gybe/tack so why carry unnecessary weight onboard   

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50 minutes ago, JL92S said:

They had been trying a new design for the port foil that differed quite a bit. Foils are expensive and heavy bits of kit (around €600-700k) and they will have worked out that most of their routing will have shown them sailing on a port gybe/tack so why carry unnecessary weight onboard   

But what useful data collection can you get from sailing with reduced RM, weight etc? Seems an odd choice.

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Finished work for the holidays, grabbed a beer and my phone and stumbled upon this when shopping for xmas gifts...

Fairly in-depth article about L'Occitane from North Sails. Some pretty cool photos in Boat News too.

For the racing they do, I really like how Manuard sacrificed LWL in order to implement more of a scow than all others. And given the issue with foils colliding with UFOs and the like, the high exit of the foils is brilliant. Much more survivable if a collision should occur. Lots of original thinking in this design.

Nice work.

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28 minutes ago, Essex said:

Wondering if we will see something closer to AC style foil systems in imocas. Not the T profile but a high or even deck level "hinge" so you can swing one or both right up out of water when preferable.

Might need a change to class rules, so maybe in 8 years.

Quote

...the class has opened up the measurement regarding how to trim the foils. As such, they have greater freedom of movement (up and down & fore and aft), stimulating the architects’ creativity all the more.

 Class-rules

2021 class rules in English can be downloaded here.

Edit, from 2021 rules:

FOIL

(a) A foil shall be retractable and shall use only one degree of freedom for this movement.

(b) It is expressly permitted a second degree of freedom to a foil if a set of two bearings are used to guide this appendage [See E.4 (a)].

(i) One of these two bearings shall not be trimmed and positioned in close proximity of the hull 
shell.


(ii) It is expressly permitted to have a degree of freedom for the other bearing. If it exists this degree 
of freedom shall be a translation type and shall limit the foil’s rotation to an angle of 5 degrees.


(iii) This angle is measured at the non-trimmed bearing positioned in close proximity of the hull 
shell.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Two boats.

Quote

Team Unveils 2021 Two-Boat Racing Schedule

By 11thhourracingteam

Posted January 21, 2021

Photo by Yvan Zedda / Azimut Challenge

Big news – we’ve unveiled our racing schedule for 2021, with not one, but two boats! 

COVID-19 dependent, we’re hoping to compete in four races this year:

The Ocean Race Europe: A four-week tour around the continent in May through mid June, with two Classes – the IMOCA 60s and VO65s.

The Rolex Fastnet: With a start on Sunday, August 8 from the home of British yacht racing, Cowes on the Isle of Wight. The fleet will head around the Fastnet Rock, south of Ireland, before finishing for the first time in Cherbourg, France.

The Défi Azimut: A 48-hour long offshore race, coupled with a short dash around the island of Groix off the Brittany coast in France. The race takes place in September.

The Transat Jacques Vabre: The legendary race from Le Havre, France across the Atlantic, kicking off on October 24. Our skipper, Charlie Enright, came fourth in 2019 with Pascal Bidégorry.

Mark Towill, our Team CEO, explains more: “Our immersion into the offshore IMOCA world continues for 2021. As of now, the plan is to be training and racing with two boats this year, dependent on the boat build schedule and any impacts related to COVID-19.”

“With the start of The Ocean Race delayed by one year, we’re taking the opportunity to gain valuable experience in the heart of the offshore sailing world, being based in France for longer periods. Our racing in 2021 will be focused on short-handed sailing, to maximize opportunities to line-up against other IMOCA teams. I’m really pleased to announce that Justine Mettraux (SUI) will be joining the team as the co-skipper, alongside Simon Fisher (GBR) onboard 11.1 – the former Hugo Boss 6.

“Charlie [Enright] (USA) will be paired once again with Pascal Bidégorry (FRA), and they will be focusing their training on our new IMOCA 60, which is set to launch in July. Depending on the final stages of the build and commissioning, we anticipate entering both boats in the Rolex Fastnet Race, Défi Azimut and The Transat Jacques Vabre.”

The build of the new IMOCA 60 is on schedule thanks to the careful management by MerConcept and CDK, overseen by our Build Manager, Wade Morgan (AUS). In addition, our Team Sustainability Manager, Damian Foxall (IRE) was based in France for a number of weeks at the end of last year, overseeing the sustainability innovations, practices and implementation.

Rob MacMillan, Co-founder and President of team sponsor, 11th Hour Racing, commented: “We are proud of the work that the team as a whole has achieved, both from a competitive and environmental perspective, with performance and sustainability integrating seamlessly. The prospect of launching a new IMOCA 60 and having two equally talented teams training and racing later in the year on the international offshore circuit is incredibly energizing. As an organization and a sponsor dedicated to inspiring solutions for the ocean, 2021 sets a remarkable milestone that merges a decade of impact achieved through our work with a new decade for the ocean fueled by global collaborations.”

What’s first on the agenda?

Wade is now onsite in Port La Forêt as the process of bringing the hull and deck together begins. The whole team is brimming with a mixture of nerves and excitement, as we wait for the decisions we made over 18 months ago to come good. 

COVID-dependant, we aim to be in France late-February to see the build progress ourselves – it can’t come soon enough.

Co-skipper quotes:

Charlie Enright: “We are all itching to get back out on the water again after this justifiably-enforced period of shore leave. The work has been relentless, and there have been plenty of late night and early morning trans-Atlantic calls and meetings with the team in France overseeing the boat build. It’s progressing well and I’m looking forward to seeing it in person in February. My first experience of racing with Pascal was in the build up to the 2019 Transat Jacques Vabre when we finished fourth. To be sailing alongside someone so experienced is a great way to learn. I’m looking forward to getting back out on the water with him again this year.”

Pascal Bidégorry: “It’s great to be back with 11th Hour Racing Team and a pleasure to be sailing with Charlie once again – and in the Anglo-Saxon way of doing things! It’s exciting to be part of this project, particularly being involved with my old friends at MerConcept and how we are approaching the technical challenges and sustainability opportunities around the build of the new boat. It will be a busy period in the build-up to the Transat Jacques Vabre and one I’m really looking forward to.”

Justine Mettraux: “I’m really looking forward to joining the team – it’s a great opportunity for me, not only to be sailing on a current IMOCA 60 but a new edition boat as well. Partnering with SiFi is something I’m really happy about – it’s going to be a good mix. I have more experience of short-handed sailing, but he has a lot of experience in The Ocean Race and is one of the best navigators there is, as well as a great sailor. I’m looking forward to getting to work.”

Simon Fisher: “Double-handed sailing will be a new challenge for me and one I’m really excited for. It’s something I have always wanted to do but never quite managed to make happen so it’s great to finally get the opportunity. It’s going to be a steep learning curve – I spoke to Charlie after his first double-handed race in the Transat Jacques Vabre [in 2019] and he said it was the hardest thing he had ever done! Being just two of us onboard, it ramps the responsibility up, but I am looking forward to the challenge. I just hope I do as well as I would like to do. Sailing with Justine is great, she is unflappable, calm and of course very experienced – I’m going to be learning loads and I couldn’t be happier to be paired with her.”

2021 Team Schedule:

February-March: Full team training in Port La Forêt, France

May-June: The Ocean Race Europe

July: Launch and commissioning of new IMOCA 60

August: Rolex Fastnet

September: Azimut Challenge

October: Transat Jacques Vabre

https://11thhourracingteam.org/team-unveils-2021-two-boat-racing-schedule/

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