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And to round this all off for now, and also for those that still don't know what Initiatives Cœur is all about, this is a great video. It's in French, but it doesn't need any translation as it is self-explanatory, and quite emotional actually.

And then you understand why I am such a big fan of Sam!

You can still click here for €1, but you need a Facebook or instagram account I believe.

https://www.initiatives-coeur.fr/

 

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Screw work. I'd rather crack a cold one, sit out on the deck and finish this post. Gosh, and it is not even 4:20. Before moving to AT, I like Nicolas Andrieu's (Team Charal) quote in Seahorse Mag

Very interesting interview by Voiles et Voiliers (the mainstream sailing magazine in France): as usual Michel Desjoyeaux has very strong opinions and he is not afraid to put them out there! So he

So no HB AT in next Vendee, that will reduce posts here with 50% in the race thread. One group slagging him of and one defending him

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On 11/22/2019 at 4:14 PM, ctutmark said:

Tip and Shaft is saying the Manuard Open 60 for Armel Tripon is coming out of the Black Pepper Shed in Nantes on Monday.  

Hopefully pics to come

Lets hope it's another different, we're really being treated with the diversity of the new IMOCA's this generation. 

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On 11/17/2019 at 1:48 AM, Fiji Bitter said:

And to round this all off for now, and also for those that still don't know what Initiatives Cœur is all about, this is a great video. It's in French, but it doesn't need any translation as it is self-explanatory, and quite emotional actually.

And then you understand why I am such a big fan of Sam!

You can still click here for €1, but you need a Facebook or instagram account I believe.

https://www.initiatives-coeur.fr/

 

A great shame that it requires a Facebook/Instagram account, neither of which I have, or will sign up to. 

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On 11/17/2019 at 12:53 AM, staysail said:

Wouldn't call the Fastnet an ocean crossing leg!

 

The finish legs of the TOR are not yet released but word is they will make a crossing of the Irish Sea look oceanic. They will be doing some bizzare thing in the wet stuff between the UK and Europe that defies imagination.

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10 minutes ago, cifrian said:

Nice. Lot of volume in that bow. Clearly far from finished but good to have another take on what could work. Those foil exits are interestingly high. 

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12 hours ago, jb5 said:

Nice. Lot of volume in that bow. Clearly far from finished but good to have another take on what could work. Those foil exits are interestingly high. 

Looks like they will have some figaro style foils

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14 hours ago, jb5 said:

Nice. Lot of volume in that bow. Clearly far from finished but good to have another take on what could work. Those foil exits are interestingly high. 

A fair bit of Class 40 influence from Sam Manuard.

Should be interesting with a narrower max beam and some chunky foils. He says he's interested in a sustained skimming effort rather than the lift and fall of the current new-get IMOCA60s. Looking forward to seeing what he's got.

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-armel-tripon-explique-les-choix-radicaux-de-l-occitane-son-nouveau-monocoque-imoca-bf8b6408-1056-11ea-aff8-b1a3d2598acf

Armel Tripon interview. In French. Some roughly edited parts below. Good interview. 

 If you had to summarize the concept of the scow and why did you choose it?

Armel Tripon: We started from the fact that on the last Vendée Globe the best sailors pushed their boats to about 85% of the polar (theoretical speed) only. It's not much. For comparison, on my Multi50 during the Route du Rhum I was 93% of the polar. (Tripon won the last Route du Rhum on the Multi50 Chocolate Rite, nd) But the general principle is obviously to arrive as close as possible to a polar 100%. So the equation to solve is how to succeed in pushing the boat harder for a longer time. In other words, maintain high average speeds over time. Which is very different to go fast at times, but to fall back and be braked brutally. With Sam (Manuard), we said that if reaching this high percentage was possible on a Route du Rhum multihull, it should be possible also on a world tour in monohull. That's it, it's this reflection that has resulted in quite advanced architectural choices. That's why we decided to build a scow. It's time to dare it, I think.

The deck of your boat is very flat and even, slightly convex. The opposite of the gull wing bridges that some Imoca have. Why ?

Armel Tripon:Even on a scow that gets wet less than a fine bow boat, there is still water on deck. You can have several hundred liters on the deck ... so many hundreds of useless pounds. Hence this idea of the slightly convex bridge so that the water - so the weight - stagnates as little as possible. Ergonomics side, we favored large areas cleared for a stuffing easy and efficient, a guarantee of performance itself. Moreover, we worked on this backrest inside the boat, opting for a facilitated movement to the rear.

when the foils are in operation?

Armel Tripon: The fact that the foils are deported and go looking for their entry into the water, create torque (the "RM"), which makes the boat from this point of view, will work a bit like a multihull. Besides, I will not tell you much more but the polar are close to those of the Multi50 trimarans. The goal is not to fly very high, we will not fly high at all, because a priori it is useless if it is to fall quickly and so put a big brake. The goal is to maintain high speed averages for a long time. The advantage of our foils is to get the hull out of the water just enough to reduce the drag, no need to go higher. We are looking for a relatively stable flight, just above the water. 

The roof that is not yet laid, how will it be?

Armel Tripon: It almost completely closes the cockpit for protection. Its originality is that it has a frontal vision with big plexis in the axis to be able to winch and settle while watching at the same time the deck, the sails and the environment of the boat.

 

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Bow could only be described as 'scow' in relation to a narrower max-beam, since Rule measurements already restrict IMOCA60 bow profiles.

Narrow beam and foils has been tried before in the Mini6.5 class, IIRC without much success - although admittedly, that was with DSS (which has been bloody hopeless on virtually everything they've ever been fitted to.) The weight gain has never produced a faster boat, AFAIK.

Be interesting to see what Manuard's foil solution looks like.

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MjAxOTExMGMzMTIxNTA2YmQ5NzlmY2JkZWZkNDQ1MmIzOWFjYWU.jpeg

MjAxOTExOWVhYjc4ZWZiMmJiMjQzMTlkNzBmY2NmNTRkZjZhZWY.jpeg

images.jpeg

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With less work being done by the foils and more focus on the hull it could be argued that in the event of multiple foil breakages in the fleet, this boat could be one of the fastest, as well as the higher averages theory talked about in the article

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7 hours ago, JL92S said:

With less work being done by the foils and more focus on the hull it could be argued that in the event of multiple foil breakages in the fleet, this boat could be one of the fastest, as well as the higher averages theory talked about in the article

It's a narrow boat, not that sure.

Reason for the very high foils pits is to not drag in the water in light conditions ... and also being able to have them out of the water in storms where you don't want to go faster.

There's an interesting bit to : they studdied the previous editions and determined that the boats where pushed to only 85% of their possibilities, so they tried to make a boat slower un peaks, but faster on average to be closest to 100% of the polars 

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26 minutes ago, popo said:

There's an interesting bit to : they studdied the previous editions and determined that the boats where pushed to only 85% of their possibilities, so they tried to make a boat slower un peaks, but faster on average to be closest to 100% of the polars 

Without numbers though, its a bit hard to say whats better, a flying boat might run at 70% of its polars, and a non flying boat might run at 90%, but if the flying boats polars are 130% of the non flying boats then that lower polar average is actually 1% faster overall...

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5 hours ago, jb5 said:

50 minute video of the TJV in the article on the link below.  In French.  Some footage I''ve not seen before.

https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/voile-documentaire-il-est-beau-mon-bateau-28-11-2019-12444296.php

Some excellent historical coverage. Worth a look.

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https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-188-armel-le-clach-brest-atlantiques-trs-riche-denseignements-comment-cherbourg-a-dcroch-larrive-du-fastnet?e=9a497c6fa7

Interview with Armel Le Cléac'h.  Covers a number of topics including IMOCA. In French.  Some IMOCA parts below.

You played the role of "professor" with Clarisse Crémer, did you like it?
I did not really know how to take things, it was new to me and, with Clarisse, we did not know each other. I went directly to the handling of the boat on the Fastnet which started soon after.  She suffered a lot, in the sense that she was more a teammate who performed what I asked her to do. But as she took charge of the boat she sailed a little more solo and when we arrived at the departure of Jacques Vabre, I did not need to direct precisely what needed to be done. In the race, I took care of the strategy and the weather, because I wanted to have this role and that the objective was that she could finish the Transat with a complete understanding of the boat so that she could bring it back alone without any worries, which she is doing. So finally, it was a nice role and I enjoyed it.
 
No regrets not to be at the start of the Vendée Globe 2020? ?
No, no regrets. This race pleased me, but a Vendée Globe where we would go for the win, it's another story ... So the Vendée is a page that, for now, I put aside. We will see in the future, but today, I can not wait to get our Ultim arounf the time when first Vendée Globe arrive home.

What do you think about the new IMOCA L'Occitane  of Armel Tripon?
It's great to see different approaches, which was not the case on the last Vendée Globe. Today, Charal is a small step ahead of the competition, but Apivia is already in the game , Advens was also a good surprise on the Jacques Vabre. For Armel's boat, when we see what Ian Lipinski and Adrien Hardy did with Jacques Vabre with a boat that resembles the new IMOCA a little, we think that if, aesthetically, it does not have the beautiful lines of other Imoca, it can be powerful, which is the priority. I also look forward to seeing the boat of my friend Nicolas ( Troussel) who has the same hull as Arkéa-Paprec , but with some updates and different foils.
 
If you had to choose one, which one would you take?
In general, I like the boats that are quite versatile, so it would be a mix between  Charal , which is very comfortable in many conditions, and  Apivia for their cockpit.
 
What do you think of Hugo Boss and do you see Alex Thomson as a potential winner of the Vendée Globe?
I think it will be one of the great favorites of the Vendée. In the TJV  he was unlucky, but over short periods, we saw averages and peaks of speed . The boat has potential, it is quite similar to Charal , even if they were more extreme with the cockpit and foils, it has always been their trademark. And I think they have an ability to return quickly.  

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2019/12/imoca-saison-2019-classement-skipper-2020-vendee-globe.html#.XeO8GV7Yqow

Rough translation

The IMOCA World Championship standings are still led by Paul Meilhat with 3 solo races to come in 2020 : The Transat, the New York-Vendée and the Vendée Globe.


Never before has the Transat Jacques Vabre had so many IMOCA participants with 29 pairs leaving from Le Havre and 27 finishing in Salvador de Bahia. Sportingly, it was a superb edition, says Antoine Mermod, President of the IMOCA class. The race was hotly contested at all levels of the fleet, for the top five as well as for the last three. All the pairs had a lot of fun racing against each other. It's very promising for next season. If the next three races are also played out like this, it will be a great show.


Of the 27 boats that arrived in Brazil, about 20 are sailing home with many sailors solo. The 2020 season is focused exclusively on solo events and the sailors need to regain their  skills in this mode. It's life-sized training before attacking the new year. In addition, the winter yards will be very focused on adapting boats to solo sailing. This return navigation from Brazil will allow them to refine the last details and possible improvements, explains Antoine Mermod.


Seventh in the Transat Jacques Vabre with Sam Davies, Paul Meilhat retains the lead of the World Championship "Imoca Globe Series". Apart from the Bermuda 1000 Race, the skipper has completed in all of the events on the circuit, winning last years the Route du Rhum and the Monaco Globe Series (with Gwénolé Gahinet).

He is followed by Yann Eliès, winner of the Transat Jacques Vabre 2019 and 2nd of the Route du Rhum 2018. German Boris Herrmann completes the podium, ahead of Fabrice Amedeo (who has finished all the races) and Vincent Riou.

The ranking of Imoca Globe Series rewards a certain consistency. Those sailors who have done all the races or almost, who have often finished well placed or even won. There will be a lot of things to be done in 2020. That's where everything will be played,  Antoine Mermod notes.

Next year, three events will count towards the Globe Series: The Transat (coefficient 4), New York / Vendée (coefficient 4) and of course the Vendée Globe (coefficient 10).

The Top 10 Globes Series:
1. Paul Meilhat: 206 points
2. Yann Eliès: 192 points
3. Boris Herrmann: 180 points
4. Fabrice Amedeo: 169 points
5. Vincent Riou: 157 points
6. Damien Seguin: 143 points
7. Sam Davies: 140 points
8 Jérémie Beyou: 132 points
9. Kevin Escoffier: 131 points
10. Nicolas Lunvent: 131 points

Source: Sea and Media

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2019/12/imoca-alexia-barrier-paul-meilhat-developpement-au-nautic-de-paris.html#.XeqPTXnYqow

Extract.

Paris Boat Show

Throughout the fair, several sailors will come to present their committed actions for of the ocean and for sustainable development. Phil Sharp, Alexia Barrier, Louis Burton, Fabrice Amedeo, Paul Meilhat, Benjamin Dutreux and Stéphane Le Diraison have already confirmed their attendance. On Wednesday, December 11, a conference will be held where the IMOCA class will present its commitments to the ocean. In the wake will be signed a partnership between IMOCA and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, under the coordination of the JCOMMOPS center.

Maybe we'll see a push towards fuel cells in the near future in IMOCA.

Related on Phil Sharp's fuel cell work. (nowhere to post Class40 items here it seems)

https://www.sail-world.com/news/224600/Phil-Sharp-sets-world-speed-record

https://oceanslab.world/

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2019/12/the-transat-brest-2020-ultime-imoca-multi50-class40.html#.Xez3bnnYqow

The Transat CIC.  Should be a great race even though it now bears almost no resemblance to what this race was.  Great to see a fleet of classes similar to the RDR. Charal said that they do not plan to race it, preferring to focus on tuning up their winter changes/foils.  HB didn't do it last time, wonder if they will this time.  The NY-Vendee IMOCA race (solo)  starts shortly after.

Excerpts-

For the 2020 edition of The Transat, the organizer offers a brand new course starting in Brest and arriving in Charleston. Altogether, 3,100 nautical miles during the North Atlantic spring into the prevailing currents and winds. The start is scheduled for Sunday, May 10, 2020.


Class40, IMOCA, Multi50 and Ultimate
At the end of November, the notice of race was unveiled, thus officially opening registrations. Class40, IMOCA, Multi50 and Ultimes are invited to participate. The craze is already strong since it will be one of the last opportunities for participants in the Vendée Globe to be alone with the elements with their boats. PRB, Arkea Paprec, Initiatives Coeur, Banque Populaire and Maître Coq are the first pre-registered.
 

 

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On 12/7/2019 at 7:08 AM, jb5 said:

Interesting comments about collision avoidance system development, JB. Although 6 seconds is a very short space for reaction time!!! Enough time to scream, 'fuuuuuck', but not much more. ;-)

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IMOCA class published, on 27/11/2019, Class rule 2021 that includes specific rules for a crewed IMOCA measurement certificate.

https://www.imoca.org/en/imoca/official-documents

Specific rules for CMC (crewed measurement certificate) aim mainly security equipment (liferaft, lifeline, desal sizing, etc...). One funny fact, a toilet become mandatory !

Interestingly, a minimum weight for the keel bulb is now specified (2450 kg). I suppose that rule imposes a minimum static righting moment in case of a foil breakage.

 

There is also a whole appendix concerning material limitation, construction method and finishing products specific to CMC but I can't tell if there are major differences with the solo version.

 

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https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-190-kvin-escoffier-si-je-finis-le-vende-je-serai-dans-les-5-golden-globe-race-comment-mcintyre-a-transform-lessai?e=9a497c6fa7

Interview with Kevin Escoffier on the link, in French. Some parts below.

On getting the PRB ride - thank you to Vincent Riou.

I did a lot of multihulls, but also two Volvo monohulls, a race that, to learn how to make a boat run fast on the water, is in my opinion the best - but also a technical experience that fit well with the PRB project, knowing that it is not part of the big stables in the budget and that the boat is quite complicated.

Concerning the loss of Banque Populaire IX  ?
For me and the team, it was hard to live. Team Banque Populaire takes little risk with safety, we have always made structural choices oriented more on that than on the mass gain, we were the only team to do a double structural check of the boats , so lose it totally was a very hard blow.

The PRB project did not include building a new boat, did it make you hesitate?
No, because I think it was the project that perfectly matched my background. Having never made solitary, I could hardly claim to have a project directly with a new boat . By cons, like PRB is a very technical boat, coming from someone very talented in the field, Vincent, who pushes things to the end

Do the foils work well?
Yes, these are foils that will rather seek the delicacy than the surface max, it is not those who will push the most, but they will drag less under certain conditions, it smooths a little performance. The winners of the Vendée Globe are not necessarily the fastest all the time, but they are never the slowest.
 
If you look at the fleet of new boats, which ones inspire you?
Today, in terms of pure speed, Charal has a little advance, they have worked a lot for a year and a half, but he also has weaknesses in small airs on which Jérémie will work this winter. 

What is your goal for the Vendée?
I think with this boat, looking for these small performance gaps and more, if I'm on the finish line, I'll be in five .

Brest Atlantiques ?
There were a lot of breaks and stops, which proves once again that these boats are long to be reliable, but it finally gave rise to a nice twists and turns to follow. When I return from the Vendée Globe, I hope to be able to participate in the round-the-world crew race in late 2021 .

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Update on Charal's winter refit. Four development areas - foils, ergonomics, energy and sails .

https://www.charal.fr/post-voile/chantier-de-charal-nouveaux-foils-pour-2020/

Returning by the sea from Salvador de Bahia on Thursday 5 December, the IMOCA Charal entered the Lorient hangar of the Charal Sailing Team on Monday where, for three and a half months, it will be the focus of the technical team's attention and several subcontractors. This winter project will notably include equipping the boat with a new pair of foils.

The project which will mobilize around twenty people in all. The goal of this winter project is to take it a step further in terms of performance for the Vendée Globe 2020, the main objective of the entire Charal Sailing Team, it is divided into four areas: foils, ergonomics, energy and sails .

As for the foils, these appendages which make it possible to "fly" the IMOCA Charal, the file was opened in January 2019, with first reflections on a new pair, more adapted to the course of the Vendée Globe. "The forms of foils vary according to the configuration of the races," confirms Pierre-François Dargnies, technical director of the Charal Sailing Team. The Transat Jacques Vabre and the Route du Rhum are races with especially reaching and VMG, we can also find ourselves upwind and crossing fronts at the start of the route. As our objective was to be efficient on these two races, we had designed version 1 of our foils accordingly. The Vendée Globe is on the other hand a race with 80% VMG, so we typed our V2 according to that. "

For the design, the design office of the Charal Sailing Team worked with VPLP, the architectural firm that designed the IMOCA Charal, the latter having for the occasion a brand new tool, a simulator developed by Emirates Team New Zealand on the America's Cup for ten years and now marketed. “On the first version, we worked with a performance prediction tool (VPP) which simulates the performance of the boat, but on a flat and static sea. Having this tool, which provides dynamic simulations, much closer to reality, has been very profitable and we are quite confident that this new design methodology can bring us performance  ”, explains Nicolas Andrieu, engineer in the design office, in charge of performance.

To finalize the final design, last July, the design office and the VPLP firm also relied on feedback and data records during the two major navigation sessions of the boat, in December 2018 and then March -April 2019. Construction then started, at C3 Technologies, near La Rochelle, which will deliver the new foils one after the other between mid-February and mid-March. For its part, the Lorient site Gepeto was entrusted with the construction of wells and foil systems, designed in collaboration with the company Awentech and structural engineers from Gurit. Before Christmas, the old wells will be dismantled, the installation of the new wells will start in January, before the finishes and paintings in March. It will then be time for IMOCA Charal to take off.

 

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1 hour ago, jb5 said:
Corum nearing completion. 3 more months to go.
 
 
corum_troussel.jpg
Credit: E Stichelbaut
 

 

 

From the first picture, and the view of the mold at the forefront, it seems that the transom is much flatter and square than the latest launches (HB, Charal, Apivia). More "traditional" in a way, for IMOCAs

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Corum for me is one of the strangest sailing programs to have entered class 40 & imoca in recent times. They launched the most powerful most recent Manuard Mach 40, Troussel partners with Lipinski on some events - didn't exactly blow everyone out of the water & underperform compared to say Phil Sharp.

Then immediately moves on to the imoca class to build a new boat to aim for the VG but extremely late. 

I... just don't get it.

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https://us12.campaign-archive.com/?u=1e692787e2c4cc3370813fca1&id=54f7279309

Interview with Pip Hare on the link in English.  Post TJV.  Pip has been posting a lot on IG this week pulling her boat out of the water and getting in the shed for a winter refit.

On doing the VG Pip says she is very short of funds still and speaks about the stress.  If anyone deserves to do the VG Pip does.  I hope she makes it.  Much more on the link.

How do you cope day to day, it is incredibly stressful?
The thing is nobody else cares about this as much as I do, so it just seems to me that you have to be task focussed. If you want something, then you have to identify what it is, and you have to make it happen. I don’t really know how to explain it any other way.
The thing about the way I’m doing it and the flip side is that it is really, really, really hard work, I have never worked so hard at anything in my life ever. But so it should be, shouldn’t it? The other thing is that it is built on ten years’ experience. I didn’t just wake up one morning and think…… ‘oh, I’m going to do the Vendee Globe’.

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8 hours ago, jb5 said:

Interesting. Is that a bit of a bustle I see designed into her run aft (a little like ETNZ's Te Aihe, AC75, but much shorter?).

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29 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Interesting. Is that a bit of a bustle I see designed into her run aft (a little like ETNZ's Te Aihe, AC75, but much shorter?).

Looks that way. Stern seems to fall away a little. Arkea Paprec doesn't seem to have anything similar. Maybe a refinement. This boat is so late.

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11 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Interesting. Is that a bit of a bustle I see designed into her run aft (a little like ETNZ's Te Aihe, AC75, but much shorter?).

Nope, they are tricking you, that is the deck, hull is to the left with bulkheads installed. they love to trick you.

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/2020-c-est-comment-jeremie-beyou-il-y-a-une-vie-apres-le-vendee-globe-568416b4-2e4a-11ea-8684-b03d65ac22ce

Interview with Jérémie Beyou, in French. Some highlights below. 

Regarding “timing” and his Charal which was launched more than a year ago, Jérémie Beyou continues to think that “it was probably the right one. Neither too early nor too late. And our 'racing fact' on the Transat Jacques Vabre is proof of this: our underperformance in going from doldrums in this race is a negative experience that is better to have known before the Vendée Globe than during ”.

The important thing is to position yourself at the right time before a race in this attitude of progression through experience, even bad . ”

UFOs

"Oscar may not be THE solution, but like other teams, we are working on it," said the Lorient driver. And it's a solution that goes through 'work in progress'. Each of us records data and the set will serve everyone. The more we enrich this data, the better it will work. It must be fed and we will see what it will give. It's better than nothing and we may not have found better by the time Les Sables-d'Olonne left. As long as you feed it well by then. It's 'work in progress' again. "

We now know that Alex goes fast, that he can go very fast," he adds. We also know that other Imoca can go very quickly, even just out of the construction site. In 2020, we will therefore have to monitor all of this even more closely and learn as much as possible from it ”.

Even in four years, I couldn't tell you too much what the Imoca would be like. There are tracks, for sure: the rigid wings, the double skin sails, the bearing planes on the rudders… It's moving, it will move again. I will be there, I will not be there? We'll see. At worst, it will continue to evolve without me. The main thing is that things are still moving ”.

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2 hours ago, jb5 said:

Even in four years, I couldn't tell you too much what the Imoca would be like. There are tracks, for sure: the rigid wings, the double skin sails, the bearing planes on the rudders… It's moving, it will move again. I will be there, I will not be there? We'll see. At worst, it will continue to evolve without me. The main thing is that things are still moving ”.

Ken Read said something similar in a promo piece for North Sails a few weeks ago

Quote

"Apparent wind sailing has been the rage for a while, but with the latest generation of yachts you essentially go "upwind" all the way around the world meaning that even when running, the apparent wind is so far forward it feels like you are on the wind! On the foiling IMOCAs, the sail has to be powerful enough to help you pop out of the water, but then in the perfect world, once you're foiling have the ability to reduce drag and depower easily. 3Di, a patented spread-filament process with its incredible strength to weight characteristics, can be combined with our new structural sail feature called Helix which brings a whole new side of adjustability to sails. Helix is all about load sharing between a downwind sail or headsail and a small luff cord or headstay in order to create more efficient shapes and reduce rig loads, all the while projecting the luff of the headsail forward as never seen before. But it's the adjustability which is key - enabling sailors to have the power to get going, then reducing the aero drag in order to achieve these incredible speeds."

"Helix is a different style of engineering for a sail which translates to a different style of engineering for a new boat or a better style of sailing for an existing boat. For example, if you raise a flag on a headstay on a windy day, the flag will try to pull the headstay away from the wind, whereas within the Helix concept, just through the engineering and the 3Di tape layouts, the flag material would take much of the load off the headstay and project the flag forward into the wind. In a Helix sail, the loading of the Helix structure in the sail skin is pushing the small luff cord or the headstay forward, decreasing the loads on the bowsprit, mast, running backstays and the boat itself, all the while increasing aero efficiency. What started out with broad reaching sails, moved onto reaching sails, staysails and we're now we're actively working on upwind sails."

[snip]

We have seen the technology used in the top end of the sport trickle down to provide benefit and convenience to everyday sailors. One of the many features of the new AC75 America's Cup yachts is the double-luff mainsail, so we asked Kenny if he thought this would be a feature seen more often elsewhere in sailing:

"That's a really great question and it's a great debate right now. We're calling them Twin-Skins, as that's what they are, which have incredible amounts of control from top to bottom, making a soft mainsail react much more like a hard wing. I personally was all for this and we've put a lot of effort and time into the development of this, helping to write the rules and create the concept. Even if the concept ends up being a one-hit-wonder, then my view is that at least we tried - you've got to keep trying to innovate and move forwards. With the speeds that offshore trimarans and the IMOCA yachts are going now, any kind of aerodynamic efficiencies increase boat speed exponentially, so we have to keep pushing for these innovations.

"Is it going to be clumsy and complicated at the beginning? Of course it is as every innovation has to go through this stage before becoming a refined product, but I personally think it has a future and could trickle through some aspects of sailing, making it more fun, more efficient, more pleasurable and in turn more entertaining for whoever wants to take it up."

Sounds expensive for this VG, and maybe the TOR. Might be the reason TOR Amendment 2 will not allow carbon fibre sails

Quote
  1. 6.5  On the Assembly Date, IMOCA 60 Teams shall nominate up to fourteen sails plus one storm jib. Where an IMOCA Team does not nominate the full fourteen sails at the Assembly Date, it shall nominate the remaining sails before 1st March 2022. Only these nominated sails and sail bags shall be carried, hoisted or used on the Boat at any time after the Assembly Date. Sail materials used for nominated sails shall not include Carbon Fibre.

 

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Sounds expensive for this VG, and maybe the TOR. Might be the reason TOR Amendment 2 will not allow carbon fibre sails

Pretty sure the main reason is that carbon may screw up the satellite communications if the sail blankets the satellite. Cost and durability might be secondary reasons, but that's all relative, and Ken Read couldn't care less about that.

Interesting sail developments though, and nice and typical North Sails talk as well...

 

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16 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Pretty sure the main reason is that carbon may screw up the satellite communications if the sail blankets the satellite.

I wondered about that, but thought it odd the carbon exclusion was specifically for the IMOCAs. We'd seen problems with sat  streaming on the 65s and 70s, so I was reading Read to see if his new improved sails might also be more 'transparent'.

And speaking of carbon fibre sails and your other post about lighting storms  .  .  .  was glad the carbon boats survived the lightning in the doldrums these past few years. These modern boats too often seem like floating anodes, about to burst into candles in the dark. 

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30 minutes ago, stief said:

was glad the carbon boats survived the lightning in the doldrums these past few years. These modern boats too often seem like floating anodes, about to burst into candles in the dark. 

It's a real worry, much like this carbon canoe:

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Saw a big carbon mast once that had hit a power line, it split open like an old spruce spar. Do the same with an aluminum mast, on an alu boat, and it's not a problem. How do I know? :D

 

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4 hours ago, Chimp too said:

VOR always banned carbon in sails purely because of the comms issues it causes. 

Ah. Found more here (from 6 years ago)

Quote

With the exception of the A3 and the storm jib, all sails will be built to varying deniers using North Sails’ 3Di process, using pre-impregnated tapes made of black Twaron Aramid and clear Dyneema SK75 fibres.

No carbon is allowed in the sail material as it blocks the signals to and from the satellites essential for communication and data transfer.

I guess I mistakenly confused "black Twaron Aramid" with carbon in the VOR sat streaming issues (live finish coverage problems). Thought I read somewhere that the sails hampered the signal.

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/2020-c-est-comment-yann-penfornis-chez-multiplast-ca-turbine-vivement-le-vendee-globe-19faa40c-2fcf-11ea-bd8d-af17540d3768

Yann Penfornis Multiplast interview in French. 

A few quotes

We also have the central hull of Macif and the two Banque Populaire floats . Without forgetting in Imoca the new foils and foil wells of Time for Ocean and 11 th Hour . More in AC 75, for the America Cup, the delivery of the English bridge mold from Ineos. "

" For March 2020, he continues, as others would list their orders in light hardware, we have the new foils of Malizia II and those of Corum. 

Speaking of urgency, Yann Penfornis nurtures, he also admits, “a real regret for Yann Eliès' failed attempt to have an Imoca for the Vendée Globe. In eight months, we knew how to do it, it was possible with our molds. I talked about it with him on the quays of Le Havre, before the Jacques Vabre. But the partner withdrew, he had to find another. At best, that left us seven months. There, it was no longer possible, you have to be serious! But we would have liked it to come out. Maybe as much as him, for him ” .

 

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On 1/5/2020 at 4:57 PM, stief said:

Ah. Found more here (from 6 years ago)

I guess I mistakenly confused "black Twaron Aramid" with carbon in the VOR sat streaming issues (live finish coverage problems). Thought I read somewhere that the sails hampered the signal.

duhh ? - i have used carbon sails for a number of years with no noticeable affect on satellite coms..and IIRC the IMOCA60s, etc all use carbon sails

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1 hour ago, SSolo said:

duhh ? - i have used carbon sails for a number of years with no noticeable affect on satellite coms..and IIRC the IMOCA60s, etc all use carbon sails

Carbon sails have less impact on iridium constellation but have a huge effect on geostationary systems used by inmarsat. It isn't such a big deal for imocas because the teams generally have very low bandwidth requirements (email/weather/sat imagery & occasional short clip) while VOR wanted to be able to stream video/allow OBR to upload content nonstop.

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3 hours ago, Raptorsailor said:

is it any good?

Depending if you're a fan of Bilou I guess, I am so...the clips of the sailing are also cool.  The conversation is of course hard or impossible to follow, depending.  The website is a bit painful to use. Not a lot else happening in the offshore world right now until IDEC sets off again, so anything is something. 

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7 hours ago, jb5 said:

https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/voile-documentaire-on-m-appelle-bilou-09-01-2020-12474038.php

Video interview/documentary with Bilou (Roland Jourdain) on the link which includes a lot of clips from his various exploits.  50+ minutes. In French.

JB. Bilou is quite a character. An amazing seaman, with a ton of experience. Some good multi video footage in that doc. too.

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In the above Tip & Shaft link came up a sponsored Multiplast article in Voiles et Voiliers of a couple of months ago. It's a kind of interesting to see they are keen to continue their involvement in the Volvo/TOR.

https://www.tipandshaft.com/en/nautic-industry-en/sponsored-article-how-multiplast-are-setting-themselves-up-to-build-an-imoca-for-the-ocean-race/

Who is gone take up that build slot ?

 

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2020/01/michel-desjoyeaux-mer-agitee-20ans-bilan-societe-chantier-construction-conception-.html#.XhyoYkjYqow

Short Michel Desjoyeaux interview concerning Mer Agitée.

“ After my second victory in the Solitaire du Figaro, I wanted to create my own toolbox to manage my projects. Becoming a business manager was equivalent to being a skipper on land, as I was already at sea, ” confides Michel Desjoyeaux. The birth of Mer Agitée coincides with the launch of the PRB adventure for the Vendée Globe. Two years later, in 2001, Michel Desjoyeaux won his first non-stop solo round the world trip. This success will serve as a launching pad for Mer Agitée: hitherto devoted to one man, the structure will turn into an offshore racing stable.


Support, from design to navigation
2002-2005 is the start of a new era. The company manages three projects head-on - Géant, PRB, VMI- and the successes are there. You have to hire and rationalize the activity. Jean-Paul Roux becomes the director of the company, he will remain so for 10 years. “From design to navigation, that is our hallmark. Our experience, our knowledge of issues, timings and risks saves time for performance- oriented projects ” explains Mich 'Desj'.


Four victories in the Vendée Globe
In 20 years, the trophies collected on the shelves of Mer Agitée have numbered dozens: 25 podiums on the largest ocean racing events, including four victories in the Vendée Globe and three on the Route du Rhum, among others. This prize list does not belong only to Michel Desjoyeaux. Vincent Riou, Sébastien Josse, François Gabart and Paul Meilhat will make their mark on the history of the company.


Stir up ideas, imagine solutions
In addition to being a talent enhancer, Mer Agitée is also an ideas incubator. "I came from the boat technique before being a competitor" recognizes the one who trudged all his childhood in the paternal shipyard. " If we like what exists in series on the market, we take, if not, we design, we manufacture ourselves or we make it happen, which has also generated partnerships with suppliers ."

This inclination of Mer Agitée for creation and implementation gave birth to the Mer Forte design office. The two entities, now independent, collaborate regularly. In 2015, they imagined "Z", a hybrid catamaran (sail and motor) built by recovering old parts of competition sailboats. Ideal platform for taking on guests, the boat is available for hire for public relations operations.


A new water-based IMOCA in two and a half months
Today, the teams are focused on the construction of the 60-foot IMOCA Corum L'Epargne (Juan Kouyoumdjian plan) with which Nicolas Troussel will start the next Vendée Globe. The launch is planned in a few weeks.


Source: Blanco Negro

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https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-195-juan-k-lapptit-pour-le-vol-conduit-des-bateaux-trop-techniques-comment-les-villes-investissent-dans-la-course?e=9a497c6fa7

Interview with Juan K.  This is in French only.  Very interesting interview.  He does not answer why Arkea's foils broke, leaving that to the team.  They now know why he says.   

A few highlight quotes:

How do you assess the first season of your new Imoca?
The season in general is positive because we always learn something and I also include the excellent performance of PRB , I don't think we can really separate the two . In sporting terms, the Arkéa Paprec season was obviously very disappointing . All these boats are so technical and so pushed by the skippers that damage necessarily occurs . I hope, for Sébastien Simon and his team, that the problems are now behind . Still, the boat has shown beautiful things . If they hadn't broken the second foil, Sébastien and Vincent would probably have finished on the podium of the Jacques Vabre . But from the start, we had to face a lot of technical problems , especially in the foil control system .

Are you talking about rake control, the incidence of foils?
Yes, the system that we had designed is very complex. It did not work and the foil could only load 50% of what was expected, due to the deformations of the structure. This was especially true in the tailwind where the foil is asked to push only vertically. As soon as the angle was closed and the foil had to produce a lateral component, the boat was fast and even showed impressive performance on certain sections of the race. Unfortunately, Imoca has now changed the rule due to gauge interpretations (see below ). So, instead of revising and perfecting our system, we are forced to completely change it. This is the big job this winter, with the construction of the new foils.

More generally, what lessons do you draw from the last Transat Jacques Vabre?
I think Charal should have won the race , even if the weather hazard is part of the game and does not take anything away from Apivia's merit . Charal has consolidated and astonishing performances , notably in the VMG tailwind . Hugo Boss has also shown, over a few periods,  remarkable aptitudes at this pace . Architecturally, the lesson I take from all of this is that it's very difficult to design foilers that work well at all speeds. There are typical boats for certain conditions. I have yet to see a better boat in all conditions. The big question is whether a versatile concept can always win the Vendée Globe or if it is better to focus on a pace under specific conditions . I don't have the answer, but that's the big issue today with the foils.

On the TOR the project the proposed Spanish team has not found the funding for a new boat.  Looking at a used IMOCA potentially.

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