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I stumbled across some local beach cats that seem to be advertised at bargain prices.  But I have not seriously been on one in quite a while and that was a Stiletto 23.  One is a Prindle 18-2 (which seems to be different than a Prindel 18) and the other is a Hobie 21 SE.  I am not limiting my choices to just these two but they seem far cheaper than something like a C24 and fairly easy to set up for a day sail in calm Florida waters.

I just read a post here about how beach cats are very prone to capsize, especially single handed.  It referenced a Hobie Getaway which I have seen billed as a family oriented easy to sail beach cat.  I am looking for a day sailer I could camp cruise for a week end at local barrier islands for a long weekend.  One thing I have noticed is that what I will call modern beach cats have "wings" which seem to be raised seats on each hull which seem to make things much more comfortable for a weak old guy like me.  There are also lots of vids about how easy it is to raise the mast on such boats.

Can anyone offer advice on what I will call an easy to sail 17-23 foot (or so) beach cat that can carry a little load for beach camping .  Thing is I am seeing lots of ads for this type of boat for around $US3,000; a lot cheaper than any tri that could do those things, at least as far as I know.  So far I am leaning towards the Prindle 18 2 modified with wings since it has a tiny bit better weight to sail area ratio than the Hobie 21 SE and is much lighter.  But any suggestions for a better option are welcome. 

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Just grab the Hobie 21 SE. It will do everything you say you are looking for. Really robust boat compared to the Prindle 18-2. I've never see benches on the 18-2, it is really just a scaled down Tornado and more of a racing boat. The big benches on the H-21 are really comfortable and the SE even had a cuddy of sorts. Be sure to get the waterbag righting bag and tackle rigged under the tramp on the big Hobie though. 

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9 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Just grab the Hobie 21 SE. It will do everything you say you are looking for. Really robust boat compared to the Prindle 18-2. I've never see benches on the 18-2, it is really just a scaled down Tornado and more of a racing boat. The big benches on the H-21 are really comfortable and the SE even had a cuddy of sorts. Be sure to get the waterbag righting bag and tackle rigged under the tramp on the big Hobie though. 

The Prindle was modified for the Everglades Challenge with benches; and owner finished the race with it.  It is much lighter and the mast would be easier for me to raise solo.  I also am still laboring under the delusion that I might do the Everglades Challenge some time; which requires portage where the Prindle would have a big advantage.  No question in my mind the SE would be a much better camping boat and that I something I know I would do.

Thanks for the input; it is helping me make up my mind.

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5 minutes ago, Fat Point Jack said:

Both are members of the Dead Boat Society.  The Prindle is now a fossil.  You've been at The Beachcats, see the 21 thread, lots of help there.

Thx.  Still think the SA guys offer great unfiltered advice.

Just did a search at thebeachcats and could not find the thread you mentioned.  Do you have a link.

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P-18-2 would be a great boat for the Challenge. There was one in the Worrell 1000 the year I did it but it got eaten by the highway bridge at Oregon Inlet. That one had a nice very light sensible sectioned Carbon Fiber wing that really turbo'd the boat right up. A local P18-2 owner drove up to the checkpoint early the next morning and let the team finish their race with his stock boat. I think they made the podium. H-21 would be a beast to haul up and down the beaches on the Challenge. What are you calling a portage on the challenge?

 

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9 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

P-18-2 would be a great boat for the Challenge. There was one in the Worrell 1000 the year I did it but it got eaten by the highway bridge at Oregon Inlet. That one had a nice very light sensible sectioned Carbon Fiber wing that really turbo'd the boat right up. A local P18-2 owner drove up to the checkpoint early the next morning and let the team finish their race with his stock boat. I think they made the podium. H-21 would be a beast to haul up and down the beaches on the Challenge. What are you calling a portage on the challenge?

 

From the Challenge site

 

Quote
  • You must portage your boat a short distance between the fresh water side and the salt water side at Flamingo. You cannot receive assistance from the Race Manager, CP Captain, or bystanders. Challengers participating in the event may assist other challengers (see the note below).

SPECIAL NOTE 2: In some previous years we have provided a boat cart or other assistance for the short portage at Flamingo. As of EC2011 and beyond a boat cart will not be provided and all challengers crossing from the fresh water side to the salt water side must do this short portage without outside assistance. No cart will be provided. You must carry your own if you plan to use one. If bystanders want to help they cannot. However, other WaterTribers who are in the same event can help - see the ad hoc team rule.

 

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I thought you were maybe talking about the one up in Georgia on the full on marathon version. 20 miles or so I think. Matt Layden had wheels rigged for his little boat that year. He could mount the wheels and stick his oars out handle first through holes in the transom and wheel it along like a wheelbarrow. He was doing fine and about halfway to the Okeefennokee and the headwaters of the Suwannee River when a couple of Ga State Troopers pulled up and just said WTF???

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33 minutes ago, Tomfl said:

From the Challenge site

 

 

 This note is only for the paddlers who take the Inside Route, through the Everglades mangrove canals. 

No sailboat, especially a multihull, would get through those narrow, serpentine 'canals.'  They take the outside route around the Florida Cape to Flamingo.

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1 minute ago, sailwriter said:

 This note is only for the paddlers who take the Inside Route, through the Everglades mangrove canals. 

No sailboat, especially a multihull, would get through those narrow, serpentine 'canals.'  They take the outside route around the Florida Cape to Flamingo.

Like I posted earlier I am still laboring under the delusion of doing the Challenge; but really have no idea what that means.  Thanks for the insight.

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If you want to sail a beach cat solo, you probably want the heavier boats so the 21SE will likely be the better choice...however, that's an old boat and likely will be necessary to fix stuff.  I think the 21 also had storage in the amas, so that's a plus if you are going camping.  I started with tris and had only a short few years with a Hobie Getaway which I sailed solo, but never felt secure-especially since everyone kept telling me to practice righting it.  I never capsized, but sailing isn't supposed to cause worry, it is supposed to relieve worries.  

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On your own even with beach wheels, anything over 130kgs becomes really difficult to move around on land, sailing is the easy bit, it’s the landing, launching and getting the rig up is the difficult bit.

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Spot on I couldn't imagine dragging some of those mentioned big cats around solo, let alone imagining righting them, things like a Nacra 16 square, Nacra 18 square are big and designed for one person to sail but can carry two, righting is still tricky but my Nacra 18 square is 11 foot wide so nearly impossible to tip unless your really pushing, chuck a carbon Tornado mast on it like mine and you have a much lighter easier to handle boat

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About the only older boats that are of any value to a modern thinking single hander is an F16 type boat, the early Nacra 17 and the Hobie FX1. But the later two are both over the 135kgs.

From my own experience the F16's are just way ahead on the all round fun factor with enough reliability and durability to take a fear old bashing and yet offers some of the best single handed experiences you can get ( you will be faster than 18's or 21's over a course as you are controlling the boat rather than the boat controlling you ).

The outlander though is boats such as mine which are an older A Class fitted with an F16 size spinny. You would be surprised just how little beefing up you have to do to make them durable and tough enough to handle the extra spinny loads and yet as mine is, still 78kgs. The A Class are a joy to sail in standard trim but real pains as soon as you are not on a windward leeward course, the spinny transforms that.

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The H 21SE is not the same boat as a H 21SC; I've got the SE model- it's only a tad lighter, but still is a portly 550+ pounds.  The SE is wider with a 9.5 foot beam, and so is "supposed" to be collapsed for legal trailering.  I don't collapse mine.  The SE has very little to no storage - just the 8 inch port and the small shelf in the hulls.  The SC, on the other hand has the extra trampoline up front, the "storage cabin" , is street legal as-is and a smaller mast.  Also at least 50 pounds heavier.

I haven't even tried launching mine or maneuvering it around with beach wheels yet, though I have a set.  I put my spare wheel on the front jack in a trailing wheel arrangement and just wheel the whole thing to the water's edge to launch and retrieve.  Works so far, but boat has more beach contact than I'd like.  The point is - it's heavy, but really big, fast and fun (in my estimation) - but I don't race.  If you snap the comp tip on the mast, you're now in the realm of custom built mast, custom repair, custom molding or totaling your boat.   That's the only part I really haven't found a ready source of supplies for.  Most of the rest of the boat shares Hobie 18 parts or there's an easy solution that doesn't require original parts.

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As WayneMarlow states, all A-class cats weigh 75 kilos, and are actually pretty damn tough. See that <- thumbnail of my 1971 woodie A-cat flying with surface-piercing hydrofoils on it.   I have sailed it without foils in the 40 mile Palatka-Jacksonville Mug Race in the St. Johns River with a smallish chute many times.... because the wind quits,  then comes back on your stern after 4 hours---- I've finished 4th once, 6th a bunch of times vs all kinds of other bigger cats up to 30 ft.  Every time I have to lift an A-cat, my back says- "Thank you very much!"    And you run away from the nasty big HEAVY fiberglass cats to weather anyway.   8^)   25 pound CF mast---did that go "DING" for you yet?   

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Can't comment on the Prindle 18, but I did the Everglades Challenge on a Prindle 16.  It was slow compared to the bigger newer cats, but was easy on/off beaches, and came standard with a reef point in the main.  Each hull has inspection ports which you can store all your gear in leaving a clean tramp for sailing.

Having said that, if I had the dollars, I would consider something a bit newer.  Hobie Getaway would make a nice beach cruiser imo.  Unstable is not a characteristic I would associate with a Getaway or any of the newer family freindly Hobie Cats.

 

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The Prindle 18-2 was too good a deal to pass up.  Of course the boat and trailer had no title which resulted in me spending way too much time at the DMV; but everything is street legal now.  It is a two man job getting the boat off and on the trailer but it is doable.  If I use a ramp I should be able to single hand it; if the ramp is not heavily used.  In any case I just trailered the boat to it's new home.  First time for me with a trailer and it was a lot easier than I expected.

So next step is to get several little parts to ease putting the boat together on the trailer.  Also wondering about instruments.  I would like to get some type of chart plotter with VMG capability.  Probably the first race I will do is the 100 mile "Round the Island" at Ft. Walton.  Is it normal to use instruments on beach cats; and if so any suggestions.  Thinking about something on a tablet but am willing to learn.

prindle18-2.jpg

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Beach Cat sailors use electronics. 

I use a soft sided clear chart case.  The style you get  for sea kayaks.  Lashed down to the tramp aft of the mast on all 4 corners. 

Inside the chart case are usually some laminated charts, on top of the charts are my electronics. 

For electronics I use a handheld garmin chartplotter with Blue charts.  For back up I hve my Samsung S8 in a life proof case with both Navionics Boating HD and Plan2nav as well as some other apps I like.  Both the garmin and navionics give vmg.  The reason the garmin is 1 and the cell phone is the back up is battery life.  Garmin chartplotters take aa batteries that you can change on the fly.  I also keep my SPOT in the chart case.  A compas on the tramp can be handy too.

Only other electronics I use is a submersible VHF and a PLB, both worn on my PFD.

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All instruments laying on the deck have the same problem, you can’t see them in the sunlight. Old fashioned black and white are the best but how many people buy these type of instruments any more.

100 miles on a beach cat is tough, you may want to do a few 10 milers first and work your way up. Try the 100 miler if you like but would suggest you contact the lifeguards to say you are on your way. 

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2 hours ago, Waynemarlow said:

All instruments laying on the deck have the same problem, you can’t see them in the sunlight. Old fashioned black and white are the best but how many people buy these type of instruments any more.

100 miles on a beach cat is tough, you may want to do a few 10 milers first and work your way up. Try the 100 miler if you like but would suggest you contact the lifeguards to say you are on your way. 

From the link in my post about the Round the Island race/regatta.  I am sure in addition to the other boats around and the staged start to try and get all the boats finishing at the same time lifeguards will not be necessary.  It is really a 60/40 two day event with a stop at the end of the first day.

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Tom, 

     That race can still be a tough row to hoe! Split into two legs is much friendlier though. Good Luck! Boat looks good and those racks/seats will be a godsend on the race. Practice self righting until you can do it with your eyes closed.

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1 minute ago, Rasputin22 said:

Tom, 

     That race can still be a tough row to hoe! Split into two legs is much friendlier though. Good Luck! Boat looks good and those racks/seats will be a godsend on the race. Practice self righting until you can do it with your eyes closed.

AND, put a reef point in your mainsail so you don't capsize to begin with.  Especially if going solo.

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Don't go solo... Maybe on a Prindle 15 but the P18-2 is set up as a two person string puller for sure. It was designed as the People's Version of the Tornado 20 Olympic Cat.

      P-15 only really has two strings to pull. Mainsheet and traveller. I could right that boat so quick that I would gain places during a capsize in a race. No joke, at the St Thomas Rolex in 25 knot Caribbean Blast conditions I did a Maypole Pitch Pole dump with a visiting H-16 team from Puerto Rico just about to overtake me. A Maypole is when you stuff it so bad going down a wave that you swing right past the forestay and go all the way around the leeward side of the mast and your weight on the trap wire actually pulls the bows back out of the water. Boat still goes over but is really easy to right sitting on its sterns. You just have to swim around and unwind the trap wire and as you go around the front a good yank will pull the boat upright and it is waiting head to wind with the sail luffing waiting for you to crawl on board and then try and not repeat the stunt. If you had never seen one it looks like the skipper would be killed and the H-16 guys headed up to see if I was still in one piece and alive. I waved them on but they had gone into irons and by the time they got sorted out they looked for me and I had gained a couple of hundred yards and was jibing around the last mark. Beat them to the finish and that afternoon at the club my would be rescuers  were warning the rest of the PR fleet not to fall for my trickery. I did buy them a beer for checking in on me though.

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On 8/25/2019 at 3:19 PM, Tomfl said:

  It is a two man job getting the boat off and on the trailer but it is doable.  If I use a ramp I should be able to single hand it; if the ramp is not heavily used.   

getting the boat on and off can be easily done solo - get beach-wheels 

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1 hour ago, MultiThom said:

AND, put a reef point in your mainsail so you don't capsize to begin with.  Especially if going solo.

How do you suggest he lowers and secures the main (that is on a hook) with reef points?

this isn't as easy to do as on a beachcat with a wire/bead halyard (hobie 16 style)?

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It a LONG day or day and night to get arond the island.  My crew last time was SO drunk from the night before, so I was all by myself.    Disgusting.  yes reef a new-to-you fast and fairly light boat.   And no short races firt?  Bad idea.

 

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21 minutes ago, MN3 said:

How do you suggest he lowers and secures the main (that is on a hook) with reef points?

this isn't as easy to do as on a beachcat with a wire/bead halyard (hobie 16 style)?

You add a leader line to the head which is then attached to the halyard which is hooked like normal.  Leader line length is the same length as the reef point from the foot.  Skinny dyneema with eyes at both ends.  Quick.

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15 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

You add a leader line to the head which is then attached to the halyard which is hooked like normal.  Leader line length is the same length as the reef point from the foot.  Skinny dyneema with eyes at both ends.  Quick.

yup that should work but this method requires lowering the main, adding the leader, raising the main again

then to lower the main:  flipping the boat on it's side to get it back off the hook  

I've tried to put a beachcat on it's side in a squall - not safe nor fun and about a 5 person job

 (imho) not really a great option in big wind - which is exactly when you need to be reefed

 

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On 8/16/2019 at 5:04 PM, Tomfl said:

The Prindle was modified for the Everglades Challenge with benches; and owner finished the race with it.  

If this is so, the boat might already be modified with 2 reefs in the main.

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2 minutes ago, TBW said:

If this is so, the boat might already be modified with 2 reefs in the main.

Very true! 

most likely does have reef points as this is a requirement of all beachcats in the EC

this doesn't mean they have a solution for the hook issue  (that has been discussed at great detail on catsailor.com in the past)

 

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Seems like I remember multiple swage balls on the Hobie 16 wire main halyards that slipped into a simple hook on the fwd side of the mast which would let your reef more or less normally. Other than being nasty on your hands, I wonder why they ever went away from that simple but effective means. I bet you could insert some sort of internal plastic ball into Amsteel and then seize tightly on either side of the ball and create a 'reef stop' that fit into a nice 3d printed smooth edged hook or sorts. I'll sketch it up.

    Seems like the old big sheave on CL at the top of the original H-16 mast was designed to take the wire halyard and the swage balls without jamming. That allowed the reefing points determined by the distance between the swage balls on the wire and there was a simple SS hook right up at the top of the extrusion. I think that the CompTip masts might have changed all of the as they were too flexible. 

    Here is a link to an old thread about reefing for the EC. Good ideas for a variety of boats.

 

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47 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Seems like I remember multiple swage balls on the Hobie 16 wire main halyards that slipped into a simple hook on the fwd side of the mast which would let your reef more or less normally.

 

yup - the old h16's came with reefable mains

 

"I wonder why they ever went away from that simple but effective means. "

I believe they did away with this when they started to get sued more and more for sailors taking risks and having damages

same with the comp tip 

 

My bigger beachcat (6.0) came with a forked main halyard with 2 beads (Came from out of state, purchased by another local sailor) - this was not stock
2nd local owner of this boat is was/a marine fabricator / rigger, and removed this system - it had lots of weight aloft that wasn't needed 

he worked with an in-house marine engineer and came up with this:

an "in-mast track" spinlock to secure the halyard  (6mm low stretch dyneema cored line) for when it is removed from the hook

to distribute the now doubled load on the mast (once off the hook, it is a 2:1) he rigged a 2:1 halyard ring 

the main was designed with extra grommets for new clew and tack - I have tested this many times - pretty sound set-up. i have broken it 2x (out of around 20 times used)

 

 

i look forward to reading that article: - thanks for posting it
 

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2 hours ago, MN3 said:

Very true! 

most likely does have reef points as this is a requirement of all beachcats in the EC

this doesn't mean they have a solution for the hook issue  (that has been discussed at great detail on catsailor.com in the past)

 

True and true.

 

While I might try and come up with some type of hook on a line  rig more likely if it gets above 15 knots (or so, not sure, seen some say 18 knots) I would simply lower the main and ride it out; likely on the beach.  It is a fairly big square top; and on my Seawind the square top opens up and acts as a first reef.  My rule of thumb on a beach cat is nothing will slow you down in a race as much as flipping it and having to right it.  You were not joking about the discussion on catsailor.com being great in detail; still reading it.

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51 minutes ago, Tomfl said:

True and true.

 

While I might try and come up with some type of hook on a line  rig more likely if it gets above 15 knots (or so, not sure, seen some say 18 knots) I would simply lower the main and ride it out; likely on the beach.  

I am not sure if that would be ideal for the EC.

My P16 was reefed quite a bit, double reefed quite a bit.  Probably could have let it hang out more, but didn't want to capsize, plus, she is a 40 year old boat.

Crossed Florida Bay in 8 hours with double reefed main and single reefed jib, in the dark.  It still felt crazy fast.

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4 hours ago, MN3 said:

yup that should work but this method requires lowering the main, adding the leader, raising the main again

then to lower the main:  flipping the boat on it's side to get it back off the hook  

I've tried to put a beachcat on it's side in a squall - not safe nor fun and about a 5 person job

 (imho) not really a great option in big wind - which is exactly when you need to be reefed

 

Didn't think the boat required flipping the boat on its side to get the mainsail hooked or unhooked--owners manual glosses over those details.  Seems a strange thing to have to do.  Since you are reefing anyway, you probably can just tie off the halyard without fear of inverting the mast since the loads "should" be low enough--but I agree, helluvathing to have to do in a squall-turn the boat on its side to lower the mainsail.  Personally, I'd modify the masthead and make it 2:1 with a standard cleat installed at the base...Loads stay in the right place, right amount and easy peasy to reef.   Gotta get a loong halyard though.

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18 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

Personally, I'd modify the masthead and make it 2:1 with a standard cleat installed at the base...Loads stay in the right place, right amount and easy peasy to reef.   Gotta get a loong halyard though.

IMHO:
If you sail 2:1 all time ... you are putting double strain and stress (and life) into your mast and rigging and fittings ...  adding a nice  inline cleat for use (only with less sail area) has worked like a charm on my cat since 2011

 

"Didn't think the boat required flipping the boat on its side to get the mainsail hooked or unhooked-" -

yup - the mast/main will twist but the ring wont twist enough to clear the hook. - even if you use wire. you need the head of the sail up there at the ring every example i have seen

add 40 knots wind and .... lots less fun to deal with 

 

 

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1 hour ago, TBW said:

I am not sure if that would be ideal for the EC.

My P16 was reefed quite a bit, double reefed quite a bit.  Probably could have let it hang out more, but didn't want to capsize, plus, she is a 40 year old boat.

Crossed Florida Bay in 8 hours with double reefed main and single reefed jib, in the dark.  It still felt crazy fast.

I have sailed extensively in the Florida Keys; both ocean and gulf side.  But it was in my Seawind which is a much different boat.  I have only reefed a few times and normally fly a big screecher.  Part of that may be a result of my choosing good weather windows.  I know the EC is in March and a couple of years ago there was a front that came through causing lots of havoc.  But for the most part I don't really see winds much above 10 knots.  I did go out several years ago when the outer bands of Andrea hit the Keys and was doing 10 knots with triple reef and working jib in 12-15 feet seas according NOAA.  But that is the exception, not the rule for me.

Not sure what you mean by 'not sure if that would be ideal for the EC'; is that for the mods to the rig or sitting things out on the beach.  While it is probably still a delusion on my part to do the EC, I have no delusion about me being "Chicken of the Sea" and heading for a beach and sitting things out at the drop of a hat.

Maybe it is incorrect on my part but I have always thought a square top acts as the first reef and opens up in a gust.  Not saying you should not be careful but I really like a square top.

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1 hour ago, MisterMoon said:

Did you buy Tony V.’s boat? 

Bought the boat from a guy named Robert; not sure where he got it.  Would like to trace the ownership if possible.

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3 minutes ago, Tomfl said:

 

Not sure what you mean by 'not sure if that would be ideal for the EC'; is that for the mods to the rig or sitting things out on the beach.  While it is probably still a delusion on my part to do the EC, I have no delusion about me being "Chicken of the Sea" and heading for a beach and sitting things out at the drop of a hat.

 

3 minutes ago, Tomfl said:

Maybe it is incorrect on my part but I have always thought a square top acts as the first reef and opens up in a gust.  Not saying you should not be careful but I really like a square top.

Certainly not calling you a chicken.  

In my example above, headed out from Flamingo about 5-6 ish pm.  No thunderstorms in the forecast, but had a line of successive ones hit.  Starting just around dark.  I am Canadian, so it was my first time sailing in Florida, but could not find anywhere to hunker down in Florida Bay.  It was tough navigation by standards I am accustomed to and needed to slow the boat down to navigate.  Its dark, channels are narrow and their is lots to hit.  There were no beaches to sit out on.  Same could happen around Cape Sable, there is a beach, but if the wind was blowing the wrong way, landing on it could be a boat wrecking type emergency.  So not a chicken thing, just sometimes finding that beach to sit out on could be pretty hard, safer to keep sailing some times.

I think you are probably right about the square top, my mono is gaff rigged and you can slow the boat down a heap by slacking the peak, but still, I think the rules call for two reef points and if there is a small craft adivosory at start, you can't leave the beach without a reef in or its DQ.

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Gutsy to leave Flamingo that late! It’s way too easy to get stuck very badly if you go a little bit wrong in the dark. That being said I really wanted to leave at dusk this year right after we got to Flamingo but my partner wisely talked me out of it. It’s more fun to arrive at the finish in the afternoon anyway. 

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8 minutes ago, MisterMoon said:

Gutsy to leave Flamingo that late! It’s way too easy to get stuck very badly if you go a little bit wrong in the dark. That being said I really wanted to leave at dusk this year right after we got to Flamingo but my partner wisely talked me out of it. It’s more fun to arrive at the finish in the afternoon anyway. 

I wont do it again.  But there was a following wind and just couldn't resist the temptation.  It worked out well though.   This year the plan is to leave Flamingo in the morning, even if it costs me some time. 

I wouldn't do the race without an easy on the water reefing system though.

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1 hour ago, TBW said:

 

Certainly not calling you a chicken.  

SNIP

Not sure about Canada but in the US "Chicken of the Sea" is a well known brand of canned tuna fish that has been advertised on TV for as long as I can remember.  It is a kinda joke here to use the term with no disrespect.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Tomfl said:

Not sure what you mean by 'not sure if that would be ideal for the EC'; is that for the mods to the rig or sitting things out on the beach. 

Me thinks he was talking about the reefing system

It could be a very challenging thing trying to un-cleat the bead and reset it to the second bead while trying to reef on the fly in med - heavy air 

esp solo.. your boat would probably not "sit nice" while you were standing on a bow messing with your halyard 

 

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19 hours ago, MN3 said:

to distribute the now doubled load on the mast (once off the hook, it is a 2:1) he rigged a 2:1 halyard ring 

If you take the halyard down to a pulley and back up to the mast head, the line becomes a 2:1 but the loading on the mast become 1.5:1 so I'm led to believe from far wiser men than I.

If you take into account the old Prindle masts were like stout trees compared to todays masts, the chances of using enough downhaul to flip the top off will be limited but the additional loading of the halyard will probably matter little.

Also fit baby stays to the 1/2 way point between the diamonds to prevent the mast inverting leaving a bit of slack to allow the mast to flex but to act as a preventer.

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41 minutes ago, Waynemarlow said:

If you take the halyard down to a pulley and back up to the mast head, the line becomes a 2:1 but the loading on the mast become 1.5:1 so I'm led to believe from far wiser men than I.

agreed

on the hook = t

off the hook and secured at the base = 2t . 

with 2:1 = 1.5 t

 

11514.gif

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2 hours ago, MN3 said:

agreed

on the hook = t

off the hook and secured at the base = 2t . 

with 2:1 = 1.5 t

 

11514.gif

The point is, a small mod to the mast allows one to reef easily and without putting the boat on its side to release a hook.  The hook system would not be my choice for any boat taken offshore because I like being able to take sails down if I see a storm and I have time; but I understand, some of you folks like righting your boats after capsize.  Fun is where you find it, I guess.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm a big fan of the Tornado. Lots of them about and reasonably-priced now that they're no longer an Olympic boat. I put wing seats on mine ,as it makes it much drier and more comfortable for cruising 

received_2436876913254334.jpeg

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22 hours ago, Funslut said:

I'm a big fan of the Tornado. Lots of them about and reasonably-priced now that they're no longer an Olympic boat. I put wing seats on mine ,as it makes it much drier and more comfortable for cruising 

 

The Prindle 19 and 18-2 are very Tornado like; maybe a little more sturdy and heavier.  The 18-2 has more volume in the bows than the 19 which makes it a little slower but a little less likely to pitch pole.  The 19 has a lot more sail area.  I really like the pix as I will likely sail solo or with inexperienced crew a lot.  Also like the what I will call the under wing storage idea.  Definitely will be working on setting that up.

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