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Donnybrook is back (on the market)


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2 minutes ago, MakePHRFGreatAgain said:

Its easier to list what she hasn't hit. 

 

 

"Located in Portsmouth Rhode island, her owner is now able to accept all offers for this ( still) very fast machine.

 

Good sails, good equipment, she has everything needed to start racing again, except is in need of a new keel fin."

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So if you were selling an 80ft racing machine, wouldn't you at least sweep the floor, throw some oxy clean on the bunks and generally scrub the shit out of the interior??  They can obviously afford to race her, how much would it cost to get some cleaning people in there for an hour??  

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32 minutes ago, Crash said:

Is she the Donnybrook that hit the rocks by one of the tunnels of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel during and Annapolis-Newport Race?

No that was the smaller one. Jim took the insurance payout and bought this instead of taking care of his crews insurance deductibles/expenses when they got injured due to hitting the rock like any good skipper should have. This one BTW has hit many things as well,. including a whale during the Halifax race. 

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43 minutes ago, shaggy said:

So if you were selling an 80ft racing machine, wouldn't you at least sweep the floor, throw some oxy clean on the bunks and generally scrub the shit out of the interior??  They can obviously afford to race her, how much would it cost to get some cleaning people in there for an hour??  

You haven't bought many boats have you? ;)

IME they are pigstys more often than not. People don't even take the time to sweep the crap out of frame when they take pics let alone actually clean things up.

Of all the boats I have owned only one was at all tidy when I looked at it.

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The boat sounds like it's had a hard life but that price makes for a pretty cheap rig and hardware to outfit a new big boat. The rig alone must be worth well over that asking price.

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Last time I heard anyone talk about the boat, it needed a whole lot of work to the keel, structure and the sort. I have also heard stories from the C600 where the crew were just hoping the keel would hold for the race. So it really isn't surprising the price is so low, if the work still needs to be done. Anyone have any other details? 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

You haven't bought many boats have you? ;)

IME they are pigstys more often than not. People don't even take the time to sweep the crap out of frame when they take pics let alone actually clean things up.

Of all the boats I have owned only one was at all tidy when I looked at it.

My point is that this is a frigging 80 ft racing machine.  I can see your point with a J24, ericson39, or somesuch, but come on man, that dude has the $$ to get someone in there to make her look purty, Just doesn't care.  Sad really...  

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I was aboard her in the yard at Soper's Hole. She was hauled for the keel head failure during the delivery down from New England. It definitely has been ridden hard and put away wet.

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3 minutes ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

I was aboard her in the yard at Soper's Hole. She was hauled for the keel head failure during the delivery down from New England. It definitely has been ridden hard and put away wet.

That's the case with anything Jim has ever owned and never properly funded hoping it would just "hold together". From the electrical fire on the 74 footer to this, I'm not surprised its in the condition it's in. Come to think of it I'm surprised it's in as good condition all things considered. 

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About the cleanliness..

The problem with a boat like that is it must have a pro crew.  At least 2 full time people if not 3, and then if you want to be competitive you need pro sailors to do well.  Boat kike that just can't be handled by a large majority of the crew being weekend warriors.  Donnybrook was known for slap together crew, boat like that needs a buncha pros on standby payroll to do whatever race the owner wants to do.

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  • 11 months later...

I talked to Brad Avery at OCC (Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa California) about his yacht donation program, and how I could emulate it for a couple of 501(c)3 non-profit orgs I own (really, am financially responsible for, as nobody owns a non-profit, you are just on the hook for liabilities).

He said the most important decision is to always be willing to say NO, especially for large yachts. He had several horror stories of taking on such vessels and then losing huge amounts of money on them. He learned the painful lesson, and I am very happy he shared those lessons with me.

I also paid consultants on this topic, and they agreed from the legal and tax point of view. Brad made it clear emotionally: don't let ego make the decision for you, as of course your ego is stroked by taking title to a big yacht.

Brad was adamant when he said that OCC could only accept large yachts if the yacht came with sufficient cash (endowment) to take care of the vessel for the number of years the non-profit MUST LEGALLY control and operate the vessel in-line with the purpose (as listed on the IRS filings) of the non-profit. Sure, the boat can be "leased" and the money used for the purpose of the non-profit. But until its leased, AND FOR AS LONG AS THE BOAT IS LEASED, truly for the several years the non-profit is LEGALLY RESPONSIBLE for the boat, the non-profit must be able to cover costs and repairs AND POTENTIAL TAX LIABILITIES to keep the boat useable and marketable. On a large yacht, we are talking big, big money for YEARS.

I would not touch that boat with a 2000 mile pole.

I hope this is not the end of Mudratz. They seem a quality organization. Latest information from March 2019 implies they have a reasonable amount of income and assets, so they may be able to cover the nut. I wish them well, I really hope it works out well for them.

https://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.profile&ein=472180418

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I've only ever seen it really successful in two ways.  1) sale and leaseback for a term/specific events, and full lease price paid in advance, or 2) nonprofit has a proper fleet, maintenance staff, and ongoing charter program

Otherwise, nonprofits should not take in big boats with huge maintenance costs.  

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A beautiful, classic 72 footer was donated to the university I attended many years ago. It seemed like a good idea at the time as it was used to entertain bigwigs and donors, but the upkeep was monstrous as it would be on any 72 wooden boat. The "donation" ended up costing the university a fortune.

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When I was at school an old guy "donated" his huge 90 foot old wood motor yacht to the school on the condition he be allowed to live aboard until he died. Turns out the old fart was a lot more durable than expected, the boat a lot less so, and he was a cheap bastard too. The boat eventually was so rotted out she sat on the bottom in the slip and the bilge water went up and down with the tide. Old fart didn't care, he stayed above the high tide line inside the boat. He eventually died after getting a 90 foot slip for free for years and the boat had to be scrapped at no small expense :rolleyes:

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11 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

When I was at school an old guy "donated" his huge 90 foot old wood motor yacht to the school on the condition he be allowed to live aboard until he died. Turns out the old fart was a lot more durable than expected, the boat a lot less so, and he was a cheap bastard too. The boat eventually was so rotted out she sat on the bottom in the slip and the bilge water went up and down with the tide. Old fart didn't care, he stayed above the high tide line inside the boat. He eventually died after getting a 90 foot slip for free for years and the boat had to be scrapped at no small expense :rolleyes:

Sounds like a clever fella

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22 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

A beautiful, classic 72 footer was donated to the university I attended many years ago. It seemed like a good idea at the time as it was used to entertain bigwigs and donors, but the upkeep was monstrous as it would be on any 72 wooden boat. The "donation" ended up costing the university a fortune.

Teddy Turner donated Challenge America (née The Card) to my college in the 90s. I don’t know what it cost to keep her up, and the school actually sailed her, but she was sold for something around 120k from what I can remember. 

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10 minutes ago, Cristoforo said:

Then there are people (few) like Coumantaros who also gave a pile of cash to look after his donation of Boomerang. 

In 2008-2009 the academies had more donations than they could accept. Not enough people to sail them and nowhere to put them  

 

 

I think Zaraffa’s donation(s) to USNA may have had some similar arrangement. What a great boat. I got to do a mere delivery after Governor’s Cup and I was smitten. 

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  • 10 months later...
On 8/28/2019 at 12:44 PM, shaggy said:

My point is that this is a frigging 80 ft racing machine.  I can see your point with a J24, ericson39, or somesuch, but come on man, that dude has the $$ to get someone in there to make her look purty, Just doesn't care.  Sad really...  

see how easy it is to spend other peoples money?

 

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4 hours ago, Carrera said:

Is this thing on the move? Just noticed the following entry in this year's BYC Mack Race and it has some similar attributes.

image.thumb.png.5b3174fe028fc0654175bad8969da3d9.png

It probably won't make the start, the bulb is missing.

No, not a light bulb; the big lead keel hanging thing.

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On 8/28/2019 at 11:06 AM, SloopJonB said:

You haven't bought many boats have you? ;)

IME they are pigstys more often than not. People don't even take the time to sweep the crap out of frame when they take pics let alone actually clean things up.

Of all the boats I have owned only one was at all tidy when I looked at it.

SloopJonB is absolutely correct about this.  It is disgusting.  Of the many boats we have inspected during our recent boat search, well less than half were clean and obviously well cared for.  One actually had visible mold.   Brokers and sellers should be ashamed of themselves for presenting a dirty/messy boat.  And, some of the pix seen in Yachtworld listings are rediculous.

... FC

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23 hours ago, Foxtrot Corpen said:

SloopJonB is absolutely correct about this.  It is disgusting.  Of the many boats we have inspected during our recent boat search, well less than half were clean and obviously well cared for.  One actually had visible mold.   Brokers and sellers should be ashamed of themselves for presenting a dirty/messy boat.  And, some of the pix seen in Yachtworld listings are rediculous.

... FC

Why is it the brokers responsibility ?

Owners have to take some accountability for the boat they want sold.

Brokers are brokers, not baby sitters or cleaners. They will recommend things to owners but.....

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7 hours ago, huwp said:

Owners have to take some accountability for the boat they want sold.

True.  But a smart broker is going to know - and say - that a couple of hours scrubbing and tidying can make a world of difference between selling and sitting.

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 On 6/10/2021 at 6:47 AM, Foxtrot Corpen said:

SloopJonB is absolutely correct about this.  It is disgusting.  Of the many boats we have inspected during our recent boat search, well less than half were clean and obviously well cared for.  One actually had visible mold.   Brokers and sellers should be ashamed of themselves for presenting a dirty/messy boat.  And, some of the pix seen in Yachtworld listings are rediculous.

... FC

On 6/11/2021 at 6:02 AM, huwp said:

Why is it the brokers responsibility ?

Owners have to take some accountability for the boat they want sold.

Brokers are brokers, not baby sitters or cleaners. They will recommend things to owners but.....

HUWP... Yep... Sellers are primarily responsible for a clean and presentable boat.  But, a good broker will always be involved in ensuring the boat is presentable.  If not, I would think they are not doing their job.  I suggest "insist" is the operative word as apposed to "recommend". And,  how many YW listings have you seen with boat pix that show a bunch of personal crap strewn around the boat?  That's on the broker.

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