Jump to content

A very one design, the rebuild..


Recommended Posts

No boat work will happen this weekend, we're in a major storm 70mph + winds, we've more damage than in any time in the last 20years.. Power has been off several times for extended periods. A more than month's rain in 24 hours.

The marquee has been damaged, recovery of that and trying to get some sort of cover over the boat will occur later wind permitting.
We have several branches of oak tree on the powerline to next door which has dropped to almost ground level luckily it was replaced a couple of years ago with insulated triple twisted cable and hasn't broken. Although their telephone cable has.

We've lost a couple of leading edge clay tiles off the leading edge of the roof, that has taken the guttering off the front of the house.
The power has tripped and restored twice in the typing of this.

A couple of trees are down in the garden, I'll check for further damage when we get some daylight.

Off to make breakfast while we still have power..

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/26/2020 at 1:10 AM, The Q said:

No boat work will happen this weekend, we're in a major storm 70mph + winds, we've more damage than in any time in the last 20years.. Power has been off several times for extended periods. A more than month's rain in 24 hours.

The marquee has been damaged, recovery of that and trying to get some sort of cover over the boat will occur later wind permitting.
We have several branches of oak tree on the powerline to next door which has dropped to almost ground level luckily it was replaced a couple of years ago with insulated triple twisted cable and hasn't broken. Although their telephone cable has.

We've lost a couple of leading edge clay tiles off the leading edge of the roof, that has taken the guttering off the front of the house.
The power has tripped and restored twice in the typing of this.

A couple of trees are down in the garden, I'll check for further damage when we get some daylight.

Off to make breakfast while we still have power..

Good luck! We had that fun about a month ago with a tropical storm. Poer out 2 days. We were lucky. People a cooupke miles away out for 12 days!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The missing tile count reached 6, I'm now on the hunt for replacements, there are shaped and over 100 years old so that could be a problem... The power was off for 7 hours on Saturday, we were just getting ready to sleep in the living room as that has a stove, when the power came back on and we had central heating again..

The power company came Sunday and removed the branches  in a couple of hours, the telephone company came late Sunday to repair the cable and put in a temporary one on the ground , as next door is listed as a vulnerable person (She has Cancer).

The oak will be sorted and some will head for my bandsaw or lathe, the rest will keep us warm next year..

The rest of the garden I'll start sorting next weekend I hope. Unless I can get some tiles, I Need to get up there and see what else is required anyway...

Link to post
Share on other sites

The power was off for another 7 hours on Monday,  I think I've found a suitable modern tile on the net, I need to compare the measurements later..

Link to post
Share on other sites

After a month's worth of rain last weekend in September,  we have now received Octobers rain in the first 4 days.  We are under the centre of  storm Alex,  which is causing devastation in parts of France and Italy 900 miles away and a few deaths. 

I've traced the roof tiles, they are a French design,  there are two reclamation yards with tiles within reasonable travel distance,  the further one definitely has the tiles, the closer one,  near work, I don't know.  I get the landrover back Monday from its annual service and MOT (vehicle inspection) so I'll go for a tile search sometime next week. 

Out in the rain I hoisted up the boat yesterday, and built up the pile of breeze and foundation blocks,  raising the boat from 12 inches  above ground level to 32 inches. This will allow the installation of a wooden plank to spread the keel load.  The plank already has the keel bolt holes drilled to guide me in drilling through the hull.  With a little digging,  I should be able to install the keel at that height.  Only needing to raise the boat further for putting the boat on the trailer. 

Time to put the overalls on and paddle across to the garage to prepare for boat work over the winter  This will Include new shelving to be built next weekend.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Well, the nearer reclaim yard did have the roof tiles I needed and only £1:80 per tile so I bought a dozen , and will probably go back for more, it would be a good Idea to have more in stock, with the exposed position of the house..

I got one coat of varnish on top of the boat name, it probably needs another couple..

The first set of Shelves was extended, then a shelf was added for SWMBO's old Ghetto blaster by the work bench,  it has been donated to me as she no longer has a use for it.. It's now set to a classical channel on the radio, it has cassettes but I doubt they will get used again, though the CD player might..

..and then some electrical work was done.

 First was to split the power sockets from the lighting circuit, yes some real cowboys fitted out this garage..

At the same time a new distribution box was fitted..  gone are are the old fuse wires,, in are resettable contact breakers and a RCD (equivalent to a GFI ).

Later I found one of the sockets had no earth connection to the earth pin... a good 1/2 inch gap between the end of the wire and it's terminal... it could never have been made to connect.....

I have on order more double sockets, some switches and 4 4ft LED batten lights, further electrical work will continue next week.

That includes,

4 sockets for a charging station, so many battery powered tools these days,

2 sockets near the site for the lathe,

4 sockets by the work bench including one that has a USB output (that one is also for the Ghetto blaster).

2 sockets in the workshop store room,

2 Sockets in the garage half of the building..

Work shop store room? yep not only is the workshop being partitioned off from the garage, but I've decided to partition off the back half the workshop side. That will mean much less area to be heated,  and more wall space for tools and shelving..

Anyway the work bench is now clear of the detritus which has been sorted and put on the first set of Shelving. So the keel is now clear to be worked on, I'll finally get round to bonding the ballast lump to the wooden keel stub next weekend, before getting the sparks right..

Time to continue measuring this current shunt, now it's warmed up, the last of 4 sets of 20 measurements 2A to 20A..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I forgot to mention this Sunday is the Tri-icycle race Run by Snowflake Sailing Club https://www.sfsc.co.uk/pages/ , a sort of mini 3 Rivers Race,  on 3 section of the rivers. About 22 miles to do if the wind and tide is right so they can set the full course.. and normally the time limit is from 10:00 to 16:00.you should sail from Horning to Upton Dyke to Womack dyke , and back to Horning. Vessels from 45ft down to 14ft the rivers are at most 100ft wide, so there is lots of tacking.

Normal years 30 to 50 Boats, how many this covid year I have no idea. Sadly the club Webcams are down due to a rebuild of the web site.. SO unless the volunteer IT man gets some time to get them back online there'll be no live pictures .

Sadly I can't compete this year as my crewmate is still using a walking frame after his motorcycle accident last year.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mooring All...

No work on the boat done this weekend, life got in the way..

What should have been in the way, is the Tri Icicle race, which is 20 mile ish round trip of three legs on the Norfolk broads. Anything can enter from little Dinghies to 45ft broads cruisers.. Only the second time I've missed it in 20 years.

My normal sailing compatriot was in a motorcycle crash 14 months ago, and only about a month ago had some Meccano changed in his thigh so he's still barely mobile.. 

Looks to have been a good race, and there are 4  Yeoman class in the top 10 including the winner, 2 of the Yeoman  whom we normally beat, so we missed out there.. Numbers were a bit down this year probably due to covid..

Pictures of facebook here.. https://www.facebook.com/SnowflakesSailingClub/posts/1639313466221777

Results below for those who don't go on facefart.

 

Oh I don't know if you ever had Meccano in the USA.. it was a children to teenagers assembly kit, including hole punched metal strips  rods, wheels and hundreds on nuts and bolts.. you could built all sorts of things out of it..

image.png.60e14793998dd5413d14904293126482.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am interested in the elapsed times... it's seems likely to me that a Norfolk Punt would beat the heck out of a Yeoman!

A Laser or Phantom could do well in this kind of event with lots of tacking, wind shifts, traffic, etc.... but kind of an endurance contest.

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/27/2020 at 2:38 PM, Steam Flyer said:

I am interested in the elapsed times... it's seems likely to me that a Norfolk Punt would beat the heck out of a Yeoman!

A Laser or Phantom could do well in this kind of event with lots of tacking, wind shifts, traffic, etc.... but kind of an endurance contest.

FB- Doug

Sailed 2 UK Laser Nationals in the early 90s, almost 200 boats, course was triangle, triangle, sausage, triangle, 1.2 mile beats, start at the bottom, finish at the top, leader took 2 hours 15 mins approx, 2 races back to back, 45 min sail out to the start, about 5 to 8 general recalls every start, all under the black flag.

The good old days.........mY knees hurt just thinking about it, and most of us wore weight jackets., 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/27/2020 at 12:38 PM, Steam Flyer said:

I am interested in the elapsed times... it's seems likely to me that a Norfolk Punt would beat the heck out of a Yeoman!

A Laser or Phantom could do well in this kind of event with lots of tacking, wind shifts, traffic, etc.... but kind of an endurance contest.

FB- Doug

With a punt handicap of  879, Against the yeoman handicap of 1108, as a rough guess,   it will have finished around about 8 minutes ahead.. 

The short time indicates a very shortened course,  the full course would take around,  4 to 5 hours as it gets slow in the trees... 

So i'm thinking they will have had a tow down and back for the first 3 or 4 miles, .. That removes some of the punts advantage,  by starting after the tree lined section of the course. 

Many years ago I competed in the race in a laser,,  several times..  Not very successfully, The laser has the disadvantage of a comparatively short mast.  The phantom would be better with 5ft more mast height..

Height is everything on passage races on the broads due to the wind flowing over embankments and trees. 

 

Sadly the Yeoman nationals due today were cancelled because of 40mph winds.  They were going to be rescheduled for next weekend,  but we are being locked down for November.. It will be the first time in 20 years,  I will not be lowering the club flags at 11:00 for Remembrance Sunday..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Today is Rememberance Sunday,  at 11:00 this morning, I should  have been at the sailing club lowering the club flags,  for the silence. Racing would have been delayed until 11:15, and all. The club members would have stood on the quay facing the flags.. 

 

We Will Remember them.. 

 

poppy_in_wheat_field_1170x461.jpg

On the Kohima memorial it reads.. 

When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say,
For Your Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Finally did a little work on the boat, I backed off the keel bolts holding the lead lump on to the wooden stub keel, filled the gap between with thick bonding resin, and then wound it all back up again. The keel is unfortunately lying on it's side so I was only able to form a fillet on the top side and scrape off excess on the bottom side.

Next week the great adventure of getting 150 KG off the work bench and down to the floor, then fillet the other side..

Meanwhile also the workshop got it's internal doors that work, but are not finished yet and the power wiring has been extended 3/4 the way round the shop. so there are now working sockets either side of the work bench, just not the one at the back for the radio..  to do when the keel is moved out of the way..
After that general lighting wiring and switches need installing.

The Yeoman Nationals have been moved to the weekend of 5/6 December providing lock down ceases

Link to post
Share on other sites

The adventure of lowering the keel from work bench to the floor was carried out, I think the workbench sighed in relief..
it wasn't elegant and had a few problems, but was achieved without damage to keel , me or anything else.

Of course the fittings I was waiting for, arrived the day after it was lowered, so it was just ropes and blocks to a roof beam.., I've decided for comfort, It needs another reduction in load on the operator, so this week I'll see if I can work out a method to add another turn round a block or two..

There is a proper mounting rail for the lifting tackle now fitted to the roof beams with load spread between them and reinforced. I've put my weight on it and there wasn't even a creak from anything..

More wiring was carried out so 2 of the 3 LED battens are now working from their switches in their correct places, one has still to be fitted, but I haven't fitted that part of the ceiling yet, about 1/2 of the ceiling is now clad and insulated with fibreglass.. I've run out of OSB, and with the Land rover in for an engine repair, I can't carry full sheets. So because the DIY sheds are also not cutting timber at the moment, that's on hold..

So the keel was then moved on the floor, I can "Walk" It by moving one end at a time, It's sitting nicely on it's bottom even though the keel bolts are still sticking out a little more than they should. The second side was filleted between Stub keel and lead lump.

Next week I should clean that up and then start fibreglassing it all. It only needs a couple for water protection of the wood, but several to join the wood to the lead lump to make sure cracks don't appear under load..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning All,
This weekend was just a two day affair, and I had various aches and pains which reduced my efforts..

So the workshop had some handles made and installed on the doors, nothing fancy just 2X1 spacers and a 2X1 pull bar across the top, I've not even sanded them yet.

The ring main was completed, while doing that I noticed the consumer unit was wet, then my head my head touched the underside of the roof and that was wet too... Condensation, the results of many years of leaks inside the garage.. Anyway wet and electrics don't mix, so I cobbled together some left over bits of OSB to make a ceiling over that area, installed that and stuffed some insulation in the gap. The area was dry the next morning.

A hoover has been purlioned from the stock, we had 5.. ours and inherited.. This will form part of the built in dust extraction system, I bought a cyclone unit and have used an old 20litre resin can as the bucket. So the cyclone unit is now bolted to the lid.. It awaits more piping which I hope to get this week.

4 pieces of beam were extracted from the used pile , screws which refused to come out, met the angle grinder, and the beams cut to length. They will be part of the frame work for the table saw trolley.
The Table saw was extracted from storage power up and.... Nothing...
Checked, the plug and fuse.. OK,
Checked the built in resetable fuse OK
Checked the on off Switch OK.
Then thought plug in somewhere else.. Lots of noise as it powered up...
Yep an old extension cable that doesn't like modern plugs with half insulated pins..



After some sanding and preparation work, the keel was then laid on it's side and sand / keyed on the bottom. The angle grinder was then deployed cutting off the excess threaded rod sticking out from the bottom of the keel only, about an inch on each rod... it sits on it's base better now.
A length of glassfibre was cut, luckily the width of the roll is just over the size of top of keel, down the side, then across the bottom, handily economic. The glass was then resined into place.
Next week sand that down, cut off the small amount of excess, then turn it over and do the other side.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep it's the only way I can do it, I don't have a method of holding the keel so that I can wrap the keel in one go.

The keel being a construction of wood, lead, and various other bits I thought it the best way to keep the water out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, The Q said:


Yep an old extension cable that doesn't like modern plugs with half insulated pins..
 

This made me laugh, these plugs have been standard in the UK for the last 35 years...lol.

How old is your extension lead? Will we see it on the Antiques Roadshow...lol.

Interesting build BTW.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Martin T said:

This made me laugh, these plugs have been standard in the UK for the last 35 years...lol.

How old is your extension lead? Will we see it on the Antiques Roadshow...lol.

Interesting build BTW.

I do PAT testing for the sailing club, and the Model Railway Club. Last time at the  MRC I found a plug labeled "Empire Made"

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Q said:

I do PAT testing for the sailing club, and the Model Railway Club. Last time at the  MRC I found a plug labeled "Empire Made"

I should add it's a very cheap Chinese extension cable, obtained second hand when a supermarket charging station used for instore radios was replaced

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another weekend over, and just a little more progress..

First there was the adventure of turning the keel round, whilst I can walk it by lifting each end alternately, that didn't give me clearance to turn it round. In the end I lifted onto 2x4 beams on their edges, then pushed the keel so the beams toppled over, by doing so I moved the keel 2 inches backwards which after 3 repeats gave enough clearance for the Dillet to pass by the workbench.

Once turned round, and shuffled to one side of the workshop, it was just tip it over, trim off any excess fibreglass round the edges then cover this side of the keel with glassfibre.

 Next week I have the fore and aft edges to cover  for reinforcement, and maybe the top.

The fun starts after that, getting the keel turned upside down,  in order to put several layers of reinforcement on the bottom..

Other work, in the workshop, I was donated an old small cupboard from SWMBO, 20 inches by 15 inches by 2 ft tall, including the drawer on top. That, She / Her mother has had it for over 50 years and it was secondhand back then. It fitted nicely over the workbench at the back, attached to the wall about 18 inches above the work surface.. Temporarily I'm keeping my tins of La Tonkinois in it, off the uninsulated concrete floor and a bit more insulated than being on a shelf in the open workshop area next to a concrete wall..

 The LED light battens were causing some interference on the radio, So I've fitted some Ferrite rings to the mains cables as the leave the LED units. That seems to have fixed the problem..

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much done on the keel this weekend, After I had finished cladding the ceiling and inserting fibreglass insulation. My back was screaming enough!!!. So I sat down, cleaned off the top of the keel, and fibreglassed that..
After that rest I did try out moving the keel with the altered block and tackle arrangement.. It's easier, but not as easy as I'd like, some more bits have been ordered to make the task easier..

The interest in improving the lifting tackle also because I've had a diet change! Thanks to covid, I wasn't getting the routine medical checks from the doctors for sugar levels (though they've now called me in tomorrow.)
So I bought my own diabetes testing kit...
After some experimentation it showed I reacted badly to bread of all sorts, rice, and mashed potatoes. Removing them from my diet and my weight is dropping dramatically. Even though I've replaced mashed spuds with chips or baked spuds.

If I were to drop to my required by the RAF weight for someone of 6ft (admittedly 35 years ago) of 11.5 stone (161 lbs)(73Kg) Then I'd have another 30 KG to add to the keel..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd too would love to see the keel in place thanks, 

But first,..

Since the last waffle, I've changed the lifting tackle , which now works well.

Glassed round the aft end of the keel then added a layer either side which comes the a point. Next time out this will be trimmed straight ready for it to be sanded and given a suitable profile when finishing occurs...

Next time, probably tomorrow the new lifting tackle, will position the keel on a pile of breeze blocks so I can almost turn it over to do the bottom and leading edge.

i'm hoping during these holidays to get the reinforcing done and a finishing coat of glass fibre.

Then it will sand fill etc before painting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Every day so far of this holiday except Christmas day I've worked on the keel.

So it's had two coats all over of heavy glassfibre cloth , one of surface tissue on the sides and bow.

The bow was surfaced this morning, while that was setting, I sat the other end and reshaped the tail end of the lead lump. It needed building up a little on one side, that was done with glass cloth and thickened resin. It's now setting with a heater gently blowing over it.

It needs turning over to finish the bottom of the keel, but that will have to wait till tomorrow. When it's all set..

There is Border collie at my feet wanting his long walk...storm Bella is on its way time we went..

Ps Ben the border Collie is banned from the workshop until I've vacuumed  up very well, a dog with fibreglass up his nose would not be a good idea..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost a week later and Ben the border Collie is lying alongside me as we have just returned from today's long walk.

Both sides of the keel have been sanded, filled, sanded filled, etc It's now lying on its side with one side just painted with top coat. There are two heaters in there keeping it warm till it sets..

Meanwhile I'm building shelving units for our library, one is built except for painting, the other has both sides assembled and gluing at the moment. That one will be be full assembled tomorrow.

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, The Q said:

Almost a week later and Ben the border Collie is lying alongside me as we have just returned from today's long walk.

Both sides of the keel have been sanded, filled, sanded filled, etc It's now lying on its side with one side just painted with top coat. There are two heaters in there keeping it warm till it sets..

Meanwhile I'm building shelving units for our library, one is built except for painting, the other has both sides assembled and gluing at the moment. That one will be be full assembled tomorrow.

Good plan. That will keep the household gods happy so you can work more on the boat

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2021 at 8:47 AM, The Q said:

Almost a week later and Ben the border Collie is lying alongside me as we have just returned from today's long walk.

Both sides of the keel have been sanded, filled, sanded filled, etc It's now lying on its side with one side just painted with top coat. There are two heaters in there keeping it warm till it sets..

Meanwhile I'm building shelving units for our library, one is built except for painting, the other has both sides assembled and gluing at the moment. That one will be be full assembled tomorrow.

I FINALLY got two more bookshelves and put more books on it. STILL haven't gotten enough shelves to empty enough boxes to find Manfred Curry book!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have around 45ft horizontally of shelving, 5ft tall to build. They go on top of 3 ft tall cupboards already in place. These two are the starting points round a doorway. They are heavier built than most of the others, till I reach the windows. Once fixed in place, I'll be building each way away from them.

A colour has been approved, by the "authority" her favourite colour of course.. Blue..I'll be painting the units next week before installation. The following units will be painted in kit form, before assembling in situ.

I bought a mains power 7day  timer during the week, hopefully the workshop will have it's heater running from an hour before I arrive this morning, especially since there's a heavy frost today.

Once the second shelving unit is assembled, and gluing. The keel will have some filling done on a couple of low spots on the bottom then it will be turned round,  laid on its side, to paint the top coat on that side.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Not a huge amount done this week,

 The heater timer worked well, nice to walk into a warm workshop...

The keel is now finished except for anti fouling, which it will get with the boat.. So  it was lifted onto a trolley and after a multi point turn, the trolley was moved into the entrance of the workshop. It would have moved on to near the boat, but we had heavy snow on the Saturday, and it was tooo cold on Sunday..

One Shelving unit has now been painted blue, due to drying time and a keel in the way, the other hasn't been done yet..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree with the previous statement, but that one piece was done so well..

Today, I've moved the keel out , it didn't get far, the ground is too soft, even with the board beneath. So I've parked it where it is until I get a couple of thicker boards .

And a couple of photos..someone insisted in being in shot..

20210123_135246533.jpeg

20210123_135348251.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Over the last couple of weekends the board, which will be come part of the underside of the hull, to spread the weight of the keel, has been glassfibred and sanded ready. However it's been blowing 50mph with snow out there. So it ain't going to be fitted yet.

So I started cutting the old flat bed that sat on the trailer, then a section was taken into the workshop, I was going to start further work on that section, but found the noise of the angle grinder on hollow metal tube way too loud indoors and my ear defenders have hidden themselves somewhere.. A new pair has been ordered, but no deliveries at the moment due to the snow,,

Two more smaller pieces need cutting from the old flat bed, all three will then need trimming to shape, de rusting , zinc paint and topcoat painting, then assembling together as the new bed to rest the keel on, on the trailer..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
With New ear defenders on, the piece of flat bed already cut off was trimmed to shape, wire brushed down (wire brush in angle grinder) painted with Zinc paint, then top coat. another top coat still to do..
last weekend was -3C 45mph winds not a weekend to be outside, next weekend is forecast to be 10mph Winds +17C so if that happens the rest of the flat bed will be butchered up for bits..

Some time ago when I started looking at rebuilding Blue Moon, I found a handicap calculator that gives rough figures from the sizes of sails and hull. It's used on the PRHF (Performance Handicap Racing Fleet) in some areas of the USA.. (found here, http://www.capedory.org/phrf.html ).

After butchering the formulas to remove things like inboard outboard options as they don't apply to Dinghies and small keel boats. Then using their fiddle factor column which they used to adjust for type of course, I used it to change the final results from the USA 3 digit PRHF handicap Number to the 4 digit UK RYA Portsmouth Handicap number.
I then put in the details of every Dinghy and keel boat including Blue Moon, that I could find the dimensions for to produce a graph..
That produced a reasonably straight line except for a few of the most extreme boats. The graph was plotted Portsmouth Number against Norfolk Handicap Number. They should correlate, and for the most part do..


Anyway I searched for the spreadsheet on the computer and found it.. It claims I last used it 2005!!! So I suspect that it's an early version.. I've updated it with the latest figures from Blue Moon and it shows it to be faster than first thought. I'm not sure I believe that, but won't know till she sets sail..

There should be a second spreadsheet of generated handicaps / issued handicaps but that's missing, So I'll have to regenerate it.
IIRC That too wasn't too bad a line, Oddities were boats which can plane easily, especially at the extremely fast end of the spectrum and those favoured by the Olympics and Hot shots.. Which shows the average level of skill pushes up the handicap..

Further research and adjustments will, be made to the spreadsheet.
 
Link to post
Share on other sites
This weekend, more metal bashing, two pieces were cut off the old flat bed for use. The rest of the flat bed was cut into useable pieces for the might come in handy pile.

The smaller piece goes between the sides of the previously processed section, it will spread the weight of the boat onto the axle. That piece has now been trimmed to size and cleaned up for painting.

The larger piece goes at the front end of the section that will have the keel resting on it. It goes from side to side transferring the weight onto the A frame of the Trailer, 40 inches forward of the Axle. It's been trimmed roughly, and dry fitted. It just needs a little fettling, then derusting, before painting with the little piece.

I was going to weight the trailer but the bathroom scales failed.. They are 30 years old plus .. A new set has been ordered.

The trailer needs to be raised up to work on it, I'm going to get some foundation blocks this week for the purpose, they will be used later to raise up the boat to fit the keel..

More playing with the PRHF spread sheet seems to indicate a Norfolk Handicap of about 13%, that's slightly faster than an Enterprise but slower than a Laser. I need to do more work on the spreadsheet though to add more information.


4 MDF sheets were demolished into sections for shelving and uprights in the library
 Three more shelves were installed, as were two uprights for the  next section of shelving.
Link to post
Share on other sites

New scales arrived so I weighed the trailer,  16.2kg on each wheel, 59.7kg on the coupling, 92 kg. Somewhat lighter than I expected, add the various pieces that I have to go on the trailer and it  totals , roughly 145kg. That leaves 155kg for keel guides and various other bits and  pieces much more than enough.

This weekends work, 

Two more bits zinc coated, and top coated. Various brackets fitted to those pieces. One of those pieces now bolted to the future flat bed.

Next week start modifying the trailer to take the bits I've made, and to start derusting the trailer.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This weekend's trailer work..

Went to remove old axle, hubs in the way, try to remove Castle nuts.. No chance , heat, hammering, long arms on the socket.. Nothing would move them.. Then I realize I'm not using them again.. Out with the angle grinder, two 1mm thick cutting disks later on each castle nut and off they came..
After that it was an easy job.

 Then turned trailer over much easier without the old axle on board..

I then placed the New Axle in place and....

Cogitated... for some time, Measured, cogitated, measured again... and thought about it.

Conclusion, put the axle in the place of the old one, don't move it forward by 3ft ish so I can tow the boat bow forward, it would cause to many other problems and of course an IVA..

Positioned new axle, measured, adjusted, measured, adjusted, wandered off did something else, came back and remeasured.. Yep it's in the right place, marked up new axle for the new bolt holes, checked the markings again... and again.
Took axle inside and drilled holes, working my way up to 16mm in two steps.. A new set of quality drill bits made life a lot easier..

After that it was wire brush in the angle grinder, and start derusting the trailer... 1.5 hours later 2/3rds of the bottom and sides of the tubes done. Back beginning  to complain.. So stopped at that point and coated  what was done with zinc paint..

Meanwhile on the main road 3 miles from me this went past from the builders to the south coast..
STARBOARD!!!

xxx-abnormal-load-a140.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're really renewing everything

I'd almost be expecting you to be growing the trees, smelting the metal, and distilling your own epoxy, at this point. But it looks like it's going to be a marvelous boat for your area.

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

We get a sailing or motor boat of that size travelling that route about every six months or so.

Somewhere there's a photo of a motor boat that sort of size on the bridge over the river that we sail on. Needless to say the motorboat is too big to go under the bridge.

I have got some oak branches up to, 12 inches thick to use, from a tree in the garden, badly damaged in gales before Christmas. But I'm a bit over weight on the boat design I'm trying to reduce weight not add to it..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this weekend trailer work didn't get much done, mostly due to 50mph winds and horizonal rain.. So no work done on the Saturday.

The holes were drilled for the new axle, then I offered up the bolts... Yes they did go in, But, I've not allowed enough for the thickness of the washers (2X 2mm) So I've ordered, the next length up. Should arrive today.

Then the forward bit of the triangle plus the coupling arm was derusted,  painted in zinc and the rest of the trailer was given it's second coat. I've taped over the holes in the chassis to keep the rain out until next week. I also ordered some plastic caps for the end of the axle tube to permanently keep rain and mud out.

Meanwhile thought have been going on about the rudder MK3, the one I have is MK2.

MK 1, was way to short and with the boat pitching in the sea left very little in the water. Whilst it kept control it was only just, so I built MK2

Since MK2 was built, I've learnt a lot more about rudders, I've probably gone too far the other way. The length is correct but the width and span to big..

The MK2 rudder shaft is a piece of scaffolding pole, that's all I had available at the time, the whole rudder is very heavy. But it will be used for the first season at least to see how I feel about it's control of the boat.

So I've been searching through what I've got, and..

There is some 30mm 3mm wall Stainless tube, that will allow a significant  reduction in width.

There is  glassfibre, lots of..

There is stiff Extruded Foam resistant to resin..

So all the makings are there.. design has been started.. I came across tubercles which is an interesting Idea and am considering their relevance to how this boat will sail.. That is:

Generally smooth water,

With Blue Moon being so narrow often at a good heel,

Max speed 6 mph,

A lot of tacking on narrow rivers..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I'd stay clear of anything too clever. Basics first, if a blade isn't smooth and fair its not going to be great for anything, and as soon as you have lumps in the leading edge its going to be a bitch to fair. Its got to at least treble the amount of effort in building the blade. Also they look like super weed catchers... And broads sailing means a lot of time down speed and out of efficient range. Often these things work well in a limited range, but badly outside of it. The tubercles give you a drag penalty but an increased stalling angle, but then a lower aspect blade also gives you increased drag and increased stalling angle, and is probably a lot better at paddling out of an awkward situation. I bet its also one of those things that you can't design on the back of an envelope, and if its not designed exactly right its worse than useless.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JimC said:

I think I'd stay clear of anything too clever. Basics first, if a blade isn't smooth and fair its not going to be great for anything, and as soon as you have lumps in the leading edge its going to be a bitch to fair. Its got to at least treble the amount of effort in building the blade. Also they look like super weed catchers... And broads sailing means a lot of time down speed and out of efficient range. Often these things work well in a limited range, but badly outside of it. The tubercles give you a drag penalty but an increased stalling angle, but then a lower aspect blade also gives you increased drag and increased stalling angle, and is probably a lot better at paddling out of an awkward situation. I bet its also one of those things that you can't design on the back of an envelope, and if its not designed exactly right its worse than useless.

 

I experimented with foils with a row of very short bristles at 35~50 chord. There were hints of a way better L/D and bigger stall angle, but not consistent results. Probably because of my home brewed test equipment. Not worth the effort, we know that smooth regular foils work quite well and they're difficult enough to get right.

FB- Doug

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

During the week I overdosed on aerodynamics and hydrodynamics. Amazing amount of wing and tail devices used on aircraft over the years that would not necessarily work on boats and even less likely to work on Blue Moon.
I did come across three very useful articles in Proboat magazine issues 98, 99 and 100. (Available online) This gave a series of formula which I entered into a spreadsheet.

So the Rudder should be 2.5 square feet. That's 2% of sail area and or 5% of the block area side view of the boat underwater.
The shaft works out to be just over 20mm of 1.5mm side wall stainless. 

Note, a 4X safety margin is built into the formula.

So MK 2 rudder is approximately 50% over size, the shaft is well over 200% over size and 400% over strength.

The 30mm shaft would be 100% over strength and 50% over width.

As for shape, draft limitations mean a long elegant rudder is impossible, instead the starting point will be a 1ft by 2ft 6inch a fin, with limited shaping. Hopefully something like a Kucheman tip, but without carrots.
As for its aerofoil a plain NACA 00 series will be used, , I've seen recommendations anywhere from 0009 up to 0025!! I will however choose somewhere around 12 or 15%.

 The nearest commercial  rudder shape  I can find would be something like a Jefa RUD26,

  https://jefa.dk/products/rudder-blades/ 

though I'll probably keep the aft edge straight for ease of construction

And so to this weekends work,
The new axle, was fitted with sealant between axle bolts and chassis. The forward triangle of the trailer received its second coat of zinc paint. The coupling was greased.

After that the keel progressed from outside the workshop down to the boat, where it will sit for a couple of weeks before, the boat is lifted another couple of feet to get the keel under.
I needed a rest after that and my left elbow is complaining badly about shifting such weights..

Then the great parts search took place, all the various pieces of trailer were collected together, I eventually found the hubs in a box containing blocks cleats etc.. I know I didn't put them in there.

I also found the Makita 1/2 sheet sander I'd been looking for for ages, it would have made sanding the keel much quicker.. Still it's found now, so it will be useful for the final rub down before anti fouling.

In other things, another shelving unit was fitted in the house, and a pile of blanks for the shelves of the next two units.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning All,
Not a huge amount of work done on the trailer,
Axle bolted up tight,
Trailer turned over,
Top surfaces de rusted and given one coat of Zinc paint,
Bent over to do one area on the back of the trailer which uses C section steelwork, while trying to get at the inside to derust, my back went..
That ended work on the trailer for the weekend,
Except for one small piece that was done on the work bench on Sunday, a section of tube was cut to size derusted and painted with zinc, this will reinforce the "table" that the keel will sit on.

More overdosing on rudder and keel hydrodynamics during the week, led me to model boats and aircraft. Seemingly a model Aircraft wing operates from an Re of 20,000 up to, flat out down hill, Re 500,000, just what I'm looking for. So I've found a university paper on model Aircraft wings.. It compares the wings in a wind tunnel in the USA and from results from one in Germany, there are 60 wings discussed unfortunately without showing their foil shape, So I'll have to look each one up and dismiss any that are asymmetric. Then consider the results.

En-route to that, I found an interesting discussion on the MS15 /MS12 (as used on the Extra 300 aerobatic aircraft) aerofoil verses the J5012 foil.
They are very different,
The MS15 having it's widest point just 18% from the leading edge, then straight back to the aft end.
The J5012 having it's widest point at 35% but otherwise a more normal hydrodynamic shape..
From all accounts the MS 15 is a better foil shape for lift, but more drag until the flow separates, then it loses all lift suddenly, the J5012 is not quite as good as the MS15 for lift, but has less drag and a much more gradual separation.
The J5012 having a much better Drag coefficient than a NACA 0009...

The MS 15 seems to recover from a stall more rapidly. That would be good for Blue Moon with the amount of tacking she will do, especially on the river there are always more throw the rudder over occurrences, than sea sailing /racing. On the other hand The J5012 might be more controllable the rest of the time..

 

The above may be rubbish, but it's all I can find..
Still a lot more to research, when I have the time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What's wrong with the NACA foil series? They work quite well, relatively easy shapes... these fancy exotic ones often have an advantage in one specific regime but suffer all other times, and are -very- finicky to shape.

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

The NACA series are good in a general sense and the fall back is to NACA0012. But I started researching foils and somehow got hooked. It's also true that most are good at Re500,000 and above.

Unfortunately the average windspeed for my Area is 15mph, and our rivers have trees one side and houses the other. So the Re is quite often well below 500,000. As an example of our sailing, here's a club advert just put up on our website, it's not quite as slow as this all the time. Oh and we can get an downriver flow of 2 to 3mph and a up river flow of 1 to 2 mph at spring tides.. The tacking and recovering ability of rudders is especially of concern, crash tacks are common especially in the middle of summer with all the unqualified tourists out in the 20ft hire day boats.. Luckily the normal wind direction is south west, which is straight down river.. towards the corner the club is on

 

I hate to say it but I am in shot...

It's often a case of sailing Chess, you are not just looking where you are now, but several tacks later, who will be where, what will be in your way, where will the next piece of clear air be, while staying out of or in  the tide to your best advantage

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/30/2021 at 12:51 AM, The Q said:

The NACA series are good in a general sense and the fall back is to NACA0012. But I started researching foils and somehow got hooked. It's also true that most are good at Re500,000 and above.

Unfortunately the average windspeed for my Area is 15mph, and our rivers have trees one side and houses the other. So the Re is quite often well below 500,000. As an example of our sailing, here's a club advert just put up on our website, it's not quite as slow as this all the time. Oh and we can get an downriver flow of 2 to 3mph and a up river flow of 1 to 2 mph at spring tides.. The tacking and recovering ability of rudders is especially of concern, crash tacks are common especially in the middle of summer with all the unqualified tourists out in the 20ft hire day boats.. Luckily the normal wind direction is south west, which is straight down river.. towards the corner the club is on

 

I hate to say it but I am in shot...

It's often a case of sailing Chess, you are not just looking where you are now, but several tacks later, who will be where, what will be in your way, where will the next piece of clear air be, while staying out of or in  the tide to your best advantage

 

Thanks for sharing that video. What a unique place to sail!

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Alan Crawford said:

Thanks for sharing that video. What a unique place to sail!

Thanks, If you've ever read the Arthur Ransome Swallows and Amazon books , particularly "The Coot Club" and "The Big Six" that's Horning Staithe on the left where the moored boats are just beyond the Pub with the fake black and white beamed frontage..

Our summer season, which in a non Covid year would start Last weekend, normally consists of approximately 8 Sundays racing around the cans outside the club house and up river for 2 miles. 8 Sundays up on the Broad shown in the video, which is just over a half mile up river and 8 Sundays chosen for the best tides, on down river races to a pub for lunch and then race back.

There Is a weekend for the 3 Rivers Race Home (3rr.uk) the first weekend in June and of course regatta week the First week in August..

 I love sailing there because of the range of different sailing, and none of this set off at a start line on a course for 20 miles slowly losing touch with everyone. You are always tacking, choosing courses, around other boats, competitor or not, or working out where not to go behind the trees depending on how the wind moves. Come mid afternoon in the summer the wind often shifts to a sea breeze from the east instead of a south Westerly..

There are also quite a few Saturday sailing days for particular classes or for the Juniors who are still learning. Plus of course social events about once a month plus every night during the regatta.

 

We've been a formal club since 1913, but there are photos in existence showing, at the same place for the previous 20- years at least. There is also a video of the regatta in 1908 East Anglian Film Archive: Yachting on the Norfolk Broads - The Horning Regatta, 1908 (eafa.org.uk) As you can see that regatta was large and well organised so we believe the informal club was probably running for 50 years or more before that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well another weekend with more trailer work, some of which during a 50mph gale plus hailstones!!!

Rudder plans drawn Up, MA 15S foil discarded, just to risky to use a shape that lets go too quickly.

The flat top frame is now secured.
Then the chequer plate top, was derusted and screwed to that.
Both suspension units are fitted, hubs fitted to that, then wheels.
The trailer is now sitting on two wheels at the back and still on a block at the front.

Hit a major problem, I don't know what steel the builder used for the main chassis tubes, but it's eating my drill bits. Now on order a set of quality cobalt steel bits (1-13mm), so I can drill through to fit the jockey wheel.

Left to do on trailer,
Fit sides and front to flat top, to keep keel from wandering during transport.
Fit boat supports, which won't be done till boat is on crane, but weight on flat top.
Fit mud guards,
Weigh the lot.. with and without boat on trailer.
Make new trailer weight plates and fit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 That 1908 regatta film is very interesting! Some really nice boats. Must be exciting when it’s blowing. Looks like selecting the right pipe may have been important. :D

your weather sounds similar to here, ie variable. 70 and sunny last Sunday; 15 and snow today with some good mid winter skiing. Lakes still frozen solid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it, does get very exciting in high winds those crowded waters, and you're tacking from bank to bank in seconds.. The highest I've competed in there, reached 40mph during the race having started at 25mph..

We were in these,  Yeoman class Keelboat.. 20ft, draft 3 ft, 3/4 of a ton displacement.

Horning_March2010.jpg.37b1b8e0d70176b2fa371ad03e0cbf04.jpg

The picture is from the front of the club house looking down river..

 

Some of those boats in the 1908 video are still competing , and  some are owned by the grand children or great grandchildren of the people you see..

 I had a crisis of confidence during the week and started working out modifications to the hull, if she's too heavy for her buoyancy.

Not a huge amount to report, shelf building duties took much of the time this weekend.

A new set of Cobalt drill bits arrived and were put into use, straight through the chassis no problem, so the trailer now stands on it's own three wheels.

The flat top of the trailer received it's sides and front cross bar to stop the keel going for a wander in transport. They have had one coat of zinc paint so far.

Some cogitation on installation of Mudguards, has lead to metal brackets being ordered and a planned slight change to the trailer, a full width cross beam of thinner metal tube will be fitted to help hold the mudguards and the lighting board.

Next week I hope to lift the boat.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning All,

The first task this weekend was to remove the block timber and tie down ropes holding the plastic cover on the boat... It's amazing how much dirt accumulates under the cover, then four 17 kg foundation blocks were carried down from the trailer Park to the boat, the lifting slings attached , arranged to lift one end only and the crane raised to it's maximum height. The Boat was raised, two foundation blocks lifted to chest high put on the pile then the boat lowered.. After rearrangement to lift the other end of the boat, that end was raised two more block inserted and the boat lowered..

The keel was lifted from the trolley, then with much levering  placed under the boat but not yet in the middle, as I need access, to fit the weight spreading beam first.

After that the first stage of a general clear up of the area, removing various bits of timber etc no longer needed..

On Sunday the task was to put the roof on the marquee, this was a bit of a struggle because A, it's heavy and B, a winter crunched up meant lots of creases to stretch out. This included wandering around on deck hauling the Marquee roof over the top... So I know the boats stable, though I left the crane hooked up just in case..
 Some more clearing up was done, but I've been thinking since and a rearrangement of what's where will be needed before work recommences on the boat..

The first task on recommencing boat building will be that weight spreader plank, that will need more bonding compound, which I'll order tomorrow, along with what I hope will be the finial tin of resin to complete the rebuild..  Unfortunately resin products in the UK have gone up by about 30% since Christmas..
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, this weekend, I restarted work on the boat,
First was a wipe down of the hull to clean off the dirt accumulated over the winter.

2nd, pencil mark the water line, one side is done. I'm intending to antifoul to the loaded water line, knowing when I'm not on board, that's 1/5 th less weight, so the antifoul will then be above the waterline.

3rd, I climbed in, measured, marked up , measured again, went away came back and measured again...
Then I drilled the pilot hole for the reference keel bolt, part way through it hit the remains of a brass screw and deviated slightly. On getting underneath it was out (sideways) by 2mm . Luckily as it was just the pilot hole that can be corrected.

4th a temporary bolt was dropped through, to act as a guide for the weight spreading plank., Then I tried to place the plank in place.. ah problem. The boat is too far forward on the support frame..

So the boat and frame was lifted by the crane, all  supporting concrete blocks moved forward by a foot.
The boat was then lowered but with small piles of planks, to support the boat on the blocks.  
Then the straps removed, and reinserted, but round the boat only. Boat lifted up again, support frame moved , then the boat lowered again.
Straps then removed and put round the frame, boat and frame lifted, small piles of wood removed.
 Boat and frame placed back in correct position.

The weight plank was offered up, fits ok, three screws put in place to temporarily hold the weight plank. That has been drawn round. Next weekend I'll drill through from below the remaining 5 keel bolt pilot holes, remove paint from inside drawn oblong. Before fitting the plank properly.

And so a couple of pictures,
Blue Moon just before leveling into her current  position, framed by the crane in its lowered state. The chair is facing south....

IMG_20210425_123228_1.jpg.ecf01b4f5c690b633f6d3ca663bb5cb9.jpg

Second the stern, with a fresh coat of varnish over the lettering.

IMG_20210425_123247_1.jpg.7cabf4a3ff2001210507b0612a03d486.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Morning all,
This weekends work was the weight spreader board for the underside of the hull.

First job was pilot holes, Drilled from beneath using the weight board as a pattern..
Some small ones for the screws that will hold the board in place, and some larger ones for the keel boats.
Some keel bolt ones went through fibreglass skin, ply hull, resin, oak bearers, the centre line holes didn't go all the way through due to the hog.
Clambering inside I then drilled through the marked positions for the center line holes, I'm glad to report hole met holes and well within future hole full size straight..

Then it was pain time, lying beneath the hull, wooly hat, goggles, proper half face mask, gloves , overall, done up to the neck, Angle grinder in hand , removing paint and filler where the bearer board will it.. Arms up in the air , blood draining out, trying not to damage the glassfibre cloth skin.
Tea break.
Once done, the half sheet sander was deployed removing anything left, and using a 40 grit paper to ensure there was grip for the resin..
tea break.
Guesstimated I'd need about 3/4 ltr of thickened resin, this was mixed, then slathered over the weight board, held up to the boat (one temporary keel bolt in place to guide it)..
Stiction of the resin helped hold the board on while I was adjusted it to exact position and then screwed it up. Gratifyingly resin squeezed out all round, but not to much.. That was filleted to a certain extent, but a sand and proper fillet will be required..

Had hoped to do more on the Monday bank Holiday.. But 60mph gales put paid to that idea..

Next week, lower the boat onto the keel, and bolt it up. This joint will use a sealant so the keel can be removed if necessary, Which I must order today, to ensure it arrives on time..

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK Folks if any of you are interested in the waffle I've been typing.. I need a little help please....

At some point I'll need to get a handicap for Blue Moon, so I've got a couple of spread sheets made up. Eventually to put to the club handicapper.. 

The one I'm working on at  the moment is based on the Falmouth Area Yardstick , a formula developed by  Professor  Linda Wolstenholme, she's a professor of Statistics.. See here http://www.flushingsailingclub.co.uk/pdf/fay.pdf

It's for displacement keel boats, so that's a reasonable start. 

Now The classes I've found of a similar type to Blue Moon are:

Defender 12,

Deception,

International 2.4mR

Illusion

Millimetre.

 

 Of those I've got an PY for the Illusion and  2.4mR and a D-PN for the Illusion and Millimeter.

Does anyone know of a D-PN for the Defender 12 ,  Deception  and 2.4mR?

I'm comparing the FAY results with D-PN and PY handicaps , the two I can do so far show some agreement.

Just to complicate things once I've got the PY, I then have to convert that to a BH... Broads handicap, which is a percentage handicap..

 

To see Broads Handicaps go to here http://www.thegreenbook.org.uk/  click on Green book on the left, then scroll down to Allcomers Handicaps..

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its perhaps worth noting that the statement in that Fay paper about PN "Its initial assumptions are fairly demanding, (cf. [US Sailing, undated]) and include:" are only true for the old US PN system and are definitely not true of RYA PYS. In particular RYA PYS pays no special attention to race winners.  My personal summary is that RYA PN can be said to be a representation of the observed performance of roughly the top two thirds of the fleet sailed in conditions that are reasonably suited to the boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, thanks Jim.

I do know they discard outliers from the results. So effectively the handicap is biased to the competent sailers. I can only say in my main keel boat fleet sailing experience I was normally in the top 5 if not top 3 of class . So that bias will be against my sailing ability. 

The RYA PY from experience of long distant laser sailing is biased to all waters. Sailing on my local rivers it's competitively rare for a laser to plane so PY based results were biased against us.. I was crap sailing a laser anyway so that didn't help..

With a one off design, it's very difficult to find true comparisons, the boats previously mentioned are the nearest in style to that of Blue Moon hence the appeal.

I've done the first pass of FAY against PY, and the PY converted from D-PN for what info there is. The results are encouragingly close particularly for Version 10A, version 14 gives values for some boats that are also close, but others are up to 80 PY apart. Time to check for typos .

There's a previous spreadsheet where I worked with a PHRF handicap formula, on that there are a great many more boats including local Norfolk Broads designs.

On some boats  details of SA, Draft and LWL seem to unavailable, which means they  can't be included in the charts.

I'm going to start merging the data showing the results from both spreadsheets. Although the PHRF being American is in imperial, FAY is metric so it's going to take some time just plodding through the conversions.

 Using Excel every day at work, it's quite interesting generating new spreadsheets and graphs. Though it's a bit boring filling in old spreadsheets with new measurement data. Up to 25,000 characters some days..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This weekends work,
Saturday was a washout, 50mph winds bucketing with rain..
Sunday,
First shuffle the keel into the correct place, much levering , not easy on your knees..

Humidity awful, with all that rain yesterday, warm and sunny today ..

Then lift the boat which means going up the step ladder to reach the chain hoist, the chains hanging down into the boat, and remove the first blocks. Then up the ladder and lower, a little more shuffling of keel.
Then up the ladder, lift down the ladder remove the next blocks and up the ladder lower.
Keel bolts wouldn't go in. More shuffling a little still wouldn't go in.. more shuffling a little, still wouldn't go in.


Then I remembered, while the keel plank has the correct size holes , this idiot still had to open up the pilot holes through the hull..
Up the ladder, Lift hull a little, use drill and correct size bit drill through.

Up the step ladder to the chain hoist, hanging over boat, Lower hull... Yippee keel bolts going through.
Take off another layer of 3inch blocks and up the ladder to lower.
The boat is now sitting on the blocks with all keel bolt poking through and about 2 inches of gap between hull and keel.
At that point I ran out of time and energy having been up and down that step ladder so many times.

So next week,
I shall lift the hull and keel by way of eye nuts attached to the top of the keel bolts. Each bolt is more than strong enough to lift the combined weight. But an eye bolt is just above its SWL but below its breaking strain. So I will be using 3 lifting points.
Not quite sure which 3, but I will best guess.
Once happy that's the right 3 and everything else is OK, I'll lower, then slather the top of the keel with sealant . Then lift again 200kg + of hull should compress the sealant ok. After cleaning of the excess, It'll be into the boat and temporarily do up the nuts on the spare keel bolts .
Some blocks will be put under the keel, the boat lowered into the blocks, boat propped into position and left to set.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, it's the hanging the boat by the eyebolts on the keel, that will be the big step for me, hopefully I remember to get a photo..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Afternoon All,

Saturday.. scattered shower light winds, very humid when the sun came out.

Lifted boat using strops round boat and support frame,

Removed a layer of blocks either end,

Climb up step ladder to reach chain hoist over boat,

Lowered boat.. keel not quite lined up.

Climb up ladder to chain hoist Lift boat,

while kneeling below boat, try to move keel using various bits of wood as levers.

 Climb up ladder to chain hoist, Lower boat, 

Aft end not quite right,

Climb up ladder to chain hoist, Lift boat , move keel, 

Climb up ladder to chain hoist, Lower boat, keel bolts go into holes on keel plank.

But no further,

Lift and lower a couple of time ....

Then I remember...

This idiot has only drilled the pilot holes through the hull..

Go get drill and bit..

Lift boat clear of keel, drill through with large drill bit.

Clamber out,

But stay on ladder to reach chain hoist,

 Lower boat, drops straight onto keel yippee..

Day light visible, there appears to be lumps on the keel stopping the keel sitting correctly..

Attach eyenuts to keel bolts and lift to see if balance right, a couple of lifts an lowers and it's set for attaching the keel tomorrow.

The Balance point with keel appears to be about six inches forward of the centre of the boat, but that's without the steering gear and Rudder fitted.

But fixing the keel can wait till Sunday I'm knackered..

I should say I had the Pfizer 2.0 jab late Thursday, a light headache slowly developed over Friday  to Saturday, and I was feeling alternately hot or cold and knackered..

Sunday,  no headache, still feeling weak. More sunny, till much later when thunder and heavy down pours arrived.

Climb ladder to chain hoist, 

lift boat, find the lumps stopping the boat sitting correctly is the swarf from drilling the holes through. Clean keel top, did a trial lower to make sure..

cover keel top with sealant, 2.5 tubes used.

Lower boat, clean off squeezed out sealant.

Climb ladder into boat remove lifting gear, drop several washers down each keel bolt then wind down a lock nut.

Climb out, remove squeezed out sealant. Do some moving of stuff  for SWMBO.

Climb back in, run a normal nut down each keel bolt, when it hits keel bolt. Wind back several turns. Cut off excess keel bolt above nut, repeat for each keel bolt.

TIghten each keel bolt, put eye nut back on the keel bolts , each now sit nicely with the required amount of thread showing through.

Climb out of boat remove a small amount more of squeezed out sealant.

Lower boat onto blocks, weight now on keel, prop boat into position.

I've decided to make a lifting bracket, this will be a triangular plate, very wide and short. Shackle for the hook on top, three shackles below to the eye bolts. This will give a safer straight lift than the bodged rope and bolts to the eye nuts I was using.

Also to be made, three steel plates that will go across the keel bearers, two holes in each for keel bolts.

When each is fitted, I'll remove the old washers, and locknut. Run resin into the oversize keel bolt holes. Put the steel plate on, then a single washer, the lock nut, and then an eye nut.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There didn't seem to be a lot done this weekend though I spent the same time doing it.

Metal bashing,
The metal lifting bracket was cut from a piece of 3/8 steel, 5 20mm holes drilled through it, then a little trimming done. It now needs the sharp bits grinding off, before trying out. If that's ok derusting and painting will follow.

Three pieces of 1/8th steel 1ft by 1.5 inches were cut and derusted. Two holes drilled in each for the keel bolts. They need another coat of paint before being installed inside the hull to spread the weight of the keel onto the bearers.

As we have possible guests arriving next weekend , part of the model railway was moved to the gardening shed out of the mobile home, that was made easier by cutting the grass short en-route. Also more shelving for the house was cut to size and painted. If the guests don't turn up I'll be assembling them next week too

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes, a large number of hours are invested in fiddling with various parts, trial-fitting and adjusting for example, and no real progress seems to be made.

My experience is that usually, after a lot of this, suddenly, things come together.

You don't have a deadline, right?

FB- Doug

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was  hoping to launch by regatta week this year, 31st July - 6th August, but the chances are receding. That's only 9 weeks, 2 weekends are already spoken for, maybe 3 depending on the full release date from Covid  lockdowns.

So if she's not finished in time,  it's not worth launching, I'd be paying Broads Tax (Apr 1st to Apr 1st),  Summer Moorings (Apr 1st- Oct 30th) and insurance. It's intended I'll only sail her for the summer season , and crew in a Yeoman 20ft keelboat for the winter. 

Left to do, not necessarily in this order.

Finishing the hull - keel, joint, this weekends main task , though I may go onto preparation for hull painting, if there is time, since the joint will need painting over.

Fit the rudder,

Make and fit the steering gear.

Fit all the jammers, cleats etc, that's, I think, 11 ropes and sheets coming back into the cockpit.

Jib, uphaul, outhaul, furler in,  Vang, sheet port, Sheet Starboard

Main, uphaul, outhaul, cunningham, Vang, mainsheet.

Deck hatches / covers  need repainting.

Finish painting the hull,

Antifoul the Hull.

Mount boat on trailer, including fitting the support arms to the trailer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

While researching something completely different on boats I came across the boat pictured below.

The GOS 16 keelboat. A Spanish design, 

3.jpg.207519e014e9cd937ab2c0fe75511bdd.jpg
The GOS 16 is 4.95M LOA, 1.02M beam, 0.93M draft displacement 275Kg +2 crew say 475 Kg

Blue Moon is 4.87M LOA, 1.2M beam, 0.965M Draft, displacement 400Kg + 1 crew say 500Kg, If BM was still for two crew I'd have had to reduce the ballast by the required amount.

Both have a near vertical bow, both have a retrousee stern.
I designed Blue Moon in 1996, the GOS 16 date is 2004...
I think BM has about twice the sail area, but she'll need that to sail on tree lined Broads.

Very similar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The forecast for Wind for the 3 Rivers Race has changed again to a 10 mph Northerly , which is good for the race, but hard work for the competitors, up to 5 hours tacking every 30 seconds or so on the longest leg..

And to Boat building, I wasn't expecting to do any, as we had visitors, but then they arrived late and left early..

SO..
Saturday Morning, tried lifting bracket.. A failure not in metal, but it was "on the HUH" has they say hare in Norfuk, very tilted to the stern. I had put the top hole for the lifting hook in the middle , forgetting the balance point was 2 inches aft of that..
New hole drilled, tried the bracket.. Success, it lifts straight and level.
Sometime, I'll trim off more excess metal and tidy it up.

Monday
Sitting, kneeling, lying awkwardly under the boat to tidy up the keel - hull joint much scraping off of excess sealant and sanding.. Then batch of Filler was mixed up to fillet and smooth off the joint.
Good news I had some left over, so the joint was pretty good in the first place, Bad news  I wasted some filler.
Next time give that a final sand and paint over.

I noticed that the step ladder had again been knocked against the hull (by me) not good, So I  want to fit the fendering. This is a white rubber C strip which you screw on with then insert a Blue rubber D in the C which covers the screws. It's 27mm wide and stands proud 16mm, and wasn't anywhere near the price now, as when I bought 12 Metres of it.. It's now £16 a metre!!! from Ebay.

1703122019_(KGrHqIOKiwE3Du91-(BN)F(8wZ5!___12-228x228.jpg.effc14a6e31134f0fd12f6546c056ffd.jpg

But first a light sand of the hull followed by a top coat above the waterline as I don't want paint on the fendering.. More blue added as the previous coat was still too light once it had dried..  
Of drying, it was so warm, I had trouble keeping a wet edge it was going sticky so quickly yesterday, if another coat is needed more white spirit will be needed.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturday 08:00 arrive at Hickling sailing club.

Sunday 07:00 leave Hickling sailing club,

In-between count the 57 boats of the 116 entries that managed to reach us in the 2021 60th 3 Rivers Race. Of those 33 made it to the finish line within their alloted 24hours . It was a very light wind race, choice of route was very important. 

 

As for the boat. Not surprisingly I've had today off, so a little work was done, the keel joint sanded and the forward port quarter of the hull.

The keel was painted with the paint as was, I then added a good dollop of white spirit to the paint. It was too thick for a fine finish. 

That quarter was then given another coat of paint.. a couple of hours later it was touch dry and a much better finish than the previous coat.

So the first coat of paint on the keel has shown, up various points at the joint that require further sanding. The rest of the hull needs sanding and then painting again.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

And to this weekends work, not as much as I would have liked it was bucketing down with rain for a lot of it..
Even under the marquee rain was coming in the sides, because the side canvases aren't fitted the rain would have flowed across the ground anyway, it was very heavy..

So another quarter of the hull was sanded , unfortunately the previous layer hadn't stuck properly in some places I've no ideas why it was treated the same as the Portside, which sanded well.. That clogged up all the fine sand paper I had for the palm sander, so that was why the rest of the starboard side wasn't sanded.
 So I got a rotary flap wheel on the hand drill and went over the hull - keel joint, that cleared a lot of minor bumps and lumps that were showing after the first paint on the joint.

Both bits of sanding were then painted I'll see how that stays on next weekend.

 Then the fendering inner layer was screwed into place on the port side, slightly worrying is the sound of creaking of the teak style decking as the screws went in..
It's on but it was a bit of a wrestling match, the weather being much colder than last week, the fendering was a lot less flexible. I'm hoping it will relax a bit more on the next hot day..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning

Yet another weekend over and not enough work done on the boat.

The last quarter of the boat was sanded and painted. I'm still not happy with the adherence of the paint, but it will have to do for this year.  I'll just have to see how it does for a season.

The fendering / gunnel round the edge of the boat was fitted to the starboard side, no creaking this time, bigger pilot holes.. That was after fitting the forestay plate, it seems a long time ago I took it off, and a big step forward putting it back.. The fendering wraps round the forestay plate in one piece, avoiding an awkward shaped join, it just needed a little trimming on the inside to allow it to bend.. Just the aft ends need trimming to shape now.

I've taken some pictures but they are not on this computer so they'll appear when I have time.

During the week I spent many more hours working on the Handicap Spreadsheets, There are now 4 formula in the mix, Falmouth Area Yardsticks 10A, 10B, 14A and the basic PRHF formula.

Surprisingly similar results, they mostly come out with with just the odd strange result where an odd boats dimensions seems to throw a weird result.

Just 5 boats don't have their exact sail P,I, E J on the spreadsheet, but that's because they are gaffers, though very close to gunter in some cases and they are all local further investigation will be required on them.. I haven't even managed to get the separate SA of main and jib, it's just not online,

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, The Q said:

During the week I spent many more hours working on the Handicap Spreadsheets,  [snip] Surprisingly similar results, 

still think you're hugely over thinking this. Similarity of results no real surprise, and in any case people vastly over estimate the importance of the things.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well since I intend to race Blue Moon, the handicap is important. However I recognize I've gone way over the top on the spreadsheet, I've just got very interested in the way they work.

As for the time, for work I measure very accurate electronic equipment, I have to spend up to half an hour at a time waiting for measurements to settle, sometimes the entire day is just a dozen measurements, of which six hours I'm sat hardly moving because if I move much more than my hands on a keyboard, the results change.. So most of this spreadsheet work is  my employers time.

 

As for my own time, here's a couple of pictures of Blue Moon..

IMG_20210627_124444.jpg

IMG_20210627_124434_1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

And this weekends work.

The holder for the rudder stock was measured in length, and the rudder stock marked up,

The Jib Club was cut to length,

The holder for the rudder stock was measured in length, the measurements on the rudder stock were checked.. All good, rudder stock cut to length. Then two holes were drilled across the top of the rudder stock for the T bar which will be connected to the control lines..

After a little filing of the bottom of the hull / rudder stock hole junction, the rudder stock was pushed into the hole, it with much waggling it got just over halfway before stopping, mean while the boat is hanging from the crane waving about as I lie under there at an awkward angle pushing.

Rudder stock withdrawn bringing with it a load of crud.. I'd forgotten there was old grease  in there, and that had collected lots of dust and rubbish from other work. Hole cleaned with white spirits and a small brush on a stick.

 Rudder stock re inserted and it slid up quite easily, T bar at top inserted without the top bearing to stop rudder falling out, that allowed the rudder to drop about an inch so..

I painted the rudder including it's top edge, then I painted the bottom of the keel.

After that the rubber gunnel was trimmed at the stern, I don't like the finish, but there aren't endcaps for this size rubber unlike the larger sizes. So I shall furtle around in my railway modelling tool box for some plasticard to make a couple of caps..

The eyes on the bow were sanded and given their first coat of paint they look quite good, the paint colour I mixed up is very similar to the blue insert in the gunnel.

Then the Dog was taken for his long walk, He had to stop and lie down in the shade several times as the humidity on Sunday was very high and he's an old man..

On return the boat was lowered onto foam pads  that's keel and hull, then the rudder was given a second coat of paint.

Then I sat with a can of cider and had a codgitate, the boat won't be ready for regatta week there's just too much left to do. So I've booked on the rescue boat revision course and will do rescue boat for the whole of regatta week again.

 So what's left,

Hatches, there are two that sail with the boat, two that don't sail with the boat that all need repair and painting, a third non sailing small hatch needs manufacturing.

The steering gear needs installation, some parts I have from the previous installation, some parts need making,

The seat needs final installation (its removeable anyway,) and varnishing.

Then the marquee needs to come down, the crane raised to max height, the boat lifted up and the trailer inserted below.. The trailer boat support arms need fitting.

Fit the mast, rigging, control lines, jammers and cleats.

A trial raise of the sails, a sit inside and check everything is OK.

Then take it all down, wrap the boat up for winter, as she won't get launched till the start of the summer season Next March.

 

Meanwhile..

We have a 50mph gale forecast for overnight today so when I get home it's tie everything down time..

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Having tied everything down for the gale.. it didn't happen, it swerved well south of here..


Now having spent hours and hours designing a modern a high an  aspect ratio rudder as it could go with our limited waters, I'm now worrying..  

Weed growth raises questions over safety of Hickling Broad users | Eastern Daily Press (edp24.co.uk) This has now spread to the rivers and our nearest Broad..

I am beginning to wonder if a traditional rudder as shown below had a purpose in shedding weed, it would of course be aerofoiled not a flat plate welded onto the rudder bars.. Having spent hours and hours designing a new rudder for Blue Moon,

I am beginning to wonder if a traditional rudder as shown below had a purpose in shedding weed, it would of course be aerofoiled not a flat plate welded onto the rudder bars.. 

resize20180402-8802-pkbofh.jpg.40f1d4d56c7cff71d8b60e6195f459ba.jpg

Though I'm leaning towards a lower aspect ratio modern shape, shortening the design by 6 to 9 inches off the current design of 2ft 6 inches, the leading edge at 45 degrees the trailing edge vertical and the top edge hugging the hull.

I asked around on other forums and locally and  no new suggestions of rudder shape have come up here or elsewhere. The only original suggestion , is a weed pusher operated from inside the hull to push weed down the front of the rudder.. I'll think about that for the future.

So back to the rebuild, I got the chair back in, sat inside with a bit of wood trying various positions for a tiller.

The most obvious is a tiller on the Centre line pointing back at me from the front.. one problem, if I stood up to get out, it would do me an injury where it hurts...

So then a vertical whipstaff between the legs was tried, problem the control wires would go through my legs or generally stop me getting in and out.

So a side lever was tried, success, so one on each side. Pivoted at the base, problem it hit the chair arms, what to do about that?.
What to use ?

I was thinking of some old snooker cues, but they heard their ends were going to be cut off, so they've hidden themselves away. SWMBO suggested some old walking sticks, and appeared with two identical old bentwood handle walking sticks.
I tried them, perfect !!! with the handles pointing into the boat the verticals go down the side of the chair the handles over the chair arms.. push forward on that side to turn to the opposite side of the boat.

So they've been trimmed to length, the bottom squared off and extra wood added to thicken the foot to allow a bolt through.
That's now setting till next week.

The steering cables will run from the rudder head. Down each side of the boat to the walking sticks, then on to the front of the cock pit and then crossing to meet just behind the mast. At the join a bungy tensioner may be added to remove slack in the cables.

The main hatch 4ft long by about 2ft wide over the aft compartment, was removed to the workshop for its refurbishment. A hole has been cut for Baron Blue Moon the hairy models base, and a new skin added under that to stop it dropping through.
The top was sanded but there are so many scratches and dents acquired over the years, so after a sanding a skim coat of filler was applied. That too is setting till next week.
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I submit that the quickest and surest way to remove weed is a dagger rudder blade that you can just pull up and push down. Instant weed removal. If it could run in some sort of cassette in the hull that would be cool, but probably impossible to arrange without major surgery.
OTOH on the broads a low aspect balanced spade rudder with plenty of paddle capability is awfully useful for those situations that don't really occur much for open water sailors. You know what I mean. 
Lot of problems getting a nice raked leading edge with a low drag blade and semi balanced planform, not least the issue of having enough thickness for the pivoting point. TBH the requirements are way beyond my rudimentary knowledge of the science. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know what you mean about how useful a paddle facility is, some years ago during the 3 Rivers Race  we were tied up at stupid o'clock in the morning with a slight tide running against us with no wind  and from behind I saw red green red green red green. Yep,  one of the Yare and Bures as shown above,  was waggling away behind us, once he realised we could see him, he stopped and tied up...

Yes, getting the steering shaft correct with a highly inclined rudder is difficulty, , as you can see the curved rudder stock on the Yare and Bure..

Whilst a cassette facility would be useful , unfortunately not for me during a race. I'd have to sail off the racing line,  Remove the hatch , remove the steering cables from the top of the rudder shaft,  then the cassette to be lifted, then it all put back again.

Since we generally sail 1 hour races you could say goodbye to the race anyway, with the time that would take. We can tie up at the club house or on the broad the pontoon, between races, it's an easy reach to remove weed from there.

To this weekends work:

First the steering controls were sanded, then two pieces of plastic were laid on the bench.

Two pieces of 4inch square fibreglass cloth laid and resined on the plastic sheet. The controls placed on top and propped in place and two more pieces laid and resined on top forming a top hat shape. Then a little more reinforcing cloth was laid on where needed.

Once set the fibreglass was trimmed into a D with the curve facing down. After a sand and fill they have received their first coat of paint.

The main hatch which lives above the rudder, was sanded down, then painted white , the next day lightly sanded again and a second coat painted on, it may take another  coat yet.

The cockpit outer edge was painted white, I had tried varnishing  but couldn't get the finish I'd like and it's a high wear area so I've gone for paint.

The fore hatch was sanded repaired, One of the retaining edges had come off, the only problem being the top came off the glue bottle. Flooding the underside of the hatch. That was pushed to where needed, and when semi soft, the excess glue scraped off. This is a varnished hatch so next week it will be turned over sanded again then the first coat of varnish applied.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_20210719_154922.jpg.82833147a47305dfd458fc74b3d6761d.jpg

A view down the boat, you can see on the propped up on the port seat arm, the hand roughly in position for steering control, on deck the other one, both have only had one coat of primer, long way to go before finishing. 

Also unfinished is the lifting plate for the boat , that's the metal thing under the control handle and sandpaper. The eyes that it hooks onto are under the seat, and slightly below shot.

The nearest stainless bar crossing the boat will also have a centre vertical to the hull, it will hold a panel for various sail controls,  the other sail controls for the jib will be on the inside of the cockpit combings and the bar is also is my grab handle so I can pull myself out of the seat.

The stainless bar across the boat behind the seat is the horse for the mainsheet block.

The boat needs a good clean inside..

Link to post
Share on other sites