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I have lusted after one of these things off and on for years but never really seriously thought I'd have one.  Ran into a really good deal (practically a giveaway) on a good fixer upper boat.  I had actually been planning on building a Contender and was working on getting the plans when this one turned up.

She's sail number 7155, built by Ballenger in 1980 and was originally named Cantakerous Canary.  Spent lots of time stored away unused, but she does have a few scars, ugly repairs, and suffers a bit from neglect.  I plan to make her nice again and put her to good use!

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I LOVE these boats, I sail one quite frequently out of Niagara On The Lake, An Old Rondar, about 50 years old I think, The guy who I sail with who owns the boat takes excellent care of it, Has a wooden foredeck and wooden centerboard trunk an absolutely beautiful boat and so much fun to sail, Hope things go well for you on your project, Good luck!! 

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Alright! I screwed a couple of bicycle hanger hooks into the rafters in the garage and got the mast hung safely up out of the way. Ready to get started!  First thing I pulled out the jib sheet, vang and a few of the uglier control lines including the ones for the centerboard.  That centerboard... Bare wood on the top where it sticks up out of the case, let's pull it out and see what''s up with that thing.

 

Wow, that's a bit bigger than expected.  And heavier.  Weighs in a 19.8 lbs according to the bathroom scale.   In addition to the bare wood area mentioned above, there is some peeling on the lower leading edge and a few spots at the trailing edge that look like the glass never properly wetted out when the board was built.  Also in the places where the glass has peeled, it seems the rest of the glass is not well adhered to the wood.  I can easily shove a popsicle stick under, peeling up the glass.  I didn't do a whole lot of that just yet.   I'm not sure if that's normal or if it indicates a bad layup?   Seems to me like it should be much harder than that to peel.  I'm tempted to just peel the whole skin off and redo it.  Or maybe I should just sand it off in the loose areas and do spot repairs.    Any input on that? Is there a "normal" foil refurb process?  If I do reskin the board I'll definitely vacuum bag it.  I've been involved with that a little bit many years ago so the process and equipment aren't completely unfamiliar to me.

 

 

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Sounds a bit like me & my boat : US8172.  Took a while to set up, but am now getting ready to go racing. Sanding down the delaminated/no resin areas and re-glassing them will be a lot quicker than tying to pry all the glass off and having to do the whole board. My boat had ugly scars too, but I took Gouvernail’s advice and got out the Krylon. It has held up OK, despite Krylon’s insistance that it is not suitable for marine use.   

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 I took a small piece of glass that had peeled off and gave it a bit of a burn test.  No poly smell there.  Also it's quite flexible so I'm fairly certain it's an epoxy layup.

Krylon, that's interesting.  Sure would make cosmetic touch-ups a breeze later on!

 

 

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So peel it is!

I decided to take the board up to my shop to work on taking the hardware off and when I saw it in the sun my decision was made.  Lots of blisters that I hadn't noticed I guess since it was late and I didn't have great lighting. 

As you can see and hear in the video she was not good.

 

Took me right at 15 minutes to peel the board bare.  With my bare hands even!  Just grab and pull...

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Might be easier to just buy a used standard centerboard from somebody on the class site.  I think Henry Amthor had one or two for sale.

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The board is cedar (presumably WRC) and amazingly is so well preserved that on the way home from the shop today my car smelled of cedar.  It was awesome! Even better, my garage now smells like fresh lumber.  I love it!   The board just needs a few resin spots sanded down and a few spots filled where I lifted the grain but otherwise it's perfect.  I'll reskin it with bagged epoxy/glass and maybe some carbon or kevlar on the leading edge where it had been banged up before.  

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6 hours ago, Cheapster said:

The board is cedar (presumably WRC) and amazingly is so well preserved that on the way home from the shop today my car smelled of cedar.  It was awesome! Even better, my garage now smells like fresh lumber.  I love it!   The board just needs a few resin spots sanded down and a few spots filled where I lifted the grain but otherwise it's perfect.  I'll reskin it with bagged epoxy/glass and maybe some carbon or kevlar on the leading edge where it had been banged up before.  

Getting the cloth to wrap tight at the edge is critical (and difficult), in the past one thing I've done is to use hi-density filler along the edges and especially at the bottom tip. This stuff isn't bullet-proof but it takes a lot more beating than plain wood or wood/glass

FB- Doug

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Don't use kevlar. You'll end up with the dreaded fuzzies. Then again I built a rudder with kevlar and it never got them. But I didn't use it long.

Carbon is much stiffer than fiberglass but not stronger. That's its big advantage. The leading edge needs no stiffness. But the trailing edge does. On the other hand, I chip out and damage carbon trailing edges just as much as fiberglass ones. If the fibers run the length of the span they do nothing for the trailing edge.

52 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Getting the cloth to wrap tight at the edge is critical (and difficult), in the past one thing I've done is to use hi-density filler along the edges and especially at the bottom tip. This stuff isn't bullet-proof but it takes a lot more beating than plain wood or wood/glass

FB- Doug

If you do a good job of vacuum bagging that takes care of itself around the leading edge. The problem child though is the trailing edge. And then of course the tip.

The easiest way to get good results is leading edge up supported from the inboard end, light 4 oz cloth as many layer as needed drooped over. That's how we built thistle rudders.

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I'm about to place my order for stuff to do the layup and bag etc.  Before I do, I just need to decide exactly what I'm going to do about the leading and trailing edges. 

 

Options I'm considering include:

1) do nothing, which was what was done originally.  Actually not NOTHING, as the original glass was laid up with an extra layer or two near the leading edge just as fastyacht mentioned.  Have to consider that this board is 40 years old and it was probably fine for a long time, so anything more is probably overkill.  Then again, it was in need of repair so a little overkill might not be such a bad thing.

2) inlay strips of g10 or CF into the edges and tip before layup.  Probably the strongest most durable option but also the most expensive and painstaking. Also probably WAY overkill.

3) build up the edges with Marine Tex or JB Weld before layup.

 

I feel like option 3 is probably my best bet.   By the way, what the heck is in Marine Tex or JB weld that makes them set up rock hard?  Seems like I ought to be able to do the same with the proper filler added to the same epoxy I'm using to lay up the glass shouldn't I? 

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Another good way to get a tight wrap is to cut wide strips along the bias..... at 45..... and use this as your doubler along the edge. Cloth with the thread running diagonal will flex and wrap smoother, easier. I dunno why but I seen it done!

JB Weld is great stuff, has anyone tried to work it into a layer of cloth though? That (IMHO) is the great thing about hi-density filler. You don't have use the expensive West System stuff, although IMHO it is easiest to get good results with. You can add a little to make a soft putty to do the cloth layup then slather on a much thicker mix.

Try to get a good shape when wet, otherwise you end up trying to shape it with a mill file

FB- Doug

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6 hours ago, Cheapster said:

I'm about to place my order for stuff to do the layup and bag etc.  Before I do, I just need to decide exactly what I'm going to do about the leading and trailing edges. 

 

Options I'm considering include:

1) do nothing, which was what was done originally.  Actually not NOTHING, as the original glass was laid up with an extra layer or two near the leading edge just as fastyacht mentioned.  Have to consider that this board is 40 years old and it was probably fine for a long time, so anything more is probably overkill.  Then again, it was in need of repair so a little overkill might not be such a bad thing.

2) inlay strips of g10 or CF into the edges and tip before layup.  Probably the strongest most durable option but also the most expensive and painstaking. Also probably WAY overkill.

3) build up the edges with Marine Tex or JB Weld before layup.

 

I feel like option 3 is probably my best bet.   By the way, what the heck is in Marine Tex or JB weld that makes them set up rock hard?  Seems like I ought to be able to do the same with the proper filler added to the same epoxy I'm using to lay up the glass shouldn't I? 

Probably the same thing as Gougeon "high density filler" 404: calcium silicate.

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  • 3 weeks later...

 

Getting the centerboard prepped for new glass turned out to be more of a project than I bargained for!  There we some pretty deep voids and several splintered areas so I started out by just filling the worst of them with Bondo.  I figured that stuff is at least as dense as the wood and none of it is going to be happy if it gets wet, so I went with the quick stuff.  Also I'm not worried about adhesion since I didn't use it on large areas.  First evening after doing the bondo I spent a couple hours sanding off the stray patches of epoxy on one side and gave it a skim coat of epoxy to seal it all up.  Not too bad.

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Then the second side took me a week!  That side was so splintery my sandpaper kept going under the wood grain or actually rolling splinters off the board when I tried sanding across the grain.  So I gave that side a skim coat of epoxy before trying to sand anymore.  After several rounds of sanding, feeling for high and low spots, filling increasingly small voids and skim coating again, I finally got to where it actually seems nice all over and I'm ready to put the glass on.  You can see on port side there are a lot more Bondo spots.  After the fist epoxy skim coat, all spot fills were either epoxy with cotton flock or microballoons.  Man that flocked epoxy is a bitch to sand!!  Now I just need to fab a couple of fittings so I can connect my vacuum pump to the bag and I'll be ready to rock.   The board will end up white so I'm not concerned about the pink Bondo showing later. 

There she is, all filled and fair, sealed and smooth at last.

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Everything I read about Bondo is to avoid using it on boats because it is hydroscopic - it absorbs water.  Even on car repairs it is deemed less than optimal because of this - the moisture it absorbs leads to the eventual rusting of the sheet metal it is spread on.  Covered by paint and kept dry, it may take a while, but rust never sleeps.  The epoxy coats you’re putting over it may prevent problems in your case, but since you’re using epoxy anyway, it might have made more sense to mix a batch with microballoons or fine sawdust/sanding dust and use that instead of the Bondo. As the spots aren’t that large, hopefully the board won’t delaminate because of the Bondo. 

 

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On 9/1/2019 at 11:39 AM, Cheapster said:

I have lusted after one of these things off and on for years but never really seriously thought I'd have one.  Ran into a really good deal (practically a giveaway) on a good fixer upper boat.  I had actually been planning on building a Contender and was working on getting the plans when this one turned up.

She's sail number 7155, built by Ballenger in 1980 and was originally named Cantakerous Canary.  Spent lots of time stored away unused, but she does have a few scars, ugly repairs, and suffers a bit from neglect.  I plan to make her nice again and put her to good use!

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i remember this boat from the sbra days, but damned f my memory can recollect who had her. congrats and good luck on the resto rod!

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2 hours ago, PaulK said:

Everything I read about Bondo is to avoid using it on boats because it is hydroscopic - it absorbs water.  Even on car repairs it is deemed less than optimal because of this - the moisture it absorbs leads to the eventual rusting of the sheet metal it is spread on.  Covered by paint and kept dry, it may take a while, but rust never sleeps.  The epoxy coats you’re putting over it may prevent problems in your case, but since you’re using epoxy anyway, it might have made more sense to mix a batch with microballoons or fine sawdust/sanding dust and use that instead of the Bondo. As the spots aren’t that large, hopefully the board won’t delaminate because of the Bondo. 


I thought about that but the board was awful rough in a few places and needed a lot of filler.  Bondo has such a perfect consistency, sets quickly and sands about the same as wood so it was a natural choice.   Also I reckon Bondo is no more hygroscopic than wood and probably a good deal less than the WRC the centerboard is made from.   Either way that board is not going to be happy if moisture gets under the glass so I'm not too concerned about the Bondo becoming an issue.

 

 

 

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Nice job on the board core re-work! Bondo is no more moisture absorptive than most other off-the-shelf filler products, the limit being it is polyester based vs. an epoxy or vinylester based product. I.e micro exposed to water will absorb moisture, so encapsulating it in epoxy is better than doing the same with polyester, but if the whole thing is getting properly encapsulated with epoxy/fiberglass I wouldn't worry about it too much. The auto guys generally slap bondo on then fair and paint, so there is no other moisture barrier and eventually rust does set in.

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On 9/27/2019 at 7:36 AM, aA said:

 

i remember this boat from the sbra days, but damned f my memory can recollect who had her. congrats and good luck on the resto rod!

I was the second owner, 98-99. It didn't race much in the previous 10+ years, but it's a memorable color and stripe. Jason Spiller was the original owner, his last regular crew was a guy named Gordon, a bmw mechanic. Or was it porsche?

Keep up the good work Cheapster!

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She's coming along a bit slower than I had hoped since things got so busy at work.  Looks like yet another 2 day workend ahead for me so again will be limited boat progress.  I'm really wanting to get at that glassing with the vacuum bag but I"m kind of wanting a whole day to fool with it and I just haven't had that for a while.  I usually like to tackle one thing at a time, complete that item and move to the next, but I'm starting to think maybe I'll do some stuff to the hull while waiting for my big chance to finish up that board.  Looks like the hull will also need some glass repairs in addition to the numerous gelcoat repairs, but most of that can be handled with a half hour or hour spot repair here and there. 

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3 hours ago, Cheapster said:

She's coming along a bit slower than I had hoped since things got so busy at work.  Looks like yet another 2 day workend ahead for me so again will be limited boat progress.  I'm really wanting to get at that glassing with the vacuum bag but I"m kind of wanting a whole day to fool with it and I just haven't had that for a while.  I usually like to tackle one thing at a time, complete that item and move to the next, but I'm starting to think maybe I'll do some stuff to the hull while waiting for my big chance to finish up that board.  Looks like the hull will also need some glass repairs in addition to the numerous gelcoat repairs, but most of that can be handled with a half hour or hour spot repair here and there. 

I don't see a need to vacuum bag the skin on your centerboard. If it is just a skin, set the board up so that leading edge is up, drape the cloth over it and wet it out. The excess will drape nicdely down and you'l be able to trim it cleanly with a stanley after an hour or so.

Bagging on the other hand is tricky because of that trailine edge. There are a couple of ways to deal with that. But why bother?

You can do the skinning in an hour. In the cellar where it is out of the way. At least that's where I did my board.

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I hear you FY! 

But since I saw our guys at the hangar doing mods on Kevlar panels in the early 90's I've thought vacuum bagging was the slickest damn thing and have kind of wanted to try it.  Well I've finally got a good project to do that on and have bought all the stuff to do it, so it must happen!  No basement though.  That's a pretty rare thing here in North Texas.  Something about having to build the foundation below the frost line or whatever horse shit...  Believe me, that was my favorite place in the house in Michigan where I grew up and I miss having that.  But my garage will serve fine.   I actually did the sanding by hand in the living room with a big plastic drop cloth over the coffee table, lol  Hey, it was hot out and I have no wife to bitch at me!   :blink:

 

My plan is to start with the board trailing edge up, glass the aft 2/3 or so, then when it sets up I'll turn it over and get the rest in a second layup with some overlap.  I want to get the second layup on there as soon as the first cures enough to safely remove the peel ply.  I also have some carbon fiber tape I want to put on around the leading edge and tip that may end up being a third bagging.  After all the layup is done, sand out any lumps or ridges, open up the screw holes as needed, and roll on the white gelcoat.  Probably two layers of gelcoat with some sanding.  It'll probably be a big mess but nothing a good sanding won't fix.  We'll see!

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I know it is cool. But if you are putting a single layer o glass over wood, the bagging does essentially zero useful work. Bagging is good because it consolidates multiple layers. It also when done properly allows you to control the amount of resin. Note the term "properly." It isn't all obvious how to make it behave. You can accidentally suck too much resin out into your breather layer (traditionally burlap, now often inexpensive batting but you can also spend $$$ if you feel like it). Or you can bag it but end up with excess resin.

You might want to do something more, well, laminate-y with your newfound supplies. You could make a brand new rudder! Haha.

I assume you've watched lots of videos?

I also like finding cool stuff randomly. Mike Patey, builder of "DRACO" the STOL airplane, showed himself doing bagging of a silly little part. But actually good pointers.

 

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I've watched some videos and have even lent a hand ages ago.  Also there was a trick our guys did that I haven't seen anyone else do.  They would take a piece of bagging plastic and mark out the layup they wanted on that. Then they would wet out the layup on that and cover it with another layer of bag.  Once that sandwich was together all nice and wet and fairly bubble free they would cut that shape out with ceramic bladed shears.  Peel off the inner bag skin and stick the layup down.  On to the next layer and so on.  Seemed to be a fairly precise way to get the layups to exactly the size shape and location they wanted.   I wasn't planning on doing all that but I found it inspiring.  

You know, that idea about making a rudder might be pretty good too.  The rudder on this boat is kind of screwy in my opinion since the damn thing doesn't kick up and the tiller goes through the transom and apparently bolts on to the rudder blade.  I'd prefer to have a kick up rudder and some kind of easily removable tiller, so I may just do up a whole assembly.  As far as the centerboard is concerned, I might just do it up in one layer like you suggested.  Originally it was two layers of glass at least, which was obvious when I peeled the thing. Some places one layer of class actually came up and left a layer under it, which I also peeled.  I think that might have been the side of the board that came out extra rough.  I suspect it will still be more than strong enough with a single layer of glass and that will sure speed up the glassing process too. 

I'll have to have myself a good think on that one tonight when I get a chance to watch the vids.  Thanks for those by the way!

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The transom dimensions on the Ballenger are taller than a lot of other boats in the US. You might be able to find a kick up rudder head assembly from an old Parker, possibly from an old Rondar as well. You might need to look in the UK as well.

The rudder on 7155 itself was a very nice refinished Waterat standard non high aspect foil. Hopefully it's still in good condition and could be retrofitted to lift in a case or pivot. I bought it from Waterat after the home made rudder broke at our first regatta.

Home made rudders break, we've seen it over and over. Don't waste your time and materials building a rudder foil. And yet I'd love to try, it looks like a fun project.

 

 

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1 hour ago, another 505 sailor said:

I have 2 broken nearly new non waterat high aspect foils in my garage. Both professionally made. They will go up on the wall eventually.

You have to actually engineer foils. Or make out of solid 1.25" mahogany. In the latter case they will not break. Unless bad wood or not taken care of.

People make mistake of not considering the shear forces. Cores cannot be H80 or other crap. Must be able to withstand actual stresses. This is why often a real wood core is best.

Ordinary home builders have not the technical understanding to engineer a composite structure with a core.

Some "professionals" are fabricators but certainly not engineers. UGWUPF

My Rondar kick up low aspect rudder blade is solid mahogany about 3/4" I could go measure it. Been sailing in its original aluminum rudderhead for 40+ years.

I had a GP15 mahogany plywood centerboard snap in 25 knots. Why they used unreinforced plywood? God only knows. I've sinned with plywood cores but only with whole laminate over vacuum bagged engineered to keep the rolling shear in the core below failure.

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3 hours ago, another 505 sailor said:

And both had very nice wood cores.

You probably need to triple the amount of the correct carbon for a home build. Then add more layers.

High AR. What is the core species? If cedar...

Did they break in shear directly across or spiral twist?

The shear is the killer. IF the skins are not connected with a sttrong enough shear web, the board will still break.

Compared to the original boards, rthe high AR has much much greater bending moment, combined with a dramatically reduced cross section to take shear. The original boards with solid mahogany looked like spitfire wings and were absolutely bombproof.

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I don't know why I didn't think to say this before, but I've broken not one, not two, but three centerboards in my lifetime.

Two were plywood, a GP-14, and a 505. The latter, Rondar, early 70s, original painted plywood. The GP-14 varnisehedplywood. Both  "mahogany" or "african mahogany" (dense so kaya or sipo or sapele, not gaboon).

Plywood in "rolling shear" is a serious problem, which is especially bad in fully reversed loading.  The skins of the plywood may be fine in tension but once the core plies fail in rolling shear, the whole thing folds and blows up. Whatever you do, do not use plywood cores. (As I said, I've done that--actually twice in total--but with overengineered laminates to reduce the bending so that rolling shear fatigue would not happen. I intend to never do again because there really isn't a reason to use plywood except lazy convenience).

One was a daggerboard--V15, fiberglass. The core failed. Surprise surprise. In fact the core wasn't even glued properly--that's why it failed. And there was no laminate connection on the leading edge. Building fiberglass blades requires some care. You need actual thick connection between the clamshell halves--not a knife-edge. I used to build centerboards as a boatbuilder a long time ago, so know this from the build side as well as the engineering side.

I broke a rudder once--grounding.

The bending and shear always need to be strong enough to take two crew on the blade bouncing up and down trying frantically to right the boat the wrong way (like, calm down, uncleat the damned mainsheet etc.... but people will make this mistake). Also must check against hydrodynamic loading with maximum righting moment with dynamic roll. One or the other, depending on boat geometry, will be higher. That's the basic engineering part. You will be surprised at the bending moments developed on a dinghy centerboard!

The rudder is pretty simple. Maximum expected speed, with rudder at maximum lift coefficient. That is how you generate the moment on the rudder blade. (505 = 20 knots....that's safe). And then there's grounding---which you can never really protect against except to "make it stout: but better make the transom stouter. I broke one of those, too!

 

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Well that was pretty hilarious..

 

  I decided you guys were right, I'll just go ahead and lay up my glass and squeegee it out. Done and done, simple enough.  Cut my glass cloth and laid it in place but it didn't really want to lay down.  Figured it would lay better when I wetted it out.  And it did, but just a little better and I needed it to be a lot better!  It just wouldn't stick near the trailing edge where I had wrapped it around. Huh. 

  So then suddenly I had VACUUM BAG EMERGENCY!!  Grabbed all my bagging stuff (that I had never even assembled to know if it worked) and went to town!  Cut off a piece of bag material "about that big" and spread it out laying on top of my spare cradle box.  Peel ply a little bigger than the glass cloth and throw that on.  Bleeder a bit bigger than that, throw it on too, then cut the bag and installed my vacuum fittings and proceeded to tape it up with the chewing gum tape.  I actually got it all together and didn't have to make a single pleat.  Miracle of miracles, the damn thing actually sucked down when I hooked it all up too.  I could hardly believe it!  Had to have set some kind of record for fastest bag that actually worked done by a guy that doesn't generally do that stuff, lol.

 I did hear one hiss but it stopped when I squeezed the tape in that spot.  The gauge on the pump was climbing above 20 but the bag all felt like it was pressed down plenty well so I backed off the bleeder until the gauge read 15".     Went and checked the leftover epoxy in the mixing cup and it hadn't started to kick yet so I think I''m probably going to be ok on this one.  We'll see in the morning!

 

 

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  Well there we are!

  She came out a little starved right on the front flat face at the top, but overall looks very good.  I'm not sure if I over-vacuumed it or if maybe that portion wasn't sealed as well as the rest and I actually pulled air out of the wood and through my layup.  I won't worry too much about it I guess since it seems perfectly well stuck down and that's a heavy area that I don't think sees much abuse.  On the opposite side of the shown transition, I got about a dime-sized area where the glass bridged over instead of pressing down to the board. Between those two issues, I'm not if I should back the vacuum off to 10" or pull it down to 20" next time.  Maybe just leave it at 15"?   To repair my void, I'm thinking I'll drill 1/16" holes in opposite ends of that area and inject epoxy to fill it up.  Seems like that should be a sound repair with minimal damage to the glass cloth.  Wonder if there will be amine blush inside that little pocket? 

   I was surprised at how well the peel ply was stuck down, it really took a bit of work to pull that stuff off!   No doubt, it was stuck to my layup at least as well as the old glass was stuck to the board.  My layup seems to be really properly stuck.   Last thing I had done before glassing was thoroughly wash off the blush and give a final sanding to make sure everything was flat and clean, and I made sure there were no shiny spots left. 

  Where I had masked the lower part of the board with newspaper, all the drips became little newspaper layups.  Oops, well I hadn't planned on bagging it when I masked it off, and that will all sand off easily enough.  I'll mask with plastic on the next layup. I believe next I'll do the leading edge, and after that I'll do one side and then the other in a 4th bagging. At this point I don't play to do any glassing without bagging.  The bag makes it come out so even and the peel ply leaves such a nice surface, I want to keep the rest consistent with what I've got so far.

  Overall I'm very satisfied so far.  I was able to trim just a tiny bit off the end of my bag top open it, so it should be good for several more uses.  Let's see if I can't actually get this bad boy done!

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm still making progress over here! Maybe a little slow, but that's OK I guess.

I got the board completely glassed as planned by doing the edges first and then the sides, so I have minimum 2 layers of glass with some of the overlaps building to 3 or 4 layers.  I did have the one bridged over spot which I drilled and filled with a syringe. Worked perfectly so that void is no more.  Here you can see where I drilled the glass but the bubble is history.

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After letting the epoxy cure up way longer than necessary I found some white paint.  End up getting a free gallon of Polane from a buddy in the aviation industry since it had gone beyond it's expiration date. Disposal of this stuff is always a problem for those guys since they can't just toss it in the dumpster.  The paint is super thick, like maple syprup so I brushed on a very thick fill coat which mostly filled the texture left by the peel ply on the glass, and also went a long ways toward filling in the steps left where my glass plies overlap. The pic here shows the first fill coat sanded down ready for second fill coat, which is on right now.  When I get to the point where I don't see any steps or other imperfections after sanding the fill coat, I'll thin my paint and spray the last coat.

IMG_1936.thumb.JPG.6cef5dbc248bc83ab4f63c1e88a462fb.JPG

 

So far so good!!

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, koolkat505 said:

Just make sure the board still fits in the trunk!!  Looking good!

Yep, I had thought of that!  Seems like there was plenty of room in there when I took it out, and I guess being a gybing board it has to have a fair amount of room to flop around.  I can sand it down here and there if need be, but I expect she'll still fit just fine with that extra little bit of paint.

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  • 6 months later...

Wow, I finally wrapped up my walk-in shower project and got back to the boat!  Got her flipped over and took off the CB gasket, found that the replacement gasket that came with the boat was about 2" too short!  DAMN!  Alright, I got another gasket on order this morning.  Need to grind off some old repairs and try to do them up right, get my new gasket on there and LAUNCH.  No rerig or expensive stuff required, I just want to get her out for some fun =)

 

And what in the hell is up with the pictures?  I turned it around and around but when I put it on the forum it turns it sideways every time, lol.  IF it loads!  Most times it takes a few attempts before it'lll get past "loading error"  Maybe I need some sort of forum tutorial or something...

IMG_3219.JPG

 

 

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Nah, these gaskets are pretty hammered.  They bear a close resemblance to giant white strips of cooked bacon, haha.  Actually, if you zoom in on the picture you can see the gaskets still in place.  They look sort of like um, lips... that might be seen on another kind of slot... LOL

I'll have to check out that bike tube deal.  You haven't got any pics by chance, have you? I did see one write-up where the guy used a single flap of gasket material the covered the front of the slot and was able to be pushed out when the board came all the way down.  I had planned to do the same but the bike thing actually sounds better.

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I want to try to launch next week but realistically it will probably be the week after.   We'll have to see if my gasket material arrives this week as it's supposed to and hopefully, I won't find too much missing when I stand the mast up for the first time.  I probably should have done that mast thing a while back! Oh well, I'll get it all sorted out soon anyway. It's time!

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On 6/4/2020 at 8:08 AM, Pro looper said:

your gaskets are probably fine, at the front of the trunk you should  install two pizza

shaped pieces of bike tube so they form a gasket

PL. 

Hey Pro, got any pics of your pizza pieces? I was wondering as well -- I thought the gasket on my old Rondar was in decent shape but it doesn't have what you described at the leading edge.

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A few photo's of how the front of the CB slot is done.  Traditionally drilled aluminum strips hold the gaskets in place with rubber strips added in the front to conform to the CB when it's been lowered.

You have to make sure you use something like duralac on the screws to prevent galvanic corrosion of the aluminum strips.  The latest thing is machined G10 strips and nose piece which won't corrode. If the boat was carbon you would still need a coating because there's a reaction between SS and carbon.

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/saddington-consultants-plus-duralac-anti-corrosion-jointing-compound

CB Gasket comparison.jpg

CB Gasket.jpg

CB Gasket 2.jpg

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