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6 hours ago, Misbehavin' said:

Is there such a thing as a good looking wind vane?

Not really. Maybe a Cape Horn. But then all the working bits end up next to your quadrant, which as we’ve seen in other threads, can make access hard. 
 

My monitor is named Loick. 

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Something must be wrong with me.  I don't really "lust." I rarely lust after other homes. Other locations? Occasionally, but only a tiny bit.  My home and property are great. Visitors often tell

Ummm, I don't suppose you've noticed that this is CRUISING anarchy? It involves the pure joy of cruising with furniture. I'm 65 and sail a 48', 30,000#, wooden sailboat with my 64 year old wife. The w

Ted Hood always seem to manage to steal my heart.  First the Little Harbor series and now this: https://www.lymanmorse.com/sailing_yacht/hood-lyman-morse-60-windwalker-ii/

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New page top, so I'm re-posting my question-

Thinking about how to effectively use Yachtworld to shop for dream boats in the "new economy."  Is there a way to use search to find boats that have been listed for a long time?  Maybe 6+ months, or 1+ years? 

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2 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

New page top, so I'm re-posting my question-

Thinking about how to effectively use Yachtworld to shop for dream boats in the "new economy."  Is there a way to use search to find boats that have been listed for a long time?  Maybe 6+ months, or 1+ years? 

Yeah! To simplificate, is the any effective boat-for-sale search function any more? Yachtworld used to be OK but they crippled it ... (rant snipped) there are a couple Craigslist-compile-and-search websites like SearchTempest but there are a heck of a lot of boats for sale. Buyers need some help

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

New page top, so I'm re-posting my question-

Thinking about how to effectively use Yachtworld to shop for dream boats in the "new economy."  Is there a way to use search to find boats that have been listed for a long time?  Maybe 6+ months, or 1+ years? 

I haven't found anything.  Closest I can figure out is to look on Sailboatlistings.com, which often has cross-listed boats, and does include a posting date.  

Sailboatlistings is frustrating though because so many boats are just left up on the site even after they're off the market.  

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7 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

 

Windvanes are beautiful in the functional sense. They are a fabulous piece of kit for the serious sailor. We loved our Monitor, called it Morley (Canadian cultural reference there).

Combo of Farley and Mowat?

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6 hours ago, Elegua said:

Not really. Maybe a Cape Horn. But then all the working bits end up next to your quadrant, which as we’ve seen in other threads, can make access hard. 
 

My monitor is named Loick. 

I agree, the Cape Horn is the only one that isn't offensive to my eyes.

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11 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Thinking about how to effectively use Yachtworld to shop for dream boats in the "new economy."  Is there a way to use search to find boats that have been listed for a long time?  Maybe 6+ months, or 1+ years? 

I wish.   Even my broker who has access to the backend says he see's lots of sale data but nothing about time on market like real estate ads.

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There used to be a "posted since" search filter that you could use to get an idea when things were posted, but I've seen plenty of ads get reposted, pulled, edited, whatever so definitely not foolproof. Really comes down to calling the broker and asking questions and making a judgement based on that.

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On 3/25/2020 at 10:24 AM, Israel Hands said:

New page top, so I'm re-posting my question-

Thinking about how to effectively use Yachtworld to shop for dream boats in the "new economy."  Is there a way to use search to find boats that have been listed for a long time?  Maybe 6+ months, or 1+ years? 

moreboats.com includes a line in listings with "last updated ____ and on the market since ______". Search function is also not great, but no worse than US yachtworld's now. Moreboats doesn't have as many listings, but many brokerages cross post boats from yw. I mainly use it for that date info and easier scrolling through pics. 

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Sailboatlistings.com shows when each listing was first posted, but it is not a searchable field.  And they are notorious for failing to remove old ads.

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1 hour ago, SemiSalt said:

Since people were opining about old Persons, I thought I'd post this picture that I took in Bermuda in 2000. Even then it was a major restoration, not just a boat in top condition.

bb048.JPG

Whenever I see a small wheel on a small yacht I almost expect this couple to be onboard.

6E2E4BDD-080D-48EC-BA2A-74FAC0274115.jpeg.b7e048f6e58afd379c371f5b485845cf.jpeg

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On 3/25/2020 at 3:02 PM, Raz'r said:

Combo of Farley and Mowat?

Sorry for the slow response, our modem quit so we have not had Internet, TV, and home phone for a few days. Morley is from the Dave and Morley stories that Stuart McLean did on the Vinyl Cafe for many years (DTS, far too soon). For those unfamiliar with these stories Dave is a typical husband which means he makes grand gestures in life and generally screws things up. Morley, like most wives (my wife explained this to me) brings calm and organization to any difficult situation and that was what our Monitor did for us for close to 40K NM.

Here is a sample Dave and Morley story.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-ZkYDJzv30

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On 3/28/2020 at 2:58 PM, MFH125 said:

Long, skinny, double ender! Paging Mr. Bottoms!

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On 3/30/2020 at 8:19 AM, Steam Flyer said:

+ low freeboard, yu-u-uge overhangs, and varnish

For the win

Decisive win!

FB- Doug

All those characteristics, along with skinny draft, and the small rig needed for such an easily-driven hull, all contribute to its lustworthiness.

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5 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

All those characteristics, along with skinny draft, and the small rig needed for such an easily-driven hull, all contribute to its lustworthiness.

I meant beam not draft. I am losing it I think. At some point in the future I am going to get a totally impractical, not too expensive daysailer. Not a woody though.

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On 3/25/2020 at 10:24 AM, Israel Hands said:

New page top, so I'm re-posting my question-

Thinking about how to effectively use Yachtworld to shop for dream boats in the "new economy."  Is there a way to use search to find boats that have been listed for a long time?  Maybe 6+ months, or 1+ years? 

I just noticed items for listing date, new-to-old and old-to-new, in the Sort By menu.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not usually a go fast kinda guy. I like built for comfort, not for speed. I might make an exception for this...

https://scanboat.com/en/boats/details/Sejlbaad-froeken-32-daysailer-17356502

 

Sailing-boatFroeken-32-Daysailer-scanboa

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Went back a couple of months and didn't see this one posted here so, apologies if I'm duplicating someone else's objet de lust. I am truly daft to even look twice at this:  https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1931/alden-yawl-2397538.

Thing is we already have a perfectly fine 40 footer my wife and I can take out together and I, at 74, frequently single hand with the help of "Otto", has private cabins for three couples and can be raced with a fair turn of speed (PHRF of 57), so what is wrong with me? The truth is I/we all want what we don't have and what we don't have is romance, nostalgia, a relationship with something that has truly stood the test of time and our tupperware special just doesn't turn heads when she shows up at the guest dock.

Hi, my name is Kinardly and I am a boataholic.

 

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2 hours ago, kinardly said:

Went back a couple of months and didn't see this one posted here so, apologies if I'm duplicating someone else's objet de lust. I am truly daft to even look twice at this:  https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1931/alden-yawl-2397538.

Thing is we already have a perfectly fine 40 footer my wife and I can take out together and I, at 74, frequently single hand with the help of "Otto", has private cabins for three couples and can be raced with a fair turn of speed (PHRF of 57), so what is wrong with me? The truth is I/we all want what we don't have and what we don't have is romance, nostalgia, a relationship with something that has truly stood the test of time and our tupperware special just doesn't turn heads when she shows up at the guest dock.

Hi, my name is Kinardly and I am a boataholic.

 

Nothing wrong at all, K! My rule has always been that my boat must improve the view, regardless of how scenic the anchorage. Seakeeping, safety and comfort fit in on the list as well, but some of our most treasured memories are of strangers rowing up to compliment the boat, or one of the windjammers anchoring nearby and many guests line the rails  taking pics of our boat. As they say, life's too short to own an ugly boat.

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53 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

That's a beauty, all right. Excellent use of varnish!

FB- Doug

She looks beautiful and fast.  But I can't shake the feeling like I'd be sailing a piece of fine furniture.  And that I'd be paranoid about marring the finish.  But I suppose if you can afford that boat, you can afford to have someone else worry about the varnish.

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16 hours ago, Willin' said:

I'm not usually a go fast kinda guy. I like built for comfort, not for speed. I might make an exception for this...

https://scanboat.com/en/boats/details/Sejlbaad-froeken-32-daysailer-17356502

 

Sailing-boatFroeken-32-Daysailer-scanboa

I think you found my retirement boat. I've a bit of life left in me for now, but damn!

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3 hours ago, Hukilau said:

She looks beautiful and fast.  But I can't shake the feeling like I'd be sailing a piece of fine furniture.  And that I'd be paranoid about marring the finish.  But I suppose if you can afford that boat, you can afford to have someone else worry about the varnish. 

Well, I would assume a boat like this has good enough handling, and is light enough, that one could avoid most of the bash-ups. OTOH I had a fancy racing boat with rolled-in gun'ls and no rub rail for a few years. Although I treated it like a Fabergé egg, it acquired a set of nicks and gouges almost by osmosis. I would want a rubrail, fer sure. And a full canvas cover, although that would serve more to keep the peasants from ogling her too much as for protection.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:
17 hours ago, Willin' said:

I'm not usually a go fast kinda guy. I like built for comfort, not for speed. I might make an exception for this...

https://scanboat.com/en/boats/details/Sejlbaad-froeken-32-daysailer-17356502

 

Sailing-boatFroeken-32-Daysailer-scanboa

I think you found my retirement boat. I've a bit of life left in me for now, but damn!

I dunno.

You buy the boat.

Den what?

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6 minutes ago, Black Sox said:

I dunno.

You buy the boat.

Den what?

Can't yet, still racing the ocean racer. Well, paying bills on it anyway. No one is racing these days.

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, I would assume a boat like this has good enough handling, and is light enough, that one could avoid most of the bash-ups. OTOH I had a fancy racing boat with rolled-in gun'ls and no rub rail for a few years. Although I treated it like a Fabergé egg, it acquired a set of nicks and gouges almost by osmosis. I would want a rubrail, fer sure. And a full canvas cover, although that would serve more to keep the peasants from ogling her too much as for protection.

FB- Doug

You could charge the peasants too ogle. Would help pay the maintenance.

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I have discovered a way to decide if a boat is really lustworthy. If you look at it and say, ' It should be on a mooring rather than at a dock' it is lustworthy. Only docks around here though. If I remember my introductory physical geography course from 1968, moorings are common where there are submergent coastlines and docks dominate in places with emergent coastlines - I think. That was not mentioned in the course, prof was not a sailor.

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6 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

It can be at a dock - the true test is how many times you turn to look back at it as you leave.

On a mooring you get the whole picture without other stuff, like other boats, being in the way. It is about purity of vision when looking back. One advantage of rowing away from a mooring is that you are facing the right way the whole time.

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8 hours ago, Raz'r said:

I think you found my retirement boat. I've a bit of life left in me for now, but damn!

 

On 4/15/2020 at 3:50 PM, Willin' said:

I'm not usually a go fast kinda guy. I like built for comfort, not for speed. I might make an exception for this...

https://scanboat.com/en/boats/details/Sejlbaad-froeken-32-daysailer-17356502

 

Sailing-boatFroeken-32-Daysailer-scanboa

Beautiful, may need to lust after one for my mooring buoy instead of an Express 27 for daysails.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

It can be at a dock - the true test is how many times you turn to look back at it as you leave.

You've got to be careful with that looking back thing. I fell off the dock once doing that. The full story is around here somewhere.

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On 4/15/2020 at 6:50 PM, Willin' said:

I'm not usually a go fast kinda guy. I like built for comfort, not for speed. I might make an exception for this...

https://scanboat.com/en/boats/details/Sejlbaad-froeken-32-daysailer-17356502

 

Sailing-boatFroeken-32-Daysailer-scanboa

Fractional rig, tiller, narrow, no offset companionway, no runners. What's not to like?

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14 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I have discovered a way to decide if a boat is really lustworthy. If you look at it and say, ' It should be on a mooring rather than at a dock' it is lustworthy. Only docks around here though. If I remember my introductory physical geography course from 1968, moorings are common where there are submergent coastlines and docks dominate in places with emergent coastlines - I think. That was not mentioned in the course, prof was not a sailor.

Around here moorings dominate where people won't/can't spend the cash for the convenience of a dock.  Docks dominate where people have money and are prepared to spend it.  A good example was the south coast of the uk had a lot more dock proportionally when compared to the east coast.  That's changed, and now a lot of moorings on the east coast sit empty.

Obviously some paces are difficult to build docks and others tricky to lay moorings.

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On 4/16/2020 at 9:48 PM, Crash said:

Ass is too phat???  House is too far aft???  It should draw at my heartstrings, but doesn't quite.  Like a beautiful women with bad teeth...

 

Just a touch too angular.  Hard edges.  Boats should be like women, more curves.....

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4 minutes ago, FixinGit said:

Nautor Swan? 
 

Most likely a Swan 47. Its great that after all these years they register on ‘Lusting on Yachtworld’. I’m pretty sure this model came in both the bridge deck companionway, and the dual aft cockpit/bridge deck companionway setups. I used to lust after this boat, but no aft companionway was a hypothetical deal breaker for me.

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38 minutes ago, fufkin said:

Most likely a Swan 47. Its great that after all these years they register on ‘Lusting on Yachtworld’. I’m pretty sure this model came in both the bridge deck companionway, and the dual aft cockpit/bridge deck companionway setups. I used to lust after this boat, but no aft companionway was a hypothetical deal breaker for me.

I have been on a 47 that had the dual centre and aft cockpit areas each with companionways. Although from memory the aft companionway was half the size of the main centre/bridge deck access. 
The owner of the one i was allowed a tour of kept the engine area cleaner than my galley. 
Beautiful yachts, quality, inside and out. 

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Drool. My favorite shot of that gallery is image 9 of 12, looking from the front of the cockpit back towards the stern, because it emphasizes the fact that, even if I were on one of the megayachts in the deep background, I'd be aching to jump off and swim over to the sailboat.

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4 hours ago, ChrisJD said:

Drool. My favorite shot of that gallery is image 9 of 12, looking from the front of the cockpit back towards the stern, because it emphasizes the fact that, even if I were on one of the megayachts in the deep background, I'd be aching to jump off and swim over to the sailboat.

No question about that
Hood-Lyman-Morse-60-Windwalker_Cockpit_Looking_Aft.thumb.jpg.b61a82d1b08bb91f9e75d63d30ea2edf.jpg

If I breathed my last breath laying on this deck looking up at the stars, it would have been a great life.
Hood-Lyman-Morse-60-Windwalker_Looking_Fwd-deck.thumb.jpg.30d5d100b8254106145ca65bc4334ca0.jpg

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On 4/18/2020 at 11:11 PM, FixinGit said:

Nautor Swan? 
 

Yup. Swan 47. Amazingly beautiful yacht. On this one, yes the engine is cleaner than most galleys. I can't wait to get her home; damn virus.

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3 hours ago, Jules said:

If I breathed my last breath laying on this deck looking up at the stars, it would have been a great life.
Hood-Lyman-Morse-60-Windwalker_Looking_Fwd-deck.thumb.jpg.30d5d100b8254106145ca65bc4334ca0.jpg

Stunning!  You'd certainly want a full time varnish professional on staff.  

Here's one in a similar vein but more accessible - price actually looks pretty good at $135k if you like varnishing and can stomach an in-mast furling main.  

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1989/mason-44-3669482/

image.thumb.png.fa858b3a2bbbbe2c7ff6617622f97cce.png

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1 hour ago, socalrider said:

Stunning!  You'd certainly want a full time varnish professional on staff.  

Here's one in a similar vein but more accessible - price actually looks pretty good at $135k if you like varnishing and can stomach an in-mast furling main.  

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1989/mason-44-3669482/

image.thumb.png.fa858b3a2bbbbe2c7ff6617622f97cce.png

It’s a sinker.

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7 minutes ago, Matagi said:

This is very nice. It's a One-off from M&P in Northern Germany, 41 ft, from 1985.

linky ?

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11 hours ago, Jules said:

If I breathed my last breath laying on this deck looking up at the stars, it would have been a great life.

Ted’s boats have a habit of doing that for people. The following is from Yachting, describing Thomas Watson’s (second president of IBM) late-life pursuit of sailing, for which he built seven successive boats, each called Palawan, the last of which is a Hood-designed 75-footer currently for sale:

For me, sailing into the lagoon at Deception was the climax of a project that had been in the making for many years. The event that triggered it began on November 26, 1970, when I awoke in the night with a modest pain in my left side, I thought it was a touch of indigestion, drank some water and went back to sleep. ... Shortly, I found myself in the Greenwich (Conn.) hospital. One month later I was discharged, having recovered from a moderate heart attack. As a result, my life priorities were completely rearranged. Being able one day to sit on my front porch in Greenwich, look down at the boat at the dock, and say, "Well Palawan, we've done it all," would mean the fulfillment of my third dream cruise ... to follow Magellan's track to his Strait.

6886759_20181024082833222_1_XLARGE.jpg

https://www.wellingtonyachts.com/yacht-details/6886759/1991-little-harbor-custom-75?typedb=1

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21 minutes ago, ChrisJD said:

Ted’s boats have a habit of doing that for people.

6886759_20181024082833222_1_XLARGE.jpg

I don't know exactly what it is, maybe simply a fine balance of everything that makes a sailboat scream, "Sail me!"  But Ted's boats have always made my heart skip a beat.

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22 hours ago, Jules said:

Ted Hood always seem to manage to steal my heart.  First the Little Harbor series and now this: https://www.lymanmorse.com/sailing_yacht/hood-lyman-morse-60-windwalker-ii/

Hood-Lyman-Morse-60-WINDWALKER_Aerial-View-Fwd.thumb.jpg.f47d534e244a5ba91ba37c2c42094153.jpg

The cabin trunk is really quite awkward in that view.  When I shared a dock with her once, she had a Trinka 10 sailing dinghy with matching awl grip on the cabin top aft of the mast, nestled between the Dorades. Mine was tied to my stern. We had a little chat.

There are a shitload of quality boats begging for offers. A friend sea-trialed Chimaera , the 61' Hinckley-Alden not long ago. He ended up not making an offer, and instead ordered some new sails for his current ride. There are a bunch of 50'+ Little Harbors at a tiny fraction of replacement, they can't get anyone to even look at them.

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16 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

There are a bunch of 50'+ Little Harbors at a tiny fraction of replacement, they can't get anyone to even look at them.

The trouble is that even at a dime on the replacement dollar they are still a large amount of money.

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

The trouble is that even at a dime on the replacement dollar they are still a large amount of money.

No matter how good a deal you get on the purchase price, it’s really the on going bill  to keep them in good Knick ever after....

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15 hours ago, Jules said:

Love means never having to say your waterline is too short.

Ha, speaking of love, I showed SWMBO the sweet little cold-molded 32'er. 

Nope. Too small, freeboard too low. When we get to our retirement boat, just detune our Andrews, with a furler and lazy-jacks.

Smart, that girl.

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On 4/21/2020 at 8:41 AM, ChrisJD said:

Ted’s boats have a habit of doing that for people. The following is from Yachting, describing Thomas Watson’s (second president of IBM) late-life pursuit of sailing, for which he built seven successive boats, each called Palawan, the last of which is a Hood-designed 75-footer currently for sale:

For me, sailing into the lagoon at Deception was the climax of a project that had been in the making for many years. The event that triggered it began on November 26, 1970, when I awoke in the night with a modest pain in my left side, I thought it was a touch of indigestion, drank some water and went back to sleep. ... Shortly, I found myself in the Greenwich (Conn.) hospital. One month later I was discharged, having recovered from a moderate heart attack. As a result, my life priorities were completely rearranged. Being able one day to sit on my front porch in Greenwich, look down at the boat at the dock, and say, "Well Palawan, we've done it all," would mean the fulfillment of my third dream cruise ... to follow Magellan's track to his Strait.

6886759_20181024082833222_1_XLARGE.jpg

https://www.wellingtonyachts.com/yacht-details/6886759/1991-little-harbor-custom-75?typedb=1

That boat would do it for me. Huge fan of Ted Hood's work. He did not think like the herd and build heavy boats that still sailed well. Their beauty is obvious. Our Bristol 45.5 did well for us for 40k nm. Had a friend who won the Marion-Bermuda race on a Little Harbor 44 with Ted Hood onboard as crew. Before the race my friend was taking as much weight off as possible. Hood came down to the boat and told him to put it all back on. In his words, "It is supposed to be there." Of course having Ted Hood onboard didn't hurt. The man was a genius, I think the most impressive sail person of the 20th century: designer, sailmaker, sailor, inventor.

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1 hour ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Our Bristol 45.5 did well for us for 40k nm. Had a friend who won the Marion-Bermuda race on a Little Harbor 44 with Ted Hood onboard as crew. Before the race my friend was taking as much weight off as possible. Hood came down to the boat and told him to put it all back on. In his words, "It is supposed to be there."

My dad sailed the 1989 Marion-Bermuda race on his boat, a 1970s Ted Hood design (already linked further up in the thread) that's currently for sale.  My grandmother and aunt cooked two 25-pound turkeys with all the fixings, veal, pasta and God knows what else; a crew of six sailed with food for over a month.  I remember as a kid seeing the boat in Bermuda and I'd never seen so much food in one place in my life.  They didn't even bother restocking in Bermuda for the return trip.

7360517_20200214101502453_1_XLARGE[1].jpg

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1 minute ago, ChrisJD said:

My dad sailed the 1989 Marion-Bermuda race on his boat, a 1970s Ted Hood design (already linked further up in the thread) that's currently for sale.  My grandmother and aunt cooked two 25-pound turkeys with all the fixings, veal, pasta and God knows what else; a crew of six sailed with food for over a month.  I remember as a kid seeing the boat in Bermuda and I'd never seen so much food in one place in my life.  They didn't even bother restocking in Bermuda for the return trip.

7360517_20200214101502453_1_XLARGE[1].jpg

Shopping opportunities in Bermuda in 1989 were not wonderful and pricey to boot - other than Goslings and Barritts of course. One of the many neat things about Hood's boats were that they sail well and are so comfortable. When we sailed across the Indian Ocean toward South Africa we had weeks when the winds were never less than 25 knots and often 35, gusting higher and it was all wonderfully comfortable. It wasn't till later that I realized how hard that trip might have been with many boats.

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On 4/21/2020 at 1:14 AM, socalrider said:

Stunning!  You'd certainly want a full time varnish professional on staff.  

Here's one in a similar vein but more accessible - price actually looks pretty good at $135k if you like varnishing and can stomach an in-mast furling main.  

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1989/mason-44-3669482/

image.thumb.png.fa858b3a2bbbbe2c7ff6617622f97cce.png

Off centre and vane steering - both ugly and a death trap - runaway!

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