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Uyghur Muslims being led to concentration camps in China


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In the video upto 600 people most likely Uyghur muslims can be seen blindfolded, heads shaved, and hands tied behind their back. They are being let by armed guards from the station in Korla city in Xinjiang province. As some Uyghur activists have said on the backs of some of the detainees you can see it says "Kashgar detention centre" so they were likely transferred from there. Another activists identified a large scale concentration camp 40km West of this station. It is likely they may have been transferred there. You can see more on twitter @BirdsOfJannah
 
Creds for the original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGYoe...

 

 
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The video, posted to YouTube last week anonymously by War on Fear, has been verified as authentic by Nathan Ruser, a satellite analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.

Mr Ruser said by zooming in on Google Earth details like the shadow cast from a pole or the planting of bushes, he could determine the footage was shot in either April or August in 2018 at a train station west of the city of Korla.

"Through all of those methods I was able to basically verify that that video is legitimate," he told the ABC.

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-23/video-uyghurs-shaved-blindfolded-xinjiang-train-station-china/11537628

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This is all western propaganda. We have been told by our Kiwi politicians that the kindly Chinese government has built vocational training centres to help the poor Uyghur population improve themselves. The internment camps are imperialist slurs on the peaceful PRC.

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It's why we put Uighurs in Gitmo.

China is also expanding it's territory by building up seamounts into fortresses.

Hong Kong's no big deal really and I'm sure they are holding to every environmental document they ever signed.

 But, HEY, don't put any sanctions on them, it might hurt sales and hinder the rollout of the Belt and Road system. 

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6 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Uygurs vs coal.

The Australian government has made its stand.

It's environmentally and sanctimoniously sound policy.

And, you get tax credits for exporting the pollution that comes from making your consumer stuff.

 

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Alas this has been going on for ages. Here's an article from last year.

https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2018/10/15/report-china-wants-googles-help-to-persecute-uighur-minority/https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2018/10/15/report-china-wants-googles-help-to-persecute-uighur-minority/

The Chinese goverenment is not a force for good.

When was the last time you heard "free tibet"? Why did everybody just roll over on that?

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6 minutes ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

No, it's not. Those were enemy combatants. China used the pretext that this was all about terror to begin their campaign, then expanded it over the course of a decade to it's current horrible state.

@jzk running propaganda for his authoritarian prison labor buddies like a good little lick spittle.

What do we have here?  A trump supporter?  Who knew.

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3 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

No, it's not. Those were enemy combatants. China used the pretext that this was all about terror to begin their campaign, then expanded it over the course of a decade to it's current horrible state.

@jzk running propaganda for his authoritarian prison labor buddies like a good little lick spittle.

Soreass likes him some dick-taters.

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6 hours ago, Saorsa said:

It's why we put Uighurs in Gitmo.

China is also expanding it's territory by building up seamounts into fortresses.

Hong Kong's no big deal really and I'm sure they are holding to every environmental document they ever signed.

 But, HEY, don't put any sanctions on them, it might hurt sales and hinder the rollout of the Belt and Road system. 

The Uighurs are muslims from Xinjiang which borders Afghanistan and Pakistan, yes that brand of "muslim" the whole area is in "unrest" with the Chinese trying to wipe out the religion. Maybe the USA could take in the persecuted as refugees?

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  • 2 months later...
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The Global Times, China's national English language newspaper, reported on Sunday that the match would not be broadcast on CCTV 5 because Ozil's remarks had "disappointed fans and football governing authorities".

 

 

snowflakes

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8 minutes ago, B.J. Porter said:

Stephen Miller must be SO jealous.

Sounds like a horrid story that we will do nothing about as a nation.

I'm sure the UK and most of Europe will take a similar stance.:(

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2 hours ago, BravoBravo said:

Since the end of WWII...China and Russia have been and are still behind all the evil in the world....

If you actually believe so, why are you so enthusiastically in favor of Putin's butt-boy(s) taking over the USA?

 

1 hour ago, B.J. Porter said:

Stephen Miller must be SO jealous.

Sounds like a horrid story that we will do nothing about as a nation.

What do you mean, "do nothing"? We're miles ahead of the Chinese, we have private holding companies reaping massive profit from OUR 'detention centers.' And we've got a much easier system of sorting thru who gets sent there.

- DSK

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  • 5 months later...

John Bolton Plumbs the Depth of Trump’s Depravity

The former national security adviser accuses the president of putting his reelection above everything else—endorsing the persecution of China’s Uighur minority.

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“According to our interpreter, Trump said that Xi should go ahead with building the camps, which Trump thought was exactly the right thing to do.” 

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/06/john-boltons-damning-indictment-of-trump/613168/

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President Donald Trump has signed a bill that aims to punish China for its human rights abuses against the Uyghur Muslim population on the same day his former national security adviser claimed Trump told Chinese President Xi Jinping he should proceed in building detainment camps for the group.

A White House spokesman said Trump signed the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act of 2020 on Wednesday.

 

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/06/17/politics/trump-uyghur-human-rights-bolton-china/index.html

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  • 1 year later...

Terrorwashing a Genocide
 

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In 2002, the United States sent 22 Uyghur men to Guantanamo Bay, where they joined more than 700 other detainees living beyond the comforts of the Geneva Convention. The men were Chinese citizens who U.S. intelligence believed had received weapons training in Afghanistan, and the U.S. military had advertised $5,000 a head for their capture on leaflets circulated among bounty hunters in Pakistan. After their camp in Afghanistan was bombed in the early days of the American invasion, 18 of the men spent months hiding in the caves of Tora Bora, hoping to return to China. When they finally made it across the border to Pakistan, their mountain guides lured them to a mosque, where they were turned over to U.S. forces and flown to Gitmo.

Years passed. After a series of tribunals in the mid-2000s, the military concluded that none of the detained men was an enemy combatant. None could be charged with a crime under U.S. law. Until their detention, none had even heard of Al Qaeda, the great enemy of America with whom their obscure militant group was meant to be closely allied. The prisoners "only have one enemy, and that's the Chinese," one of the detainees told a tribunal in 2004. "They have been torturing us and killing us all: old, young, men, women, little children, and unborn children."

...

With the start of the war on terror, a new field of foreign "terrorism experts" in the United States and Europe began to rely on Chinese state materials on Xinjiang as part of a global assessment of terrorist groups. These "experts" often took Chinese authorities at their word about the urgent risk posed by Uyghur separatism while ignoring regional experts who for the most part viewed any separatist risk as remote. Roberts singles out one notorious target of government anxieties—the East Turkestan Independence Movement, or ETIM—for special scrutiny. This happens to be the group to which the 22 Uyghur men detained at Guantanamo allegedly belonged.

In Roberts' view, ETIM was a "phantom terrorist group." Although a group commonly identified as ETIM did release propaganda videos in the early 2000s showing a dozen men training with rifles and guns, their members never called themselves by that name, and Roberts finds little evidence that the group existed in more than the barest sense of the word. ETIM and its members performed no confirmed acts of militancy inside China or anywhere else. The group never claimed responsibility for an act of violence. And it remains virtually unknown among Uyghurs in China, with "very little if any impact inside the Uyghur homeland."

Yet in 2002, the U.S. and U.N. both declared ETIM a terrorist organization. Within two years its leader was dead and its members decimated. Since then, Chinese state media has denounced the phantom threat as the "black hand" behind almost all acts of violence in Xinjiang "for decades."

With unprecedented detail, Roberts shows how ETIM's image in the eyes of the international intelligence community went from a ragtag nonentity to a well-funded terrorist conspiracy. He provides suggestive evidence that the U.S., which initially dismissed China's claims about ETIM as politically motivated, reversed its conclusions in order to secure China's support on the U.N. Security Council in the weeks before the U.S. pleaded its case for the invasion of Iraq.

As late as December 2001, the U.S. State Department refused to accept China's branding of Uyghur dissent as a "terrorist threat"; a U.S. representative suggested at the time that "the legitimate economic and social issues that confront people in Northwestern China" should be solved "politically rather than using counterterrorism methods." By mid-2002, the story had changed. The U.S. was by then anxious to forestall any objections from China concerning its pre-emptive strikes in the Middle East. Western "experts" needed no further prompting to produce all the evidence required to treat ETIM as a significant threat to Chinese stability.

Some of these experts claimed that ETIM was underwritten by Al Qaeda, and this may have been the link that doomed them. Roberts finds no convincing evidence the connection was real. Indeed, the organization seems to have denounced 9/11 and rejected any connection to the Taliban or Al Qaeda. Even calling ETIM an "organization" appears to oversell its status, Roberts writes: "I would argue that the available information about [leader Häsän] Mäkhsum's group suggests that it was not an organization at all, but a failed attempt to create a militant movement."

The Uyghurs who ended up in Guantanamo Bay had indeed "trained" in an ETIM camp—in addition to morning jogs, there was one Kalashnikov, which they took turns shooting—but they did not appear to understand themselves as belonging to a particular militant group. Most had ended up in Afghanistan looking for a safe place to live after leaving Kyrgyzstan and Pakistan over fears they would be extradited. To be labeled a "terrorist" in the global war on terror, however, is to become a figure with no legitimate political grievances.

...

 

So ETIM suddenly became very scary when we wanted to invade Iraq. Interesting coincidence.

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  • 3 weeks later...

She Survived China's Attempt to Erase Her
 

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...

Some attribute the Chinese government's push for conformity to capitalism, and to Beijing's desire to staff its factories, increase production, and surpass the U.S. on the global stage.  But the Chinese Communist Party says its goal is to build a "Modern Socialist Country," not a capitalist one. Capitalism is about diversity and allowing citizens to prosper as individuals. It's the antithesis of coercion and uniformity. Most of the world's most successful companies were founded in the U.S. because of that freedom. Think Apple, Microsoft, Walmart, Tesla, and Facebook, which is banned in China. 

China seeks to impose one identity, culture, and language on all of its 1.37 billion people, erasing that which does not conform. When command and control societies seek to impose uniformity—from the policies of Mao to those of Lenin and Stalin—those societies inevitably abuse human rights in the process. 

Ziyawudun says that she felt as if the Chinese government set out to eradicate her culture and ethnicity.

The Chinese government has ever more sophisticated tools of surveillance at its disposal. And it allegedly provides local authorities with lists that detail how to identify extremists. In Ziyawudun's case, she says she was arrested when she returned to Xinjiang from Kazakhstan, where she had been living with her Khazak husband. She had come back to renew her visa.

Ziyawudun says she was released after her husband advocated on her behalf. She made it to the U.S. in 2020 under the protection of the Uyghur Human Rights Project, an organization that seeks to promote the rights of the Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims from Xinjiang.

Today, Ziyawudun lives in a suburb of Washington, D.C. She says that her heart aches for her family and for the Uyghurs back home, millions of whom are still being imprisoned, tortured, and surveilled in their most private spaces, including their "living rooms, dining areas, and prayer spaces," according to one report.

Although the U.S. has condemned the mistreatment of the Uyghurs, and government officials are boycotting the Beijing Olympics in protest, America has admitted zero new Uyghur refugees in the last two years. Welcoming foreigners like Ziyawudun is what has allowed the U.S. to avoid becoming a monoculture, and our diversity of thought and experience is the secret to the success of American capitalism. China's erasing of Uyghur culture and its efforts to surveil, imprison, and torture the Uyghur people in pursuit of becoming the leading global superpower isn't just morally abhorrent; it won't work. 

 

 

 

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