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Commercial Ship Admiration Anarchy


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IMO the single best looking commercial ship ever was the Nuke powered Savannah. Better looking than even most yachts.

La Merced... I admire shipwrecks. This one is in Anacortes. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/overgrown-ship-hulk

You can't fool us. We can tell those pix are from Australia.

Posted Images

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Dredge No. 4 is a wooden-hulled bucketline sluice dredge that mined placer gold on the Yukon River from 1913 until 1959. It is now located along Bonanza Creek Road 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) south of the Klondike Highway near Dawson City, Yukon, where it is preserved as one of the National Historic Sites of Canada. It is the largest wooden-hulled dredge in North America.

With its 72 large buckets, the dredge excavated gravel at the rate of 22 buckets per minute, processing 18,000 cubic yards (14,000 m3) of material per day. It was in use from late April or early May until late November each season, and sometimes throughout winter. During its operational lifetime, it captured nine tons of gold.

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8 hours ago, Zonker said:

20190925_080722.jpg

Now you're making me feel old. The "Nadon" was first of the class and I helped with the design in my early days. One is now tied up at the Vancouver Maritime Museum as a retired museum boat!

They are awesome boats. After sea trials we got a call from them somewhere near Hecate Strait. They had to slow down to 27 knots - because the seas were over 6'. We had to gently explain that was a wee bit beyond the design sea state/speed and please back off on the throttle.

 

I seem to remember hearing some rumours about severe corrosion issues on those boats - just rumours or any truth to it?

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8 hours ago, Zonker said:

20190925_080722.jpg

Now you're making me feel old. The "Nadon" was first of the class and I helped with the design in my early days. One is now tied up at the Vancouver Maritime Museum as a retired museum boat!

They are awesome boats. After sea trials we got a call from them somewhere near Hecate Strait. They had to slow down to 27 knots - because the seas were over 6'. We had to gently explain that was a wee bit beyond the design sea state/speed and please back off on the throttle.

 

I seem to remember hearing some rumours about severe corrosion issues on those boats - just rumours or any truth to it?

Edited by mayday12
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Coming into Nanaimo Julyish 2017 this thing came roaring out of the harbor.  Slow at first, just hovering over the water.  Water flying everywhere, so much so the hull was hidden by the spray, kind of freaky as we didn't know what the heck it was, was it going to gobble us up??  And loud as all get out, even from 1000 yards.  Then it slowly picked up speed as it went by til it flew out into the Strait of Georgia.  Very impressive, did I say it was loud?  Canadian Coast Guard obviously.

 

Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 8.09.45 PM.png

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Those hovercraft are pretty neat, but as you said, really loud. We watched one help out a sailor from Alaska who tried to go through the Cut at Thetis Island. The sailor ended up scrubbing the bottom of his boat while that hovercraft sat 100' feet off blowing spray and noise everywhere.

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Nice idea for a thread Norse.  Need more sailboats, wheres the tall ships? 

Here's a nifty period pic of the retired fire boat Duwamish mentioned in post #1.  And another  LInk.  Now it resides between the 1889 120' Arthur Foss Tug which maybe the oldest wood tug in the world and the 1904 130' light ship that was once stationed on the Swiftsure Bank off the coast of Washington and is the name sake of the Salish Sea's premier Sailboat Race.

 

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One more:  Steam Paddlewheeler Blumisalp, Lake Thun, Interlaken, Switzerland.  Mesmerizing watching that slow moving crank and piston rods, (I have the movie)  Note the skipper on the wing bridge using a voice pipe for commands to the engine room.  Amazing how fast the paddle wheels stopped that boat when he threw it in reverse.  Must have a lot of torque, if thats the correct term.  

Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 9.17.01 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 9.18.00 PM.png

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6 hours ago, eric1207 said:

One more:  Steam Paddlewheeler Blumisalp, Lake Thun, Interlaken, Switzerland.  Mesmerizing watching that slow moving crank and piston rods, (I have the movie)  Note the skipper on the wing bridge using a voice pipe for commands to the engine room.  Amazing how fast the paddle wheels stopped that boat when he threw it in reverse.  Must have a lot of torque, if thats the correct term.  

Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 9.17.01 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 9.18.00 PM.png

Torque is very much the correct term. Piston steam  engines have maximum torque at 0 RPM, which is why railroad steam engines don't need gears to get moving.

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9 hours ago, mayday12 said:

I seem to remember hearing some rumours about severe corrosion issues on those boats - just rumours or any truth to it?

Not sure, she was replaced by a much larger ship, about 140 ft.  The replacement has onboard accomodations for 8 or 9 crew and a couple of good sized RIBs.

I got this pic of her at a tall ships festival in Brockville.

20190927_075708.jpg

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450px-Kwasind_and_Hiawatha_-a.jpg

MV_Hiawatha_Photo.jpg

MV Hiawatha built in 1895 for the Royal Canadian Yacht Club,. Built by the Bertram Engine Works near Queen's Wharf in Toronto harbour. The oldest passenger vessel still in active service on the Great Lakes.

 

450px-Kwasind,_Royal_Canadian_Yacht_Club

M/V Kwasind is a passenger ferry built in 1912 for the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She was built by the Polson Iron Works and cost CA$13,000.

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A fun one from the “architect got drunk in a bar, and this is what happened” files... The Ship Docking Module.  Has two Z-drives, one in the “bow” and one in the “stern”, each offset opposite sides from centerline.  As such, can exert full 60 tons bollard pull in any direction.  Completely interchangeable and symmetrical bow to stern (2 sets of running lights depending on which way you’re going) and able to go dead sideways at 6 knots.  Have an offer to go for a ride someday, which I need to when I can find some time.07B171B0-C46A-4092-8D5A-E29F25B50980.thumb.jpeg.8ee7e4fd04fc368655fd9e55b39b90a3.jpeg

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23 minutes ago, KC375 said:

450px-Kwasind_and_Hiawatha_-a.jpg

MV_Hiawatha_Photo.jpg

MV Hiawatha built in 1895 for the Royal Canadian Yacht Club,. Built by the Bertram Engine Works near Queen's Wharf in Toronto harbour. The oldest passenger vessel still in active service on the Great Lakes.

 

450px-Kwasind,_Royal_Canadian_Yacht_Club

M/V Kwasind is a passenger ferry built in 1912 for the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She was built by the Polson Iron Works and cost CA$13,000.

I skippered both of them part time after college.

Wonderful boats to handle, especially the Kwasind.

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13 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Anyone remember Howard Hughs's foray into shipping?

image.png.0b8325913cc169305b0d6d78daf1650a.png

 

Sure, the Glomar Explorer.  Here sistership was the Glomar Challenger, which was the ship that began scientific ocean drilling in the late '60s.  The JOIDES Resolution was and is the successor to the Challenger.

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2 hours ago, monsoon said:

Sure, the Glomar Explorer.  Here sistership was the Glomar Challenger, which was the ship that began scientific ocean drilling in the late '60s.  The JOIDES Resolution was and is the successor to the Challenger.

And because of it we now have the “Glomar Response”.  Press got wind of this thing and asked what was going on.  The CIA, because of FOI had to say something, but any mention at all would scupper the project.  After some thinking, some anonymous agent (not so any more... he’s been interviewed) came up with “we can neither confirm nor deny...”.  And the rest is history

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4 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Torque is very much the correct term. Piston steam  engines have maximum torque at 0 RPM, which is why railroad steam engines don't need gears to get moving.

I was on one of these Thunersee boats 20 years ago...unfortunately missed the immaculate steam engine view!

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6 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Torque is very much the correct term. Piston steam  engines have maximum torque at 0 RPM, which is why railroad steam engines don't need gears to get moving.

Torque is great, but just as important is the large surface area of the wheels - they move a lot of water. Hell of a lot more surface than a propeller, even if not as efficient.

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On 9/26/2019 at 7:29 PM, mayday12 said:

I seem to remember hearing some rumours about severe corrosion issues on those boats - just rumours or any truth to it

Yes, I heard about some but was away cruising when it was referred to our office to check out so no details unfortunately. The Arneson drives have a big bronze casting and if you don't keep up with your anodes, the aluminum nearby will be attacked. Not saying that is what happened; just speculating.

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This has to be one of the weirdest vessel I was involved in designing. I was the PM. For the Caspian Sea, where drilling for oil on little artificial islands needed multiple emergency evacuation vessels in case of a sour gas (H2S) blowout and resulting super poisonous gas cloud. I present the "IBEEV" 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icebreaking_Emergency_Evacuation_Vessel

- ice breaking
- shallow draft (2m max)
- ~340 persons
- multiple airlocks
- air tight, rebreathers for pax
- blast proof resistant (notice the shutters for the wheelhouses)
- air independent propulsion (diesels ran on compressed air for 1/2 hour to get out of the gas cloud)
- twin independent engine rooms
- diesel/electric

IMG_2829-1024x682.jpg

The huge circular cutouts in the web frames were for the compressed air tanks - 600mm dia x 10m long @ 200 bar or so. Had to install the tanks before the engine rooms were closed up!

pic_ibeev_02_big.jpg

 

 

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16 hours ago, TBW said:

Not sure, she was replaced by a much larger ship, about 140 ft.  The replacement has onboard accomodations for 8 or 9 crew and a couple of good sized RIBs.

I got this pic of her at a tall ships festival in Brockville.

20190927_075708.jpg

Well, continuing with the innuendo and rumours (and thread drift) apparently those ones were certified for their designed rating, but the (some?) crew have demanded they not operate in rough seas due to the "very uncomfortable" ride they experience. Apparently it's being "reviewed".

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11 hours ago, Zonker said:

This has to be one of the weirdest vessel I was involved in designing. I was the PM. For the Caspian Sea, where drilling for oil on little artificial islands needed multiple emergency evacuation vessels in case of a sour gas (H2S) blowout and resulting super poisonous gas cloud. I present the "IBEEV" 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icebreaking_Emergency_Evacuation_Vessel

- ice breaking
- shallow draft (2m max)
- ~340 persons
- multiple airlocks
- air tight, rebreathers for pax
- blast proof resistant (notice the shutters for the wheelhouses)
- air independent propulsion (diesels ran on compressed air for 1/2 hour to get out of the gas cloud)
- twin independent engine rooms
- diesel/electric

IMG_2829-1024x682.jpg

The huge circular cutouts in the web frames were for the compressed air tanks - 600mm dia x 10m long @ 200 bar or so. Had to install the tanks before the engine rooms were closed up!

pic_ibeev_02_big.jpg

 

 

Fascinating solution, but....   it seems to me that by the time the 'cloud' is that big, notifying, evacuating, loading folks aboard takes time.  Be a miracle if it would also have been able to avoid an ignition source as well.  But, it's good for the safety engineers,  "...at least we tried...."

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I used to drone back and forth over Puget sound multiple times per day.  I enjoyed studying the wakes of the various commercial craft coming and going from the ports of Seattle and Tacoma.

My favorite was the Orca Class Ship(s?) operated by TOTE.  Admired for it's very small wake and (I assume) efficient operation.

jrZjAap.jpg

  

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8 hours ago, Veeger said:

Fascinating solution, but....   it seems to me that by the time the 'cloud' is that big, notifying, evacuating, loading folks aboard takes time.  Be a miracle if it would also have been able to avoid an ignition source as well.  But, it's good for the safety engineers,  "...at least we tried...."

They also had airtight refuges on shore - with airtight gangways that would mate to the ship. In the event of a gas cloud release you run to the refuges. If they can't contain the blowout, then you evacuate to the ships.

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49 minutes ago, Zonker said:

They also had airtight refuges on shore - with airtight gangways that would mate to the ship. In the event of a gas cloud release you run to the refuges. If they can't contain the blowout, then you evacuate to the ships.

Suddenly Alberta’s tar sands start to seem competitive alternative.

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2 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

This is off-topic, but I'd like to ask this question of the assembled brain-power: What are the diagonal pipe structures on the top sides of some British and German battleships of the WW1 era?

2019-09-28_2052.png

I think they were for rigging anti-mine net defenses when in harbor

 

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

They also had airtight refuges on shore - with airtight gangways that would mate to the ship. In the event of a gas cloud release you run to the refuges. If they can't contain the blowout, then you evacuate to the ships.

Must have been some REALLY sour crude in that field.  H2S is deadly and when you can smell it, you're dead---or about to be.  I don't think you could pay me enough to work that field.

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Hmm... Torpedo net... OK. But why would a Nuevo Sternwheeler/Tourist Hauler have them?  I think they're wood 4 x 12's or such and attached to the boat with a little chain at the upper end and the bottom end rests in a bracket.  One of these days, it'll bug me enough to hail them and ask.

 

Sternwheeler-Side.jpg

CGSBOW.jpg

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1 hour ago, toddster said:

Hmm... Torpedo net... OK. But why would a Nuevo Sternwheeler/Tourist Hauler have them?  I think they're wood 4 x 12's or such and attached to the boat with a little chain at the upper end and the bottom end rests in a bracket.  One of these days, it'll bug me enough to hail them and ask.

 

Sternwheeler-Side.jpg

 

I think those are lock fenders.

20190929_164503.jpg

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Hmm.  A good possibility, but I don't quite see how it would work - there is a 3-4 foot wide side deck below the things, so if lifted out of the brackets, they would drape diagonally to/over the edge of the deck.  That boat does go through the Bonneville locks every day.  In fact, that's where I first noticed the timbers, when I locked through with them.  Didn't seem to be in use that day.  They seem to use tires like everyone else...

My best guess was "decorations."  But they don't seem to be particularly attractive decorations.  Maybe it's just me.

CGS_LOG.jpg

MG_1412.jpg

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A (crazy) friend getting up close and personal with some of the Big Boys in SF.  :o  I stayed under the pier and away from the prop.  

These were taken 10 years ago, so I'm pretty sure I'm safely past any statute of limitations on maritime trespassing.  :P

 

1) Found a cruise ship in dry dock.  We were able to paddle right up/under it.  I wish I could find the photo I took from under the bow.  It was pretty cool!  

39654_138097276227557_2117226_n.jpg

2) My perspective, looking out from under cover as my friend inspected the hull of a car hauler at Pier 50.

37965_138106242893327_2758522_n.jpg

3) His perspective, looking back at me, hiding under the pier where I felt relatively safe. 

37965_138106246226660_7282574_n.jpg

4) It's amazing how wide these ships are.  The side of the ship is touching the pier behind him.  

39785_138537716183513_797122_n.jpg

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1 hour ago, toddster said:

Hmm.  A good possibility, but I don't quite see how it would work - there is a 3-4 foot wide side deck below the things, so if lifted out of the brackets, they would drape diagonally to/over the edge of the deck.  That boat does go through the Bonneville locks every day.  In fact, that's where I first noticed the timbers, when I locked through with them.  Didn't seem to be in use that day.  They seem to use tires like everyone else...

My best guess was "decorations."  But they don't seem to be particularly attractive decorations.  Maybe it's just me.

CGS_LOG.jpg

MG_1412.jpg

Heres a pic of an old canal steamer (non replica) built in the 1880s.  I think the replica boats are trying to copy the style of the old river/canal boats.

20190929_174133.jpg.e7dee854ff1722f9e325edcf3ad573e5.jpg

Some locks don't permit the use of tires.  Here is a screenshot of the Fenders section in the St Lawrence Seaway Handbook.

20190929_173717.thumb.jpg.e608e1c8f213a947e3bdb16cfa9ba86a.jpg

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Yep, seems obvious now.  Totally decorative Old-TImey-Look™ fake fenders.  Since they seemed to have a mechanism, I was always trying to figure out how they could actually be used for something.  

Permanent all-round fenders?  What a concept!  Makes too much sense to actually do.  Someone took a big chunk out of a bridge pylon last year in the middle of the night and nobody saw nothin!  

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On 9/29/2019 at 8:19 AM, Priscilla said:

Talking bows USS Alarm.

Fully submersed paddle wheel , torpedo on a prod what’s not to like.BA83479A-BDD9-4C7C-A74D-1FC42B9E298F.jpeg.53d1773dad1c74f7d2dab9fe6815d079.jpeg775D45BE-E9D3-4546-8757-ECEF97C9B4B5.thumb.jpeg.a3318ed90616a5a19b79a5c8c938dcae.jpeg

 

An early rendition of one of these:

VSPreal.jpg

A Voith Schneider Propeller.

voith-schneider-propulsion.JPG

u8q7DXH02_Z1cJGvweoW7JKLBv3txgbHta1H2yT2

Used in tugs, research vessels and anything else that needs near instant 360 degree thrust.

Like Z-drives, really expensive to run aground.

Also sounds like some sort of SciFi spaceship space folding engine.... "We are positioned for the jump.  Activate the Voith Schneider drive, NOW!!!"

- Stumbling

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Two of the largest ferry fleets in the world here are in the PNW, with Washington State having the second largest volume in the world and BC Ferries having the second most vessels in the fleet.

BC Ferries Celebrates Over 50 Years of Service | BC Ferries - British Columbia Ferry Services Inc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BC_Ferries

This Week in History: 1961: The province takes over Black Ball Ferries | Vancouver Sun

 

Funny how non boating people love their ferries, especially the older ones.

The pic below is our local ferry, the oldest in the fleet at 61 years, the North Island Princess, pictured below busting some serious weather crossing the Malaspina. The ship was stretched and widened in a refit and the little cat became known as the Playtex Princess. The only cat hull in the fleet, after the Fast Cats were sold.

http://www.westcoastferries.ca/ferries/bcferries/northislandprincess.html

She still serves the public admirably but will soon be replaced by a diesel electric ship, as BC and WA ferries convert their fleets. A charging station will be built where she berths at Blubber Bay, as she is docked there for the night, as Westview is too open to the winter storms. Many will mourn her passing including me.

BC Ferries moving to electric-powered ships

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_retired_BC_Ferries_ships

'Ferry Tales' | The Tyee

BC-Ferry-vessel.jpg

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On 9/29/2019 at 7:27 PM, toddster said:

Yep, seems obvious now.  Totally decorative Old-TImey-Look™ fake fenders.  Since they seemed to have a mechanism, I was always trying to figure out how they could actually be used for something.  

Permanent all-round fenders?  What a concept!  Makes too much sense to actually do.  Someone took a big chunk out of a bridge pylon last year in the middle of the night and nobody saw nothin!  

I could be wrong but I seem to remember, from a tour 15 years ago, of the S.S. Klondike Riverboat that these were part of a system to support and lever the boat over sandbars in the river, used along with the "Grasshopper Poles" on the bow.  I can't find any info on the technique for these spars on the sides of the boats but the Yukon River Steamboats had them and there were no locks there to navigate through.  On the Klondike they seem too far in from the sides of the hull in their storage position to be fenders but they may still be used as fenders of sorts.

Plan-your-visit-banner-Mueller.jpg?modif

"When a steamer ran aground on shoals, sand bars or muddy river bottom, the "spars" were utilized which were stiff wooden poles set down into the river bottom. A wire cable connected the spars to the derrick and then with a winch at the capstan. When the wire was taught, the boat was lifted up and out of the mud and forward towards the river waters. At the same time the paddewheel would churn sand and water, aiming to propel the ship ahead. Such a navigational feat was referred to as the "grasshopper". 

You can see the S.S. Klondike's Grasshopper Poles and their rigging in the photo below:

ss-klondike-whitehorse.jpg

 

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22 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

Two of the largest ferry fleets in the world here are in the PNW, with Washington State having the second largest volume in the world and BC Ferries having the second most vessels in the fleet.

I remember when B.C. Ferries used to say they were the "12th largest Navy in the world". :D

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3 hours ago, Salazar said:

I could be wrong but I seem to remember, from a tour 15 years ago, of the S.S. Klondike Riverboat that these were part of a system to support and lever the boat over sandbars in the river, used along with the "Grasshopper Poles" on the bow.  I can't find any info on the technique for these spars on the sides of the boats but the Yukon River Steamboats had them and there were no locks there to navigate through.  On the Klondike they seem too far in from the sides of the hull in their storage position to be fenders but they may still be used as fenders of sorts.

 

"When a steamer ran aground on shoals, sand bars or muddy river bottom, the "spars" were utilized which were stiff wooden poles set down into the river bottom. A wire cable connected the spars to the derrick and then with a winch at the capstan. When the wire was taught, the boat was lifted up and out of the mud and forward towards the river waters. At the same time the paddewheel would churn sand and water, aiming to propel the ship ahead. Such a navigational feat was referred to as the "grasshopper". 

You can see the S.S. Klondike's Grasshopper Poles and their rigging in the photo below:

 

 

I'd quite like to see that!  

Also a bit reminiscent of "drying legs" carried by some sailboats.  But they seem to be mounted too high and inboard for most of these proposed uses...

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29 minutes ago, toddster said:

I'd quite like to see that!  

Also a bit reminiscent of "drying legs" carried by some sailboats.  But they seem to be mounted too high and inboard for most of these proposed uses...

Here is another description of the process: 

 

"Sparring", "walking the boat" or "grass-hoppering"

Sparring was a means of actually lifting the bow of a steamboat as if on crutches, up and off a sand bar with stout spars, block and tackle, and the use of the paddle wheels to lift and move the boat through successive stages, over the bar. This booming a boat off a bar was by it's very action know as "walking the boat" and "grass-hoppering." Two long sturdy spars were forced forward from the bow on each side of the boat into the sand of the bar at a high degree of angle. Near the end of each spar a block was fastened with a strong rope or hawser passing through the pulleys which went down through a pair of similar blocks secured on the deck near the bow. The end of each hawser went to a capstan, which when turned would tighten and with its weight on the spars, slightly lift the bow of the boat. Engaging the paddle wheels forward and by the placement of the spars caused a lifting of the bow off the sand bar and moving the boat ahead perhaps a few feet. This was laborious and dangerous work for the crew even with a steam driven capstan. 

https://books.google.ca/books?id=tsanyZWcqMEC&pg=PA254&lpg=PA254&dq=spars+for+grounded+river+boat&source=bl&ots=HwVifSkRAP&sig=ACfU3U3vOga3R-CoNDLN5J_fqCGeD_q7Xg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj-7oL9-_3kAhWLUt8KHTJyC9oQ6AEwCnoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=spars for grounded river boat&f=false

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4 hours ago, Salazar said:

I could be wrong but I seem to remember, from a tour 15 years ago, of the S.S. Klondike Riverboat that these were part of a system to support and lever the boat over sandbars in the river, used along with the "Grasshopper Poles" on the bow.  I can't find any info on the technique for these spars on the sides of the boats but the Yukon River Steamboats had them and there were no locks there to navigate through.  On the Klondike they seem too far in from the sides of the hull in their storage position to be fenders but they may still be used as fenders of sorts.

Plan-your-visit-banner-Mueller.jpg?modif

"When a steamer ran aground on shoals, sand bars or muddy river bottom, the "spars" were utilized which were stiff wooden poles set down into the river bottom. A wire cable connected the spars to the derrick and then with a winch at the capstan. When the wire was taught, the boat was lifted up and out of the mud and forward towards the river waters. At the same time the paddewheel would churn sand and water, aiming to propel the ship ahead. Such a navigational feat was referred to as the "grasshopper". 

You can see the S.S. Klondike's Grasshopper Poles and their rigging in the photo below:

ss-klondike-whitehorse.jpg

 

Love those Yukon stories. Sternwheelers: The Yukon River - Yukon Archives Online Exhibit - English

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How about USS LST-510, now operating daily for the Cross Sound Ferry Company between Orient Point and New London as the "Cape Henlopen." Landed troops and armor during the Normandy invasion, made multiple transatlantic crossings, with a long and interesting commercial career. She may be the only D-Day veteran ship still in active service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_LST-510

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10 hours ago, Grizz said:

How about USS LST-510, now operating daily for the Cross Sound Ferry Company between Orient Point and New London as the "Cape Henlopen." Landed troops and armor during the Normandy invasion, made multiple transatlantic crossings, with a long and interesting commercial career. She may be the only D-Day veteran ship still in active service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_LST-510

Neat ship with interesting history. Hoping she can still sport her Battle Star

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I admire that the bow is still on there... see no8 on the list. https://www.hotcars.com/pictures-of-boats-too-ugly-for-the-water/

" Pizza freaks need look no further. Called one of the ugliest ships to ever exist by more than a few sites, the Ramform Titan is unabashedly ugly in a way that only its shipyard mother could truly love. But that’s OK, as the massive—and we mean really massive ship—needs to have this pizza-slice shape in order to maximize stability on the water. The Titan is a seismic ship, designed to monitor all sorts of seismic movements underwater. Titan launched in 2013 and is more than 341 feet long and almost 230 feet at its widest point, making it easily the widest ship in the world. It’s very interesting that it can be fully navigated with just two propellers, if need be. "

https://www.pgs.com/globalassets/fleet/ramform/pgs_ramformtitan_pgs02166_rgb_860x484px.jpg

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HSS Stena Carisma (aka Stena Express)

She used to run between Gothenburg in Sweden and Fredrikshavn in Denmark. Powered by two gas turbines turning a jet drive each. She hasn't moved for over six years now due to rising oil prices and from what I've been able to gather locals here in Gothenburg are rejoicing. The exhaust from the gas turbines used to create oil films on the windows of buildings near the river and the wash from the jet drives (each apparently pumping over 1000 cubic ft/second) were a nightmare for any boat tied up in the river.

This first picture is in her current state, I don't know if the weird trim is because they've taken stuff out of her or because her tanks are pumped dry. Nevertheless she doesn't get much love, I've seen a broken window and she's covered in bird shit. The second picture is from sometime before 2013, you can see the crazy jet wash as well as how thin those hulls are - always surprises me about boats like this how low the underwater volume looks to be compared to a monohull.

Capture1.thumb.JPG.6644edd69e5ab4751fe27eec3303dcf6.JPG

 

Capture2.thumb.JPG.31dcd1b23b1845961c93bd7b75aa291c.JPG

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3 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

I admire that the bow is still on there... see no8 on the list. https://www.hotcars.com/pictures-of-boats-too-ugly-for-the-water/

" Pizza freaks need look no further. Called one of the ugliest ships to ever exist by more than a few sites, the Ramform Titan is unabashedly ugly in a way that only its shipyard mother could truly love. But that’s OK, as the massive—and we mean really massive ship—needs to have this pizza-slice shape in order to maximize stability on the water. The Titan is a seismic ship, designed to monitor all sorts of seismic movements underwater. Titan launched in 2013 and is more than 341 feet long and almost 230 feet at its widest point, making it easily the widest ship in the world. It’s very interesting that it can be fully navigated with just two propellers, if need be. "

https://www.pgs.com/globalassets/fleet/ramform/pgs_ramformtitan_pgs02166_rgb_860x484px.jpg

 

UglyShip.jpg

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Back in 2000 we tried out the HSC Max Mols as a Newfoundland Ferry Service between North Sydney and Channel-Port aux Basques for Marine Atlantic.

Introduced on charter during the summer season to evaluate whether a high speed catamaran vessel was suitable for the Cabot Strait crossing, the vessel could travel at speeds of up to 48 knots. With the ability to carry 780 passengers and 200 cars, the 5617 tonne vessel helped increase capacity during the summer period. Scheduled to be in service for one summer in advance of the arrival of the MV Leif Ericson to the service, the HSC Max Mols wasn’t popular with many customers who complained of seasickness due to the increased speeds and movement during the crossing, as well as the vessel’s unsuitability to environmental conditions in the Cabot Strait.  She was a bit of a curiosity though, and some customers just did a walk on and made the round trip the same day so they could see what riding a CAT was like.  The CAT did shave some time off what is normally a 5 to 6 hour crossing if conditions were good.

(not my photo, found online)

9176058r.jpg

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4 hours ago, Norse Horse said:

I admire that the bow is still on there... see no8 on the list. https://www.hotcars.com/pictures-of-boats-too-ugly-for-the-water/

" Pizza freaks need look no further. Called one of the ugliest ships to ever exist by more than a few sites, the Ramform Titan is unabashedly ugly in a way that only its shipyard mother could truly love. But that’s OK, as the massive—and we mean really massive ship—needs to have this pizza-slice shape in order to maximize stability on the water. The Titan is a seismic ship, designed to monitor all sorts of seismic movements underwater. Titan launched in 2013 and is more than 341 feet long and almost 230 feet at its widest point, making it easily the widest ship in the world. It’s very interesting that it can be fully navigated with just two propellers, if need be. "

https://www.pgs.com/globalassets/fleet/ramform/pgs_ramformtitan_pgs02166_rgb_860x484px.jpg

Looks like they forgot to open the rest of the design pages that had the rest off the ship construction on them.