futravu

Burial Boat - X-332 or Elan 333?

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For many years my wonderful, beautiful Dutch wife (no, I’m not a newbie and won’t) has been understanding and patient with my passion for increasing wet, spartan, deep-draft go-fast racy boats, and I am now considering something smaller, cosy and comfy, and sensible for weekends away.  It needs to look the part but also fit the bill for the occasional Dutch/UK shorthanded coastal and offshore race, in both ORC and IRC.  Think of the first VW GTI, which I had the pleasure to own, way back in the last century.  

In Holland this is also referred to as the ‘burial boat’, in some cases recognizing the sailor is getting on in years, but also for the symbolic burial of the hardcore racing schedule.  We’ll keep the go-fast boat a little while longer, but the missus deserves this and I may just get used to it.

The forum is already rich with drool lists and heady debate on the topic, and as an incurable boat romantic I tend fall hard and see the beautiful side of nearly every vessel -- you know how a person can look lovely in just the right light (or through the bottom of a pint glass), or no matter their shape, in the heat of passion you can always find something nice to hold on to?  Perhaps giving away my vintage, there are those of us who still see that come-hither look in a lumpy and aged IOR boat.  After much falling in and out of lust and love, we have a short short list.

Given price considerations the shortlist includes a larger, long-unloved boat that would be a maddeningly fun project, and for purposes of this thread we have a lightly raced and somewhat tired X-332, and a less familiar Elan 333 in better cosmetic shape. I expect this will not get most of your pulses racing, but   happy to hear your experiences, preferences, weakness, tales of yore, unfounded prejudices, and wild hyperbole.

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Between the two: X.

Winner 10.10 might fit the bill.

Elans are often worn out from charter, cheap ones only in Croatia. 

If a bit bigger is ok, look for an Omega 36.

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Boats with an x in their name tend to win races. 

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It’s like tits, noob

You have to choose the one that’s right for you

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The X332 was very competitive in IRC in the noughties, so I imagine that for the occasional race it would still be good nowadays.

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1 hour ago, NORBowGirl said:

Boats with an x in their name tend to win races. 

Mac 26X ?

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4 hours ago, NORBowGirl said:

Boats with an x in their name tend to win races. 

Tough boats too.....the quality is there  That's for certain. Anything with "X" in it is a keeper. If you can't make it work on the racecourse you're doing it wrong.

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7 hours ago, futravu said:

For many years my wonderful, beautiful Dutch wife (no, I’m not a newbie and won’t) has been understanding and patient with my passion for increasing wet, spartan, deep-draft go-fast racy boats, and I am now considering something smaller, cosy and comfy, and sensible for weekends away.  It needs to look the part but also fit the bill for the occasional Dutch/UK shorthanded coastal and offshore race, in both ORC and IRC.  Think of the first VW GTI, which I had the pleasure to own, way back in the last century.  

In Holland this is also referred to as the ‘burial boat’, in some cases recognizing the sailor is getting on in years, but also for the symbolic burial of the hardcore racing schedule.  We’ll keep the go-fast boat a little while longer, but the missus deserves this and I may just get used to it.

The forum is already rich with drool lists and heady debate on the topic, and as an incurable boat romantic I tend fall hard and see the beautiful side of nearly every vessel -- you know how a person can look lovely in just the right light (or through the bottom of a pint glass), or no matter their shape, in the heat of passion you can always find something nice to hold on to?  Perhaps giving away my vintage, there are those of us who still see that come-hither look in a lumpy and aged IOR boat.  After much falling in and out of lust and love, we have a short short list.

Given price considerations the shortlist includes a larger, long-unloved boat that would be a maddeningly fun project, and for purposes of this thread we have a lightly raced and somewhat tired X-332, and a less familiar Elan 333 in better cosmetic shape. I expect this will not get most of your pulses racing, but   happy to hear your experiences, preferences, weakness, tales of yore, unfounded prejudices, and wild hyperbole.

X-332 is a great boat, it's a wolf in sheep's clothing.

There are 2 on LIS that I know of 1 of them I sailed on, one is owned by a guy with a clew and does real well and one is owned by someone CLUELESS and does not do well.

A matter of fact most of his competitors are thankful he comes out, so they don't have to worry about getting last.

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4 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

It’s like tits, noob

You have to choose the one that’s right for you

 One?

 

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1 hour ago, VWAP said:

 One?

 

I’m a twin.
It was tough competition.

 

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2 hours ago, Crash said:

Like most here, I'd say go with the X.  If the current one fits the bill, but is a little rough, why not wait till a good one shows up?

Yachtmarket shows 9 for sail in Europe:

https://www.theyachtmarket.com/boats/sailing-boats/x-yachts/x-332/

I think you might get an excellent deal on the UK based ones. But you'd have to move them within the next 14 days or so...

Actually, only looking at the numbers, both the X and the Elan aren't that far apart, just 0.01 or so in IRC, if I recall correctly.

So a looked-after Elan might be not so bad after all, here is a polar of examples of them under ORC (credit: https://jieter.github.io

image.png.0916659fc1c0ed3f377a00f1efcf9487.png

image.png.46a5f1a80cb5a74a8c8251a76b8b85ac.png

 

 

image.png

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Ohh... is it the Elan in Lelystad? If yes, she looks great. Especially below waterline, she looks like new. I've changed my mind.

If not, I'll send you the link, you should see her.

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Take the missus to the Elan chateau for the weekend then a tour of the factory and ask her about boats a few weeks later, as we sailed on a Lagoon my missus kept spotting the Elan’s

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I chartered an Elan this summer, a 2006 384.

For a 13 year old charter boat it was in really good shape, we had one day of beating into ~25 kts true and the amount of squeaking and groaning below decks was very limited. She had leaky hatches in the forward cabin and the main salon and (I think, as a result of that,) some squeaky floorboards in the saloon area. To be fair both hatches were missing one out of four handles so that's probably why they leaked. The boat had in-mast furling main and furling genoa from a sail manufacturer I've never heard of, "Dustom Sails". On the last day with maybe 7-10 kts true we tacked through 75-85 degrees with acceptable speed if memory serves me right. She had an array of cosmetic "problems", no doubt due to her hard (and surprisingly long) life as a charter boat, but the basic structure seemed fine, all the doors closed and the bilge was dry (until we overfilled the watertanks which apparently had their overflow routed into the bilge as opposed to overboard).

Long story short she seemed like a solidly built boat. We didn't really have any big dramas at all, at least none that could be traced back to Elan themselves. A bunch of things were broken or broke during our week of sailing but I'm pretty sure that was because of bad maintenance and not bad build quality. After all, she had been maintained by a company who, with a group of five people at hand couldn't tell the difference between a log transducer and a depth/temp one, and in an attempt to fix the broken depth sounder they swapped the log and put the replacement one in with the "forward" arrow pointing towards the starboard aft corner of the boat, resulting in us having neither log nor depth when we set off...

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My first thought when reading the OP on the FP (yes there is)

Was X332... 

But I'm biased I would like one myself... Good looking, slippery and spacious, but most importantly small enough to singlehand with confidence.. 

I love the x412, but in the words of my former admiral "you can put up any sail you like, IF I don't have to be involved AND it doesn't block the sun"

I think the 332 fits the bill...

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