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Vendee Globe 2020

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Having my first coffee and what do I see? Boris in 3rd! It seems the boats positioned further offshore / to the east had better and more stable winds. The speed difference between Boris (15.21 nds) and Damien (13.06 nds) is the advantage a foiling boat has over the older generation in these kind of conditions.

Go Boris, bring it home!

Next obstacle are passing recife, and then the doldrums, just see how crucial gitana ultime is suffering right now...

 

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image.png.ffed9b7c94ed9fecc2845da1283ad4f9.png

EruDQBNXMAAk_l1_s.jpg.9c41a5d41864cc62b3f686bb43da53cf.jpg

https://twitter.com/VoileMACSF/status/1349817135057563648

"[INFO DU BORD] After crossing a front this AM, Isa crossed her path, symbolically completing her round the world tour at 17h30HF. This stage, even though it was completed out of competition, is a great balm to the heart of the skipper*, who has found milder temperatures again. Now towards Brazil!"

* or "great feeling for the skipper", or "great achievement for the skipper", etc. The original "met du baume au cœur de la skipper" was tricky to translate.

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28 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Having my first coffee and what do I see? Boris in 3rd! It seems the boats positioned further offshore / to the east had better and more stable winds. The speed difference between Boris (15.21 nds) and Damien (13.06 nds) is the advantage a foiling boat has over the older generation in these kind of conditions.

Go Boris, bring it home!

Next obstacle are passing recife, and then the doldrums, just see how crucial gitana ultime is suffering right now...

 

Honestly, even if i really like Boris, that would be a bit sad if he manages to win the Vendée, he's not of the same bread of Charlie or Yannick, just happened to be luckier than them.

Charlie should be flying on top, the meteo disfavoured the leaders in this edition and Charlie had really bad luck with his foil.

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43 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Both Charlie and Thomas have some amount of foil damage. Louis does not.

Boris has the biggest undamaged foils if you consider the boats at the lead. And he has time compensations.

Charlie and Thomas sadly can't use their boats at their full potential, 

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8 minutes ago, cortosam said:

Honestly, even if i really like Boris, that would be a bit sad if he manages to win the Vendée, he's not of the same bread of Charlie or Yannick, just happened to be luckier than them.

Charlie should be flying on top, the meteo disfavoured the leaders in this edition and Charlie had really bad luck with his foil.

I think Boris also had his fare share of bad luck with the weather. Remember the restart at the beginning of the Pacific, where he parked up like Yannick now. Louis Burton would not be in the lead without that weather pattern. And is Charlies foil damage just bad luck, or did he just pushed too hard - compared to Boris, who tried to preserve his material (and still do so) consequently?

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On 1/6/2021 at 6:31 PM, tato said:

hello @Herman !
Regarding synoptic charts, here you can find it from Marinha do Brasil: https://www.marinha.mil.br/chm/dados-do-smm-cartas-sinoticas/cartas-sinoticas

Sat images (goes16): http://satelite.cptec.inpe.br/acervo/goes16.formulario.logic?i=en

I'd like to say thank you for the wx updates you post, I'm following your steps with opencpn and have been learning a lot in the process. 

Cheers,

Renato
 

Thank you very much Renato, appreciated!

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58 minutes ago, cortosam said:

Honestly, even if i really like Boris, that would be a bit sad if he manages to win the Vendée, he's not of the same bread of Charlie or Yannick, just happened to be luckier than them.

Charlie should be flying on top, the meteo disfavoured the leaders in this edition and Charlie had really bad luck with his foil.

 
 

Hard to agree with this - Boris has managed to stay in touch with the leaders while appearing to take an incredibly relaxed attitude to the race. That's impressive in itself. If he's made it to here with his boat in better shape that's not luck alone (though he has had mainsail issues at least). As of 0800GMT looks like he's 1st when the redress is taken into account and sailing 1-2kts faster than Charlie and Louis. Wouldn't bet against him right now... But equally wouldn't be surprised if any of the top 6 came throughh and won.

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1 hour ago, b3nharris said:

Hard to agree with this - Boris has managed to stay in touch with the leaders while appearing to take an incredibly relaxed attitude to the race. That's impressive in itself. If he's made it to here with his boat in better shape that's not luck alone (though he has had mainsail issues at least). As of 0800GMT looks like he's 1st when the redress is taken into account and sailing 1-2kts faster than Charlie and Louis. Wouldn't bet against him right now... But equally wouldn't be surprised if any of the top 6 came throughh and won.

Weather favoured the guys behind, it's as simple as that.

Giancarlo Pedote had the same boat as Boris, he would be in the same place as Boris.

He has 6 hours free of time bonus, because  of the weather every leaders got stuck at the end. Same for Bestaven who has a good compensation but was very unlucky with the weather.

Breaking a foil as happened to Thomas or Charlie is purely bad luck.

 

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16 minutes ago, cortosam said:

Breaking a foil as happened to Thomas or Charlie is purely bad luck.

UFO damage yes, I agree - damage from spending too long in the 'red zone', no.

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18 minutes ago, cortosam said:

Weather favoured the guys behind, it's as simple as that.

Giancarlo Pedote had the same boat as Boris, he would be in the same place as Boris.

He has 6 hours free of time bonus, because  of the weather every leaders got stuck at the end. Same for Bestaven who has a good compensation but was very unlucky with the weather.

Breaking a foil as happened to Thomas or Charlie is purely bad luck.

 

Can't remember what happened to APIVIA, but LinkedOut's foil failed without collision AFAIK - so down to design or construction. Not purely bad luck.
Don't think anybody ends up in the top 3 of the Vendee at any point by luck alone - and that includes being able to get sponsors on board and get a competitive boat. It's all part of the job.

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1 hour ago, cortosam said:

Weather favoured the guys behind, it's as simple as that.

Giancarlo Pedote had the same boat as Boris, he would be in the same place as Boris.

He has 6 hours free of time bonus, because  of the weather every leaders got stuck at the end. Same for Bestaven who has a good compensation but was very unlucky with the weather.

Breaking a foil as happened to Thomas or Charlie is purely bad luck.

 

Hitting a UFO is bad luck, but saying Pedote would match Boris in a comparable boat and it's all abour the weather is just superficial. There are obviously so many more factors involved.

Considering only the effect of sail choices on the performance when foiling or not foiling (see Stief’s post #10885 above) plus the efficiency of the foils in certain wind strengths and sea states there are plenty of reasons why Boris would excel right now that have little to do with chance.

During this VG one can also witness, probably better than ever, the impact of the physical and mental condition of the skippers on their performance, Boris probably allowed the most frequent and open insights in that respect. However that doesn't mean other skippers are constantly able to deliver a top performance. They too will have ups and downs that affect their performance.They are simply not as outspoken about it. The last clips by Yannick show how he suffered physically and mentally from the fickle conditions he encountered. That might have taken a toll and explain his present speed. The damaged foils/foil casing will have an effect, but it’s hard to judge from here how great that is. Charlie was doing 16 kn only yesterday.

Weather prediction is an essential part of the race. We will never know, how much luck was involved in Yannick's 400 nm lead a week ago. He made a choice to go closer to the Brazilian coast than the others. They took advantage of his misfortune – or his disadvantageous decision. Take your pick. It’s a sail boat race. Nailing the next shift can make a fool look like a genius and the other way around. The genius will nail it more often but not always.

There are so many more factors. Boris statement in his recent video relates only to the sail choice and trim and explains why one boat might have a 3-5 knot advantage over another in the same conditions, if the skipper is more active in adjusting to even little changes in wind direction and speed.

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Having said that, I wouldn't be surprised to learn that Yannick has a technical problem...

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An often quoted statement is that the boat that wins is the one that makes less mistakes than the others. That can mean many things in a VG race and that includes all the choices both before and during the race.

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Favourite fan formula: When leader = MY FAV, then POS(Total - 1) = skill. When leader = OTHER, then POS (Total -1) = luck.

Works for all isms (nationalism, design choiceism, sexism, racism, Port-la-Forêtism, etc)

E.g.:  see what happens if MY FAV = JLC or Damien. 

Also known as the 'shoulda coulda woulda' formula. Or the FFS.

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

Favourite fan formula: When leader = MY FAV, then POS(Total - 1) = skill. When leader = OTHER, then POS (Total -1) = luck.

Works for all isms (nationalism, design choiceism, sexism, racism, Port-la-Forêtism, etc)

E.g.:  see what happens if MY FAV = JLC or Damien. 

Also known as the 'shoulda coulda woulda' formula. Or the FFS.

I'm saving this in the archives, well done!  :lol:

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Good to have you back Herman. Guessed you saw how forecasts were changing faster by the hour and so taking a few hours to prepare one would be futile. Looking forward to post doldrums when the models might be less volatile.

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7 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

Hope Kojiro has a good alarm set...

5 hours away at 14 knots. I think I slept less than that last night :D

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1 minute ago, Snowden said:

5 hours away at 14 knots. I think I slept less than that last night :D

Perhaps I should have checked the scale first... 

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Looking forward to more comments from Sir Robin:

Quote

In the Vendée Globe, Charlie Dalin in Apivia is holding his leading place, just 22 miles ahead of Louis Burton in Bureau Vallée. But there are only 81 miles between the top 6 boats with poor Yannick Bestaven’s Maître CoQ in 6th place. His position further west, partly forced on him by condition a few days ago, has not paid off and he has been bleeding miles. Boris Herrmann in Seaexplorer-Yacht Club de Monaco has had the best days run of 373 miles which has propelled him into 3rd place 39 miles behind the leader . Then comes Linked Out, and Groupe-Apicil just 3 and 7 miles further back respectively. It's very tight up there at the head of the fleet and the squally conditions, which mean sudden changes of wind force and direction, make for tiring work. There are no real tactical moves available at the moment, it’s all about heading north and getting to more stable weather conditions.

Romain Attanasio, husband of Sam Davis, was thrown hard against a winch yesterday and has suspected fractured ribs. He has been prescribed pain killers and is continuing. He was lying 13th at the time, 1,000 miles ahead of Charal and 350 miles astern of Clarisse Cremer in Banque Populaire. He has my full sympathy. Just before the Velux Race in 2006 I slipped and cracked my coccyx. For the first month of the race this was a serious handicap as it meant I could not lift heavy weights, and sails on these Open 60’s are heavy weights. Considering my lifestyle, it is remarkable that this is the only time I have every fractured anything!

Pip Hare still holds 17th place and Miranda Merron 23rd. The leading lady is Clarisse Cremer in 12th place.

Edmund de Rothschild has suffered the frustrations that the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone, better known as the Doldrums to most, can bring. The wind has eased and their lead over their target to gain the Jules Verne Trophy has disappeared. They are faced with the squalls that are so familiar to those of us to sail up and down the Atlantic. The only good thing is that these squalls often bring sharp bursts of cooling rain, which is wonderfully refreshing in the heat. Olivier de Kersuason’s great remark in this area when we raced him for the trophy in 1994 was “All that is missing are the flies!”

https://www.clipperroundtheworld.com/news/article/knoxjohnstons-vende-view

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43 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

Perhaps I should have checked the scale first... 

The IMOCA icons are about 60 NM LOA on the default zoom setting

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No more audio log from Ruyant . . but he still sees many opportunities ahead. 

Quote

The first five are still held for 50 miles. Yannick Bestaven, 6th, is slightly dropped. Benjamin Dutreux, Giancarlo Pedote and Jean Le Cam a little more, without these differences being obviously defining. The weather negotiation will still play a crucial role in the coming days: avoiding the grains off Recife and moving as far away as possible from the Brazilian coast, apprehending a Pot au noir with contradictory interpretations, and anticipating the post-Cape Verde period well. Nothing is decided.

On the other hand, for the microphones aboard LinkedOut, the daily live sound journey stops here. The Vendée Globe experience ends off Salvador de Bahia. The sound data transmission system no longer works, and Thomas Ruyant cannot dwell on this problem, he has a race to finish with one less foil and constant concentration to compensate for this navigation handicap. Even if it is not favored by the prognosis of ocean bookmakers, the final victory is more possible than ever.

At dawn on the 68th day at sea, the sound stops. Of the 16 microphones, many suffered and the device abraded by corrosion can be heard in this last audible logbook. It looks like you're hearing a vinyl record scratching. We can deplore the fact that the experiment ends in this way while the final sprint is going to be underway, we can also rejoice that it lasted 68 days, especially in the violence of the South Seas, on the borders of Antarctica.

Safari trans from https://www.francetvinfo.fr/replay-radio/l-experience-vendee-globe/l-experience-vendee-globe-jour-67_4241215.html

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

On the other hand, for the microphones aboard LinkedOut, the daily live sound journey stops here. The Vendée Globe experience ends off Salvador de Bahia. The sound data transmission system no longer works, and Thomas Ruyant cannot dwell on this problem, he has a race to finish with one less foil and constant concentration to compensate for this navigation handicap. Even if it is not favored by the prognosis of ocean bookmakers, the final victory is more possible than ever.

how does this translate in the @jack_sparrow vendee skipper's dictionary?

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4 minutes ago, Snowden said:

how does this translate in the @jack_sparrow vendee skipper's dictionary?

LOL. Completely unpredictable, entertaining, and doubtless infuriating.

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1 hour ago, stief said:

 

[aside] I try all kinds of carcinogens to get Sikaflex off skin, like acetone. What works best?

 

Acetone works quite well, and it is not really carcinogenic. But, you need to be quick as Sikaflex (well, the brandname covers a huge number of products, so let's say most of them) cures to humidity, so it cures really quickly in contact with the humid skin and once cured it is much harder to clean off from the pores of the skin. Then mostly time is the best solvent. Like for many other things.
SIka actually provides a Sikafelx remover, but acetone is much cheaper. For cured Sikaflex they recommends mechanical methods, in addition with trying to soften with acetone or isopropyl.

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6 hours ago, cortosam said:

Honestly, even if i really like Boris, that would be a bit sad if he manages to win the Vendée, he's not of the same bread of Charlie or Yannick, just happened to be luckier than them.

Charlie should be flying on top, the meteo disfavoured the leaders in this edition and Charlie had really bad luck with his foil.

What a BS statement. Only because someone  maybe looks better after his equipment than others and maybe takes less risks therefore he is not worthy of winning?

And weather favored or disfavored everyone in the lead pack over the course of the race.

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5 minutes ago, Marty6 said:

And weather favored or disfavored everyone in the lead pack over the course of the race.

Really like benchmarking the Virtual VG thread against the conditions for the actual race boats. Best way to look for key variables like wear and tear, currents, sea state, route choices, and more as mentioned there. Also fatigue :lol:

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Weird and really good stuff in the Live today. Sound, but not video cut out, chat suddenly disabled. German focus. Very open.

Herrmann is getting almost 80-90 daily print articles there? Wow. Media 'value' (yeah, yeah, accountant-speak) Euro 172 million already? Wow.

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1 hour ago, Snowden said:
1 hour ago, stief said:

On the other hand, for the microphones aboard LinkedOut, the daily live sound journey stops here. The Vendée Globe experience ends off Salvador de Bahia. The sound data transmission system no longer works, and Thomas Ruyant cannot dwell on this problem, he has a race to finish with one less foil and constant concentration to compensate for this navigation handicap. Even if it is not favored by the prognosis of ocean bookmakers, the final victory is more possible than ever.

how does this translate in the @jack_sparrow vendee skipper's dictionary?

Redundancy Check.

Bakelite Rotary Phone...Nah we don't fucking need that.

images - 2021-01-15T235103.396.jpeg

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58 minutes ago, Very Lazy Jack said:

Like for many other things.
SIka actually provides a Sikafelx remover, but acetone is much cheaper.

I'm lazier than you Jack.....take the day off to let cure..then ocilating blade moving to angle grinder. :D

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51 minutes ago, Very Lazy Jack said:

Acetone works quite well, and it is not really carcinogenic. But, you need to be quick as Sikaflex (well, the brandname covers a huge number of products, so let's say most of them) cures to humidity, so it cures really quickly in contact with the humid skin and once cured it is much harder to clean off from the pores of the skin. Then mostly time is the best solvent. Like for many other things.
SIka actually provides a Sikafelx remover, but acetone is much cheaper. For cured Sikaflex they recommends mechanical methods, in addition with trying to soften with acetone or isopropyl.

Depends on which one but recently I have found that white spirit seems to work OK provided the sika is reasonably fresh. Acetone works but dries so fast it leaves some sika behind if you are not very quick.

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Manuel Cousin? 0.3 kts, big course change up to the Horn965197563_ScreenShot2021-01-15at8_07_48AM.png.2f6e4e9b9e504c312be0e26b6181a7df.png 

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only two months ago I was thinking Louis Burton's penalty was not going to cost him in such a long race, and now it could cost him win, but most fascinating he still might be winning

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24 minutes ago, stief said:

Manuel Cousin? 0.3 kts, big course change up to the Horn965197563_ScreenShot2021-01-15at8_07_48AM.png.2f6e4e9b9e504c312be0e26b6181a7df.png 

Looks like he just is in the center of a strong high-pressure

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3 minutes ago, jonas a said:

Looks like he just is in the center of a strong high-pressure

Hope so. It was the 0.3 kt average that was odd , but a messy sea state having to go upwind in almost no breeze could fit.

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7 hours ago, cortosam said:

Honestly, even if i really like Boris, that would be a bit sad if he manages to win the Vendée, he's not of the same bread of Charlie or Yannick, just happened to be luckier than them.

 

Real keyboard warrior stuff this.

Imagine cortosam sitting at a bar after the finish in Les Sables, and he gets introduced to Boris if he happens to have just won the VG. Conversation includes, cortosam to Boris, "I think its a bit sad you won. You are not of the same bread as Yannick or Charlie. You just happened to be luckier than them."

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That's cortosam's domain

 

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3 hours ago, stief said:

From Clarisse "Climbing up the mast to repair J2 gave Clarisse a hard time, but it's mission accomplished. Hard time indeed. Glad she's OK.

[aside] I try all kinds of carcinogens to get Sikaflex off skin, like acetone. What works best?

 

God, I love that girl. Meanwhile, our friend Armel appears to be in the running for the most distance travelled throphy. Before closing, I just have to say it..

Go YesWeCam!

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4 minutes ago, Varan said:

God, I love that girl. Meanwhile, our friend Armel appears to be in the running for the most distance travelled throphy. Before closing, I just have to say it..

Go YesWeCam!

So many 'deserving' sailors. Privilege to watch them all. Thanks for the heads up on Armel--didn't catch that.

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10 minutes ago, staysail said:

Real keyboard warrior stuff this.

Imagine cortosam sitting at a bar after the finish in Les Sables, and he gets introduced to Boris if he happens to have just won the VG. Conversation includes, cortosam to Boris, "I think its a bit sad you won. You are not of the same bread as Yannick or Charlie. You just happened to be luckier than them."

Agreed.  Pretty stupid attitude for a race like this.  As if Boris just happens to be there!

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Kojiro woke up

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-15 at 9.36.30 AM.png

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Clarisse gives more details about her J2 fix, in EN.

aside @r.finn Best wishes for your project. Looking forward to following the thread

Edited by stief
added link
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32 minutes ago, stief said:

So many 'deserving' sailors. Privilege to watch them all. Thanks for the heads up on Armel--didn't catch that.

Surely Charal has this sewn up after returning to Les Sables d'Olonne? Already travelled 200nm more than Armel (which is insane considering he was tied up for 4-5 days) despite being 1100nm behind on DTL

image.thumb.png.29522fb7c4872e4b172d2b2f99cb68db.png

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3 hours ago, stief said:

This is one of the best videos of the whole race! Thanks stief.

 

16 minutes ago, stief said:

Clarisse gives more details about her J2 fix, in EN.

And this completes my daily Cremer-therapy, I am now happy and ready to face a worldwide pandemic.

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Weird and really good stuff in the Live today. Sound, but not video cut out, chat suddenly disabled. German focus. Very open.

Herrmann is getting almost 80-90 daily print articles there? Wow. Media 'value' (yeah, yeah, accountant-speak) Euro 172 million already? Wow.

Besides the raw numbers - the first time I realized something special is going on has been his presence in the german mainstream tv primetime new years eve tv show

This will hopefully become a huge boost to young german skippers like Lennart Burke and Lina Rixgens to find decent sponsoring opportunities. But wether a german Vendee campain by pure sponsorship (without private supporters/patrons) like Macif/Apivia or Banque Pop, etc could succeed, remains to be seen. 

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13 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Besides the raw numbers - the first time I realized something special is going on has been his presence in the german mainstream tv primetime new years eve tv show

This will hopefully become a huge boost to young german skippers like Lennart Burke and Lina Rixgens to find decent sponsoring opportunities. But wether a german Vendee campain by pure sponsorship (without private supporters/patrons) like Macif/Apivia or Banque Pop, etc could succeed, remains to be seen. 

Race is not finished and lot of events can still happen but at the moment, thank to the redress it looks like a German guy might well be the first non French person to win the Vendée! I think that the Brits will be gutted if this happens, they've tried very hard to be first to achieve this.

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13 minutes ago, stief said:

+1 ( Another way to avoid miserable news: today's T&S offerings for Mini, AC and Richomme fans)

I liked it a lot, thanks!

Has many interesting facts and insights in it:

Quote

...18 of the 33 sailors in the current edition have gone through the Mini Transat...
...three former winners of the Mini, Yannick (Bestaven, 2001 in proto) , Thomas (Rouillard, 2009 in proto ) and Armel (Tripon, 2003 in proto)...
...among the girls who do the Vendée, almost all have gone through the Mini-Transat...
What does the Mini Transat teach a future Vendée Globe candidate?
...it will unleash and accelerate after Recife, with about five days of reaching on the program  until the Azores high...
Will the Azores high pressure again reshuffle the cards?

 

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3 hours ago, stief said:

Weird and really good stuff in the Live today. Sound, but not video cut out, chat suddenly disabled. German focus. Very open.

Herrmann is getting almost 80-90 daily print articles there? Wow. Media 'value' (yeah, yeah, accountant-speak) Euro 172 million already? Wow.

Talk about happy sponsors! I'm sure the price of Monaco will be delighted to have such attention directed at his small, backwater principality

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18 minutes ago, crashtack said:

Talk about happy sponsors! I'm sure the price of Monaco will be delighted to have such attention directed at his small, backwater principality

And unhappy, if the Prince wears a Hugo Boss tux at the social celebrations.

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Apivia and Bureau going much faster than the polar projected in the last 20 hours or so.  (Red circles show route position vs last pos report). Ran a new set of routing with Apivia at 103% day and 100% night. Bureau at 103% day and 102% night, just to try and account for some difference with foil damage vs no damage.  Have now included SeaEx and ran him at the same as Bureau to account for how lucky he is! (Btw, If he was even luckier and sailed in 2% more breeze, he would finish some four hours ahead of Apivia and Bureau!).

All weather is run at GFS 100%.

Vendee20.JPG

vendeepolarcomp.JPG

Vendeesum.JPG

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27 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Apivia and Bureau going much faster than the polar projected in the last 20 hours or so.  (Red circles show route position vs last pos report). Ran a new set of routing with Apivia at 103% day and 100% night. Bureau at 103% day and 102% night, just to try and account for some difference with foil damage vs no damage.  Have now included SeaEx and ran him at the same as Bureau to account for how lucky he is! (Btw, If he was even luckier and sailed in 2% more breeze, he would finish some four hours ahead of Apivia and Bureau!).

All weather is run at GFS 100%.

Vendee20.JPG

vendeepolarcomp.JPG

Vendeesum.JPG

Would be amazing if Hermann can win. His six hours compensation already puts him maybe 50 miles ahead. 

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7 hours ago, stief said:

From Clarisse "Climbing up the mast to repair J2 gave Clarisse a hard time, but it's mission accomplished. Hard time indeed. Glad she's OK.

[aside] I try all kinds of carcinogens to get Sikaflex off skin, like acetone. What works best?

 

Tough job for Clarisse, I hope the repair holds up for the rest of the distance!

[aside follow up] If your hands are used to manual labour and the skin is a bit tougher, try a good dose of abrasive hand cleaning soap (like a full tea spoon of it) and a shot of clean motor oil. The additives of the oil are really good at crawling under the gunk and the abrasive bits help pushing the oil. This is still pretty rough, does not work under or around the finger nails, and is definitely not recommended for softer skin like your face or anywhere near your eyes. But at least you can prepare food and eat without a side of Sika. :) 

 

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8 hours ago, stief said:

 

[aside] I try all kinds of carcinogens to get Sikaflex off skin, like acetone. What works best?

 

Baby oil or coconut oil. just apply over the sika, paint, or whatever..... and wait. In a few hours it will be off. it works its way along the skin and under the substance. No scrubbing required.

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1 minute ago, littlechay said:

Baby oil or coconut oil. just apply over the sika, paint, or whatever..... and wait. In a few hours it will be off. it works its way along the skin and under the substance. No scrubbing required.

Good to know.  I'll add baby oil to my kit. 

A rigger on my crew told me about denatured alcohol as the best remover of latex caulk and 3M 4200 mess.  Works much better than acetone, which is nasty stuff. 

 

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The crap weather conditions for this VG may give the leaders one more hurdle in four days time, a false doldrums near the Canaries.

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7 hours ago, Very Lazy Jack said:

Acetone works quite well, and it is not really carcinogenic. But, you need to be quick as Sikaflex (well, the brandname covers a huge number of products, so let's say most of them) cures to humidity, so it cures really quickly in contact with the humid skin and once cured it is much harder to clean off from the pores of the skin. Then mostly time is the best solvent. Like for many other things.
SIka actually provides a Sikafelx remover, but acetone is much cheaper. For cured Sikaflex they recommends mechanical methods, in addition with trying to soften with acetone or isopropyl.

 

6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

take the day off to let cure..then ocilating blade moving to angle grinder. :D

 

6 hours ago, staysail said:

white spirit seems to work OK provided the sika is reasonably fresh. Acetone works but dries so fast it leaves some sika behind if you are not very quick.

 

1 hour ago, Grog said:

try a good dose of abrasive hand cleaning soap (like a full tea spoon of it) and a shot of clean motor oil. The additives of the oil are really good at crawling under the gunk and the abrasive bits help pushing the oil. This is still pretty rough, does not work under or around the finger nails, and is definitely not recommended for softer skin like your face or anywhere near your eyes. But at least you can prepare food and eat without a side of Sika. :) 

 

21 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Baby oil or coconut oil. just apply over the sika, paint, or whatever..... and wait. In a few hours it will be off. it works its way along the skin and under the substance. No scrubbing required.

Good tips--thanks all. Hadn't thought of oils applied after. (Had greased the hands before the job with lotion or dishsoap pre-sika job which help a bit after). Missus always complained when my Leatherman came out to do the job on the hands.

Gasoline applied furtively worked on the decks  and hands too . . . :P

Clarisse looked so clean and fresh after, . . . wondered what her secret was.

Sorry for the drift; 2100 sked coming up and gotta dig into Hitch's screenies

 

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4 minutes ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

The crap weather conditions for this VG may give the leaders one more hurdle in four days time, a false doldrums near the Canaries.

Yep, last restart most likely...

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Denatured alcohol, also known as methylated spirits outside of the US. I found this out when trying to buy metho in the US on a cross country cycle trip years ago when I asked for metho to use in a camp stove. Seems we had to go to a paint store in the US to buy it, here in OZ you can buy it in supermarkets etc.

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2 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Apivia and Bureau going much faster than the polar projected in the last 20 hours or so.  (Red circles show route position vs last pos report). Ran a new set of routing with Apivia at 103% day and 100% night. Bureau at 103% day and 102% night, just to try and account for some difference with foil damage vs no damage.  Have now included SeaEx and ran him at the same as Bureau to account for how lucky he is! (Btw, If he was even luckier and sailed in 2% more breeze, he would finish some four hours ahead of Apivia and Bureau!).

All weather is run at GFS 100%.

Vendee20.JPG

vendeepolarcomp.JPG

Vendeesum.JPG

Back at the start there was a lot of criticism about how cautiously the foilers (except HB) were dealing with TS Theta. Borris just took the caution all the way to the Horn. Yes, the weather and breakage never allowed anyone to really break away. But, for this rendition it's starting to look like a pretty smart strategy. 

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2 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Apivia and Bureau going much faster than the polar projected in the last 20 hours or so

Just a heads up. Conrad H asked SciFi about polar adjustments --and SciFi answers about sea state and wave models. 

 

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3 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Oh dear...

EriG24eXMAMRgw4y.jpg

You need to see his latest video...

Depending on your mindset or take on it, you may either conclude that he is a poet, or that he lost his marbles and he is tripping bad... IMHO, the jury is still out...

 

 

Just for everybody to appreciate, my transcript, in French, below, and then my best attempt to translation (not easy to translate poetry)

 

Même les gransd fonds qui terrorisent,

Les nuits profondes où t’agonises,

Où même tes espoirs cicatrisent

Et que ton cerveau joue la traîtrise…

 

Si comme moi tu es écorché vif,

Va te mesurer aux profondeurs

Sur ton canot, promis tu kiffes,

L’heure de ton voyage intérieur.

 

La routine, c’est un pied dans la tombe,

Alors va mouiller tes tongues !

T’as des rêves jusqu’au bout de ta quille,

Ouvre donc tes écoutilles !

 

Tu partiras presque sans rien,

Pour faire que le truc soit plus humain.

Trois océans à boire cul sec

Et tous ces rêves contre un seul mec.

 

Tu sais que tu peux tout péter,

Que ton canot peut abdiquer,

Être dévasté de solitude,

D’avoir barrer dix nuits sans lune.

 

Tes émotions sur toute la gamme

L’adrénaline pour seule lumière,

En tête-à-tête avec ton âme,

Ce bateau, c’est ta régulière.

Ecoute à l’oreille ta grand-voile chanceler un matin d’été

Et rigole des heures sans sommeil, parce qu’enfin tu as pigé,

 

Que trouver est ta raison,

Que le voyage est ta maison.

Ton testament sur l’horizon,

Tu t’es posé les bonnes questions.

 

Dans le regard de milliers de visages

Qui tous t’attendent sur le rivage.

Tu découvres un monde de terriens,

Qui soudain ne te dit plus rien.

 

Et tu repenses au temps jadis,

Qui vit le périple d’Ulysse.

Dix années durant sur la mer,

Si loin des siens et de sa terre.

 

Combien te fut réparatrice

Cette solitude divinatrice !

Car on voulait que tu t’accomplisses,

Loin de tes frères, tes complices.

 

Et pour éviter ton naufrage

Et subsister dans ce long voyage,

Tu auras compté sur ton courage,

Pour seul et unique équipage.

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Even in the deep waters that terrorize,

In the dark nights where you agonize,

Where even your hopes are mending;

And your brain is betraying...

 

If like me you feel skinned alive,

Measure yourself against the deep seas.

In your boat, I swear, you will love

The time of your inner journey.

 

The routine, it's one foot in the grave,

So get your feet wet!

You have dreams all the way to the tip of your keel;

Open your hatches!

 

You will leave with almost nothing,

To make the thing more human.

Three oceans to drink bottom up,

And all your dreams agains only one guy.

 

 

You know you can break everything,

That your boat can abdicate,

Being devastated of solitude,

For steering ten moonless nights.

 

Your emotions all over the range,

Adrénaline as your only light,

Face to face with your soul,

This boat, she is your regular one.

 

Listen to your mainsail staggerring in a summer morning,

And laugh of the sleepless hours, because finally you got it.

 

That the search is your purpose,

That the journey is your house.

Your testament on the horizon,

You asked yourself all the right questions.

 

In the eyes of thousands of faces,

All waiting for you on the shore,

You discover a world of landlubbers,

Which suddenly doesn't talk to you anymore.

 

And you think of old times,

Which saw the journey of Odysseus.

Ten years on the seas,

So far from his people, from his land.

 

How mending has been,

This divine solitude!

So you could become yourself,

Far from your brothers, from your accomplices.

 

And to avoid your shipwreck,

And survive this long journey,

You will have relied on your courage,

As your sole crew.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

The crap weather conditions for this VG may give the leaders one more hurdle in four days time, a false doldrums near the Canaries.

Canaries? I can't see them going anywhere near the Canaries.

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It's not obvious from his track, but Boris appears to have had a couple oopsies in the past two hours.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-15 at 3.57.33 PM.png

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1 hour ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

The crap weather conditions for this VG may give the leaders one more hurdle in four days time, a false doldrums near the Canaries.

 

5 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Canaries? I can't see them going anywhere near the Canaries.

I think he meant this; in four days time.

 

image.png.cd410d659140976331a3bf969c04a454.png

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Correct, a low wind barrier extending west from the Canaries, by bad for mentioning near the Canaries.

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9 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

It's not obvious from his track, but Boris appears to have had a couple oopsies in the past two hours.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-15 at 3.57.33 PM.png

No oopsis. Just changing Sails. 

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Boris, I know you can't hear me, but just take a lap around the deck every day looking for chafe buddy. We want you to do this!!!

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guillaume-verdier-696x465.jpg
 

Guillaume Verdier with his team is at the forefront of the news with his boats: On the Vendée Globe, we owe him the design of the new generation Apivia and Linked foilers, not to mention those signed with VPLP, Bureau Vallée 2 , Seaexplorer or Maitre CoQ . He is also heavily involved in the design of Team New Zealand's AC75 for the America's Cup and finally it was he who developed the idea of the ultimate offshore flywheel with the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild. He gave himself up during an exciting interview for Apivia.

You who are currently in New Zealand alongside Team New Zealand, a team involved in the America's Cup, how do you experience this Vendée Globe from a distance?
Guillaume Verdier: “I currently work half of my time with Team New Zealand for the America's Cup for three campaigns, and for the other half with my collaborators, with whom we work on IMOCA, among others. . Of course, that I am this Vendée Globe! I have been working in the Vendée Globe since 1996, when I joined the Finot Group, and since then I have closely followed each of the editions… Moreover, I have never seen conditions like this in the South Seas. Speaking here with the meteorologist from Team New Zealand, who knows the southern seas very well, when he saw the start of the Vendée Globe and the arrival of the boats in the South, he said that the southern summer weather does not was not established at all. He told me that the boats were two or three weeks apart. For him,

 

It must be satisfying to have the two latest generation IMOCAs (APIVIA and LinkedOut) which have always been at the forefront of this 9th edition of the Vendée Globe?
GV: “Yes, we are happy, me and the whole team! Moreover, I would like to mention and thank Hervé (Penfornis), Romaric (Neyhousser) and so many others in the firm who have worked a lot on APIVIA. The entire Cabinet worked on this project and I really want to reiterate that. Of course it's better to have our boats in front, but to be honest, it's a mechanical sport and even if it's not like in a car or a motorcycle, and there are two criteria that are very predominant in our sport: meteorology and the human factor. These are two huge factors in sailing… I am also delighted to see that the course of this Vendée Globe does not follow a latest generation logic. This is not always the case, but here we have to do with great sailors. I am also thinking particularly of Damien Seguin who is having an incredible race. It's really remarkable what he does! I can only be in awe of all this… And there, in addition, it's interesting to have so many boats together… We had never seen this! There have been Vendée Globe events where for those in the lead, it was a carpet that was unrolling and not much was happening. There, this is really not the case ”.

In the opinion of many, the foilers did not have the best conditions to be able to express themselves fully. Is this your opinion?
GV: “The foilers had great conditions on the descent where they were going 2.5 to 3 knots faster. They showed their abilities and arrived a lot ahead in the Saint Helena high. Then, they stayed 5 to 6 days planted… It was really bad luck. In fact, when at one point they could express themselves, they lost all their gain the next move. It's a race that never started from the front and it always came back from behind. For the foils, I think everyone wants to go to the foilers. It is helpful for them to have that throttle button and activate it when they need it. But there, they were caught up each time in the soft. But what's also to be seen is that all of these boats will improve in the future. If luckily, this class does not become a one-design - which would be a pity - we are currently witnessing a kind of Darwinism, a very interesting development for this type of boat. This is what interests us in architecture, seeing the natural evolution of the choices made by sailors to fill a deficit. "

What was Charlie's contribution to the design of APIVIA, because on one side there is the skipper and on the other side the naval architect?
GV: “Charlie has already been super humble and modest in his approach, which has been very pleasant for us. Then, we did not have clear opinions on everything but we always tried to find solutions, to expose all possible doubts, to exchange as much as possible. For these reasons, it has been very pleasant to work with Charlie on his APIVIA project. Obviously, we speak the same language because we have the same scientific knowledge. Sometimes, we taught him things and other times, it was he who taught us things through his experience and suddenly, the exchange was simple and constructive. We sat down next to each other to draw the foils, to look at the hulls and he came back to me, two days later, to tell me "don't you think if we did like that, wouldn't that be more interesting? ". I never stopped him from doing that… We then went through the hulls in fluid calculation and we looked at the results together. Sometimes, we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we went. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I never stopped him from doing that… We then went through the hulls in fluid calculation and we looked at the results together. Sometimes, we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we went. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I never stopped him from doing that… We then went through the hulls in fluid calculation and we looked at the results together. Sometimes, we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we went. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we moved forward. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we moved forward. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! "

APIVIA is a so-called versatile boat. How is that decided?
GV: “In fact, we think it pays to have a versatile boat. We can see it clearly in this Vendée Globe. It's absolutely the same thing in finance and in investments I imagine. Sometimes it pays off for those who take extreme risks, but in the majority of cases, it loses… I believe that people who invest well are the ones who are very diverse. There, it's a bit the same, we have a multitude of events that happen and if we are that good in one area, we get beheaded! I believe in being able to manage in all conditions and not be deadlocked ”.

How exciting is a Vendée Globe project from a naval architecture point of view?
GV: “It is precisely all these exchanges that we have and all the pre-project phases that are fascinating. The goal is to understand all the parameters that will create the performance. When we draw, there are several parameters that we classify: performance, safety, ergonomics and maneuverability… In each decision, we try to classify these parameters. What I find fascinating in the classification of these parameters and in the major performance criteria is that we try to give a cost, a value (note, not the financial notion in this sense but the notion of performance) to everything. How much does it cost, for example, for a boat to drift more than 1 degree or less than 1 degree? How much does it cost to have the center of gravity forward 1 meter or back 1 meter? How much does it cost to have the center of thrust of the canopy at 9 meters, 10 or 11 meters? This is called derivative, or the cost of a parameter relative to performance. You might think they are always the same derivatives, but they are not. Because depending on the evolution of the boats, such as when we introduce more efficient foils or sails, and that changes everything. All these parameters are then to be questioned. And that is interesting and fascinating. The ergonomic side is also very interesting. Today, we are at the limit of a sailor's ability to operate his boat. We can also see that we do not use the performance of the boats very well and often they could go much faster. But, the sailors have to sleep, sail, eat… These boats with 4 or 5 sailors, like the Volvo Ocean Race, would be really quite different in terms of performance ”.

Are certain ideas already germinating within the Cabinet after reading this Vendée Globe?
GV: “We have lots of little ideas that sprout up as we go along and throughout the race. One which is quite interesting and which strikes me is to see that you have to have boats that are good enough to withstand the very strong oversales that they experienced in the South. All the competitors described that when they had thirty knots of established wind, you had to have your hands on the sheets constantly, because that meant slaps at 45 knots… Also, it is not by having a super narrow hull that it's easy to sail downwind in seas like this. The hull must be able to withstand oversold, heavy seas and not lie down in the deep south. This is a subject that I discussed with Kevin Escoffier who told me that it was incredible the slaps he took constantly. The logic towards which we would be tempted to go is to make very very large foils with a completely atrophied hull. But if the foils work well in dynamic conditions, they don't work at all when you are not going fast. And, in a Vendée Globe, there are plenty of different situations with times when we don't go fast and others when we have strong winds and oversales. For me, there is a dimension of boat that must be super strong! I believe that it is this robustness on which it is necessary to work… We see that they waste hours and hours to replace an aerial at the head of the mast, these stories of failing hooks are incredible, and very quickly from the start. start of the race… It's a shame and what's more, it's extremely dangerous. The robustness of the boats in the face of oversold, the robustness of the boats mechanically on parts like those at the top of the mast, in addition to very dangerous access, are tracks on which we must work especially for solo sailing. "

What could the IMOCA of tomorrow look like?
GV: “Here, we must already clarify all the information, reactions and exchanges that we will have after this Vendée Globe. Then, we have to take up some innovations that we have seen elsewhere, whether in the America's Cup or in kite surfing, certain advances in new materials that would open up new perspectives. All this in order to put on the table all these derivatives I was talking about earlier and find out how we can make a breakthrough. For example, the rig could be a really big breakthrough… If there was a gauge opening on the rig type, that would be an interesting breakthrough. If we could have another keel or another form of keel, it would also be a breakthrough… We try to put all these elements on the table and brainstorm where we throw lots of ideas. Some are interesting to dig into, others are not ... When you obsess over an idea, in general, it does not work. Some people are obsessed with this idea and they just drop everything else. In the end, we have boats that are not homogeneous. We saw crazy things like that in the years 1998, 2000 like at the start of the Boc Challenge with super large boats, not homogeneous at all… ”.

Is this exchange of ideas and thoughts also one of the reasons for your presence alongside Team New Zealand at the America's Cup?
GV: “You learn a lot by working on different subjects. And I'm fortunate to be able to work alongside Team New Zealand, as well as other people on my team who work for other Cup campaigns. Also, we learn as well in mechanics, as in software, as in profile drawing of foils… We work with programmers who develop specific artificial intelligence software. I give them my objective parameters, the way I design the boats, the criteria that make me design hulls like this or that. I give them to this artificial intelligence software which, overnight, passes them into the calculation of fluids. Seeing this unfold before our eyes is very interesting and in fact, we are learning a lot. The fact of working on a lot of different subjects, whether on the maxi trimaran Gitana, dinghies, or more recently on windsurfing fins, each time we learn something new ... And we find a common point in everything who sails. It is always the balance of three forces, problems of ventilation, cavitation… What we are currently learning about the foil profiles and the rudder profiles is incredible. Tomorrow, the IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on the America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " each time we learn something new… And we find something in common in everything that sails. It is always the balance of three forces, problems of ventilation, cavitation… What we are currently learning about the foil profiles and the rudder profiles is incredible. Tomorrow, the IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on the America's Cup boats. But it also matters for the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… it all comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " each time we learn something new… And we find something in common in everything that sails. It's always the balance of three forces, problems of ventilation, cavitation… What we are learning at the moment about the foil profiles and the rudder profiles is incredible. Tomorrow, the IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on the America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. "

Last question Guillaume, how do you become a naval architect? A childhood dream?
GV: “I did a sailing course when I was 8 years old and my teacher went to the naval architecture school in Southampton. I don't know why, but it stuck in a corner of my head… And when I finished Math Sup in Paris, I said to myself: what am I doing here? And why won't I do what I love, which is sailing? I inquired, this school still existed and I went to England. I was also passionate about biology… I was not at all predestined to do this. There are some who are born at the water's edge, who come from families predestined for that. Me, no… We all have very different stories and backgrounds, and that is indisputably what makes each other so rich. "

Source Apivia

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I wonder what he means by “tomorrow the imocas will have risers like the America’s cup boats”

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Bureau is pretty much constantly chipping away at Apivia, as is SeaEx.  Right now the route into the Doldrums as usual is going to carry a lot of weight.  The ones who get it right, will have brought a gun to a knife fight.

The other factor is once into the trades, how much performance loss will Apivia and Linked see. Sorry to keep harping on about this but there could be 50 to 56 hours or so of tradewind reaching with the TWA forward of the beam.  Prime foiling conditions?

The  more observant of you will notice that the routing I have shown in this post is quite different from the previous. I'm using the same machine to route two different races and forgot to zero out the wind direction rotation.  I won't post the solutions from the update as they are meaningless for comps with the previous. I have gone high tech with the reminder and have a post-it on my screen now!

That said, what does stand out for me is the visible difference in the solutions of Bureau (red) Vs. Apivia and SeaEx (other colours!).  To maintain some consistency Apivia is still at 103/102%. Bureau is at 103/103% as is SeaEx.  Wx is GFS at 100% as usual. 

vendeetrackup.JPG

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51 minutes ago, JL92S said:

I wonder what he means by “tomorrow the imocas will have risers like the America’s cup boats”

T-foils and lifting foils on the rudders

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A new message from Isabelle Joschke... she's now heading to Salvador da Bahia, she should be there in 10 to 15 days.... and at 1:05 she deeply thanks all the netizens and others who have sent her encouragements, it was important during this tough week, nice. Really love this sailor.

 

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1 hour ago, JL92S said:

I wonder what he means by “tomorrow the imocas will have risers like the America’s cup boats”

He means "send business my way"... :ph34r:

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