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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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8 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Passing Cape Horn in such weather, Yannick has proper "clothes".

 

Complete with alarms going off in the background. Looks fairly powered up. Congrats for being first "around" the horn.

"He passed safely some 85 miles off the rock with an elapsed time since leaving Les Sables d'Olonne of 55 day and 22 minutes." VG

 

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2 minutes ago, Varan said:

Complete with alarms going off in the background. Looks fairly powered up. Congrats for being first "around" the horn.

I imagine it is J3 or storm sail and mainsail with 3 or 4 reefs. :o

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In his most recent Facebook post "The Vengence of the poor" Brittany based German sailor Jörg Riechers is certainly not going to mince matters.

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The Vengence of the poor

I remember very well a conversation with the member of the IMOCA board which has worked as an adviser for a project I was involveld in, but has taken up a job at one of the € 10mio+ Vendée Globe projects. When I mentioned how cool it would be to modify the old Acciona with a super strong mast and good set of foils for a total budget of around 3mio and be capable of doing a podium finish at the Vendee Globe – his response was – „that would be a nighmare for the Class IMOCA and the big projects and he will do everthing in his power to prevent that projet to be at the startline oft he Vendée Globe“. Well the first half of his plan went well. He convinced the owner of that project, not to do the Vendée Globe – the boat is laid up in a pitty state in Gosport since one and a half year.

Well, but nonetheless his nightmare has become reality in this Vendée Globe with three „Ghetto Projects“ with very small budgets being scarely close to the podium places, while his 10Mio project is „drifting“ around the Southern Ocean in the low 20ies.

But why is that – how come that 12years old boats which were appart from „Yes we Cam“ were playing no role at all in 2012 and 2016 races could be that close to the frontrunners? Because on paper these boats should not even be in the top 10. One thing which is clear, the three „Oldtimers“ are sailed by very good sailors who could win the Vendée Globe, if they would have a new boat.

Which plays in their favour is he fact that, a lot of skippers on the new foilers have to abandon the race or have to sail their boats too carefully because the super sized foils are very hard to control in heavy conditions and on some boats they can not get their foils out of the water. I think the concept of foils and hulls need to be completly rethought for the next race. In some other cases it is down to incapacity of some to push themselves beyound their limits and take riks if it is needed. Their attitude is very understandable, you need a special kind of mindset to overcome the inconvinience of being alone in miserable conditions and still push the boat hard – not everybodies Cup of Tea.

Pushing hard was one of the great qualities of the generation of Micheal Desjoyeaux who was able to push himself and his boat beyound the limits to win races.

Well time will tell if the „Ghetto Kids“ could stay the partybusters on the way up the Atlantic. But for me , they are the heros of this edition of the Vendée Globe. Another skipper who is doing an amazing job is Armel Tripon who is sailing through the fleet like a hot knife through butter since 2 weeks, after he suffered problems early in the race which put him out of competion early on. It would not surprise me if he would end up in the top 5 with a little bit of luck.

 

Jörg certainly does not hesitate doing it the hard way. A few pages behind someone already mentioned his Cap Horn passage during the 15/16 Barcelona World Race in similar if not even stronger conditions than right now for Yannick and Charlie.

Funny: While browsing through Boris Hermanns recent YouTube Videos, I come across this Vid (Day 53, starting at 00:02:40), which could be a direct replique to Jörgs "When the going gets tough the tough get going" Facebook post where he is pointing his fingers to the more conservative approach of "certain skippers" seen in this edition of the race.

Boris: "I am a softie. I might be a softie. This is how I like it. Ha Ha. I don't like it when she is like racing off the waves, doing 30 knots, stopping, plowing,..."

 

Jörg and Boris - certainly two completely opposed charachters

As a reference, Jörgs rant on Facebook about the softie approach of certain skippers...

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Here you can see who has the racing genes in his blood. I personaly could not sail in a defensive and slow mode – it creates real pain to me. For me it is like flat out racing or nothing.

Something which shocked me a bit were comments from certain skippers that the conditions were to rough and they are not enjoying their race…Pardon… not enjoying their race!? Well some of them are paid very high wages, so it should not be a question enjoyment, it should be a question to do a good job for their sponsor – and that should be doing a good and competitive race.

My personal choice for enjoyment would be a two week holiday on Ibiza and not a Vendée Globe.

When you are doing a round the world race you know it will be cold, though and shitty…so better read the small print before, once you are in the Indian Ocean it‘s too late and sorry there is no guarantee and no pay back…

 

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At Cape Horn, the winners and losers of the Vendée Globe can be counted

CHRONIC

Jean-Louis Le Touzet

Yannick Bestaven and Charlie Dalin, leading the race, are at the gates of the terrible cape, so dreaded by the sailors, where they are promised gusts of 60 knots and troughs of seven meters.

Charlie Dalin, aboard “Apivia”, during his preparation for the Vendée Globe, off Brittany, in June 2020.

  Charlie Dalin, aboard “Apivia”, during his preparation for the Vendée Globe, off Brittany, in June 2020. JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER / AFP

LCape Horn would be, in a way, the hand extended to the sailor to welcome him and immediately dismiss him in the same movement. The solo sailor has been waiting for a month for the expulsion to the Atlantic and the route to less tumultuous waters, milder temperatures, hoping to catch the easterly trade wind, north of the Saint Helena high.

The first two of the fleet (Yannick Bestaven and Charlie Dalin) are preparing to leave the immense wet and cold palace of the Pacific by the Cape Horn gate on the night from Saturday to Sunday, in facing gusts of 60 knots and troughs of seven meters.

Yannick Bestaven ( Maître-Coq IV ) suffers from a speed deficit on a 2015 boat, but he had kept, these last forty-eight hours, a sustained pace. Charlie Dalin ( Apivia ), on a latest generation foiler, should demonstrate his racing skills in the ascent of the Atlantic on a boat faster than that of Bestaven. Dalin, who managed to stay ahead of the high pressure - but at the cost of a northern route - shifted southeast to ward off the Horn.

"Infernal Cauldron"

Thomas Rettant ( Linked-Out ), again in third place, has himself attributed "the role of turkey of the farce" . The Dunkirk is probably referring to the "train" he missed, but perhaps also to the splendid race made by Damien Seguin ( Apicil ), escaped from the group of pursuers (Le Cam, Herrmann, Joschke, Sorel) trapped in a area of weak winds. What Seguin is doing, on a 2008 Imoca, is truly breathtaking. So much for the table.

Here at the Horn, it is said, the winners and losers of the Vendée. Here, there is no reconstructed chance, but the breathing of icy air makes blind threats. Because crossing the Horn means taking the Drake Passage, named after the English pirate Francis Drake, who in 1576 discovered this maritime corridor between the South Shetlands archipelago, on the Antarctic side, and the Tierra del Fuego Archipelago. , America side.

This frightening joy is found precisely at 55 ° 58 '48' 'South and 67 ° 17' 21 '' West. At the foot of the high peeled point of the cape, the long swell from east to west, in a perpetual, almost hypnotic movement, comes up violently on the shallows which rise from 3000 m to 80 m, often raising an enormous sea. , long real maritime tomb merchant ships until the beginning of XX th  century.

At Cape Horn, the grammar of the maritime story was built on the basis of rotten soup, the smell of coaltar, cotton sails stiffened by the cold

Here, the grammar of the maritime story was built on the basis of rotten soup, the smell of coaltar, cotton sails stiffened by the cold or cargoes of Chilean phosphate en route to Europe.

It was not until 1968 and the Golden Globe that this myth revalued by adventure regains all its vitality and signifies, for us earthlings, once again the reserve of will, the accumulation of daring and the ultimate capital of courage on boats, admittedly, four times faster than a century ago.

Above all, this is the end of the triple event which has long swallowed up all the navies of the world: Espérance, Leeuwin and Horn, the last passage in the Vendée Globe.

It is probably this imagination that you take with you when you embark on such an adventure for the first time (Tripon, Bestaven, Dalin, Seguin, Joschke, Herrmann, Crémer, Dutreux, Sorel, etc.).

Jean-Luc Van den Heede (twelve passages of the Horn), writes after the first Vendée Globe, in 1989, in Un Globe à la force du travail (Filipacchi, 1990): “When I leave him behind me and the whole road from Antarctica, (…) I must admit that I trembled. I don't put anything above the condition of a sailor. Nothing. "

VDH also speaks of “infernal cauldron” . The landowner immediately imagines bubbling foundry tanks. Here, the sea can be four stories tall. With one vice per floor.

This is what the first are already going through, as they are about to enter this corridor. Scared? Trouble? Trouille, Bestaven slice: “It materializes on reading the weather files which indicate in advance the fate reserved. Scarlet red bubbles: more than 50 knots. In truth, this fear is essential, because it signifies vigilance. » Low ceiling, sea clouds, gusts to 60 knots: the forecasts are in line.

"Nothing consistent in the Pacific"

But for all that, the “conformity” of the Pacific, which the loners saw as a gift given at speed, as Yannick Bestaven specifies in Le Monde in a vocal communication, does not seem in any way to the natural identity:

“Nothing in the Pacific conforms to what I had read, or that I had been told! No long slips. In addition, since the end of December, everything is only waves and crosswinds. And the expected depression is not in a good way… ”

The crossing of the largest ocean did not take place, except for Armel Tripon ( L'Occitane-en-Provence ), who seems to have ridden in a rapid for three weeks.

If nature provides the backdrop, if the race provides the men, we can say all the same that the trajectories of the Imoca in the Great South resemble a herringbone marquetry.

Bestaven had from the start, before the start, highlighted the double belonging of the offshore rider to performance but also to travel. For that, he had provided himself with a notebook to write down his impressions. Cannot write anything "on it right now" . “Since the rescue of Kevin [Escoffier, November 30] , I haven't really had the courage to get back to it. Too difficult, not quiet, not the heart for that. The pages are blacked out, but will I be able to reread myself? » , He confided to us.

“There isn't a day when I say to myself: 'What are you doing here?' "(Romain Attanasio," Pure-Best-Western ")

However, fifty-four days later, he does not withdraw a word from his comments made at the end of October, enriching them:

“This Vendée is a journey and necessarily deep within oneself. A trip to the land of hardship. A relentless journey that plunges us into history, that of the men who paved the way for navigation aboard boats then without any of the technical means at our disposal. "

And to recall the famous adage of Michel Desjoyeaux (two-time winner): “One fuck a day in the Vendée. Well, we're pretty close ... "

Joined Thursday December 31, Romain Attanasio ( Pure-Best-Western ) is a loner who has never seen himself in a distorting mirror. He is also the man who gets to the heart of the matter. He often reaches the point and always with exquisite politeness, despite fifty-four days punctuated by this mammalian life, while apologizing for the terrible noise on board:

“I'm thinking right now of my first trips as a teenager on a lake in winter. I felt bad and that added even more to the pain of the observation. In fact, there isn't a day when I say to myself: “What are you doing here?” "

And now he laughs at himself. Attanasio sees himself crossing the Horn (doubled for the first in 2016) on Wednesday, four days after the first.

The Vendée Globe would be a see-saw for him: “I tell myself every day that I'm an ordinary guy who will do something extraordinary every day. Sometimes I say to myself: “But why this job?” Or the variant: “Never again”, especially when you vomit, frozen. "

And who, once on land, will say that we will not take him there again, while doing what is necessary to set off again, "because deep down, it's my job, like that of a cyclist" .

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Based on 5 min of googling, Acciona is a 2012 build with a keel stepped mast.  So grandfathered in before the one design mast and non-rotating because it's keep stepped.  Based on the "ghetto project" idea I'd have to assume it's taller than the one design mast and replacing it with the same size but stronger/thicker would be legal?

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Those trying to outdo each other with ever more column inches per post without anything which hasn't already been published elsewhere long before are making the thread a bit tedious to follow and very slow to load

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I’m not sure who JörgRiechers is but his comments don’t make a lot of sense. Ellen MacArthur seemed pretty unhappy a lot of the time but is plenty tough enough for me.

Whatever he thinks of Boris, only one of them got a boat on the start line and is consistently challenging for the top 5. 

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Jorg Riechers isn’t coming across very well - part of it is his personality and part of it is sour grapes at not being able to find a sponsor because of that charming personality. 

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Acciano lost her keel in the return leg of the Atlantics,   she sat the last Vendee out.  An Owen Clarke design and Merfyn was well into redesigning her for recomission 

Working within a wider design team is standard practice for OC on grand prix projects. For example, our eighth IMOCA 60 was designed in collaboration, with Team New Zealand and British Americas Cup designer Clay Oliver. A 1/7th scale tank testing program was completed at Southampton University as well as a three-week program at 1/3rd scale, both in parallel with CFD modelling. Without compromise, Acciona was is an ‘all out’ Vendee Globe IMOCA 60, but also a zero emissions offshore racing yacht that circumnavigated the globe without a fossil fuel engine onboard. A world first in green energy, a design of the future, developing power entirely by solar panels and hydro-generators.

Credit: J.Renedo/sailingstock.com

Jörg Riechers and Seb Audigagne in the Barcelona World Race

 
 
Riechers8652_0662_1D_1D.jpg?resize=752%2

© BRESCHI / RICOCHETS17

 
 
 

During the Boot Show in Düsseldorf, the skipper Jörg Riechers and Nikolaus Gelpke, director of the Mare-Verlag editions, who sponsor the team, announced their registration for the Barcelona World Race 2014/15. Frenchman Sébastien Audigane will be the co-skipper.

The second participant registered for the Barcelona World Race 2014/15 officially announced his participation in the race today at a press conference at the Boot Show in Düsseldorf. The German sailor Jörg Riechers and Nikolaus Gelpke, director of the Mare-Verlag editions which sponsor the team, presented their project to the main media at the most important boat show in Europe.

“I developed this project with one of the most competitive boats in the current fleet and I consider Sébastien Audigane an ideal companion due to their experience in offshore racing and in the IMOCA Class,” said Jörg Riechers , one of the most experienced German sailors in this type of race, especially on mini and 40 class yachts. Jörg Riechers, winner of the Solidaire du Chocolat last year, in doubles with Marc Lepesqueux, will this time have for co-skipper the French Sébastien Audigane. Audigane, who took part in the last edition of the Barcelona World Race, teamed up with Kito de Pavant on Groupe Bel, is a speed specialist. The team will sail on the current Master CoQ, one of the best IMOCA Open 60s.

Nikolaus Gelpke, Managing Director of Mare-Verlag Publishing, said: “This is our third and most important project from the Mares Raing Team. We have a lot of enthusiasm in this offshore racing team which will be among the most competitive. Jörg has an excellent record in Classe Mini and Class 40 and we will give them the best continuity in the IMOCA class. "

Andor Serra, CEO of the FNOB, underlined the importance of the participation of the Mare Racing Team in the Barcelona World Race: “It is essential and extremely positive that a helmsman of the level of Jörg Riechers and a sponsor such as Mare -Verlag, eminently involved in the development of ocean sailing in Germany, are betting on the Barcelona World Race and sharing its objectives, given the current economic situation. This confirms our philosophy: to work for the dissemination of the values of this sport and links with innovation and scientific research, as well as commitment to the environment, which constitute the pillars of the third edition of the regatta. "

The objective of this new team is to start preparing the sailboat as soon as possible. Jörg Riechers will participate in several races on class 40 and mini class sailboats throughout 2013 and, in 2014, he will start the Route du Rhum on a class 40 sailboat.

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joerg-riechers-c-1600-660.jpg © Christophe Breschi / Mini Transat La Boulangère.    7sept 2018
With a third place in the recent Mini Class Les Sables Azores Les Sables, winning the second leg., German solo racer Jorg Riechers closes his successful ten years chapter in the Mini Class and, just turning 50 years old, is now ready to ink the opening pages on his ambitious Vendée Globe 2020 campaign.

Riechers wears the benefits of his years in the Mini Class and in Class 40 well. His infectious sense of humour, a quick with which sometimes runs away with him, mask a deep seated determination and a hard earned knowledge base which ensures he knows what he wants as the constituents of his Vendée Globe programme. And with a 2015 Barcelona World Race under his belt he has the experience to deliver a competitive result.
His Owen Clarke IMOCA 60, formerly Javier 'Bubi' Sanso's Acciona, was purchased as a damaged hull -  Sanso capsized 350 miles from the Azores, close to completing the 2012-13 race - and was being refitted in a yard in Lisbon, Portugal. This winter the boat will be completely be brought up to date - foils and a new rig being fitted - and should be ready for a March launch followed by a month of sea trials from Cascais before the first IMOCA race next spring.
Riechers is pleased to have finished his Mini career with a podium result, accepting that carrying on to pursue the pinnacle MiniTransat victory which eludes him would be wasted time, " I have been second in the Mini Transat, all my singlehanded finishes with the boat have been on the podium, and I think if I carried on in the mini that would be to the exclusion of doing the Vendee Globe. Doing it again with the chance of finising fourth would be pretty stupid. If it's good, don't touch it again." But, like other successful 'Made in Mini' skippers, the apprenticeship in the Mini has been essential learning, " The Mini taught me that you can break boats. So, go with the capability and the performance of the boat. It is a good thing for the IMOCA 60, it is the same. You overcook it you break it. The mini is just the same. If you push too hard you destroy the boat, not like a Figaro or a Class 40. The Class 40 was good because the boats are easy, they are a nice size and the competition is good. On the techncial side they are not that interesting like a Mini or an IMOCA, but they are easy to sail so it is a bit like a holiday boat."
Riechers speaks with the benefit of success in the Class 40 too, he won the Solidaire du Chocolat, and the Atlantic Cup, was second in the Quebec Saint Malo, third in the Transat Jacques Vabre and sixth in the Route du Rhum.
He laughs, "So the same thing applies, don't touch it again."

New foils for 2020
The boat is in Lisbon is being refitted to the new rule with the required new ballast configuration now fitted.  The next step is adding foils. Short term Riechers and his team are finalising the purchase of a second generation set from a 2016-17 podium finisher. Working with foils ace Martin Fischer (GC32, Groupama, A Class cats, Luna Rossa) and designer Merf Owen, the intention is to fit a latest generation set of foils and a replacement, higher volume bow next winter. But the initial objective is to get out, get foiling, race miles and get qualified for the Vendée Globe.
He contends, "Everyone knows that the generation of foils being fitted now will be succeeded by the time of the next Vendee Globe, so the new generation like the new Charal, are much more perfomant. And we have to decide in the next two weeks if we go for a wing or a spreader mast. At the moment I err on the side of a wing mast we can reinforce like we want, because it is a 2011 boat, and we know that the new foils are creating and enormous righting moment, I think we have a card to play there for us. We have the freedom to add a lot more strength and resistance to the mast, so we can push the boat much harder. That will be interesting in the NE trades and in the south. Hard core reaching we can have the same performance as the 2020 boats, at say between 90 and 130 in over 20-25kts of wind."
After the Jacques Vabre the intention is to add a new bow, going max volume and then new foils. " Definitely we will go for new foils after that. " he affirms, "The secondhand foils just now are just to get going and get results and experience. I can then give good feedback to Martin and Merf and that is important.  I think the boat has huge potential because it is narrow, 5.53m compared with the new boats which are 5.45m and this boat does not have a lot of extra wetted surface which is good for foiling. The disadvantage is the boat is still a little bit heavier than the new boats, about 300 or so kilos. But it is in the ballpark." Riechers has a clear objective, particularly in the knowledge he has always - he says - been able to make boats go fast and can endure the suffering necessary to be successful, " I am not doing this Vendee Globe to win. I am hoping for maybe a top five, an outsider for the podium, the darkest of dark horses!"
" I think I can get a little bit more speed out of any boat. In my whole sailing career, from the beginning, I have never had the fastest boat but I have been winning races and so there is something there that I must be capable of doing. I think I am good at sacrificing myself. Like in the Mini It was really difficult to sail. In the Mini Transat just as in the Azores race I had two and a half to three hours sleep a day, keeping that rhythm for two and a half or three weeks you have to be able to sacrifice yourself. That is tough. I hated that boat at the finish, well 12 hours before the finish. I am good on preparation. And I am good at the MacGuyyver aspects, fixing and keeping going. I was really proud of fixing a huge hole in my mini in 2011 just after being hit at the start, repairing hole in the night and still being first on the first day of the race. I was really proud of that. I fixed it inside and outside during the first night at sea, a real big patch, and next morning I was first." He adds, "It's a funny thing I always do well when people crash into my boat. I fix it and do well. On the other hand when I am in the yard I am not allowed to do anything because it is always such an ugly mess. And at home in the house I am hopeless, my wife has to do everything. Preparing meals I am good by the way. But at sea I am good.

 

THEN ONE DAY THE SPONSOR PULLED OUT

 

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ACCIAONO/ Offshore Team Germany.   Ready for the 2020 Vendee

 ....just sitting there

otgermany.png

There is always more to the story.....

     and german doesnt always translate well to english , comes across as harsh..

 

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Joerg RIECHERS « 2012 Class40 Champion » !

Last Friday (November the 9th) during the executive meeting, the race committee gave the ranking of the 2012 Class40 Championship.

After a magnificent season full of regularity, The Classs40 N°115, skipped by Jörg RIECHERS, imposes itself logically. Winner on the Solidaire du Chocolat and the Atlantic Cup, the German skipper will have left the podium only once over five events in the Normandy Channel Race (DNF). He reached the second place in the Transat Québec-St Malo and the 3rd place in the Class40 World Championship. These performances underline a professionalism and a constancy quite exceptional for someone who has just launched his campaign “ Vendée Globe 2016”.

Sébastien ROGUES impresses on Eole Generation GDF Suez (N°105) climbing on the second step of the podium! 5 races for his first season in Class40, and he was five time in the top 10 and once on the third place of the podium (Transat Quebec Saint Malo). At 24 years old, Sébastien clearly shows that he will be a serious competitor for the title next season.

Participating in only 3 races, Aloys LE CLAQUIN, skipper of Class40 N°104, climb on the third step. His good results (6th in Solidaire du Chocolat, 8th in Québec Saint Malo and 2nd in Class40 World Championship) shows that Aloys stays among the favorites.

The prize giving ceremony  will take place during the Paris Boat Show. In the meantime the complete ranking can be downloaded here!

 

 

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Jorg went to france and competed hard.....

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16 minutes ago, huey 2 said:

There is always more to the story.....

Jörg and Offshore Team Germany split in early 2019 - his plans to modify Acciano optimized for the Vendee collided with plans to optimize her for "The Ocean Race".

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  27 minutes ago, huey 2 said:

There is always more to the story.....

Jörg and Offshore Team Germany split in early 2019 - his plans to modify Acciano optimized for the Vendee collided with plans to optimize her for "The Ocean Race".

 

There is alot more to the story, than that............

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This Monday will be a busy day at Cape Horn. Rank 3 - 11, 9 boats overall could cross cape horn on Monday, 2021-01-04. Probably one of the most busy 24 - 36 hour period out there ever - at least in terms of racing yachts entering the Atlantic. What is then coming could be one hell of a race. Since I'm with Boris I hope he finally will be going off the brake and give it some beans. Show us what Seaxplorer is capable of - for sure she has more to give... 

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Vendée Globe: "I live with this fear that wears me down", admits Armel Tripon

French skipper Armel Tripon, aboard his boat & quot; L & # 039; Occitane en Provence & quot;  December 22, 2020, during the Vendée Globe
French skipper Armel Tripon, on board his boat "L'Occitane en Provence" on December 22, 2020, during the Vendée Globe
afp.com - Armel TRIPON
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02 JAN 2021
 
Update 02.01.2021 at 08:00
 AFP 
© 2021 AFP
 

Heavily heckled by a southern depression as he headed for Cape Horn, Armel Tripon spent "New Year's Eve on the alert", dancing "on the skin of the devil!". "I live daily with this fear that wears me out," said the skipper in his logbook for AFP.

At the helm of his brand new "flying boat" (L'Occitane en Provence), the skipper, who is taking part in his first solo round-the-world trip, is in 13th position on Saturday at dawn (out of a fleet of 27 skippers still race).

He still has some 8,400 nautical miles (just over 15,550 km) to cover before the finish.

"Bonne-Esperance, Australia, New Zealand are now far in the wake of the L'Occitane-en-Provence express train! This frantic race in the deep south will end in a few days after the legendary passage of Cape Horn, which will give the legitimate right to piss in the wind! Unless it is for the sailors who pass it from east to west! Whatever, I will do the test alone in my corner! ".

"There is nothing around us around, we cross the symbolic Nemo point, the most remote GPS point from any land on the globe! It does not affect me more than that, since I have been sailing for more than fifty "Two days in an immense desert! The open sea is a good remedy to lose all reference to daily life, clocking up to the clock and at fixed times. I live to the rhythm of the sun, which has been generous in this Pacific Ocean. An ocean that I particularly liked, very much alive, rhythmic, invigorating with its string of depressions that twisted us in all directions! ".

"+ And for the 31st, what are you doing, Mr. Tripon? + Well I'm dancing ... on the devil's skin! A southern depression inviting itself to the party makes me spend a New Year's Eve on the alert, with hollow, bumps and a + gusty + and icy wind! Without ceasing, for forty-eight hours, the boat passes from wave to wave, rising and falling with a crash, and comes to mind this sentence of Mandela, never as true as during this extraordinary race: + I discovered a secret: after having climbed a hill, all that we discover is that there are still many other hills to climb + ".

"It hurts for my boat with each blow received, I'm afraid of breakage, since the start of Les Sables d'Olonne, I live daily with this fear that wears me out. This is also the great south. , the rhythm of the waves and the strong wind, associated with the rhythm of the race which manhandles the boat! "

"The fatigue of man and machine will be rewarded after the Horn, even after the Falklands when the heat picks up and the strong winds of the Howling Fifties run out of steam in my transom! In the meantime, I keep my back round on the devil's skin! Happy New Year. "

Interview by Sabine COLPART

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Vendée Globe. Yannick Bestaven: ”I can't wait to get out of there! 

December 31, 2020
 
 
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vg2020-20201008-maitrecoq-vg-bi-jml-5869 Yannick Bestaven training aboard Maitre Coq, for the Vendee Globe. (Photo Jean-Marie LIOT / Maître Coq)
 

Yannick Bestaven is still the leader and should pass Cape Horn in the lead ahead of Charlie Dalin. The two men take advantage of a front to widen the gap with the rest of the fleet. With a boat in perfect working order despite 53 days at sea, the Rochelais is already projecting itself into the Atlantic.

 
 

“I have a small forehead which is passing over me: there is a little air (27 knots)! It is also what I came to seek to make a good trajectory on port side in order to make the most direct route towards Cape Horn. I have a northerly wind on a rather pretty sea with a good speed, but behind the front, the wind passes to the North-West so it will naturally make me go up towards the North: I should make a nice curve along the ZEA.

For the passage of Cape Horn, it will be necessary to see the 'timing': I should still be quite southerly but it is not yet written since there will be wind with gusts and especially sea. Pacific swell, but it's okay! It's not rough seas like in the Indian ... The boat slips instead of stopping in the wave ahead.

53 days at sea, it pulls a little on the organizations, physically and mentally. Of course, I can't wait to get out of there to be a little more calm and balanced. But it should be noted that the weather was rather particular in the southern seas and we took a long time to cross them… It is time for that to stop and that we go back to more temperate latitudes: dry the boat and the sailor to have energy to attack the last stretch in form.

I stayed in UTC time and night is beginning to fall here: we must be eight to ten hours behind Greenwich. New Year's Eve is not going to be party favors and mother-in-law's tongues and in addition, as all the discos are closed… It will be an evening like any other! Of course, I'm going to call my family and friends ashore who are going to celebrate New Years Eve, but that's it. It doesn't do much to me, even if there are plenty of ways to disconnect at sea: I live a bit from day to day. The new year is not going to change the way I sail or the weather to come!

Twenty knots on average, that's a lot, especially as our “little” foilers are not very pleasant in these conditions. But it's fun to go for miles! We hang on and I spend a lot of time in the standby seat or in the bunk. But you have to behave! It's not too cold, as I had to get used to it. It is not too humid in the boat but I am sailing with everything closed: I am dry! And then there are no longer those “buffet stops” that we have known in the Indian ...

I've never spent so much time at sea: it's starting to get a lot of days, even if I don't see the days go by. I got used to the surroundings and started to know my boat well. As soon as possible, I take a tour of the monohull to do a check because everything is starting to age and wear out, which is normal. It is better to prevent pips than to cure them. But the boat is still 100%. I keep an eye on the weather forecast for Cape Horn. As for the pursuers, it is happy that it finally leaves in front! This was not the case before ... So much the better if I can make myself a little mattress in advance before going up the Atlantic more cautiously. And the foils are really the boat's turbo. "

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Been out of the thread for a bit.  Happy New Year Vendee junkies

Still plotting my select boats though.  Also, ran a test routing to Cape Verdes yesterday.  Interesting to see a couple of things.

First, yesterdays (Jan 1, USA west coast) comp of MCoQ to polars was really quite close. Todays 1700 update relative to the routing was quite a bit off.  I wonder if Yannick backed things off a bit to preserve the boat. The video of him being at Cape Horn upthread shows it is breeze on conditions and the grib (gfs) indicates mid 30's with gusts to 40!

The routing to Cape Verde looks to pass pretty close to the Capricorn gate that I placed when the fleet were heading south from the start.  It will be interesting to see how that plays out!

 

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16 minutes ago, huey 2 said:

Jörg and Offshore Team Germany split in early 2019 - his plans to modify Acciano optimized for the Vendee collided with plans to optimize her for "The Ocean Race".

 

There is alot more to the story, than that............

At least what is publicly known ...

By the way I am not a critic of Jörg - I would have loved to see him on the start line this time. To be frustrated after to Projects busted so close to getting real is only understandable and human. May the force be with him. Reason for my post was to highlight the different personalities of Boris and Jörg. When I came across Boris' "I'm a softie" video, I could not resist. It's a bit sad to read his facebook posts all mixed with a bit of sour grapes. 

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Pardon the VG newbie question, but is there prevailing wisdom for passing inside or outside the Falkland Islands? Seems there's more wind outside, but the angles look challenging to get North and West thereafter.

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14 minutes ago, prime8 said:

I can tell Dalin is a millennial by his skew towards CH for the selfie

Too bad it is dark. I was hoping for a daylight passage, with perhaps a photographer in a chopper. Maybe when the next group arrives.

Edit: But they do have 17.5 hours of daylight, so maybe photos are possible. Sure hope so.

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A bit of a concerning slow down on the Coq over the last 4 hours - or it could just be a slow sail change and getting used to new conditions on the new course. Average 8-ish knots over 4 hours...

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2 hours ago, Varan said:

Too bad it is dark. I was hoping for a daylight passage, with perhaps a photographer in a chopper. Maybe when the next group arrives.

Edit: But they do have 17.5 hours of daylight, so maybe photos are possible. Sure hope so.

Charlie passed 04:39 UTC, 01:39 (-03:00) local time. No photos so.

However, I prepared a selfie weather forecast for the remaining fleet - may they adjust their routings accordingly ;-)

  • Sunrise:  04:54
  • Sunset: 22:18
  • Dawn: 23:18

Best time windows for a selfie would be Sunday before dawn (SELFIE1), Monday morning (SELFIE2) and Monday evening (SELFIE3). Otherwise it's raining the whole day. It might be worth to slow down for a passage at Tueseday morning (SELFIE4) - weather forecast looks really nice then.

 

cap-horn-2020-01-03-selfie-forcast.thumb.png.dd19ec37bee90c0454796ab41f523786.png

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On 12/31/2020 at 5:05 PM, stief said:

@Coconuts.is  and @Haji Some questions

IIRC, you were/are in touch with boat preps, and hope you might have some background why there aren't more zero emissions efforts this time? Figured more boats would have gone for a zero emissions Vendee Globe, like Conrad Colman last time.

What happened to the 'Oceanvolt' motors or equivalent?  Seemed like a good idea all sailors would like to see develop. Had thought Conrad's agreement with the Race Authorities had worked out a solution to the drive shaft seal issue.

Halyard locks and Corum's mast. Less prep time for the riggers as a major factor this edition?

Thanks for any insights you feel free to offer.

Not sure why there is not much interest this time around for the zero emission thing.  If Conrad found the money he would have done it of corse.  

A OceanVolt motors was installed on Hugo Boss but was never talked about much unfortunately.  In my opinion it is a fantastic set up for the IMOCA because of the regeneration capabilities.  At 18kts you can make crazy amounts of power so you charge quickly and it is protected so you dont have the problems that the watt&sea has when you hit shit.  

Karver changed the model of the hooks before the last Jaques Vabre and most everybody changed to the new hooks.  The teams are trying to figure out what is happening and don't think it is lack of preparation.  The new hooks look almost identical, the mechanism is the same as it has been for years.  Possible the new hooks have different metals/materials that are not withstanding the long term abuse of the VG but where ok for the JV.  Another factor that needs to be considered after this VG is the new boats generate much more RM which translate into more load on the hooks causing them to fail.  

Corums mast we will never know and I doute they will be transparent about what happend.  If I had to guess I would say, often when you launch a new boat there are alot of surprises that you might not see if you haven't sailed enough and for sure they haven't.  For example: you can have a loop that doesn't show much ware when sailing around Lorient, then when offshore it gets eaten up super quickly...and boom, just because the surface was not perfect or the radius was not sufficiently big enough.  Also a likely scenario is human erreur.  One design mast have broken in the past in ten knots of wind because the J3 cable was not in place. 

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15 minutes ago, Coconuts.is said:

Not sure why there is not much interest this time around for the zero emission thing.  If Conrad found the money he would have done it of corse.  

A OceanVolt motors was installed on Hugo Boss but was never talked about much unfortunately.  In my opinion it is a fantastic set up for the IMOCA because of the regeneration capabilities.  At 18kts you can make crazy amounts of power so you charge quickly and it is protected so you dont have the problems that the watt&sea has when you hit shit.  

Karver changed the model of the hooks before the last Jaques Vabre and most everybody changed to the new hooks.  The teams are trying to figure out what is happening and don't think it is lack of preparation.  The new hooks look almost identical, the mechanism is the same as it has been for years.  Possible the new hooks have different metals/materials that are not withstanding the long term abuse of the VG but where ok for the JV.  Another factor that needs to be considered after this VG is the new boats generate much more RM which translate into more load on the hooks causing them to fail.  

Corums mast we will never know and I doute they will be transparent about what happend.  If I had to guess I would say, often when you launch a new boat there are alot of surprises that you might not see if you haven't sailed enough and for sure they haven't.  For example: you can have a loop that doesn't show much ware when sailing around Lorient, then when offshore it gets eaten up super quickly...and boom, just because the surface was not perfect or the radius was not sufficiently big enough.  Also a likely scenario is human erreur.  One design mast have broken in the past in ten knots of wind because the J3 cable was not in place. 

 

Karver has a webpage where they try to debunk the lock issues : https://www.karver-systems.com/en/news-uk/vg2020.html

There is this interview with Nicolas Troussel where he says they know the mast rotated too much, which caused it' breakage. They don't know what caused the excessive rotation though (but assume something like a lower shroud broke) : https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/nicolas-troussel-abandonner-si-tot-c-etait-hyper-dur-27-12-2020-12680399.php

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56 minutes ago, Coconuts.is said:

Not sure why there is not much interest this time around for the zero emission thing.  If Conrad found the money he would have done it of corse.  

At least Boris is in the zero emission thing, It's one of the key marketing stories he sells  - remember the Greta Transat -  but he is certainly not going to sacrifice his race for it as he has still the Diesel as a Backup. Earlier in the Indian he broke both of his Watt&Seat Hydros and was relying on his Diesel for almost the whole Indian ocean to generate energy at night. I selected the time range in his public dashboard (hope the link works). In the first light winds after the Indian, he was able to repair both units. 

Edit: Attach the Hydro repair video

 

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58 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

Good morning, troll99! Now he is 68nm behind.

I thought your boy was hungry. What was it today? :lol::lol::lol:

hehe.. morning, Virgulino!

did you see the article? He trembled with fear.. I guess to cook her wasn't fun.:D

 

Banque Populaire and Bestavens boats give the confidence to push hard. Loccitane is being pushed so late near Cape Horn, it is understandable as it had ridden on lighter winds so long.

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3 hours ago, Nixon said:

A bit of a concerning slow down on the Coq over the last 4 hours - or it could just be a slow sail change and getting used to new conditions on the new course. Average 8-ish knots over 4 hours...

Still going slow in the 11:00 schedule - and strange heading too. Fingers crossed no show stopper for Yannick. 

vg-2021-01-03_mc_slowdown.png

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+1 on hoping all is well for Yannick. 

With luck Pip's wind instrument seems to be working better - at least her boat is reporting a correct wind direction this morning. 

The global view on the tracker really emphasizes that Destremeau is half a world behind the leaders.

image.png.fabcdae7bd1a6075212fa035927526e8.png

OK, those were pretty random thoughts on waking up and checking hte tracker.  Now for some coffee.

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25 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

The global view on the tracker really emphasizes that Destremeau is half a world behind the leaders.

Nope, :) that would place the fleet near the Northpole.

Lets hope Bestaven hit a light patch, seems like it.
A Dalin Bestaven fight for first will be nice to watch.

 

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46 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Still going slow in the 11:00 schedule - and strange heading too. Fingers crossed no show stopper for Yannick. 

Or he is positioning himself further to the east, in order to avoid a huge high pressure building north of the Falklands in the coming days. Time for the weather gurus giving us mere mortals a lookout for the south atlantic.

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47 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Still going slow in the 11:00 schedule - and strange heading too. Fingers crossed no show stopper for Yannick. 

vg-2021-01-03_mc_slowdown.png

 

Just now, troll99 said:

no need. Look at Windy plugins.

Get some confidence, man.

Windy plug in gives a very strange future scenario for tomorrow.
Charlie Dalin is taking the passage between the two main islands of the Falklands.
Yannick is slowed down and shows no further progress.
1946968649_Vendee3-1-2021.thumb.PNG.ed9914c35ae4741e0e2d76176479718d.PNG

 

9 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Or he is positioning himself further to the east, in order to avoid a huge high pressure building north of the Falklands in the coming days. Time for the weather gurus giving us mere mortals a lookout for the south atlantic.

True. Tactics in the atlantic is much more complicated than following an ice limit.
 

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1 hour ago, GER 100 said:

Still going slow in the 11:00 schedule - and strange heading too. Fingers crossed no show stopper for Yannick. 

vg-2021-01-03_mc_slowdown.png

Maybe the softies are right at the end :)

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20 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Nope, :) that would place the fleet near the Northpole.

Lets hope Bestaven hit a light patch, seems like it.
A Dalin Bestaven fight for first will be nice to watch.

 

Closer to Lake Baikal if we really want to be literal.*

Agreed about hoping for a close match up the Atlantic.

 

*Edit to add:  it might not be far from "Point anti-Nemo" - the point on land furthest from any ocean.  By eyeball, looks like that would be somewhere near the border between Mongolia and Xinjiang.

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9 minutes ago, Schakel said:

 


Charlie Dalin is taking the passage between the two main islands of the Falklands.
Yannick is slowed down and shows no further progress.
 


 

I think Charlie passes the west side of the island. To avoid shadows of winds.

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News from Isabelle Joschke...

She's as impressive and wonderful as ever, but things are really complicated right now... I made a summarized translation after the video.

Summarized translation:

(0:10)
She was getting some sleep in, waked by her alarm clock for the video rdv, she had a long night because the day before she lost her last working wind gauge, the boat made a 180 in 30 knots of wind and broken seas which was tricky to recover.
(1:12)
She doesn't have any wind information anymore, so running is complicated as she has to monitor the boat's heading constantly. Now conditions are a little more stable, she's still VMG reaching but she took a reef in the mainsail so things are more manageable, during the night she had full main sail, which is a lot less forgiving than a reefed mainsail, in the gusty conditions that accompany SW winds. With a more forgiving setup she could finally get some sleep.
(2:23)
With only heading mode available to the AP its a pain because she has to constantly monitor the boats course, the heading, the trim, etc.. so she's sleeping with one hand in a glove and the other on the AP remote control to adjust the heading if things go haywire.
(3:15)
Its really not a cool situation because she still has a big month of navigation ahead of her, a third of the way, and it won't be the same tempo, the same comfort, it will be harder to go fast, she will have to ease up to sleep, so the boat will be slower from time to time. So that is really frustrating, she thinks she will sleep a lot less, she will be very mobilized by the boat's running so its going to be tough.
(4:15)
Apart from that Cape Horn is coming, and that rejoices her because shes in a hurry to get out of the southern oceans, she's been there for a long time, she's getting really cold, and despite the beauty of the scenery she needs to get to another climate and to head north. She's looking forward to passing the horn in 2 days, its going to be sketchy, its all running so without a wind gauge it will be really hard but she rejoices to pass to the next sequence.
(5:05)
Another thing is that cape horn was among her big goals in this VG, they were the southern oceans and cape horn, and of course finishing the race. With the southern oceans and cape horn she really reached her goals and that's a great satisfaction.
(5:30)
Are there any ways to repair? On this aerial she's afraid there are no solutions, it looks like a part broke, as for the main aerial which has been out of order for weeks, sometimes it can come back, so she can always pray for a miracle, but she can't repair. What she can do is put an aerial on the transom of the boat, she has one she will be able to put there when the winds calm down, but its a stop gap that doesn't work extremely well so she doesn't think it will be much better

What a sailor... she's one of my favorites, really love her, hope something works out and she can fight to the finish.

Go Isabelle !

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Charlie Dalin: "It's a pretty strong moment to take this step"

January 03, 2021 - 11:07 am • 4980 views

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Charlie Dalin ( Apivia ), the second solo sailor to have passed Cape Horn this Sunday at 4:39 UT, was on the 9:30 am shift this morning. 

“The passage of Cape Horn went well. I was 6 miles away, it was still dark, but the night is not complete here so I could see the shadow of the rock in the half-light. I saw the lights of the lighthouse. It is a rather strong moment to cross this first Cape Horn, there was a lot of sea, a clear sky strewn with squalls, a beautiful moon. I called the lighthouse keeper so we were able to exchange a few words even if I didn't always understand what he was saying, it was nice.

It's a pretty strong moment to take this step. I celebrated it by sending back a little canvas (laughs). I passed near the Diego Ramirez Islands, islands that seem quite hostile, it's sharp pebbles, it's the first land I saw from the Trindade Islands, I almost forgot that it existed. At that time, the continental shelf was parallel to the swell so I didn't notice any difference in the state of the sea. On the other hand, I had to deviate a little bit from my route to be sure to pass. far enough from the coast.

Jean-Yves Bernot (meteorologist) always tells us that we have to change mode once Cape Horn has passed, I will finally be able to understand what he means by this formula. I'm glad I'm done with the Pacific. It's a new phase of racing that opens up to me now. I have already been working for a few days on the ascent strategy, there are a lot of weather phenomena to deal with and a lot of things to do. I won't be bored. 

Before jibing, I will do a little check of the boat. A priori it's fine, I paid attention to the preservation of the boat in this last gale. It was a top priority for me to get out of there with a boat in good condition so for me there are no worries, I am not worried about the conditions of the boat.

It's slowly easing, the sun is rising, I still have between 25-30 knots, the sea has calmed down since I have been protected by the islands. The difference is really no longer having this heavy sea that accompanied us for a few days, I had up to 7 meters of waves.

I am really happy to have passed the course, to achieve it, I can say that I am Cape Hornier now. It was the third course, I passed the first two in the lead, but then fate will have wanted otherwise for this one. There is still a long way to go, there are 7,000 miles of racing left, there are still plenty to play. It was a moment of happiness. "

Charlie Dalin / Apivia 

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1 hour ago, grandsoleil said:

Did Louis Burton gybe late (11 UTC schedule) and crossed into the exclusion zone? Are is it just a tracker hickup?

From the english live: He crossed into the exclusion zone but turned around and exit where he entered, so no penalty.

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Just an odd thing, but when I did the Windy plugin to follow the routing discussions better I noticed that out of the top boats I'm following (along with the leader), Bestaven's routing does not appear (the others did).  When I run Windy forward I see Dalin take an easterly course for a bit so is Yannick's idea to bounce east earlier and then swing north east and get away from the (high) sitting off the coast of Argentina and spend better time in more pressure?

 

It looks like the peleton will be getting a rough ride around the Cape was well and it still is amazing how this group has stayed together, just swapping positions as conditions change.

 

It looks like Pip was able to work out a solution to her wind readings and she is now in 15th.  I have really enjoyed following her efforts and her ability to bounce back from adversity.  I think it is fair to say for her "Yes she cam!" :-)  Looks like she's going be in for a rough ride next Friday, but it might be a better ride then the foilers.

 

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1 hour ago, mowgli said:

I wonder why they don't use wind gauges without cups like these as a backup.

https://lcjcapteurs.com/en/categorie-girouette-anemometres-capteur-vent/racing-sailboats/

I haven’t dug into the ultrasonic wind transducers lately, but wonder about their accuracy in a variety of conditions (rain, snow etc.) and their response time.

Regardless, for a backup any of the anemometers will work, the problem is the install location at the back of the transom is not nearly as good as the top of the mast.

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It is Dalin's first ever passage of Cape Horn and he rounded some 14 hours and 56 minutes after the race leader Yannick Bestaven on Maître Coq IV. He passed some seven miles south of the famous rocky island on the very tip of South America, passing into the Atlantic to complete his first time in the Southern Ocean.

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The leader has come to a halt and lost half of his lead.Anyone has any news??Ok now he's doing 15 knots and headed SE 122 for the exclusion zone.

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Yannick's not just going the wrong way, he's going fast the wrong way, and has been for six hours or so.  I'm checking hte live broadcasts to see if they said anything, but no mention so far.

Edit to add - he was interviewed on the French live, but I my french isn't good enough to catch much of what he said.  The interviewers were easier for me to understand but didn't seem to be responding to any news of problems.

Second Edit:  Late in the English live, they show the projected routings.  Actually looks like jags to the SE are part of the projected route for Bestaven.  So with luck all is well, and this is just a counter-intuitive routing decision.

Time coded to about 8:43

 

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6 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Yannick's not just going the wrong way, he's going fast the wrong way, and has been for six hours or so.  I'm checking hte live broadcasts to see if they said anything, but no mention so far.

There is nothing on twitter or facebook where Yannick is explaining his akward course.
I have a logical explanation:  after the cape he was so exhausted he fell asleep.
 

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4 minutes ago, Schakel said:

There is nothing on twitter or facebook where Yannick is explaining his akward course.
I have a logical explanation:  after the cape he was so exhausted he fell asleep.
 

He did look pretty exhausted in his interview on the French live.  But fortunately it looks like he's following the best routing actually takes him way out east.  See 8:43-ish in the English live (link edited in to my earlier post)

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"I saw the lights of the lighthouse. It is a rather strong moment to cross this first Cape Horn, there was a lot of sea, a clear sky strewn with squalls, a beautiful moon. I called the lighthouse keeper so we were able to exchange a few words even if I didn't always understand what he was saying, it was nice."

Sure hope the lighthouse operator has a really good drone and access to YouTube. Chances are good someone will pass close by in daylight and decent enough weather. Drone shots would be amazingly. 

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21 minutes ago, The Tug said:

Last i looked he was doing 7k and suddenly now doing 15k the wrong direction,his last video at Cape Horn all was well.

As troll99 illustrated, Yannick may just be routing around an area of low wind, while sticking with his overall plan of taking a more easterly route up the Atlantic. 

20210103_072102.thumb.jpg.1172b0276129cfc615e9e9919c20ba59.jpg

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Looks easier for Bestaven, Charlie needs some luck. It is quite a brave route for him. Though the new foilers love C0 and reaching even on weaker winds so it might work. Verdier is more all-round one. 

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13 minutes ago, stief said:

Almost thought Charlie Dalin managed to fly his drone by the Horn. From his latest tweet.

image.thumb.png.5f75147e4fba6effb99f80b25a107ca4.png

Sail setup (leech ignored) looks about right, but light, waves and starboard tack don't fit, so probably a stock shot. Darn ;) 

Plus I don't think extra crew are allowed.

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Boris Hermann has been on mainstream TV (ZDF) in THE  New Years Eve TV Show, live from the Brandenburger Tor in Berlin, where in normal times a crowd of  250k people is celebrating the new year - but not this time around as we all know. Skip to 01:12:11 in the vid or 22:56  local time. During the live transmission he is sitting in his cockpit doing 20 knots. Wow. The moderator asked about Kevins rescue and general safety of the boats. We germans are softie people, I guess ;-) Boris explained his prudent approach to the race (still doing 20+ knts).

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11 hours ago, Varan said:

Too bad it is dark. I was hoping for a daylight passage, with perhaps a photographer in a chopper. Maybe when the next group arrives.

Edit: But they do have 17.5 hours of daylight, so maybe photos are possible. Sure hope so.

The SI also allows for the possibility of 1 hr tracker updates around the Horn . . .  so perhaps when the bulk of the peloton gets closer. 

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43 minutes ago, stief said:

Figured the thread would enjoy the pic. Yeah, it was fun to dream he had the drone up. Reality is a bitch. :D

We have Photoshop and 3d, VFX team to create a new reality for the crowd. Maybe in 2024 :lol: