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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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14 minutes ago, Laurent said:

 

Yes, it is fairly common for the newer boats to be sold right after the event for the next edition.

In some cases, they are even sold before the finish! I believe it was the case for the last edition winner, Banque Populaire VIII skippered by Armel Le Cléac'h, who sold his boat to Louis Burton even before the race...

There are usually lots of negociations in the Atlantig leg towards the finish, about selling boats and projects !

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They should add a turning mark / trombone to finish in daylight. The routers are good enough to predict it a few days early. Most ocean races have a turning mark at the start so why not the finish?  The advertising value would be significant 

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8 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

They should add a turning mark / trombone to finish in daylight. The routers are good enough to predict it a few days early. Most ocean races have a turning mark at the start so why not the finish?  The advertising value would be significant 

Telling skippers who are on their last rations after nearly 3 months at sea to sail around in circles for another twelve hours?

That'll be about as welcome as a turd in a punchbowl.

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

 

Yes, it is fairly common for the newer boats to be sold right after the event for the next edition.

In some cases, they are even sold before the finish! I believe it was the case for the last edition winner, Banque Populaire VIII skippered by Armel Le Cléac'h, who sold his boat to Louis Burton even before the race...

Yes indeed it was the case, mentioned in the telegram article :

Quote

Louis Burton avait racheté le 60 pieds d’Armel Le Cléac’h avant le top départ.

https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/a-vendre-imoca-entre-2-7-et-4-7-millions-d-euros-25-01-2021-12694184.php

About HB being for sale, Alex did say somewhere he is engaged for next year TJV and year after RdR on his current boat right  ?

So is that a change of plan, or part of the sale proposal ?

 

 

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2 hours ago, mad said:

Hugo Boss pulling the plug?

Cheaper to build new and then according to newer specs. Foils will get more effective so design might get more "wave piercing" to withstand slamming loads. We might see new bow and forefoot designs ...   And with possible delamination issues of the current Hugo Boss nobody would trust the "black dungeon" for a long ocean race in the current setup.

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8 hours ago, huey 2 said:

Mic Birch. still incredible to see that finish again...... he is in retirement but has an around  40ft una rig boat called Dolly set up for shorthanded sailing designed by his ferry captain mate. [ something like Designes...??]    https://www.boatsnews.com/story/18445/navigator-profile-mike-birch-winner-of-the-1st-edition-of-the-route-du-rhum

image.png.1407eda3483d314653eef3e72b6adf0e.png

Dolly 30' mono 2006 Rejean Desgagnes design
Hull, deck, and bulkheads, built for career transatlantic racer Mike Birch.

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3 minutes ago, Knut Grotzki said:

Cheaper to build new and then according to newer specs. Foils will get more effective so design might get more "wave piercing" to withstand slamming loads. We might see new bow and forefoot designs ...   And with possible delamination issues of the current Hugo Boss nobody would trust the "black dungeon" for a long ocean race in the current setup.

I would speculate that there is more sponsor return in making a big deal about a new boat with unveiling and launching etc, using the same old boat probably isn't as sexy

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21 hours ago, Your Mom said:

So I guess the 7-hour blackout we're presently in will be the last, for the leaders...  Hopefully the leaders will hit the 200-nm DTF radius before the end of tomorrow's 7-hour blackout.

I understand the reasoning behind not wanting live or near-live position reports, but I hope they can do something about the 7-hour blackout for the next edition.  For anyone outside Europe's time zones, the blackout is during the daytime, which is a real bummer trying to follow the race.

I guess I was off by a bit.  It seems we'll have to wait through one more 7-hour blackout.  Leaders will likely get within 200 nm shortly after the next 7 hours are done...

The quicker updates only apply to the boats who are inside the specified radius, right?  So the boats outside it will appear to not move while those inside it show progress...  and then the others will suddenly pop up with the first update after they hit the circle...  So it might produce some confusing visuals on the tracker for a few hours.

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10 minutes ago, huey 2 said:

image.png.1407eda3483d314653eef3e72b6adf0e.png

Dolly 30' mono 2006 Rejean Desgagnes design
Hull, deck, and bulkheads, built for career transatlantic racer Mike Birch.

 

A number of years ago (can't remember exactly when) I was visiting Walter Greene's obscure little boatyard here in Maine (I can't remember exactly why), but there was this skinny guy working on an odd, small, skinny monohull.  Being a skinny boat fan (remember Ocean Planet?) I got into discussion with the guy, who appeared around 40yrs old. 

Slowly it dawn on me that it was none other than Mike Birch.  I think he was over 70 even then.  

I also realized that if Mike's project was taking place in France, the place would be crawling with admirers, volunteers, and probably press/media, documenting every move the old master made.  While in Maine, he and Walter could work away in complete obscurity.  

Another memory, a few years earlier:  While in Les Sables in 2004, preparing madly for the 04/05 race, VG Director Denis Horeau pulled me aside... He asked "Bruce, so you came from Maine?"  I said yes, I prepared there for over a year, after the Around Alone, before departing to France.  He then asked "So do you know Walter Greene??"  I said that only knew of him, because at the time (2004)I had yet to meet Walter.  Denis then described, in great admiration, how Walter was a hero to him and many other French sailors, and that Walter was largely responsible for the multihull revolution that the French eventually took over.  He said that at least once he had made the pilgrimage to Walter's shop after having finished a race in NY or Boston. He said it "was like Mecca" to him.

We often forget that there ARE sailing legends here...Dodge Morgan, Walter Greene, Mike Planet, the list goes on.  It was really something to get the perspective from the French side, from Denis.  

I want to get his book.  

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17 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

I guess I was off by a bit.  It seems we'll have to wait through one more 7-hour blackout.  Leaders will likely get within 200 nm shortly after the next 7 hours are done...

The quicker updates only apply to the boats who are inside the specified radius, right?  So the boats outside it will appear to not move while those inside it show progress...  and then the others will suddenly pop up with the first update after they hit the circle...  So it might produce some confusing visuals on the tracker for a few hours.

That circle is clearly way to small, 1000 miles would be about right, at least 

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Herrmann: So calm about his options and result, though he does note "I'm not sure I've ever been so excited." Nicely done. He's a winner.

 

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isabelle_joschke_bahia.thumb.jpg.0772c611823d6781d07096627eeb8ad5.jpgEsrIcV_XYAEHlbW.thumb.jpg.64b5e9f0988478498fba2e1d3651e45d.jpg

https://isabellejoschke.com/imoca-macsf-arrivee-bresil-vendee-globe/

Isabelle, arrived safely in Brazil

Isabelle moored her IMOCA in Salvador de Bahia (in the North East of Brazil), this Sunday 24th January at 17h00 (local time). The MACSF technical team, who joined our skipper on the spot, is at work assessing the damage and carrying out repairs on board the boat as quickly as possible.

Moved by her return to life as an earthwoman, Isabelle looks back and rests for a few more days, looking back positively on what she has achieved and experienced. She even plans to set sail again to complete the last stage of this major adventure, if a new crossing is possible to reach Les Sables d'Olonne.
 
A moving reunion with the team and the town of Salvador.

It wasn't the finish she had dreamed of, yet the entry into the Bay of All Saints and the meeting with part of the team after more than ten weeks of separation shook the MACSF skipper. Alain Gautier, MACSF Sailing team manager, three members of the technical team (Florian, Hadrien and Fanch) and Eric Mollard, MACSF communication director were present to welcome her this weekend at the entrance to the port of Salvador de Bahia :
 
"I was a little apprehensive about the return to land in the absolute, but not too much about the arrival itself. As I entered the bay, I realised that this whole story was coming to an end because I was going to touch land for the first time in almost 80 days. A great welcoming committee was waiting for me. I was very moved because it is also a port that I love. Salvador is a place where I have a lot of very strong memories: I lived there the arrival of my first and second Mini Transat, I came back there for the Transat Jacques Vabre. Arriving here always gives me the feeling of having accomplished something. " - Isabelle Joschke

What can a sailor dream of after 77 days at sea, weeks of deprivation and a daily life in an environment devoid of comfort? For Isabelle, the first few hours on land have been gourmet and simple:

"Even before setting foot on the ground, I was greeted with a huge basket of fresh exotic fruits (coconut, mango, orange juice...) offered by a small local welcome committee. I enjoyed what I had been dreaming about for several days. On my way back to the hotel I took a shower and put on city clothes for the first time in weeks. Then we shared a good Brazilian meal with my team. I had a very good evening. The night was harder though... I think I'm programmed to sleep for an hour and then wake up and so on. I'm not used to sleeping on a floor that doesn't move either. I need to be rocked! "

Assessing the boat without wasting time

As soon as the IMOCA had docked, the MACSF team got into battle order to begin inspecting the boat. The first to get on board, Alain Gautier, the team manager, even dived under the hull to examine the keel.
 
"On Sunday, once MACSF was moored, we stowed the sails. Yesterday, Monday, everyone was on deck very early to start the diagnosis, to evaluate what is repairable and what is not. It's going to take some time. The boys have started to dismantle parts and they will soon contact local companies that will machine them so that the necessary work can be done. Seeing my boat from afar creates a strange feeling. I was on it for two and a half months, it was my companion, my little cocoon in the middle of the oceans. I was happy to find it again on Monday morning. I must admit that I had a little trouble leaving it".
 
The disappointment is over, Isabelle has gained confidence.

The 15 days that followed the official announcement of her retirement served as a transition and allowed Isabelle to reflect calmly on all that she had experienced and accomplished in this Vendée Globe. Her perception of the events changed as a result...

"I wanted to take the time to watch my Vendée Globe from the outside. It's never really easy as the race is so demanding, you're stuck inside. I needed to rest, get my head back in my head and calm down to take a look at everything that happened. I think that it isn't over yet and that this work will go on for a while. It's quite a big world tour actually. It is rich in discovery, learning and emotion."

"I learned to trust myself in tricky situations to find solutions, supported by my team, to find the necessary resources to solve a problem... As the race progressed I had the feeling that it was taking me less time to bounce back. If I had to sum up, I feel stronger. Disappointment is still a bit present. It hurts my heart a little bit to see this battle for victory from afar and to tell myself that I am not part of it. And at the same time I have managed to move on because my story is beautiful. I am lucky to have a great team. Together with our sponsor we've come up with a great project. I can't look at it with a grimace on my face. I don't have the right to."

Isabelle may not be completely finished with her circumnavigation of the globe. The sailor is ready to set sail again to bring MACSF back to Les Sables d'Olonne, if repairs are possible: "I'm sure we'll be able to make repairs. My objective is to be ready to set off again towards Les Sables d'Olonne to complete the loop and end this beautiful story where it started," she explains.

 

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

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Those time allowances are just enhancing the suspense...
80 days and still suspense... never seen this before. And will probably never happen again with so many boats in the Biscay battling it out.

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5 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Those time allowances are just enhancing the suspense...
80 days and still suspense... never seen this before. And will probably never happen again with so many boats in the Biscay battling it out.

Yes. Unprecedented in the VG, despite media hype  (2017: Vendée Globe: Closest Finish in Event's History or 2013: Closest finish in Vendée Globe history possible).  I was hoping someone would compile the finishing times of the past (I've started).

The VG sure has had many  dramatic finishes . .  . and it's not over. Friday will be a different kind of nail-biter too:

Quote

The biggest depression of winter

Friday 29th, it should be Benjamin Dutreux's turn, currently in the northeast of the Azores archipelago. Then, we will watch like milk on the fire the arrival of a large depression on January 30 and 31, which may hinder the progress of Maxime Sorel and Armel Tripon.

"This is the biggest depression of the winter," warn Sébastien Josse and Christian Dumard, the Vendée Globe weather consultants. 65 knots in gusts and 12 meters of trough in the Bay of Biscay (Source Press Service).

(snipped and Safari trans from V&V, for those who missed it)

This will be another gripping week in another gripping edition.

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Yannick (recorded just after the 1400 sked): aiming for a podium or even a win. He sure has sailed hard since his 400 nm lead evaporated off Rio. Another winner.

 

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Speaking of winners, here's another: Damien. Not just a token winner, as Christian Le Pape argued so well in the last paragraph here.

Quote

Interview with Christian Le Pape:

"There is a lot to say about Damien. The Vendée Globe is not over but already, we can say that Damien has shown consistency, serenity and adversity. He also shared his good mood and pleasure at sea, which contrasted with some leaders who complained more.

Obviously, it is easier to hold this positioning when you are not necessarily expected at this level of the race, when you are a real outsider. You could never have imagined that he would play the podium with the boat he had. However, this is what he did many times during the race. Damien is someone who always takes things in the right direction, pragmatically. He was really good in the environment he was able to have.

We can always try to relativize, tell ourselves that the weather was special, also say that some foilers do not sail 100% but other skippers who have more efficient boats, are not there. Really, we must go get this result! Damien is super good! It [He] is a bizuth [rookie] with exceptional qualities of mental resistance. This is out of the ordinary. However, in the Vendée Globe, a lot is played out in the head. It's exciting what he achieves. We exchanged a lot during this Vendée Globe. I wanted to tell him that we were particularly proud of what he achieved, proud that he was part of the team.

Safari snip and trans from a longer article at https://voile.groupe-apicil.com/le-regard-de-christian-le-pape/ earlier today.

I think the counter question would be: "Were there any losers?" Destremau is defensible, so honest answer is "None." 

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https://www.nfb.ca/film/singlehanders.   Mike Birch and so many other,  they were the original Heros of shorthanded racing and crossing the Atlantic in Ostar /Transat/ TJV , and invariably some of the Big N Atlantic Storms on the Great Circle Courses  then finish in light weather and Fog...these were the forerunners to the Caribbean race with the Joys of downhill Tradewind racing evolveing the designs....then to the BOC and Vendee.....Round the Worlders.  The Round UK and Island , The AZAB and the Three Peaks were the training wheels for these events...But there are some incredible early single handed Transat sailors, one early one was Howard Blackburn....

Blackburn first rose to fame in 1883. While he was fishing on the schooner Grace L. Fears, a sudden winter storm caught him and a dorymate unprepared while they were in their Banks dory, leaving them separated from the schooner. Blackburn began to row for shore, despite the loss of his mittens; he knew his hands would freeze, so he kept them in the hooked position that would allow him to row. He tried to save one hand with a sock and thus worsened his condition by freezing his toes and yet not being able to save his fingers. The crewmate gave up and lay down in the dory and died on the second day. Blackburn carried the body to shore for a proper burial.

After five days with virtually no food, water, or sleep, he made it to shore in Newfoundland. Blackburn's hands were treated for frostbite, but could not be saved; he lost all of his fingers, and many of his toes, and both thumbs to the first joint.

Blackburn returned to Gloucester a hero, and with the help of the town, managed to establish a successful saloon. Not content with this, he organised an expedition to the Klondike to join the gold rush; rather than go overland, he and his group sailed there, via Cape Horn. Howard, after a disagreement with his partners left the group in San Francisco after a short trip to Portland, Oregon to buy lumber to help finance the trip, and returned home never having panned for gold.

After the quest for gold failed, Blackburn turned his attention to a new challenge — to sail single-handed across the Atlantic Ocean. This had been done before, by Alfred "Centennial" Johnson in 1876, and Joshua Slocum had completed a single-handed circumnavigation in 1898; but for a man with no fingers to undertake such a voyage would be quite an accomplishment. He sailed from Gloucester, Massachussetts in 1899, in the modified Gloucester Fishing Sloop, Great Western, and reached the city of Goucester, England after 62 days at sea.

What he did in 62 days , they now do in 80 days around the world.....the times are a changing...

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2 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

isabelle_joschke_bahia.thumb.jpg.0772c611823d6781d07096627eeb8ad5.jpgEsrIcV_XYAEHlbW.thumb.jpg.64b5e9f0988478498fba2e1d3651e45d.jpg

https://isabellejoschke.com/imoca-macsf-arrivee-bresil-vendee-globe/

Isabelle, arrived safely in Brazil

Isabelle moored her IMOCA in Salvador de Bahia (in the North East of Brazil), this Sunday 24th January at 17h00 (local time). The MACSF technical team, who joined our skipper on the spot, is at work assessing the damage and carrying out repairs on board the boat as quickly as possible.

Moved by her return to life as an earthwoman, Isabelle looks back and rests for a few more days, looking back positively on what she has achieved and experienced. She even plans to set sail again to complete the last stage of this major adventure, if a new crossing is possible to reach Les Sables d'Olonne.
 
A moving reunion with the team and the town of Salvador.

It wasn't the finish she had dreamed of, yet the entry into the Bay of All Saints and the meeting with part of the team after more than ten weeks of separation shook the MACSF skipper. Alain Gautier, MACSF Sailing team manager, three members of the technical team (Florian, Hadrien and Fanch) and Eric Mollard, MACSF communication director were present to welcome her this weekend at the entrance to the port of Salvador de Bahia :
 
"I was a little apprehensive about the return to land in the absolute, but not too much about the arrival itself. As I entered the bay, I realised that this whole story was coming to an end because I was going to touch land for the first time in almost 80 days. A great welcoming committee was waiting for me. I was very moved because it is also a port that I love. Salvador is a place where I have a lot of very strong memories: I lived there the arrival of my first and second Mini Transat, I came back there for the Transat Jacques Vabre. Arriving here always gives me the feeling of having accomplished something. " - Isabelle Joschke

What can a sailor dream of after 77 days at sea, weeks of deprivation and a daily life in an environment devoid of comfort? For Isabelle, the first few hours on land have been gourmet and simple:

"Even before setting foot on the ground, I was greeted with a huge basket of fresh exotic fruits (coconut, mango, orange juice...) offered by a small local welcome committee. I enjoyed what I had been dreaming about for several days. On my way back to the hotel I took a shower and put on city clothes for the first time in weeks. Then we shared a good Brazilian meal with my team. I had a very good evening. The night was harder though... I think I'm programmed to sleep for an hour and then wake up and so on. I'm not used to sleeping on a floor that doesn't move either. I need to be rocked! "

Assessing the boat without wasting time

As soon as the IMOCA had docked, the MACSF team got into battle order to begin inspecting the boat. The first to get on board, Alain Gautier, the team manager, even dived under the hull to examine the keel.
 
"On Sunday, once MACSF was moored, we stowed the sails. Yesterday, Monday, everyone was on deck very early to start the diagnosis, to evaluate what is repairable and what is not. It's going to take some time. The boys have started to dismantle parts and they will soon contact local companies that will machine them so that the necessary work can be done. Seeing my boat from afar creates a strange feeling. I was on it for two and a half months, it was my companion, my little cocoon in the middle of the oceans. I was happy to find it again on Monday morning. I must admit that I had a little trouble leaving it".
 
The disappointment is over, Isabelle has gained confidence.

The 15 days that followed the official announcement of her retirement served as a transition and allowed Isabelle to reflect calmly on all that she had experienced and accomplished in this Vendée Globe. Her perception of the events changed as a result...

"I wanted to take the time to watch my Vendée Globe from the outside. It's never really easy as the race is so demanding, you're stuck inside. I needed to rest, get my head back in my head and calm down to take a look at everything that happened. I think that it isn't over yet and that this work will go on for a while. It's quite a big world tour actually. It is rich in discovery, learning and emotion."

"I learned to trust myself in tricky situations to find solutions, supported by my team, to find the necessary resources to solve a problem... As the race progressed I had the feeling that it was taking me less time to bounce back. If I had to sum up, I feel stronger. Disappointment is still a bit present. It hurts my heart a little bit to see this battle for victory from afar and to tell myself that I am not part of it. And at the same time I have managed to move on because my story is beautiful. I am lucky to have a great team. Together with our sponsor we've come up with a great project. I can't look at it with a grimace on my face. I don't have the right to."

Isabelle may not be completely finished with her circumnavigation of the globe. The sailor is ready to set sail again to bring MACSF back to Les Sables d'Olonne, if repairs are possible: "I'm sure we'll be able to make repairs. My objective is to be ready to set off again towards Les Sables d'Olonne to complete the loop and end this beautiful story where it started," she explains.

 

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

a friend's son offering her some homemade orange cake.

image.thumb.png.f411d304bd6d6933f3d0abf2be3d8ab0.png

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A number of years ago (can't remember exactly when) I was visiting Walter Greene's obscure little boatyard here in Maine (I can't remember exactly why), but there was this skinny guy working on an odd, small, skinny monohull.  Being a skinny boat fan (remember Ocean Planet?) I got into discussion with the guy, who appeared around 40yrs old. 

Haji,    really enjoyed this Reminiscence but that complete antithesis to the Stardom of the other-side of the Atlantic, I could imagine the quiet life would have been a haven for him....especially to prepare once again.......loved the Fuji era when he really took of..incredible seamanship

Slowly it dawn on me that it was none other than Mike Birch.  I think he was over 70 even then.  

I also realized that if Mike's project was taking place in France, the place would be crawling with admirers, volunteers, and probably press/media, documenting every move the old master made.  While in Maine, he and Walter could work away in complete obscurity.  

Another memory, a few years earlier:  While in Les Sables in 2004, preparing madly for the 04/05 race, VG Director Denis Horeau pulled me aside... He asked "Bruce, so you came from Maine?"  I said yes, I prepared there for over a year, after the Around Alone, before departing to France.  He then asked "So do you know Walter Greene??"  I said that only knew of him, because at the time (2004)I had yet to meet Walter.  Denis then described, in great admiration, how Walter was a hero to him and many other French sailors, and that Walter was largely responsible for the multihull revolution that the French eventually took over.  He said that at least once he had made the pilgrimage to Walter's shop after having finished a race in NY or Boston. He said it "was like Mecca" to him.

We often forget that there ARE sailing legends here...Dodge Morgan, Walter Greene, Mike Planet, the list goes on.  It was really something to get the perspective from the French side, from Denis.  

I want to get his book.  

   

But also Loick Peyron was another that had the Walter Greene experience with multihulls...

https://proafile.com/multihull-boats/article/happy-is-the-man

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Charlie.......up on speed now 19.3 knots ,   bearing 134

                             then 10mins later 14.6   139 deg....so a bit of variation

Screen Shot 2021-01-27 at 1.55.27 pm.png

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20 minutes ago, stief said:

Charlie's current track: if that's "local knowledge" I'm definitely not a local. Makes no sense I can see tactically. Good night.

Minus vmg at the moment, but setting up for the next gybe where vmg will approach boat speed on his good board too (I believe).

Edit: for his "next, and perhaps last, gybe".

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Boris had  a massive a slow down for at least one hour. Hope nothing serious. Look at his dashboard starting from 04:00. I recall he has a sail combination which is quite an effort to change to. IIRC the switch between the J1.5 and the Gennaker takes about half an hour or so. Hopefully all is well onboard seaxplorer.

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Less than 1000 miles to cover... In the south of the Azores, Armel happily finds stable wind and high speeds aboard L'Occitane in Provence. He is fighting to win the tenth place to Maxime Sorel. He explains (jokingly) why this world tour is too short for him.
 
Armel assures that everything is fine on board, clean-shaven and morally fixed. "Last night was still complicated with unstable wind hovering between 9 and 18 knots, but it's finally more stable in the last few hours." L'Occitane in Provence glides at high speed, often at more than 20 knots, on a swell that forms. "This time we hooked up the depression systems."
 
"Summer is over, we're getting closer to home"

"The summer is unfortunately over, I no longer live half naked on the boat. I put on socks, tights, fleeces... last night I even pulled out a little cap. It was the heat, but it's also good to see that the temperature is getting back to season, because it means we're approaching home!  The "house" was initially Les Sables-d'Olonne, now less than a thousand miles (less than 1852 kilometres) in front of the rounded bow of the Manuard plan built by Black Pepper.
 
Conquer 10th place and finish before the big weather

L'Occitane in Provence is running well, about 300 miles south of the Azores Archipelago and the attempt to conquer tenth place is more relevant than ever. "I glide between 18 and 22 knots, without requiring too much effort from the boat. These are beautiful sliding conditions and the hunt for tenth place is still going on.  Returning to Maxime Sorel "remains one of my goals, even if the first of all is obviously to complete this round the world. Don't think it's done on its own, because Maxime continues to sail well and be fast with his light boat, but I still have that desire. I've already taken 500 miles from him... there are about 80 left, it's still playable and I'm working on it."

Between two jokes about this "last Tuesday at sea, which will be followed by the last Wednesday, then the last Thursday etc." we still manage to make the skipper of L'Occitane in Provence estimate his arrival at The Sables-d'Olonne. So it would be "on the night of Friday to Saturday, let's say early Saturday morning." And "don't hang around"because a rather hollow depression will sweep the Vendée Globe this weekend, with strong winds and a big sea. All the more reason not to soften, even if "there is no problem, normally I stay in front of this depression" reassures Armel. Once again it is necessary to measure the effort: first do not take inconsiderate risks to complete the round the world, second try to conquer the tenth place, tertio arrive before the bad weather.
 
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Videos of the edge

 
"I can't wait to get there"
 
On these three goals, Armel is confident... and he makes no secret of his impatience to finish, to complete this Vendée Globe, this solo round-the-world trip that is as much a great adventure as a race. "Yes now I can't wait to get there, to be back with my family, the whole team, the friends and the loved ones. We're going to do something big. And if the cruise we would like it never stop, the offshore race is still much less comfortable and it's also good when it stops!  ».
 
Predictions about the winner
 
Understandable: this Tuesday afternoon Armel and the 24 other sailors that the oceans let pass attack their 80th day at sea. It's a long 80 days alone at sea. By the way, a prognosis on the podium, very undecided? "Frankly, it's impossible to say. So, in the ladle, I see a trifecta between Charlie (Dalin), Boris (Herrmann) and Yannick (Bestaven)... but it's very complicated to go forward so tight, among other things with the game of compensation that Yannick and Boris have. Charlie and Yannick have been in the lead for a long time, not Boris, but it's the end that counts. No one can say who will prevail." 
 
Fastest from the equator to the equator, "a nice satisfaction"
 
In terms of numbers, Armel noted that he had been the fastest in the fleet between the equator going and the equator back. "It's a great satisfaction, it shows that we are in the real world with our choices for the boat." And this inspires Armel with an extra little joke: "It's way too short for me this world tour! With one more U-turn around the world I passed in front of everyone! We should extend the route... Come on I go back, I have work to do. See you in three days at the Sables-d'Olonne! » 
 
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Energy on board an Imoca


To survive alone in this hostile environment, to eat, drink, weather or to ensure the smooth running of the boat, the skipper must create his own electricity and manage his supply precisely. In the Deep South, a solo sailor sleeps only five hours a day and needs 5,000 calories of food every day, almost double an earthling' time. But if a Westerner consumes an average of 148 litres of drinking water per day, on board an IMOCA skippers have only about 4 liters to drink, rehydrate his freeze-dried dishes, or even do a bit of grooming.

Energy autonomy
 
IMOCA creates energy through the power of water, wind or sun. Since 2012, skippers have been looking to reduce the use of diesel to recharge their batteries. Although the engine is mandatory for possible problems (assistance, serious damage, breakage of other energy sources), its use remains very limited.

Listening to the testimony of skippers, renewable energy sources have become the most virtuous solutions when it comes to combining performance, weight gain and environmental protection. Today, equipped with ever more sophisticated technological tools (navigation plant, radars, tilting keel, desalination plant, wifi and other communication systems, etc.), IMOCA are becoming smarter, but also more energy-intensive. With an average consumption of 10 to 12 amps per hour, each team had to rethink the way they produced energy. Hydrogenerators, wind turbines or solar panels, IMOCA are, to this day, able to detach themselves more and more from fossil fuels.
 
By 2020, 90% of the fleet is equipped with hydrogen generators. These propellers, developed by the company founded by Yannick Bestaven, Watt and Sea, have revolutionized onboard energy management. "The hydrogen generator works almost continuously. It is more efficient to use this than to make a normal engine charge because the hydrogen generators keep the batteries level, it is very little drag and it also helps to gain weight. The use of these alternative energy sources to a goal both ecological and performance. We try to fight against every kilo too much and necessarily, loading 200 liters of diesel for its consumption, would not follow this logic," continues Jean-Marie Dauris.

Although still little used, other energy production systems are developing. Ten boats were equipped with solar panels and four with a wind turbine. Watt and Sea is currently developing a wind turbine model with a 100% waterproof alternator, a propeller surface 25% smaller than that of commercially available wind turbines and a "leeward" design that makes it very stable in waves. "The wind turbine is now a support for the hydrogen generator, it cannot yet replace it. It already works very well on the Ultim, but the speed and configuration of the monohulls are different, we still need to continue the development," concludes Jean-Marie.
 
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14 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Boris had  a massive a slow down for at least one hour. Hope nothing serious. Look at his dashboard starting from 04:00. I recall he has a sail combination which is quite an effort to change to. IIRC the switch between the J1.5 and the Gennaker takes about half an hour or so. Hopefully all is well onboard seaxplorer.

At the same time he went from 140 TWA to 155-160 TWA, his runner loads dropped and he had a increase of wind speed, so maybe running deep for a sail change that took longer than expected?  At least his VMG wouldn't of taken a massive hit

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Boris;     There was a NNW-SSE HP ridge in one of the models from Cap Finisteere , this screen shot was from before he would have come across this ridge...which was evolving in direction each time I looked....was kicked around NNE -SSW so being interacted on by the front coming through with Yannick ...possibly...

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Bit late to this last stage of the show today.  Been on the water all day. Yeah yeah, I know tough job! Someone's got to do it.

Going to be an awesome show tomorrow I think.  Where to watch it?  Anyone?

 

 

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Charlie. ;  Just gybing down wind  following the stream, but the wind will curl up to the finish line and he will follow....IF according to his  and Will's expectation of local knowledge and the routing....

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Charlie's current track: if that's "local knowledge" I'm definitely not a local. Makes no sense I can see tactically. Good night.

Yoann Richomme explains the shore effect AND the mountain affect around the NW corner of Spain.

 

Basically, if you have SW winds at Finisterre, the wind speeds up and rotate to W along the North shore of Spain.

If it is further South over Portugal, it hits the mountain range along the North shore of Spain and create a windless bubble behind it, along the North shore of Spain.

 

In the current situation, Charlie is in the acceleration zone situation; but he is the only one in the right timing to take advantage of it; right behind him, the windless bubble will appears along the North shore. So Boris does not exactly follow him. He sails a bit further North...

What is impressive (to me) is that the routing of Yoann is exactly what Charlie has done a few hours later...

Everything depends on the actual angle of wind in the gulf of Biscay. If it is not 270, but 260 or 255, Charlie is screwed, because he has to sail more North and will need one more jibe close to Sables d'Olonne, and it will be a straight line for Louis...

 

The actual route for Boris is not as extreme as what Yoann predicted, but still, a definitive East route along the North shore of Spain, through the Gulf of Biscay.

 

After correction, he gives:

Yanick Bestaven : First

Boris Herrmann: Second at 1hr 09 min

Charlie Dalin: third at 1 hr 13 min !!!

 

So... still very open and dependent on the smallest mistake or the smallest wind variation from the models.

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1 hour ago, mezaire said:

At the same time he went from 140 TWA to 155-160 TWA, his runner loads dropped and he had a increase of wind speed, so maybe running deep for a sail change that took longer than expected?  At least his VMG wouldn't of taken a massive hit

Mezaire was right, from the VG-Homepage:

Boris Herrmann in second this morning reported at 0530hrs UTC. “It is pretty warm when you are doing manoeuvres out here. I was working to change from the big gennaker to the small gennaker and I got so slow because I was hot. I took my top off. I said it is a day before the finish, take some risk to be wet! And it did not take long to be completely soaked from head to toe. Water all over me! One lumpy wave coming from the side, stacking at the back of the boat and there you go. I was a bit slow during the last hour doing the manoeuvre, it took longer than I had wanted. It is pitch black dark right now. I don’t know how to do it quicker. There is a bit of tiredness for sure but now I am set up small gennaker one reef and the boat is accelerating to 27kts at times, I have 25kts of wind off Finisterre right now and it should last like this until the end. I will do some more weather now.”

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2 minutes ago, Foiling Optimist said:

We've reached the point where they're making more frequent tracker updates at random times but I don't think they are particularly in phase. Boris showing 49nm behind on the sheet and 129nm on the map. 

Only Charlie is updated every 30mn, that is when a boat is in the 200nm circle they are updated every 30mn

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Where is the Mileage ...the Vendee map and Vendee Dashboard are not updating. but the head page has the mileage at 99 miles to go...where are the updates now ........Windy hasnt updated since 337 nm.... maybe only in OZ that maybe overloaded sit...???  The finishing up dates arent coming through and the 200 limit updates ...where to find....can someone give some new and current info....

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9 minutes ago, huey 2 said:

Where is the Mileage ...the Vendee map and Vendee Dashboard are not updating. but the head page has the mileage at 99 miles to go...where are the updates now ........Windy hasnt updated since 337 nm.... maybe only in OZ that maybe overloaded sit...???  The finishing up dates arent coming through and the 200 limit updates ...where to find....can someone give some new and current info....

Only the position in the map and the current speed ist updated every 30mins - and only for boats within the 200Nm miles radius. All other boats, as well as all the data (Speed, 4hrs Speed, 24hrs Speed) are updated in the regular scheme.

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Is this correct for mileage to go.......  wow big gap in info..... ive been following a delayed AIS...??   Is there another site for info.  Yes the Vendee site has frozen / locked at Charlie with 261 nm to go.  it seems that the lead pages is the only refreshing page for here......Can you post some screenshots, please grandsoleil or anyone else

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3 minutes ago, huey 2 said:

Is this correct for mileage to go.......  wow big gap in info..... ive been following a delayed AIS...??   Is there another site for info.  Yes the Vendee site has frozen / locked at Charlie with 261 nm to go.  it seems that the lead pages is the only refreshing page for here......Can you post some screenshots, please grandsoleil or anyone else

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1 hour ago, ChristianSch said:

The irony is that the shipping company is owned by a family which is member of the same yacht club in Hamburg as Boris is.

Wonder if part of the 30 min delay was the captain busy with a call from the family ;) 

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4 hours ago, stief said:

Charlie's current track: if that's "local knowledge" I'm definitely not a local. Makes no sense I can see tactically. Good night.

10 hours to go, do sleep! Results in the morning will tell the story.

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Just now, tama_manu said:

10 hours to go, do sleep! Results in the morning will tell the story.

LOL. True, but my bladder is now like Pavlov's dog---trained to the VG sked. Back to bed.

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So lay your bets one who finishes when/where!!

 

For mine, over the line

1. Charlie

2. Louis

3. Boris

4. Thomas

5. Yannick

6. Giancarlo

7. Damien

8. LeCam

After time compensation

1. Yannick

2. Boris

3. LeCam

4. Charlie

5. Louis

6. Thomas

7. Giancarlo

8. Damien

 

So boats with time compensation to finish 1,2,3!!  Tough on Charlie and Louis!

 

 

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, mezaire said:

So lay your bets one who finishes when/where!!

 

For mine, over the line

1. Charlie

2. Louis

3. Boris

4. Thomas

5. Yannick

6. Giancarlo

7. Damien

8. LeCam

After time compensation

1. Yannick

2. Boris

3. LeCam

4. Charlie

5. Louis

6. Thomas

7. Giancarlo

8. Damien

 

 

I think that is a optimistic for JLC personally.

After compensation I would go:

1. Bestaven

2. Boris

3. Dalin

4. Burton

5. JLC

6. Ruyant

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4 minutes ago, tallyho said:

I wonder how much Burton is kicking himself for his 5hr penalty after the start!

Not at all? Given the weather around the course and the number of times the fleet compressed I doubt this has had any meaningful impact on his position right now.

In a similar vein of thought I wonder how 'fair' the time compensation for the three skippers involved in Kevin's rescue has turned out to be. At the time I thought the time given was on the low side, but I think it's hard to argue that in the grand scheme of things it affected their position in the race that much (again due to the way the weather turned out). Can't see a better way of handling the situation though - if the delay had meant they'd missed a system and ended up 1000nm behind the compensation would obviously be way too small.

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JLC is very hard to call... depends what the incoming strong LP does... he may profit from it or find himself in nasty sea states that will slow him down... he could end up anywhere between 5th and 8th in the rankings imho. Better would be awesome but unlikely.

Looks like the first 4 will be Bestaven, Burton, Dalin, Herman... I put them in alphabetical order but who knows in what order they will finish the race. Looks like Dalin will cross the line first (Burton could, but...), but will he have enough of a lead to win the race? We'll see..

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Dalin first home, then have to wait till Bestaven finishes to know his place on the podium.

The time allowance allotted could not have been better for suspense.

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Who’ll pop up next inside the 200 mile limit, Burton or Hermann...?

Think somebody mentioned the channel is only open for IMOCAs until 1600 - doesn’t look like any of the leaders will be making it in daylight, shame for the (very few socially distanced) spectators and our hopes for a video livestream. ;)

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2 hours ago, yl75 said:

Only Charlie is updated every 30mn, that is when a boat is in the 200nm circle they are updated every 30mn

I've only just got up, and haven't had my coffee yet, but...

Why are they doing this?  It leaves us trying to follow the race by comparing Dallin's position now to old info for the other boats.

Have I got that right, or do I need more coffee?

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Why are they not updating the tracker positions for all boats in the fleet more frequently during arrivals? Seems to give those outside the circle a tactical advantage over those closer to the finish.

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2 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

I've only just got up, and haven't had my coffee yet, but...

Why are they doing this?  It leaves us trying to follow the race by comparing Dallin's position now to old info for the other boats.

Have I got that right, or do I need more coffee?

Yep, that’s right. I agree it’s a pretty odd approach - and as @staysail pointed out could give boats outside the 200nm zone an advantage. 

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4 minutes ago, Snowden said:

wish I had seen this 79 days and 20 hours ago! so much better

Was mentioned many pages ago several times I think ! ;)

The corum one also still active :

https://corumlepargne.geovoile.com/vendeeglobe/2020/tracker/?leg=1

And somehow better as you have the little podium icon in the right tools column that focus in one click on the leading 3 boats

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7 minutes ago, jimmyuk81 said:

Yep, that’s right. I agree it’s a pretty odd approach - and as @staysail pointed out could give boats outside the 200nm zone an advantage. 

...also if Louis was doing 18 kts its hard to believe he isn't in the circle by now?

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9 minutes ago, staysail said:

Why are they not updating the tracker positions for all boats in the fleet more frequently during arrivals? Seems to give those outside the circle a tactical advantage over those closer to the finish.

Yes I agree, at least they should have made this 200nm miles circle a 1500 miles one or something.

But I guess all that is part of the Race rules agreed before the start with the skippers (and they might not have thought about such a scenario)

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If you updated other people more frequently it could give the front runner an advantage to cover if needed, realistically they all have plans already and if they're close they have AIS (and probably they could just use marine traffic anyway).

A nice compromise in the rules would be a trip wire, first boat into the 200nm circle triggers updates for everyone in a 500nm radius or something.

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Do not think it is covering time, it is full on boat speed on the shortest possible route.

Does a jibe takes 30 minutes, and can we state time differences in numbers of jibes :)

It is nice to have Apivia tracker on big screen TV, I keep looking at it during my chores.

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When you consider that those outside the circle are the ones with significant time allowances to cash in, this could give them a game changing advantage if the wind ahead drops and gets patchy!

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13 hours ago, Knut Grotzki said:

Cheaper to build new and then according to newer specs. Foils will get more effective so design might get more "wave piercing" to withstand slamming loads. We might see new bow and forefoot designs ...   And with possible delamination issues of the current Hugo Boss nobody would trust the "black dungeon" for a long ocean race in the current setup.

I wonder who would buy for that amount of money a boat that can't be pushed anymore to it's limits. Unless a very, very expensive overhaul has been done too. Chartering around with interested sailors and/or business events would not be a viable business case I think for the batcave.

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Welp... .  Even with enough trackers open that I'm about to crash my browser, there's enough delays, and out-of-sync-edness that I can't really figure out who's where or what.  My favourite is the tracker on Boris' website which just shows a big red checkmark off the north coast of Spain.  (so either he gybed, or he's checking the VG off his bucket list ;))

 

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