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His press conference is very emotional...

His damage was forward on starboard. The stress of  the whole half around the world, was according to him more stressful that his capsize at Cape Horn when Vincent Riou came after 19 hours to rescue him. Here, it was the same stress, but for one and a half month...

Going in the front of the boat, opening the bulkhead cover, everyday, to check if it held... He is saying " for the last two days, I did not want to check it anymore and live this stress"

He tried to put as much weight as possible on the front to avoid slamming, all the sails forward, the central ballast was cut up, and he did not use the rear ballasts. His first repair broke in the middle of the Pacific, no other choice than to repair...

Cape Horn with 45 knots... The climb up the Atlantic was good, but he was checking the water temperature everyday, and felt OK once in the Tradewinds... Because if he had to abandon his ship and get on his inflatable "bib", the water temperature was survivable...

 

"La place du con": The dumbass rank. EIther second (you did not win) or fourth (you are not on the podium). What he says about it: "I relieved someone from getting the dumbass spot..."

 

He admits that he did not get much pleasure in this race. But the arrival is just so good.... so great, so beautiful !! People coming out of their home to greet you at 2 O'clock in the morning... This is unforgettable.

 

He tries to stretch his arms to show the difference between the emotional highs and the emotional lows and stops: "I cannot reach further because I broke a rib!"

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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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Listening to the press conference now.... Even through the French to English translation, Jeans's words assessing his race are magic.  He's able to show that he sees the beauty in what he has done.  

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Journalist: "how did you break your rib?"

JLC: "I was peeing in my bucket... So, sorry Damien (Damien Seguin is in the room ).... but I have 2 hands... So one for holding myself to the boat. One for holding the bucket. And the bucket slides off, so I release the boat from my hand; and then a wave makes the bucket fly and me as well!"

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Journalist "who impressed you in the race?, besides Isabelle?'

JLC: "Benjamin, and Damien, of course. Look at us, dagger board, old boats, small budget... And at the end, on the finish line, you have the old fart, the handicapped... and the wanker!!!

And besides that, you have the young smart asses, with multimillion dollars projects, and they are not here... !!!

So it is too bad that Isabelle is not here, because then, on top of that, you would have had the chick! "

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He is ZE one and only...

A true legend... And besides his "smart ass" remarks and his "in your face" way to talk, he is indeed raising some serious questions about the cost of the IMOCA class. Stief is right: the cost is becoming prohibitive and "regular guys" can less and less participate.

A journalist told JLC: "yeah, but you were part of the ORMA class, with super expensive boats, which were breaking, you were not concerned by budget increase then..." JLC: "yeah, and look where the ORMA class is now.... gone! What I am saying is with the current economical environment, we have to be very careful on where we are going. The vision of the Vendée Globe at the start was to make it accessible to youngsters and to small to middle size companies as sponsors... Let's not forget that"

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7 minutes ago, Laurent said:

He is ZE one and only...

A true legend... And besides his "smart ass" remarks and his "in your face" way to talk, he is indeed raising some serious questions about the cost of the IMOCA class. Stief is right: the cost is becoming prohibitive and "regular guys" can less and less participate.

A journalist told JLC: "yeah, but you were part of the ORMA class, with super expensive boats, which were breaking, you were not concerned by budget increase then..." JLC: "yeah, and look where the ORMA class is now.... gone! What I am saying is with the current economical environment, we have to be very careful on where we are going. The vision of the Vendée Globe at the start was to make it accessible to youngsters and to small to middle size companies as sponsors... Let's not forget that"

That was a good question from that journo and JLC's answer is too true. ORMAs, fixed keels, aluminum boats, single rudders, etc, gone from the top. 

Hard to avoid the irony: JLC was sailing a carbon generation canter (that's way beyond the reach of many)

Still, JLC did in some way speak for those of us who are happy (resigned?) to sail with old mono or multi hull fiberglas boats with aluminum masts and dacron sails.. Maybe those in ballasted wooden boats with cotton sails too.

And also true: there is a smug satisfaction in occasionally beating the expensive hi tech boats, despite our tech handicaps.  We are smarter sailors :)  JLC really deflated the foil lobby with his "math:" Foils only had a 24 hr lead out of 81 days? Is that all? Served the lobbyist right for such a question at such a time. That was fun. Journo couldn't argue back about freak HPs,  OFNIs, etc.

The VG (and IMOCA) is a dev class. for tech . . .  and that is expensive R&D. JLC's backing of Damien and  the other 'misfits.' shows it can be a dev class for sailors settling for older generation kit.

Costs? Might be cool if the the VG limited "new" boats to 4, proven by a JVT attempt first. That would give smaller budget programs a decent chance to podium on the VG, and give glory to a few who think they can buy a spot.

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Q. What if you had a {better; faster,; foiler} boat?  A: "well yeah . ..  with IFS, you can go very far. . . ." Bazinga.

In French we say: avec des "si", on peut mettre Paris en bouteille.

With IFS, you can put Paris inside a bottle...

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

Journalist: "how did you break your rib?"

JLC: "I was peeing in my bucket... So, sorry Damien (Damien Seguin is in the room ).... but I have 2 hands... So one for holding myself to the boat. One for holding the bucket. And the bucket slides off, so I release the boat from my hand; and then a wave makes the bucket fly and me as well!"

I think he also added something to the effect, "We should really have three hands..."

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If I understood Jean properly, I think he said, "the cost of three sets of foils was the cost of his boat."

Great sailing, and only one day difference between his previous Vendee and 2020, amazing.

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

He is ZE one and only...

A true legend... And besides his "smart ass" remarks and his "in your face" way to talk, he is indeed raising some serious questions about the cost of the IMOCA class. Stief is right: the cost is becoming prohibitive and "regular guys" can less and less participate.

A journalist told JLC: "yeah, but you were part of the ORMA class, with super expensive boats, which were breaking, you were not concerned by budget increase then..." JLC: "yeah, and look where the ORMA class is now.... gone! What I am saying is with the current economical environment, we have to be very careful on where we are going. The vision of the Vendée Globe at the start was to make it accessible to youngsters and to small to middle size companies as sponsors... Let's not forget that"

I’m not sure I can agree with this point. For me, following the „race before the race“ with all the new designs and then seeing how they perform during the race is a big part of what makes this race so fascinating. And as long as there are enough entries (IIRC this time there were people wanting to do the race than available slots) I don’t see a reason to put a stop to all that.

I see the class 40 as the more appropriate class for the „youngsters and small to midsize companies“ while the 60s are the very top of the sport for those who have proven themselves in other classes and have enough financial support by sponsors. 

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While some starters at the tail end of the fleet were ...lets call it not that successful others like Pip punch way above their weight. The majority of the "adventure class" performs about as well as expected, sailing without major problems. 

I don't see a problem in new boats, they'll filter down to the tail end of the fleet sooner or later. The challenge is in the limited amount of starters in the race (not enough deep harbor space) and the need to enough adventure boats to the start. - After making sure that they know what they are doing. The increased sailing requirements help with that.
The threat that you could be out of luck even if you qualify is not helpful to the small campaigns.

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2 hours ago, stief said:

I really like his argument that the costs are out of control, and out of reach for us dumb suckers who love to sail. 

You mean for us mere mortal "multi million dollar" dumb suckers? Who else could afford a vendee globe campaign or even class40 without proper sponsorship? I think the best athletes - backed by professional racing teams, are are the most fair ticket to the vendee - rather than just beeing a rich dude. The vendee globe somehow manages to balance them all - professional racing teams, rich dudes (Heerema) and projects in there for the adventure with a low to medium budget.

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1 hour ago, GER 100 said:

You mean for us mere mortal "multi million dollar" dumb suckers? Who else could afford a vendee globe campaign or even class40 without proper sponsorship? I think the best athletes - backed by professional racing teams, are are the most fair ticket to the vendee - rather than just beeing a rich dude. The vendee globe somehow manages to balance them all - professional racing teams, rich dudes (Heerema) and projects in there for the adventure with a low to medium budget.

Spot on!  The formula aint broke, don't try and fix it!

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The cost question is a tough one.

And the comparison with the ORMA class is an excellent one. Lots of people are saying that the IMOCA is currently very similar to the ORMA when it iwas at its APEX in 2002, just before the awful Route du Rhum that year - 3 finishers out of 18 starters (5 capsizes and 2 properly broken boats). Boats are becoming very complex and expensive, but you have sponsors willing to pay, because even at these costs, the return on investment is very high. After all, there was a queue list for the Vendee.

We must remember that more complex and expensive boats benefit to lots of people in the IMOCA world: designers, shipyards, foil builders, etc etc. This is probably 80% Britanny based and this economy is very important locally.

In my opinion, the most important thing in the IMOCA class is that you can get an old boat and run a campaign on a budget, you will still get a good exposure (look at Pip). This balance needs to be maintained so the class contines to attract different types of sailors.

Looking at all the interviews etc, people are pushing for T rudders. Even if it has been guaranteed it won't happen before 2025 at best, who knows if it is a good idea? But once you have allowed the main foils, is it logical not to go with rudder elevators?

I am also a bit doubtful on the Ocean race being run on these. Again, it is a great opportunity for the French-led industry, but is this not going to push costs even higher? I guess time will tell.

 

It has taken about 30 years for the IMOCA to get where it is, from a crazy idea in the late 80s - some French skippers were bored during the BOC Challenge stops - to a hugely popular race. Even if I don't agree with everything Jean Le Cam says, this needs to be managed very carefully. The good thing is that the IMOCA class includes people from all sides of the board.

imoca.png

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Back in the day,  you could race an open 50 in the vendee globe. 

 

Why not a class 40 start? Could that provide the extra space required in LSD?

 

Be a great opportunity for lower budget campaigns. 

 

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16 minutes ago, oioi said:

Back in the day,  you could race an open 50 in the vendee globe. 

 

Why not a class 40 start? Could that provide the extra space required in LSD?

 

Be a great opportunity for lower budget campaigns. 

 

I don't know if this has been discussed, but there are 2 round the world races currently scheduled for the Class 40s, one without stop and one with.

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I think the biggest problem with ORMA's was that they were unreliable and very difficult to sail, so there wasn't a stable second hand market for them. An IMOCA can be sailed around the world by a good amateur. That was not the case with the ORMA. My biggest concern for the IMOCAS is not necessarily the pricetag of a pro campaign, but the complexity and reliability of the new boats. 

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And in the meantime, while the Thread is sleeping (or should work ;-)), Benjamin Dutreux has arrived!

"This Friday, January 29, at 09:05:05 and 20 seconds UTC, Benjamin Dutreux crossed the finish line off Les Sables d'Olonne after 81 days, 19 hours, 45 minutes and 20 seconds of racing around the world solo nonstop and without assistance. The skipper of OMIA- Water Family, whose first Vendée Globe it was, finished 9th after leading the race and staying in the main peloton most of the race often alongside Jean Le Cam and Damien Seguin. At 30, armed with a 2007 generation boat which finished third in 2012-13 with Alex Thomson, a boat with classic daggerboards, Dutreux was one of the revelations of this edition."

 

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

I don't know if this has been discussed, but there are 2 round the world races currently scheduled for the Class 40s, one without stop and one with.

It was discussed and the IMOCA Class said no. From what I understand the VG was actually open to the idea. 

The Race Around is now the only official Class40 round the world race. The globe40 was removed from the Class40 calendar due to a calendar clash with the Route du Rhum. Both have stop overs. One has four (like the old BOC) and the other has 8 I think?

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Weather update for Sorel/Tripon

I had a look at Sorel and Tripon and that hurricane force LP moving ENE, west of them. Pic #1 has the big picture with NOAA overlay. Pic # 2 current positions and ECMWF. Both have nice winds atm. When fast forwarding to Saturday with Windity and the Regadat plugin (pic #3), Sorel will be at LSDO when the shit starts hitting the fan. But Tripon would be getting 35+ winds in the Bay of Biscay. I would not be surprised if Tripon slows down to let this monster pass him. Because it would be sailing into a lee shore with 40+ winds pushing him towards it and no way out. Cul-de-sac. See pic #4 for Saturday afternoon when the shit starts flying.

PS sea state will turn into a nightmare with 9 to 10 meters projected by ECMWF. Near the coast that could be better, but you don't want to be close to the coast with that expected wind.

On Sunday the coast will be clear as the LP has moved away over France to Italy.

 

pic 1 big pic.png

pic 2 ECMWF now 290121.jpg

pic 3 ECMWF for Saturday.jpg

pic 4 ECMWF for Saturday afternoon.jpg

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1 hour ago, Herman said:

Weather update for Sorel/Tripon

I had a look at Sorel and Tripon and that hurricane force LP moving ENE, west of them. Pic #1 has the big picture with NOAA overlay. Pic # 2 current positions and ECMWF. Both have nice winds atm. When fast forwarding to Saturday with Windity and the Regadat plugin (pic #3), Sorel will be at LSDO when the shit starts hitting the fan. But Tripon would be getting 35+ winds in the Bay of Biscay. I would not be surprised if Tripon slows down to let this monster pass him. Because it would be sailing into a lee shore with 40+ winds pushing him towards it and no way out. Cul-de-sac. See pic #4 for Saturday afternoon when the shit starts flying.

PS sea state will turn into a nightmare with 9 to 10 meters projected by ECMWF. Near the coast that could be better, but you don't want to be close to the coast with that expected wind.

On Sunday the coast will be clear as the LP has moved away over France to Italy.

 

pic 1 big pic.png

 

Yes Tripon is slowing down already, he has said in today's live FR he would let them pass didn't explain very well how though

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9 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Currently Testimony against testimony. Ist is possible to prove wether AIS was active or not? One way or the other?

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22 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

phpLmiQmp.jpg

Between the two, I think Boris wins in the more damage claims.

Regarding AIS, it will be straight forward to see if either boat had AIS on or off since a record of it reporting would be logged.  If the fisherman's boat shows a position report x minutes before then his statement would be confirmed.  If Boris's AIS was not working it would not have mattered since I doubt the crew of the Fishing boat was standing watch.  

 

Regarding the other systems on board Boris's boat, I would figure the shore crew would be looking at either why it did not work (which really matters since these guys rely on it when the sleep) or did Boris just think he had them on and being tired, forgot to set them.  Planes have crashed for similar reasons with pilots (who lived) swearing they dropped the gear or set the flaps and didn't.

 

At the end of the day the worst of this is one damaged IMOCA 60, one broken eye, and slipping a few spots down in standing.  More important, watch out for Boris next race for if he did this good in his first race, the second could be even better.

 

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Feeling anxious for Sorel...  Would really like to see him doing more like 15-16 kts instead of 11-12...  He needs to hurry up and get inside the breakwater.

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9 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

Feeling anxious for Sorel...  Would really like to see him doing more like 15-16 kts instead of 11-12...  He needs to hurry up and get inside the breakwater.

He is in 6 M waves with a 13 period so he may not be able to press it.  Armel may have it worst before it gets better looking at the Windyt routing.

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11 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

Feeling anxious for Sorel...  Would really like to see him doing more like 15-16 kts instead of 11-12...  He needs to hurry up and get inside the breakwater.

Windy shows a relatively soft spot nearby (despite the sea state), so that might explain the speed. Whatever the reason. +1 to the anxiety.

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3 hours ago, Herman said:

Weather update for Sorel/Tripon

I had a look at Sorel and Tripon and that hurricane force LP moving ENE, west of them. Pic #1 has the big picture with NOAA overlay. Pic # 2 current positions and ECMWF. Both have nice winds atm. When fast forwarding to Saturday with Windity and the Regadat plugin (pic #3), Sorel will be at LSDO when the shit starts hitting the fan. But Tripon would be getting 35+ winds in the Bay of Biscay. I would not be surprised if Tripon slows down to let this monster pass him. Because it would be sailing into a lee shore with 40+ winds pushing him towards it and no way out. Cul-de-sac. See pic #4 for Saturday afternoon when the shit starts flying.

PS sea state will turn into a nightmare with 9 to 10 meters projected by ECMWF. Near the coast that could be better, but you don't want to be close to the coast with that expected wind.

On Sunday the coast will be clear as the LP has moved away over France to Italy.

 

pic 1 big pic.png

pic 2 ECMWF now 290121.jpg

pic 3 ECMWF for Saturday.jpg

pic 4 ECMWF for Saturday afternoon.jpg

 

1 hour ago, yl75 said:

Yes Tripon is slowing down already, he has said in today's live FR he would let them pass didn't explain very well how though

Maxime is going for it, and hopes to arrive between 6:00AM and 8:00AM tomorrow morning, local time, and enter the channel around 10:30AM, if I got that right.

Armel is slowing down and is going to sail offshore of Portugal between Porto and Vigo. He does not plan to heave to, but rather sail back and forth, and wait and see, and go for it as soon as the conditions are manageable. He seemed more concerned by the sea state than by the wind. I have never been the Bay of Biscay in a big storm, but it is well known that with a rapid rise of the seafloor, it can get pretty gnarly pretty fast...

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4 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Armel is slowing down and is going to sail offshore of Portugal between Porto and Vigo. He does not plan to heave to, but rather sail back and forth, and wait and see, and go for it as soon as the conditions are manageable. He seemed more concerned by the sea state than by the wind. I have never been the Bay of Biscay in a big storm, but it is well known that with a rapid rise of the seafloor, it can get pretty gnarly pretty fast...

Trying to remember...  Which port was he sailing toward when he had the halyard lock issue and turned back, only to later decide he could repair it at sea?  Kinda funny that now he's heading toward that coastline again.

I'm glad the gaps are big enough that both of them (and Cremer) can focus on safety rather than racing for position.  If this system had come in two days ago, with 9 boats racing for podium spots, it would have forced some very difficult safety vs. competition decisions.

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1 minute ago, Your Mom said:

Trying to remember...  Which port was he sailing toward when he had the halyard lock issue and turned back, only to later decide he could repair it at sea?  Kinda funny that now he's heading toward that coastline again.

La Coruna

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12 hours ago, stief said:

Q. What if you had a {better; faster,; foiler} boat?  A: "well yeah . ..  with IFS, you can go very far. . . ." Bazinga.

With ifs you can put Paris in a bottle, goes so french saying ;)

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6 minutes ago, serialsailor said:

With ifs you can put Paris in a bottle, goes so french saying ;)

In addition to the other examples upthread,  here's an old EN one: "If wishes were horses, then beggars could ride"  ;) 

Re Maxine, another view of what  @Herman explains above. This one from Christian Dumard on the Live

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

This "Hermanos Busto" thing is so fucking unbelievable !! :D

(but the article clears the AIS question, I tend to believe what they are saying)

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6 hours ago, jonas a said:

I think the biggest problem with ORMA's was that they were unreliable and very difficult to sail, so there wasn't a stable second hand market for them. An IMOCA can be sailed around the world by a good amateur. That was not the case with the ORMA. My biggest concern for the IMOCAS is not necessarily the pricetag of a pro campaign, but the complexity and reliability of the new boats. 

I just would say that the class rules allowed very powerful boats, did they even have a mast max height or max sail area ?

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that pic #12566 of JLC on the proddy is sublime. A man and his boat in perfect balance. (Even more so if he had yet to arrive at the pontoon and was still parading up the channel.) 

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17 minutes ago, yl75 said:

This "Hermanos Busto" thing is so fucking unbelievable !! :D

And I sure hope two decent skippers, both truthful and honest, can avoid being egged into a shitfight for the pleasure of the playground fight bystanders.

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14 hours ago, Laurent said:

JLC revealing that he had problems of delamination since the Kerguelen Islands!!!

He made a first repair, which failed, and had to make a second one that held all the way to the finish... If I understand well, he had to cut panels (from his ballast tanks) to make the second repair...

And he sailed for one and half month with that worry: is it going to hold???? and it did...

I've yet to see all the takes about how JLC broke the boat by pushing too hard... going to close to Theta... or it was underbuilt... or yada yada.
Boats break. People deal with it or not. That's probably the same for all the sailors.

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7 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Giancarlo press conference is great, the best one for me

Thanks for the heads up. What with trying to catch up on the thread, falling asleep with the AM/LR Prada race last night, helping a friend get back from Costa Rica because our airflights and borders may shutter any day, and more, of course, I'm still many hours behind on catch-up on the VG finishes.:lol:

Dutreux's is a goldmine too.

(and apologies for the sulky link-less pic post. Here's the courtesy link to his Italian news )

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Did someone follow the AIS situation closely?
There is some discussion that Boris AIS did not show up on the usual sites. - Until the boat was at the dock.

Might be the classic on-off vs off-on problem. Esp. with 3 independent systems failing at the same time.

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25 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

I've yet to see all the takes about how JLC broke the boat by pushing too hard... going to close to Theta... or it was underbuilt... or yada yada.
Boats break. People deal with it or not. That's probably the same for all the sailors.

Lol, aprox. 15 000 km between Theta and the Kerguelens...

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8 minutes ago, Chasm said:

Did someone follow the AIS situation closely?
There is some discussion that Boris AIS did not show up on the usual sites. - Until the boat was at the dock.

Might be the classic on-off vs off-on problem. Esp. with 3 independent systems failing at the same time.

Hope someone followed up. Was trying to also see if there was a link between those 3 failures and  the marine Traffic/ Vessel Finder troubles at the time.

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1 minute ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Lol, aprox. 15 000 km between Theta and the Kerguelens...

JLC said in his presser it might even have been way earlier. <insert gallic shrug here>. harris' facetious point works.

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Yvon Bourgnon suggests that the damage was probably incurred during the Kevin rescue, but that Jean did not want Kevin or PRB to feel bad, so he kept quiet about it.

Could fit with his "discovery" of the damage shortly after disembarking Kevin?

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1 minute ago, cms said:

Yvon Bourgnon suggests that the damage was probably incurred during the Kevin rescue, but that Jean did not want Kevin or PRB to feel bad, so he kept quiet about it.

Could fit with his "discovery" of the damage shortly after disembarking Kevin?

Coulda. That's as reasonable as speculations that Alex's bow issues near CapeTown were related to Theta. ;) 

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4 minutes ago, stief said:

Coulda. That's as reasonable as speculations that Alex's bow issues near CapeTown were related to Theta. ;) 

Jean said himself that he found the delam just after Kevin left.

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Good little bit of news. Giancarlo's click-campaign worked

Quote

In total, thanks to the 127,000 likes, shares and comments made by Internet users on social networks (Facebook and Instagram) of the Prysmian Ocean Racing project at the Vendée Globe, all 6,775 meters of cables needed to carry out the three projects were provided for the Lycée Saint-Charles Lwanga in Ziguinchor, Senegal, for the hospital of Farafangana in Madagascar and for the schools of N'grouli and Bawelessi in Togo.

gtrans snip from https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&amp;tl=en&amp;u=https://www.giancarlopedote.it/vendee-globe-arrivo/

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1 hour ago, yl75 said:

This "Hermanos Busto" thing is so fucking unbelievable !! :D

(but the article clears the AIS question, I tend to believe what they are saying)

Tend to believe it also. That boat name is unbelievable!!!

The Basque fishermen who collided with Boris Herrmann reject all responsibility for the accident that slowed down the Vendée Globe skipper, reports France Bleu Pays Basque on Friday, January 29th. They explain that they tried to reach the navigator, in vain.

During the night of Wednesday to Thursday, "we heard a 'boom', we saw that it was a sailboat but we didn't see anyone," says Aitor Badiola, fisherman and owner of the ship Hermanos Busto, "We called him on emergency channel 16 and no one answered." If the Basque vessel, a steel longliner, does not show any major damage, the fisherman is worried about the consequences on a carbon boat.
"We thought it was a smuggler's vessel"

The fishing vessel tried to reach the monohull a second time "but it continued its trajectory as if nothing had happened, we thought it was a smuggler's vessel," recalls the fisherman. It was only afterwards that the 15 fishermen made the connection with the Vendée Globe. "I called the maritime rescue services in Spain, then in France, then by going to the Vendée Globe website I read the account of the collision and the coordinates of the accident, it's us! (...) We were sad to see that he was perhaps in a position to win the Vendée Globe".

 

The next day, the owner heard statements from Boris Herrmann suggesting that the trawler may not have had AIS, a safety system that indicates the vessel's position to avoid collisions. "It was well underway, everything is recorded, it's easily verifiable," says Aitor Badiola. "When I saw this whole AIS thing, damn it! Hey, you're at a speed of 20 knots [37km/h] at night, you're sleeping, you hit another ship, and you say it's his fault," the Basque sailor said. After this collision, the ship Hermanos Busto continued its hake fishing and will return to its home port in Ondarroa, Spain on Saturday.


Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

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1 hour ago, Chasm said:

Did someone follow the AIS situation closely?
There is some discussion that Boris AIS did not show up on the usual sites. - Until the boat was at the dock.

Might be the classic on-off vs off-on problem. Esp. with 3 independent systems failing at the same time.

Article on yacht.de is probably the most up2date information regarding the topic. He retracts the statement that the trawler did not have AIS. Most likely he was sleeping and missed the alarms.

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

 

Armel is slowing down and is going to sail offshore of Portugal between Porto and Vigo. He does not plan to heave to, but rather sail back and forth, and wait and see, and go for it as soon as the conditions are manageable. He seemed more concerned by the sea state than by the wind. I have never been the Bay of Biscay in a big storm, but it is well known that with a rapid rise of the seafloor, it can get pretty gnarly pretty fast...

A long time ago,  in a galaxy far away  it was a dark and stormy night...

 

I was delivering a 50ft ketch from the uk down to the med. We crossed biscay, and it built and built.  Fucking horrible,  hail, lightning,  short steep waves. With the F8 from the SW going round finisterre seemed stupid so bailed into a coruna.

We got in late on Saturday night,  maybe 11pm,  but its Spain,  so things were just starting. Tied the boat up,  jumped a taxi and went in search of beer. Last memory of that night is lieing on the beach,  watching the white horses out at sea  in the arms of a Brazilian girl with green hair. 

 

Next day,  waking up in the afternoon,  there is an open 50 alongside us. Get chatting to the crew in the yacht club  bar.  They had also had a really shit time getting beaten up,  but had just been offered the charter of Pete Goss Aqua Quorum, so we're dumping that open 50 in coruna whilst going to get a better one. 

In amongst the crew was this very small,  young woman. Quite prickly and defensive. Tried my best but i was getting the not interested signal and the rest of her crew were starting to crowd me out. I guessed that one was her dad,  so stopped trying and just got drunk. Come Monday morning,  they had all packed up and gone,  dumping the boat. The rest, as they say,  it's history. 

I stayed for another week,  drinking the storm away. 

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46 minutes ago, oioi said:

Next day,  waking up in the afternoon,  there is an open 50 alongside us. Get chatting to the crew in the yacht club  bar.  They had also had a really shit time getting beaten up,  but had just been offered the charter of Pete Goss Aqua Quorum, so we're dumping that open 50 in coruna whilst going to get a better one.

Good story, and--serendipity--was just reading Pete Goss' Close to the Wind, which fits with many of the arrival vids

Quote

Don’t ever think the Vendee was a single-handed race. As the skipper of the boat, I was proud to be part of a large family that designed and built Aqua Quorum. Without them I could never have made my journey, and I thank them all. This book is an account of that voyage and the events leading up to it. I hope I have done justice to all those who helped me achieve my dream.

Can't offer a good drunken story in return, but here's one with a naked lady. Was in Bahai des Ballenas down in Mexico fixing a rudder problem (had lost it off the coast of Baha California a few days earlier; fisherman towed  us to nearest bay, where a local welder managed to attach a chunk of steel plate to the stump of the shaft. Chopped up and shaped some floorboards to give the plate some shape, and glassed the works so the rust cloud wouldn't be too embarrassing every time we turned.).

Anyhoo, one morning at the dinghy coffee get together, the others were commenting about the new arrival, who had apparently picked up this Canadian girl who was hitching rides on boats down to Mexico and beyond.  Apparently she swam out to all the boats, waved, and excitedly yelled "this is so wonderful. I'm naked." 

Went back to my boat, and my 12 yr old son said: "Ummm, Dad, something strange happened. This girl swam by . . . "

"Ooooh," I said (winding him up). "You just saw your first naked lady." He mumbled, grumbled and turned away blushing.

No idea what happened to her, nor did I take the Port Captain's shocking offer of a young girl a day later. Guess both my son and I lost more of our innocence that time.

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1 hour ago, GER 100 said:

Article on yacht.de is probably the most up2date information regarding the topic. He retracts the statement that the trawler did not have AIS. Most likely he was sleeping and missed the alarms.

Bad visibility, strong winds and sleep deprivation. It just increases the likelihood of mistakes

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Mine never became a naval architect or boatbuilder, though there were promising moments

5957-004.png.9cd6e1cb9a30f3520e9c011171250730.png

back to reading about low budget programs . . . ;) 

dammit--more reading. Today's T&S looks really applicable to the thread

Very interesting article from Tip & Shaft, from the experts of the class. I especially noted the comment from the weather guy:

Christian Dumard confirms:" The sequence for the first was particular . If Apivia or others had managed to get past the big depression that Charlie had in the Indian Ocean, they could have followed behind like the participants of Virtual Regatta and arrived in 69 days. At nearly twelve hours, they would have been there for more than a week and today we are talking about the great progress of the foilers compared to the last time ...

 

For a few hours, it could have been a VERY different outcome.

 

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3 hours ago, OPAL said:

During the night of Wednesday to Thursday, "we heard a 'boom', we saw that it was a sailboat but we didn't see anyone," says Aitor Badiola, fisherman and owner of the ship Hermanos Busto, "We called him on emergency channel 16 and no one answered." If the Basque vessel, a steel longliner, does not show any major damage, the fisherman is worried about the consequences on a carbon boat.
"We thought it was a smuggler's vessel"

 

Having a hard time believing that.

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4 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Very interesting article from Tip & Shaft, from the experts of the class. I especially noted the comment from the weather guy:

Christian Dumard confirms:" The sequence for the first was particular . If Apivia or others had managed to get past the big depression that Charlie had in the Indian Ocean, they could have followed behind like the participants of Virtual Regatta and arrived in 69 days. At nearly twelve hours, they would have been there for more than a week and today we are talking about the great progress of the foilers compared to the last time ...

 

For a few hours, it could have been a VERY different outcome.

 

The asumption was that the new foilers would at least be much faster in the trade winds. The wnds were a little lighter than normally, so there was less of an advantage. Also it seems like there is kind of a catch 22 situation. You have a design that is dependent on huge foils. Ideally they work very nicely, but if you lose them, it's a disaster, so you end up taking a lot less risks, than with an older boat. Also there was quite a lot of discussion about how to improve the hull shape, so that it would be easier to sail  in complicated sea state. 

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37 minutes ago, Marty6 said:

Having a hard time believing that.

Yeah, that is one of the many oddities. The earlier GER article a page or so upthread https://www.sueddeutsche.de/panorama/boris-herrmann-vendee-globe-regatta-fischerboot-1.5189198 interviewing the Busto skipper is much better (but now paywalled, sorry to say). Really a good portrait of how the fisherman was worried for Mazilia, trying to follow  to make sure he was OK (Boris was too fast), calling for help, and wishing him well, despite the media frenzy. 

As for the VHF, if Boris was on the deck madly trying to secure the mast, sails, foil, and bow gear, that might explain why he was away from the radio. And half asleep?

Most recent GER article upthread is floating the idea he blacked out. Wouldn't be the first case of long distance solo sailors hallucinating or such. 

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A theory floated by Boris in a interview i saw regarding the failed radar and AIS: The known/suspected problem with carbon in the sails and multiple headsails/main up blocking certain angles.

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Whats really matters is that no one got hurt... and he even made it to the finish... the rest (damage to the fishing boat and mazilia) will be taken care of by mazilia's insurance company...

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