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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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5 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Memory from the 96/97 race and the late Gerry Roufs.

This is a great shot to see how much things have moved on since then.

Wife and daughter had trouble moving on. https://plus.lapresse.ca/screens/3091a76d-27e2-41b7-89b7-9a4f36a3ee13__7C___0.html

(Haven't seen the documentary "Gerry Roufs, still alive" yet)

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Speaking of competitive sailing and family life, Carolijn Brouwer (VOR DFRT 2018) explains why her parents switched from a 470 to two Lasers. 

 

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3 hours ago, stief said:

Thanks for all those carefully prepared links--still working through them.

btw, Isabelle couldn't meet with Sam , but they plan to meet up later. (apologies if you've already seen this)

Thanks, it's something fun to do.

I hadn't seen Isabelle's blog, thank you! I hope it works, it will be an ending to be remembered.

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Interesting. Can you recommend a link? Wondering about  hardware needed, and how much per GB? Tempting . . . 

https://www.starlink.com/ is where you can sign up to beta test. It took a few months until I heard back, so be patient. 

Currently, you need an unobstructed view of the north sky, about 53 degrees N iirc. No tree branches, telephone poles, etc., or you may experience brief outages. I mounted my dish up high, no issues...

20210121_113113.thumb.jpg.6109c7b80bdfb1922b94af4e70b38c71.jpg

(Ignore the yagi under the dish. It is my LTE/cellular antenna.)

The dish, power supply and WiFi router are 499 USD + tax. The setup is trivial. The dish comes with a yard stand, but it fits perfectly in any of the big name sat TV provider's mounts, one I which I already re-purposed for my LTE antenna. I just stuck the dish on top, and motors inside it raised it up and adjusted its direction auto-magically when I plugged in its small power supply. It is not a typical concave dish, rather a phased array antenna with a flat cover containing heating elements to melt snow when detected. So far, it has worked flawlessly. My guess is Starlink is selling the equipment for a loss. My simple little LTE router costs more than Starlink's router, dish and power supply combined.

The setup comes with 100' of power over ethernet cable that runs from the dish to the power supply, plus a small (8' or so) LAN cable to connect the power supply to the wireless router. All nicely color coded. Router also has a wired LAN port if you prefer a wired LAN. I use the wire port to connect to a hardware VPN, but my personal devices all connect wirelessly. Their router plays nicely with my mesh extender too.

Service is 99 USD per month with unlimited usage. Between work, meetings and SA, my monthly usage approaches 1/2 TB, more if we watch movies. Download speeds have typically been around 100 Mbps, but I have seen it as high as 150. Musk is promising 1 Gbps once the full constellation is in place. With LTE, I only see 20 to 30 Mbps, with peaks around 45 (my LTE router supports 4x4 MIMO).

The clincher for me, especially when working out of our Belgium office, is uplink speed. With LTE, I would see a few Mbps at best. Starlink, anywhere between 30 and 50. And for you geosynchronous sat users, dig this... latencies typically 20 to 30 ms. VOIP works just fine with Starlink. One oddity that I have not figured out, when I use starlink with my hardware VPN, the latency is about double that.

Again, this is beta testing, so who knows. Maybe I will end up hating it. But until now, LTE was all we had. No cable, fiber, or even ASDL where we live, but my company did spring for a 1Mbps T1 line back in the day. With Starlink, we now have two viable options. If issues should arise with one, like the mudslide that took out our LTE connection for 10 days, we have a backup.

So sorry for the extremely long winded thread drift. Now back to you regularly scheduled program. 

Cheers.

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18 minutes ago, Varan said:

https://www.starlink.com/ is where you can sign up to beta test. It took a few months until I heard back, so be patient. 

Currently, you need an unobstructed view of the north sky, about 53 degrees N iirc. No tree branches, telephone poles, etc., or you may experience brief outages. I mounted my dish up high, no issues...

20210121_113113.thumb.jpg.6109c7b80bdfb1922b94af4e70b38c71.jpg

(Ignore the yagi under the dish. It is my LTE/cellular antenna.)

The dish, power supply and WiFi router are 499 USD + tax. The setup is trivial. The dish comes with a yard stand, but it fits perfectly in any of the big name sat TV provider's mounts, one I which I already re-purposed for my LTE antenna. I just stuck the dish on top, and motors inside it raised it up and adjusted its direction auto-magically when I plugged in its small power supply. It is not a typical concave dish, rather a phased array antenna with a flat cover containing heating elements to melt snow when detected. So far, it has worked flawlessly. My guess is Starlink is selling the equipment for a loss. My simple little LTE router costs more than Starlink's router, dish and power supply combined.

The setup comes with 100' of power over ethernet cable that runs from the dish to the power supply, plus a small (8' or so) LAN cable to connect the power supply to the wireless router. All nicely color coded. Router also has a wired LAN port if you prefer a wired LAN. I use the wire port to connect to a hardware VPN, but my personal devices all connect wirelessly. Their router plays nicely with my mesh extender too.

Service is 99 USD per month with unlimited usage. Between work, meetings and SA, my monthly usage approaches 1/2 TB, more if we watch movies. Download speeds have typically been around 100 Mbps, but I have seen it as high as 150. Musk is promising 1 Gbps once the full constellation is in place. With LTE, I only see 20 to 30 Mbps, with peaks around 45 (my LTE router supports 4x4 MIMO).

The clincher for me, especially when working out of our Belgium office, is uplink speed. With LTE, I would see a few Mbps at best. Starlink, anywhere between 30 and 50. And for you geosynchronous sat users, dig this... latencies typically 20 to 30 ms. VOIP works just fine with Starlink. One oddity that I have not figured out, when I use starlink with my hardware VPN, the latency is about double that.

Again, this is beta testing, so who knows. Maybe I will end up hating it. But until now, LTE was all we had. No cable, fiber, or even ASDL where we live, but my company did spring for a 1Mbps T1 line back in the day. With Starlink, we now have two viable options. If issues should arise with one, like the mudslide that took out our LTE connection for 10 days, we have a backup.

So sorry for the extremely long winded thread drift. Now back to you regularly scheduled program. 

Cheers.

Thanks so much for all those details, especially for the bandwidth expected. Upload speeds for video conferencing is our major bottleneck out at the cottage, where my son works-from-home, so your information is especially useful. That also clears up why a mobile solution is not practical yet.

Cost is not significantly more than we pay now out there. Cheers indeed.

 

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4 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

The great Anne Liardet in tears over her iconic Roxy, and later Samantha's Roxy.

Heartbreaking.

Incredible that we don't have a Vendee Globe museum.

Anyways, Anne is doing the next Mini Transat! That's so cool!

Go Go Go Anne!!!

Appreciate the links. Great work. Some boats are "just right" PRB/Roxy was one such. A true all-round performer.

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3 hours ago, Miffy said:

From the mil folks who work in encryption, they seem to only have bad things to say about it. 

@Miffy what sort of bad things?  Too hard to encrypt, to easy to hack?

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1 hour ago, Hitchhiker said:

@Miffy what sort of bad things?  Too hard to encrypt, to easy to hack?

My guy was on the signals side of the Canadian mil and his beef with it was outside of the United States government- no one knows how the satellites encrypt traffic between each other & the ground. It is a trust issue for them even as allies. 

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3 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

Quick off-topic, but for anyone curious, there is plenty of fun , scary and amusing things to listen/read about cyber maritime attacks.

Not off topic, considering how much of the race now depends on comms. And if this edition is any measure, the skippers will rely even more on their electronic systems, which are problems enough without even considering cyber attacks. Herrmann probably had one of the top systems, and it wasn't enough to warn him of a collision. OSCAR, radar, and AIS systems weren't enough.

That 'scary' link was a very long, but very good read. Thought that like the Y2k bug, companies and users  could still operate without the net  The Maersk world wide supply chain apparently couldn't, and ended up depending on luck:

Quote

After a frantic search that entailed calling hundreds of IT admins in data centers around the world, Maersk’s desperate administrators finally found one lone surviving domain controller in a remote office—in Ghana. At some point before NotPetya struck, a blackout had knocked the Ghanaian machine offline, and the computer remained disconnected from the network. It thus contained the singular known copy of the company’s domain controller data left untouched by the malware—all thanks to a power outage. “There were a lot of joyous whoops in the office when we found it,” a Maersk administrator says.

When the tense engineers in Maidenhead set up a connection to the Ghana office, however, they found its bandwidth was so thin that it would take days to transmit the several-hundred-gigabyte domain controller backup to the UK. Their next idea: put a Ghanaian staffer on the next plane to London. But none of the West African office’s employees had a British visa.

So the Maidenhead operation arranged for a kind of relay race: One staffer from the Ghana office flew to Nigeria to meet another Maersk employee in the airport to hand off the very precious hard drive. That staffer then boarded the six-and-a-half-hour flight to Heathrow, carrying the keystone of Maersk’s entire recovery process.

Good link. Thanks. 

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Manuel Cousin's ram issue further explained. Wasn't just the ram like Sam and Isabelle's, but also the support structure:

Quote

"I was heading north racing close hauled in the trade winds. I was paying attention: it was a fairly hard sailing but nothing unusual for our boats. And then dropping from a wave, I heard a huge crack, a noise where you realise immediately something has happened. The rod in the ram has broken cleanly. The hydraulic cylinder is used to make the keel cant and when the rod broke it damaged the locking system and the carbon supporting structure.

I worked all night to strengthen this system and hope to be able to jam the keel in the central axis tp be able to finish my Vendée Globe. We'll put the race on hold a bit for sure, but the priority is to bring the boat back to the finish. I think I'm still going to work on it all day because there are very big loads on it. I've seen better days but I'm not giving up. I am doing all I can to fix it.

We have a swing keel and the cylinder is used to make it cant. The most annoying thing is that we do have a keel locking system to fix it in the axis if this cylinder breaks but when the ram broke it damaged this system. It smashed the carbon reinforcements of the system and so I have made a composite repair and reinforced this system all night to hope to be able to block the keel in the axis to be able to finish my Vendée Globe. We will put the race aside a bit for sure.

I have the equipment to repair it on board, I am doing everything I can. I am quite fed up really, I'm not sure how to express it, I'm obviously very disappointed. I haven't thought about giving up just yet anyway. But if I can't get the keel back fixed, I won't be able to reach Les Sables. On the other hand, I won't take any risks, not for me not the boat

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/22165/manu-cousin-i-am-doing-all-i-can-to-make-sure-i-can-finish

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17 minutes ago, Nh stumpjumper said:

They should have 3 different ways to fix the keel if the ram system fails. Not an uncommon problem on a long haul race like this. 
 

Why not 4. Or 5. Or 6. 

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The length of keel above the pivot point on these systems is surprisingly short, the forces on the rams must be huge. I guess anything longer would mean weight high up which is clearly not wanted. Bigger brains than mine design these things but I wonder if the reliability v speed trade off is a bit off. 

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How often do we see these failures in new builds? I wonder how well the one design parts cope with the 3-5 trips around the world these hulls tend to do, especially combined with the maintenance routines of lower budget programs. 

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3 hours ago, Foiling Optimist said:

Any thoughts on why Didac Costa has dropped off the pack he was with? 

They got to the trades first? Looks like he has chosen a more conservative routing taking him further SE to avoid the worst of the weather

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14 minutes ago, JL92S said:

They got to the trades first? Looks like he has chosen a more conservative routing taking him further SE to avoid the worst of the weather

Agreed - a bit of bad luck on his part in that he got caught in (what looked like) a light wind patch. But also think the fact the other pack is foilers is a big reason - they have more routing options available. My take is the only reason Pip has kept in touch with them is that she is out-sailing her boat.

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4 hours ago, Alberta said:

How often do we see these failures in new builds? I wonder how well the one design parts cope with the 3-5 trips around the world these hulls tend to do, especially combined with the maintenance routines of lower budget programs. 

Maintenance is the issue. The boats that have the budget have full NDT or simply new parts put into existing structure. But it's not required for entry yet... Keel system failures on new builds (without OFNI) are minimal past two editions I think.

 

2016 - SMA Paul Meilhat ram failure
 

HW

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17 hours ago, Miffy said:

From the mil folks who work in encryption, they seem to only have bad things to say about it. 

What does a (satellite) communication system have to do with encryption?

Just like any comms system, encryption is built on top of the communication layer. Only way to make sure, ask Google (I mean literally them) how they know.

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18 hours ago, Varan said:

it is not a platform for mobile applications, especially a Imoca bashing over waves.

Why not?

Antenna can be (gyro) stabilized or made multifaceted AESA array for a little higher price.

Now with incoming sat to sat laser links (first already up), I don't see why not.

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3 minutes ago, noaano said:

What does a (satellite) communication system have to do with encryption?

Just like any comms system, encryption is built on top of the communication layer. Only way to make sure, ask Google (I mean literally them) how they know.

Just knowing who is talking to who and when provides useful information, so for super sensitive stuff you also want the transport encrypted too so outsiders can't read it.

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1 minute ago, JonRowe said:

Just knowing who is talking to who and when provides useful information, so for super sensitive stuff you also want the transport encrypted too so outsiders can't read it.

For this level of sensitivity, its not like you can hide your transmission on radio level that well anyway. Especially in the middle of the sea with no other emitters present.

And as far as I understand, SL transport layer has normal level encryption and safety in place. Enough for casual use, but for more sensitive content not enough alone, for sure.

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13 hours ago, Miffy said:

no one knows how the satellites encrypt traffic between each other & the ground. It is a trust issue for them even as allies. 

You should not even need to trust their encryption, so it does not matter as long its not trivial and knowing Tesla/SpaceX/Starlink for sure it is not.

As said, security needs to be layer above the transport. Always has been like this.

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2 hours ago, b3nharris said:

Agreed - a bit of bad luck on his part in that he got caught in (what looked like) a light wind patch. But also think the fact the other pack is foilers is a big reason - they have more routing options available. My take is the only reason Pip has kept in touch with them is that she is out-sailing her boat.

I have no doubt she is squeezing every once of energy from her boat at this point.  As I've watched her videos her is a warrior's heart in that she is not satisfied to coast but to fight to the end.

Looking At the current tracker it looks likes she's going to be in the maelstrom for a bit, but to her advantage since we've seen that the foilers are not superior in heavy/mixed seas.  She's < 70 nm from that back of that pack and if she can hold her heading and keep her foot down even a little longer then the two in front she could make this a fun finish to watch.  Didac is no longer a factor so she could be conservative and just hold to her place, but I get the feeling she's not going to do that.  As it is, those two in front of her have been battling the whole Atlantic so this race has not stopped giving drama, even mid-pack.

 

Go Pip!!

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17 minutes ago, noaano said:

And as far as I understand, SL transport layer has normal level encryption and safety in place. Enough for casual use, but for more sensitive content not enough alone, for sure.

 

13 hours ago, Miffy said:

My guy was on the signals side of the Canadian mil and his beef with it was outside of the United States government- no one knows how the satellites encrypt traffic between each other & the ground. It is a trust issue for them even as allies. 

I believe even Canadian military falls into the "more sensitive content" category :lol::lol:

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2 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

 

Quote

Jean-Yves Chauve [Race Doctor]: "In my opinion, ocean racing is not affected by doping".

On a race that lasts three months, what would a doping product be used for?

It is totally unthinkable to take any product. The aim of a doping product is to improve performance, but it cannot be done over such a long period without having negative and damaging effects, or even worse than the effects of the product itself. We could see rebound effects. What would be interesting would be a product that would help fight against sleep deprivation, but over such a long period of time, there would be a drop in the action of the product with immediate sleep and hallucination phenomena. On such a long race, the doses should be increased and therefore put even more in danger, with extremely serious negative effects.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

We have heard EXACTLY THE SAME BULLSHIT since the 60's in cycling!

This fucker is in on it.

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2 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

And Charlie's removed

EtIHw2bXYAELDoB2.jpg

Interesting pic, I hadn't really thought about it before but assume they carry these covers RTW in case they have to drop a foil? Not that the tube actually opens into the interior of the boat though.

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14 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

We have heard EXACTLY THE SAME BULLSHIT since the 60's in cycling!

This fucker is in on it.

I said a few years ago that doping was a unspoken issue specifically re the high number of folks with ritalin scripts - it has been around for a decade plus but because no one is dying in their sleep with resting heart rates below 30... there's really no incentive to address it. 

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14 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Interesting pic, I hadn't really thought about it before but assume they carry these covers RTW in case they have to drop a foil? Not that the tube actually opens into the interior of the boat though.

I think thats likely an improvised cover made on the dock to protect something inside, or keep lines in place etc for a delivery?

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17 minutes ago, Miffy said:

I said a few years ago that doping was a unspoken issue specifically re the high number of folks with ritalin scripts - it has been around for a decade plus but because no one is dying in their sleep with resting heart rates below 30... there's really no incentive to address it. 

Honestly, as a merely occasional Vendee fan, I don't know if I care about doping. It's different from purely athletic sports like cycling.

What I can't stand is the hypocrisy of testing 4 sailors before the start, and 4 after the arrival; or the dumb lie that doping wouldn't work at Vendee.

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1260x840_100_300_000000x30x0.thumb.jpg.254ec95ded610cbbab70ba1f3448ffb1.jpg

https://figaronautisme.meteoconsult.fr/actus-nautisme-courses/2021-02-08/58367-en-exclu-le-carnet-de-bord-de-sam-davies-qui-rentre-aux-sables-avec-isa

Hello to all the readers of the Figaro Nautisme.

This week I'm offering you a slightly different logbook, as I wanted to tell you about a recent piece of news that I was particularly pleased with: the new departure of Isa (Isabelle Joschke) with whom I will now be making my way to Les Sables.

I am writing this while I am sitting in the shade in the cockpit, cooling off with a little breeze from the sails. I'm right next to the northeastern tip of Brazil, and it's really hot, 33 degrees in the shade already this morning!

I'm not sailing as fast as I can because I'm letting Isa get a bit closer so we can get home not too far away from each other, to make our trip more fun and also to feel safer with a friend nearby. It's great that Isa and her team have also been able to repair their boat so that she can finish her adventure "out of the race". It's a pleasure to be able to share this last part of our trip together. It's also a nice wink because we were close to each other when I hit a UFO at the Cape of Good Hope, which caused me to retire. I remember seeing Isa pass in front of me, and being so sad not to continue the race with her!

Initiatives-Coeur is still in great shape, except for the keel jack. Although the keel hasn't unscrewed since I repaired it, there is "play" in the jack which has increased and now the keel is moving a lot. This is rather disconcerting and it greatly reduces my enjoyment of sailing as I still have this fear that it could get worse or break. Every day I spend a moment checking every day to see if it has got worse and if there are any signs of further damage! At this stage of my round the world trip, I shouldn't let anything prevent me from reaching the finish! My team is currently evaluating the best options to reduce all the risks. I have the possibility of blocking the keel in the centre and reducing the pressure on the jack, which is potentially a safe solution.

Curiously, this is precisely the configuration Isa has on her boat at the moment, since the repairs she and her team carried out in Salvador. We are definitely real "teammates" now with our tired boats limping home !

This Monday I will cross the equator and be back in the northern hemisphere ! It will be another symbolic crossing point ticked on the list and a positive sign that I am slowly getting closer to home ! There is only one ocean left to cross ... the North Atlantic ! I have looked at the weather forecast for this last stage of my trip, but it is still difficult to know which route to take and with which weather we will have to return to France. First we will have to cross the Doldrums and escape the calm and gusts of wind north of the equator, then we can head north in the trade winds.

See you next week
Sam

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

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16 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

I still want to know the real story behind Fabrice Amedeo's abandonment. It has the distinctive smell of a software cock-up.

I'm sure it's just a coincidence, but Fabrice's team was advertising for a new boat captain around the time of his retirement. 

Fabrice_needs_a_new_boat_captain.png

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2 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

Good find, although I do not know what a boat captain means in this context.

chief preparateur.

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Quote

In brief / Miranda Merron this morning

(...)
The Sat C distress alarm has been going off regularly to warn of yet another pirate attack on a merchant vessel, mostly in or off the Gulf of Guinea. It's amazing how much we heard about piracy when it was taking place off Somalia and how little we hear about it now, when hundreds of crew have been kidnapped, some killed, and some of these attacks are taking place nearly 200 miles away from land by heavily armed pirates. Nothing romantic about the the word "pirate".

That sounds really bad.

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I have never been afraid to ask dumb questions so here are two.

  1. Would it be feasible to design foils that withdraw entirely into the hull if the conditions suggest that would be desirable - or perhaps if a foil was so badly damaged that it could not be used?
  2. Let's assume I have a million or so euros and want to do the race but accept that I would have no chance of winning, I just want to compete and finish. What would my boat be like? I assume a non-foiler? Could I go with a hull that is not carbon but designed to be super strong - remember I am there to finish. Could a non-carbon hull be made stronger (I know it would much heavier but for my purpose who cares)? What about a non-canting keel, that seems to be a weak point?
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You’d just build a foam core carbon boat with no nomex core. Built it heavier than otherwise have to be in the 8-9 ton range. Maybe do more design studies re reducing peak loads and invest in a scow design. 

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3 hours ago, Miffy said:

You’d just build a foam core carbon boat with no nomex core. Built it heavier than otherwise have to be in the 8-9 ton range. Maybe do more design studies re reducing peak loads and invest in a scow design. 

Not for a million euros, though, right?  What would the proposed new hull cost?  Edit: Maybe I'm wrong about that...  I have no idea, to be honest.

For a budget, I'm guessing you'd need to find an old hull that was built like a tank and is still race-legal...  Some beast from 1993 available for not much, that could be made race-ready for another 200-300k, leaving a decent budget left for entry fees, provisioning, qualification races, etc...

I've actually been wondering a similar question...  Rather than "what could I do for a million", I was pondering "what would it cost to do this as a bucket list guy, on a tank of a boat rather than a new foiler like Heerama".  I'm guessing a realistic number is in the 1-2 million range, once you account for all costs rather than just the hull purchase...?

Second edit: I'm re-thinking the value of my question...  Because to be remotely ready, you really should be short-handing and/or single-handing something for years beforehand.  If not the IMOCA, then a Class 40, Figaro, or similar...  So the question only has value after you've spent a bunch of time and money building that readiness.

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yeah, probably to survive, you need to spend a decade pretty much full time... And have support from a bunch of people. Alternatively, you can do a different big ocean race on a smaller boat and it will be much easier.

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6 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I have never been afraid to ask dumb questions so here are two.

  1. Would it be feasible to design foils that withdraw entirely into the hull if the conditions suggest that would be desirable - or perhaps if a foil was so badly damaged that it could not be used?
  2. Let's assume I have a million or so euros and want to do the race but accept that I would have no chance of winning, I just want to compete and finish. What would my boat be like? I assume a non-foiler? Could I go with a hull that is not carbon but designed to be super strong - remember I am there to finish. Could a non-carbon hull be made stronger (I know it would much heavier but for my purpose who cares)? What about a non-canting keel, that seems to be a weak point?

I think a lot of us have entertained similar thoughts.

Start with a used daggerboard boat. Used good sails etc. You aren't going to punish them as hard as the serious competitors.

I think a fixed keel would give too much away, maybe not, this would be an early decision. Overbuild the keel hinge. Rather than pack a spare rudder overbuild the rudders and mounts.

A Vendee level auto pilot is insanely expensive.  It will be harder to budget for than other stuff. Are used ones reliable?

Shore support is a budget breaker. You will have to kidnap a team but where do you put them then? A quandary.

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9 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I have never been afraid to ask dumb questions so here are two.

  1. Would it be feasible to design foils that withdraw entirely into the hull if the conditions suggest that would be desirable - or perhaps if a foil was so badly damaged that it could not be used?
  2. Let's assume I have a million or so euros and want to do the race but accept that I would have no chance of winning, I just want to compete and finish. What would my boat be like? I assume a non-foiler? Could I go with a hull that is not carbon but designed to be super strong - remember I am there to finish. Could a non-carbon hull be made stronger (I know it would much heavier but for my purpose who cares)? What about a non-canting keel, that seems to be a weak point?

There was an early nineties one for $450,000 euro    - 1/2 pages back.

You might do it for 1 mil ???

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7 hours ago, Your Mom said:

Not for a million euros, though, right?  What would the proposed new hull cost?  Edit: Maybe I'm wrong about that...  I have no idea, to be honest.

For a budget, I'm guessing you'd need to find an old hull that was built like a tank and is still race-legal...  Some beast from 1993 available for not much, that could be made race-ready for another 200-300k, leaving a decent budget left for entry fees, provisioning, qualification races, etc...

 

I am pretty sure there is an age limit. From recollection, Superbigou (Pip's boat), designed in 1997 and launched in 1999 will not be legal for the 2024 Vendee.

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

I am pretty sure there is an age limit. From recollection, Superbigou (Pip's boat), designed in 1997 and launched in 1999 will not be legal for the 2024 Vendee.

Really? I thought Pip chartered it with part of the conditions being she updated it. She is the only non hydraulic canting keel boat though...

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An article on Ari's path to the Vendee Globe... he didn't do figaros, but came to imocas through minis (two mini transats in 1996 and 2007), then a route du rhum in 2014 on a pogo 40, and then two transatlantic races and the bermuda 1000 on his imoca in the past two years before doing the Vendee... while being an airline pilot for Finnair

https://www.imoca.org/en/news/news/ari-huusela-the-long-voyage-to-the-vendee-globe

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On 2/7/2021 at 2:03 AM, stief said:

Thanks for the info.

Re the 'press' and facepalms, the question from the FR organizers to Romain was--I kid you not--"How do you feel?" I was triggered, growled , face-palmed, then laughed at the irony that the next question , the best (about the cost and effect of sat comms on routing), was from a female EN reporter, and the translator didn't know how to put it to Romain. Oh well.

Glad you liked my question, but think it's unfair to blame the translator here. I was told to wait for Romain to put on headphones so he could hear my question translated into French, but for some reason he declined, and then didn't really understand what I was asking (meanwhile I had Sam's parents sat next to me, whispering "Ruben can translate! Let Ruben translate!"). Happily the onstage interviewer (Antoine Grenapin) understood that Romain hadn't really answered my question and followed up.

I actually enjoyed Ruben & friends' contributions and think that their questions were more interesting than those of many of the adults (I have often found that when talking about solo ocean racing with kids, they are better able to imagine themselves in your shoes than most adults and hence ask better questions).

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, kass said:

Glad you liked my question, but think it's unfair to blame the translator here. I was told to wait for Romain to put on headphones so he could hear my question translated into French, but for some reason he declined, and then didn't really understand what I was asking (meanwhile I had Sam's parents sat next to me, whispering "Ruben can translate! Let Ruben translate!"). Happily the onstage interviewer (Antoine Grenapin) understood that Romain hadn't really answered my question and followed up.

I actually enjoyed Ruben & friends' contributions and think that their questions were more interesting than those of many of the adults (I have often found that when talking about solo ocean racing with kids, they are better able to imagine themselves in your shoes than most adults and hence ask better questions).

Lots to digest here: thanks for another stimulating post.

Yes, I did like your question, and agree the blame was not wholly on the translator. The entire presser seemed hurried (I put it down to the time of day there, and that Charal had taken most of the energy earlier).  I was puzzled why Romain didn't handle the translation, but figured he might not have heard it as clearly, as his initial answer seemed to show. Thanks for the clarification, and the detail about Sam's parents.

Re "kids say the darndest things," sometimes true they can trigger great answers. Two recent examples are when Conrad Humpfreys was asked by his daughter's friend "What rule would you change?" and when Alex answered the schoolgirl's question about his trimming

Would like to read more of your writing, since have been wondering who will help continue Bob Fisher's role in writing about sailing. Links or recommendations (or PM) please?

(aside: Was also wondering if Pip would say Andi redeemed himself better than Bill Cosby.)

Cheers.

 

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9 hours ago, triumph72 said:

Thing is you wouldn't want to be too slow and end up days / weeks from help if it all went wrong somewhere south. Ari has sailed a good race, I think he is the benchmark, I wonder what he spent? 

Ari . .. and Didac? Yet, Jacques Caraës said eligibility rules will probably change IIRC. Less chances for 'low' budget projects like Seb D's.

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I wonder if the tracker update caught Pip in a transition since it seems odd she's only doing 9 kts in +20 kts of wind.  Tracking her progress it looks like a close(ish) finish sometime Thursday.  Barring any last minute Hermanns (/j) she will have sailed one hell of a race squeezing everything she could out of that older boat.  It would/will be something to see her in a contemporary foiler.  Despite Isabelle and Sam "keels gone bad", with Pip amazing effort, and with Clarissa's performance this event had a great showing for women.  2024 could see some very good competition in the top 10 again.  Perhaps another woman back on the podium? 

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17 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

Nothing romantic about the the word "pirate".

Pirates, Gulf of Guinea, West Africa, 110nm offshore!

https://www.icc-ccs.org/piracy-reporting-centre/live-piracy-map

Pirates-Gulf of Guinea, west Africa, 110nm offshore.jpg

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Major congrats to Herrmann

Quote

Completing the Vendée Globe in fifth place Germany’s Boris Herrmann will be crowned the IMOCA Globe Series champion after maintaining a rich seam of consistent results over the last three years.

Across some of the constituent events Herrmann finished in sixth position in the Bermudes 1000, seventh in the Rolex Fastnet Race and the Vendée Arctic and fifth in the Route du Rhum to return a set of regular finishes which saw him finish on top of the championship leaderboard just ahead of Yannick Bestaven.

[...]

“And we finished all the races and we never abandoned a race, which is great. There is a little bit of luck involved, of course, but not abandoning is really important for me and is more important than the result in any specific race.” said Herrmann.

 “Of course I am delighted but we have to be honest about it,”he said. “I think Yannick’s project started later than ours and not everyone has the financial means or the planning possibilities to come to all the races.”

full article at https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/22190/germany-s-boris-herrmann-is-imoca-globe-series-champion

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40 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

I wonder if the tracker update caught Pip in a transition since it seems odd she's only doing 9 kts in +20 kts of wind.  Tracking her progress it looks like a close(ish) finish sometime Thursday.  Barring any last minute Hermanns (/j) she will have sailed one hell of a race squeezing everything she could out of that older boat.  It would/will be something to see her in a contemporary foiler.  Despite Isabelle and Sam "keels gone bad", with Pip amazing effort, and with Clarissa's performance this event had a great showing for women.  2024 could see some very good competition in the top 10 again.  Perhaps another woman back on the podium? 

And Pip, with just under 600 nm to go, sadly won't make her benchmark.  Only a day left to match the 94 days, 4 hours and 25 minute record set by Ellen MacArthur.  

As you say, great efforts and showings, so promising.

She explained that conditions are tough and variable, so at 70% of polars her speeds are not too alarming

Quote

The route to the finish is not easy or obvious and seems to change every day - sadly getting further away. The conditions are so volatile with wind speeds spanning a range of 25 knots in the space of an hour that I need to change gear a lot. With these constant changes it is impossible to keep to the speeds my routing options suggest. Every time I swap headsails I lose a bit of ground, then when the breeze dies and I am underpowered I lose ground while I wait to see if it is a temporary lull or here to stay. Squalls will take me off in strange directions, sometimes I can make ground here but it is the toss of a coin. I am now having to run my routing at 70% polars and even then it is a struggle to keep up with the theoretical boat on the screen.

https://www.piphare.com/blog/972pcwfnplrppttv9z5tx4q9c3urfm

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Latest sked shows some great races inbound...

Boissieres and Kojiro have split, racing for 15th.  Boissieres looks to have a good advantage and seems likely to take it, but the forecast has some significant wind gradients, so splitting probably has a better chance than following in the leader's wake.

Then you have Roura and SLD match racing, while Pip takes the split, racing for 17th.  If you look ahead 30 hours or so, it'll start looking nicer to be approaching the finish from the south...  I like Pip's move, assuming they don't all pick up the pace in the short term.

Pip is also the fastest of the five at the moment.

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7 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:
3 hours ago, OPAL said:

Pirates, Gulf of Guinea, West Africa, 110nm offshore!

https://www.icc-ccs.org/piracy-reporting-centre/live-piracy-map 

Great link, thanks!

I knew it was bad, but not that bad.

Its seriously big business, and has been for a long time. I can remember cases over 25 years ago.

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Six models of the high pressure ridge affecting the Stephane (blue)/ Alan(red) matchup. Tough calls. 

276129742_ScreenShot2021-02-10at12_00_51PM.png.e1d2f42f1eddcfd2d3c2ecfc53c306e7.png1381086521_ScreenShot2021-02-10at12_01_03PM.png.746b57e6c1a721c44c15cf4bfe0a25bf.png1496488489_ScreenShot2021-02-10at12_01_15PM.png.e6261bf6768327443d542dca33fa439d.png102329795_ScreenShot2021-02-10at12_01_32PM.png.4b8759f2822e807645ffe379333f4d5e.png1642823305_ScreenShot2021-02-10at12_01_51PM.png.57202c5e2d6d797d383193c2acd4597d.png158360587_ScreenShot2021-02-10at12_02_05PM.png.d6e7c6c45614684a205b58bfbc8a7397.png

( Wish I'd discovered  earlier that double clicking the pics before posting allows the pics to be resized and linked)

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Cable failure ---what would it take to have been anticipated in Cape Town? Was also thinking if the ram failure could have been anticipated when the keel was repaired there too. (No blaming and shaming; just wondering what Sam's prep team are considering).

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