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Some pre Prada windup in T&S today, plus some flamebait for JLC fans. And yes, fix the sked schedule of course.

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What did you like or least like about this Vendée Globe? 
What was nice were these extremely close arrivals with the uncertainty that made Yannick's victory even more beautifulbecause difficult to obtain. It didn't take much for Charlie to win, but we can only accept the interpretation made by the jury a month before the finish. Mutual assistance is essential in ocean racing, I have read some inappropriate material on the subject. Just as I found Jean (Le Cam) 's comments on budget matters to be null and void , he is not well placed to make these kinds of comments given his past, he has sometimes been part of the biggest budgets. After that, what frustrated me was having four hours between each check-in  ; in 2021, we should be able to have much more frequent check-ins to follow what's going on more intensely. 

And more, as usual. Good discussion of the VG media tours worth a look. 

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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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A thought about the sked frequency...  I understand that the skippers themselves don't want it to be more frequent, for valid reasons.  But is there anything preventing individual skippers from revealing their own positions more frequently?

For example...  What if AT and HB decided they wanted to update his position, on their tracker only, every minute.  Effectively live tracking at that point.  Marketing-wise, that would likely result in a LOT of people gravitating toward their tracker, and therefore seeing a lot more HB branding.  You get to watch AT's progress live, if you go to HB's site instead of Vendee's.  I could imagine Boris and some others being willing to do that on their own sites.

Additionally, they could still choose to black out their live feed temporarily, reverting to Vendee's skeds only for a while.  Just put up a message says "Alex is in a tricky part here, and doesn't want the competition to see his live data.  Check back soon!".

Skippers who would rather not share data more often than they're required to could of course opt to just run with the official VR skeds only.

I realize a big part of the infrequent skeds is actually because skippers need mental downtime, and seeing their competition's positions frequently is a problem in that regard.  So perhaps this would be discouraged or isn't allowed.  Just wondering.

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Re the skeds: A more open sked schedule might even be better for them.

Current skeds are provincial, set for the UTC +1 crowd, especially the media's sleep patterns, not the skippers. A 7 hour gap makes little sense for the skippers. So, if the SAEM Vendee wants to be even more of an international event they will adapt. Local pride will be a hurdle.

Skippers had unprecedented access to the internet this time--so many showed Windy overlays on their screens. So, they could access the 2 (TWO!) second updates Herrmann provided any time they wanted. I suspect that if all the teams provided such updates, the skippers might even be freed from having to run their races around the current skeds, and plan their routing more in line with the conditions they see around them.  And as @noaano showed the SAT-AIS data is available for all.

So, they would plan the downtime they know they need. 

And, judging by the enthusiasm so may expressed about their WhatsApp groups and comms, opennesss has won out over the secretive anal retentive strategies of the past.

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2 hours ago, Your Mom said:

I understand that the skippers themselves don't want it to be more frequent, for valid reasons.  But is there anything preventing individual skippers from revealing their own positions more frequently?

Boris did have his position on the dashboard. 
The perhaps biggest episode was when we here (and many others following him at the end of the race) knew that something was up when he hit the trawler and his speed went down. In contrast it took a long time until the commentators knew that something was up.

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Pip talks to BBC Radio Solent's Dorset breakfast presenter Steve Harris. A good listen.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p096shdc?

That is a wonderful interview, thank you for sharing. She's having hicchups during it, sounds so sweet ... What Champagne and sleep deprivation do to you ;)

More concerning: apparently her canting keel line broke in the last 6 hours of the race. Other than the other boats, Medallia doesn't have hydraulic keel rams. So that could have potentially been a really bigh problem, glad it occured 'just-in-time'.

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1 hour ago, Matagi said:

That is a wonderful interview, thank you for sharing. She's having hicchups during it, sounds so sweet ... What Champagne and sleep deprivation do to you ;)

More concerning: apparently her canting keel line broke in the last 6 hours of the race. Other than the other boats, Medallia doesn't have hydraulic keel rams. So that could have potentially been a really bigh problem, glad it occured 'just-in-time'.

It sounded like this happened several times in the race - so much so that the final time she had run out of spare lines to run for the canting keel 

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Some snips from the very good summary of Pip's presser (Thanks VG. I was tired of doing those)

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Next objectives? What is next in terms of the Vendee Globe? 
2024 with wings! I think there are a lot of conversations to have but ideally a 2016 generation boat would be amazing.

So, it is nice to come back from the Vendee Globe and go shopping?
I had to struggle yesterday to turn left down the pontoon rather than turn right and look at which boat I wanted next.

 [snip]

As weather forecasts improve, are we becoming more dependent on our technology and were there times when you wished you had followed your instincts and not the software? 
The routing software is incredible and you could tell we were all using pretty much the same weather files. I have always relied on my own interpretation of a chart aswell. It looked like someone had vomited on a piece of paper and no routing could take you through it or possibly understand. You use the routing software, you look at the synoptic chart and you have to use common sense of how you and the boat is to see what is possible.

Question from Elaine Bunting, do you think people appreciate the different levels of physical performance, how much harder and tougher it is to race a boat of your vintage? 
Me and Didac Costa were saying that there should be a different class in this race for people with roofs and no roofs! It was a much more brutal physical experience for me. When I have to reef the main, it takes me four trips. Everytime I want to look at a sail or trim a sail in the Southern Ocean I have to get fully kitted up in gear to just look at the trim. In terms of motivation and exertion, I think it was much harder.
The one thing I did learn in the south is that in the big breeze, I could push harder. The guys with the foils were backing off and I was revving it up and I loved that.

[snip. The next question, from a German, wanted Pip to quantify the tears :lol:. She nailed the answer]

Boris said on German TV about the tears he shed? How many tears did you drop on the floor of your boat? 
Yesterday was a tough day and I had a couple of tears yesterday. I call it a pity party and I don’t really do those. I let myself cry for a little bit but then I don’t let myself. The one thing I have shared tears about is that I haven’t been able to share this – the start and the finish - with my family and friends, that my mum and dad are not here and that is the only thing that makes me so very sad.

Whole Presser and summary here

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2 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

It sounded like this happened several times in the race - so much so that the final time she had run out of spare lines to run for the canting keel 

She also slowed way down in the last set of miles and had shortened sail so whether she could lock it in or not, she was going to keep the boat flat. 

I smiled with her comment that Madallia was happy to finish the race as well.  She downplayed the fact she finished 40 miles behind modern foilers and frankly, had she not had some of the bigger issues that had her lose miles in the SO to them she may has squeaked ahead.  She squeezed every once and more from that old boat and I get the feeling that if she gets her hands on a modern foiling boat with enough time to figure its mood, she will be pushing the top boats around the world if not leading.

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Pips press conference was great.  What a breath of fresh air.  So much better than the canned BS answers we are being fed from the AC pressers.

I hope she gets the recognition she deserves and puts together something for 2024.   

 

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15 minutes ago, yoyo said:

Pips press conference was great.  What a breath of fresh air.  So much better than the canned BS answers we are being fed from the AC pressers.

I hope she gets the recognition she deserves and puts together something for 2024.   

 

Amazing...That presser is blocked for US viewers...well done Vendee Globe to keep international people interested.

(Now to try VPN)

 

edit:  thank you Opera to watch this

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17 hours ago, bucc5062 said:

She squeezed every once and more from that old boat and I get the feeling that if she gets her hands on a modern foiling boat with enough time to figure its mood, she will be pushing the top boats around the world if not leading.

Pip did great.
Now the plan for next round "just" has to stay in place. Doing it again on a foiler.

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Anyone else following Didac in?

He's about an hour away from the finish with a falling tide. With no daggerboards and on a reach,  making the channel right after the arrival seems doubtful, and high tide is about 10 hrs away.

A RIB is on its way

 

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Done! And well Done Didac. 97d 6h 27m 03s. This is Kingfisher's 6th(?) completion RTW. Ellen still holds the record for getting Kingfisher around the world fastest. 

Andi R says this is probably the last time these older generation boats will be racing in the VG, according to his IMOCA info.

So, well done, Kingfisher.

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Great to see Didac finish in the old Kingfisher, not far behind Pip in a equally vintage boat. I was wondering why he would remove the daggerboards other than to reduce weight? I assume they are there to serve a purpose - presumably with a canting keel having a more vertical foil or foils is necessary. Pip had a central daggerboard ahead of the keel, did Didac go to a similar set up or have no daggerboard at all?

There is something rather lovely to see these old boats do multiple circumnavigations. 

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2 hours ago, nroose said:

really? They are disqualifying safe old boats? After this fantastic edition? Shit.

Finding volunteers to staff race headquarters for 100+ days is getting tougher and tougher with every edition. 

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Speaking of struggling projects, was reading about Phil Weld's 1980 OSTAR win on Moxie.

Ran across an impressive review of a documentary put together by "American Challenge: Alone Against the Atlantic by Phil Weld."

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We see the mid-Atlantic drama of Judith Lawson's battle against a force 10 gale with 50 knot winds and 20 foot seas. The camera catches her hunched in the cockpit, dejected, scared, her torn mainsail in her hands. Her mast has gone; her boat, one of the smallest in the race, lies dead in the water. She is alone, helpless, her radio disabled. One feels almost embarrassed to look because this is a raw elemental moment, stripped of all pretenses. "God give me the strength to get through this," she tells the inanimate mike, and one knows she feels she may not survive. "Please," she adds quietly, "I don't want to he a heroine, I just want to survive." This has to be one of the great moments of documentary film, a scene of enormous power as well as meaning and for this we owe a debt to Judy Lawson and to the man -- Chris Knight -- who put the film together, installed the cameras and tapes, and instructed the lone skippers on how to use them.

Sounds like it was an incredible race. Interesting: on board cams were used to document a race 40 years ago. Wonder how it may have influenced the VOR and VG coverage.

Anyone seen it?

(thanks to kass for the tip)

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I have. Even knew Phil as he and my dad were buddies. The history of the OSTAR is incredible and that race spurred the most rapid growth of sailboat performance in history. That's my view, but I'll bet I'm right. I'd like to know if the movie "American Challenge" is available anywhere. Phil sponsored the movie by buying cameras for everyone. Earlier OSTAR history is amazing. "Project Cheers" is a great book about a Newick designed proa that finished 3'rd in the '68 race. it was reprinted and is available on amazon.

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6 hours ago, peterbike said:

All I could find is a link to buy the dvd.;   http://newfilmco.com/acpage.htm

But while looking I found this ;;  https://youtu.be/g-WfFCi6Ir4

Really good. @huey 2 dug it up for the thread a few weeks ago:

On 1/26/2021 at 7:15 PM, huey 2 said:

https://www.nfb.ca/film/singlehanders.   Mike Birch and so many other,  they were the original Heros of shorthanded racing and crossing the Atlantic in Ostar /Transat/ TJV , and invariably some of the Big N Atlantic Storms on the Great Circle Courses  then finish in light weather and Fog...these were the forerunners to the Caribbean race with the Joys of downhill Tradewind racing evolveing the designs....then to the BOC and Vendee.....Round the Worlders.  The Round UK and Island , The AZAB and the Three Peaks were the training wheels for these events...But there are some incredible early single handed Transat sailors, one early one was Howard Blackburn.... 

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Blackburn first rose to fame in 1883. While he was fishing on the schooner Grace L. Fears, a sudden winter storm caught him and a dorymate unprepared while they were in their Banks dory, leaving them separated from the schooner. Blackburn began to row for shore, despite the loss of his mittens; he knew his hands would freeze, so he kept them in the hooked position that would allow him to row. He tried to save one hand with a sock and thus worsened his condition by freezing his toes and yet not being able to save his fingers. The crewmate gave up and lay down in the dory and died on the second day. Blackburn carried the body to shore for a proper burial.

After five days with virtually no food, water, or sleep, he made it to shore in Newfoundland. Blackburn's hands were treated for frostbite, but could not be saved; he lost all of his fingers, and many of his toes, and both thumbs to the first joint.

Blackburn returned to Gloucester a hero, and with the help of the town, managed to establish a successful saloon. Not content with this, he organised an expedition to the Klondike to join the gold rush; rather than go overland, he and his group sailed there, via Cape Horn. Howard, after a disagreement with his partners left the group in San Francisco after a short trip to Portland, Oregon to buy lumber to help finance the trip, and returned home never having panned for gold.

After the quest for gold failed, Blackburn turned his attention to a new challenge — to sail single-handed across the Atlantic Ocean. This had been done before, by Alfred "Centennial" Johnson in 1876, and Joshua Slocum had completed a single-handed circumnavigation in 1898; but for a man with no fingers to undertake such a voyage would be quite an accomplishment. He sailed from Gloucester, Massachussetts in 1899, in the modified Gloucester Fishing Sloop, Great Western, and reached the city of Goucester, England after 62 days at sea.

What he did in 62 days , they now do in 80 days around the world.....the times are a changing...

 

2 hours ago, Grog said:

Nice find!

I do like the low tech, low key approach back then.

Not so sure about the hair though. :) 

Good finds indeed. The 'how to quit smoking' was also catchy  . . .

Discovering more about the origins of these races makes the current edition so much more rewarding to follow.

e.g., have been thinking about starting a 2002-03 Around Alone race thread. So many familiar names and great stories there.

Bernard Stamm Bobst Group Armor Lux 16px-Flag_of_Switzerland.svg.png  Switzerland 49 pts 115 days
Thierry Dubois Solidaires 23px-Flag_of_France.svg.png France 45 pts 118 days
Simone Bianchetti Tiscali 23px-Flag_of_Italy.svg.png Italy 35 pts 159 days
Emma Richards Pindar 23px-Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom.svg.png United Kingdom 33 pts 131 days
Bruce Schwab Ocean Planet 23px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png United States 30 pts 159 days
Patrick Radigues Garnier 23px-Flag_of_Belgium_%28civil%29.svg.png Belgium Retired Leg 1
Graham Dalton Hexagon HSBC 23px-Flag_of_New_Zealand.svg.png New Zealand Retired Leg 3
Class 2: IMOCA Open 50
Brad van Liew Tommy Hilfiger 23px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png United States 50 pts 148 days
Tim Kent Everest Horizontal 23px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png United States 44 pts 169 days
John Dennis Bayer Ascensia 23px-Flag_of_Canada_%28Pantone%29.svg.pn Canada Retired Leg 2
Class 3: IMOCA Open 40
Derek Hatfield Spirit of Canada 23px-Flag_of_Canada_%28Pantone%29.svg.pn Canada 37 pts 245 days
Kojiro Shiraishi Spirit of Yukoh 23px-Flag_of_Japan.svg.png Japan 36 pts 180 days
Alan Paris BTC Velocity 23px-Flag_of_Bermuda.svg.png Bermuda 30 pts 202 days

Time now for Didac. He sure fits the pre-pro spirit of these races.

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He's happy to be back, even if he does have to go back to work in the next few weeks and start paying back the loans. Hard to believe a 40 year old can look so young :lol:

977770158_ScreenShot2021-02-14at6_11_34AM.thumb.png.f716896e190dbfa3ed91a63f169ab52d.png

Herrmann should coach Didac on prepping his hair for interviews.  

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14 hours ago, stief said:

Speaking of struggling projects, was reading about Phil Weld's 1980 OSTAR win on Moxie.

Ran across an impressive review of a documentary put together by "American Challenge: Alone Against the Atlantic by Phil Weld."

Sounds like it was an incredible race. Interesting: on board cams were used to document a race 40 years ago. Wonder how it may have influenced the VOR and VG coverage.

Anyone seen it?

(thanks to kass for the tip)

Damn...That brings back such a memory for me.

 

In 1980 I was just starting out on my own sailing path.  I had recently bought a Prindle 18 and in the area I lived in, struggled for crew so I learned to sail her solo.  The times I had that hull flying, solo, across Barnegatt Bay...anyway, I was reading articles in some sailing periodical when I saw the story about Phil Weld's OSTAR race in Moxie.  It blew me a way, as much for his effort in winning, but that he was ...well old (I was still almost a babe).  I thought if this "old" man can still sail across the Atlantic, alone, and win a race, well dammit maybe I can at least try.  He became my inspiration on how to live life.

I set a goal to sail across the Atlantic solo by the time I was 30.  I looked at boat ads, researched while at the same time beginning a career in Software Development.  Along the way I raced my Prindle, had adventures, bought a 22' Chrysler, (a boat I could afford) raced that for years, got a Capt. License, soon skippered bigger boats racing on the Chesapeake and that Atlantic dream just seemed that one decision out of reach.  Still, every step on my sailing path had Phil ad Moxie in the background.  I'm 2x 30 now and I think I missed that dream, but I'm okay with it.  Instead, I raced, cruised, I met amazing people, hit my pinnacle twice (once in PHYR, once in Dinghys), and was able to accept the moment when it was time to move in a different direction.  

Thing is, those two still in a way shape how I view life and how one does not stop living even as we get older.  Wow, thanks for the moment.  Ain't the universe strange.

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38 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

That brings back such a memory for me

Oh yes. Same here (looking forward to thread drift and trading 'what coulda been' stories when we're gumming our mashed potatoes and gravy). Others like Jack might also be looking for an alternative to Brexit, the Corona crisis, duck dynasty and the AC. 

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2086341166_ScreenShot2021-02-14at7_38_21AM.thumb.png.9f4c32e967d24b1e08c12f51250a6755.png

Some rough links to tidbits about Didac's Ascent of the channel. Some good examples how a drone makes a lower cost substitute for heli-shots.

Ran out of data (really low budget). Back to work next Frida

Pep Costa business partner

100% finishing record for Kingfisher RTW

Rich Wilson and Didac

Flares and local firemen's support

"the IMOCA rule will require that the boats for the next VG must be 2004 or newer" ( @nroose)

Fire service welcome, just as in 2017

Breakfast of octopus, french fries, and a beer.

Didac's favourite saying, "Luck favours the prepared."

No skipper this edition knows his boat better or has sailed more miles than Didac, except for maybe JLC.

Humble: apologetic because he was late for start-of-race presser: had been saving old folks in a home

music. oops (Lionel Richie - All Night Long). YT hasn't been taken down . . . yet

Pip and Didac

multi-lingual fun. As ManuelB said in the YT comments, "What a mess of an interview! The talent speaks Spanish, the translator fights it off in Catalan, the journalists ask in French, while a stuttering English voice on the background is muddling all up in a crappy sound recording. It's such a beauty after all those miles sailed, isn't it?!"

No clear idea what was said in the translation scrum. (maybe JLC was mentioned). Rather fun to follow, if you want your ears to twitch and swivel like a rabbit's.

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1 minute ago, yl75 said:

Now we have a race between the two "pit stop" girls !

I forgot, did Isabelle fully repair her kill, or is it in the middle ?

She's still got her keel locked,  last I noted, and rendezvouing with Sam for mutual support.

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Didac Presser.

Dailymotion vid. (YT not available or blocked)

1st half from the VG write up (thanks VG translators, whoever you are). Daily motion times added.

Modest, shy and – as the French would say – very discrete, Didac Costa was enchanting as he spoke to his Press Conference in his native Spanish language today. And if Didac can be quiet and unassuming his welcome by his counterparts from the Les Sables d’Olonne Sapeurs Pompiers – the local firefighters – was sustained, loud and appreciative. That special bond created in 2016 when they were instrumental in getting him back on the race course after his generator and electrical problems brought him back to Les Sables d’Olonne, are stronger than ever. Suffice to say Didac’s welcome was truly special.

How did you feel with the firefighters welcoming you back to the Channel? 9:00
It was extraordinary. There were not so many people in the Channel as the last edition but to see people out there being happy for you and happy for what you have done, even when you have done it twice it is surprising. This time it was really moving and incredible. I was so touched by the support of the firefighters. 

How did you live this one compared to four years ago? 10:20
The course is the same. The last time I had very old sails that broke and I had the boat better prepared with new sails and so it was much more different in terms of sailing. I could push hard and I could really enjoy the course and the beauty of the landscape and to enjoy the extraordinary thing that is the Vendée Globe.

Four memories, descent of Atlantic, Indian Ocean, Pacific and then going back up the Atlantic? 12:08
The descent of the Atlantic I remember very good first days but it was difficult to get accustomed to the boat and I remember the first front. The Indian I remember being side by side with Pip and trying to stick with her, I was close to her. The Pacific the last ten days were really difficult with big conditions with swell and wind. And for the climb up the Atlantic it was mostly the north Atlantic which was difficult getting round the Azores anticyclone and having to spend more time that expected and so that was starting to be a little bit complicated for me.

The Southern Oceans you now know very well, was there a highlight moment in the big South? 20:00
It is almost impossible to choose because Cape Horn is very emotional but the Southern Oceans give you such a special image when the boat is going fast and the conditions are good. The most magical thing is that the whole course feels wild and in the south that really intensifies I had so many magical moments. And in the end rounding Cape Horn is very intense.

You made a courageous choice in removing the daggerboards, how did that affect your performance? 21:00
It was a good choice to take out the daggerboard. I was able to really test this going down the Atlantic after the Equator and going back up, during a few days when I could monitor my performance alongside other boats it was good. When I was upwind in the Indian Ocean for a short time one and a half days I would have not used my daggerboards that much anyway.

You are now the best solo ocean racer in Spain, an iconic sailor how does that make you feel? 26:00
You just cannot compare things because it is so difficult in Spain for skippers to do the Vendée Globe and so I am lucky to have had the support of so many people and the team to be able to do two Vendée Globes and it is not obvious for many skippers to be able to try to get the budget to do the Vendée Globe. Even me with my limited budget it was difficult. There is a lot of good talent in Spain but you cannot compare us, a lot don’t have the assets to do this type of race. So I am very happy but it is very difficult and I am sad that many more Spanish skippers cannot participate.

So it appears you did the whole round the world race with two right foot boots? 28:45
That is true. I had two pairs, one better suited to the cold but when I packed I took two right boots and did try to put them both on together on several occasions but it was not comfortable

Will you come back with the same boat? 30:46
It is difficult to know. Of course I have been thinking about it all the time but if I do it will need to be with another boat because the class rules evolve and it I have to be ready for the next one and that would be with a newer, different boat.

What did you learn? 33:21
I learned a lot. It is so intense you are learning every day, you are learning 24 hours a day, learning about the boat, how to sail it and the meteo forecasting.

Would you like a boat with foils? 33:40
It is complicated to get the means to do this and at the moment it is not the right time to talk about it.

37:25 Q: Pip's comments about two minds about coming back to the pandemic?. A:  "Affected everyone, Didn't know if we could even start, difficult to know it's not over, must fight against the difficulties, we will manage

39:18 Q. Firefighter experience help in RTW? A: "Of course, dealing with stressful situations, and mechanical applications, and team work with firefighters.

42:00 Q: 120 students followed. Hitting whale and ocean health, did our mascot help? A: 44:20 "Yes, kids' messages helped, their dreams and energy, authentic, moving. VG is wild, great platform to speak of these issues, want to protect.

46:14 Q: Caraes: Become a firefighter here in LSDO?  47:55 A:" They'd make a great team, they'd make for a better boat, tried to stay in contact, moving support. People here support the VG, would like to prep a [Red!] boat with them if there's a 3rd project."

51:30 Q: On board last night? Foil problems? Old Boats? A: "Stayed onboard all last night. New foilers had problems, confidence with old boats helps get to the finish.

53:11 Q: Environmental state of each ocean? 54:30 A: "Can't see much, but did note more pollution, UFOs, and plastic in Atlantic especially, even in the Southern Ocean . . . getting like the Mediterranean too.

57:30 Q: 100 day objective met. Re Ellen Mac's time? 59:20 A: "Checked at each Cape, benchmarked against Pip's similar generation boat to go as fast I could. Same as Ellen until North Atlantic slowdown.

1:01:1:00 Q:  Most tiring of your 3 RTWs? 1:03: A: "BWR tiring, but easier DH, previous harder because 10 days more, even though this time N Atlantic was harder.

1:04:26 Q: Lacks/regrets this time? A: " Other than Boots, heater, not much. Had a heater last time, didn't use, so left ti behind, but colder this time.

1:05:15 Another good question from @kass about how cheaper sat data and improved access weather models affects navigation. 1:07:00 A: "Not much different from the BWR and last VG, because maybe too much info needs too much time to look into it all when alone, so had to rely on simpler ways. Certainly improvements very important for the Mini Transat

1:08:00 Q Sailing with JLC? A. 1:09:00 "Iconic to sail with such an experienced and wise sailor

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19 minutes ago, stief said:

1:05:15 Another good question from @kass about how cheaper sat data and improved access weather models affects navigation. 1:07:00 A: "Not much different from the BWR and last VG, because maybe too much info needs too much time to look into it all when alone, so had to rely on simpler ways. Certainly improvements very important for the Mini Transat

Thanks @stief. I think what he meant was that it made a big difference going from no weather data on the Mini Transat (apart from what they get by voice over the radio) to some weather data (by satellite comms) on the IMOCA, which is sort of obvious. I'm more interested in how the increase in both spatial and temporal resolution of global forecasts over the time that he, and all the other non-rookies, have been racing around the world have impacted their strategies. And then there is also the cheaper access to things like satellite images. I think this has helped make the budget campaigns more competitive. 

 

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14 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I have. Even knew Phil as he and my dad were buddies. The history of the OSTAR is incredible and that race spurred the most rapid growth of sailboat performance in history. That's my view, but I'll bet I'm right. I'd like to know if the movie "American Challenge" is available anywhere. Phil sponsored the movie by buying cameras for everyone. Earlier OSTAR history is amazing. "Project Cheers" is a great book about a Newick designed proa that finished 3'rd in the '68 race. it was reprinted and is available on amazon.

Oh wow, what a privilege to have known him! (I was 15 when he died, and had only set foot on a sailboat once at that point). His book is a great read and by luck rather than design the second hand copy I ordered off Abe Books was signed by him. I have an extensive collection of OSTAR books and a number have turned up signed, while other's I have gotten signed whenever possible.

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5 minutes ago, kass said:

Thanks @stief. I think what he meant was that it made a big difference going from no weather data on the Mini Transat (apart from what they get by voice over the radio) to some weather data (by satellite comms) on the IMOCA, which is sort of obvious. I'm more interested in how the increase in both spatial and temporal resolution of global forecasts over the time that he, and all the other non-rookies, have been racing around the world have impacted their strategies. And then there is also the cheaper access to things like satellite images. I think this has helped make the budget campaigns more competitive. 

Thanks for the clarification about the Mini Transat example--didn't know they only have voice. No gribs? harrumph.

Apparently Andi noted that Didac had run out of data (no mention how much he bought, and at what cost), so expected him to mention that in his reply to you. 

Yes, agree that the cheaper data should help some projects, but maybe it's still a bit much for the really low cost ones, and it certainly can be a case of "too much information." I find the the whole "comms/ outside assistance" issue is pointing more and more to allowing shore based routing.

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1 hour ago, kass said:
15 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I have. Even knew Phil as he and my dad were buddies. The history of the OSTAR is incredible and that race spurred the most rapid growth of sailboat performance in history. That's my view, but I'll bet I'm right. I'd like to know if the movie "American Challenge" is available anywhere. Phil sponsored the movie by buying cameras for everyone. Earlier OSTAR history is amazing. "Project Cheers" is a great book about a Newick designed proa that finished 3'rd in the '68 race. it was reprinted and is available on amazon.

I have a hunk of cedar from Moxie's stbd float on the book shelf in my family room.  Made several trips to France in 2014-2015 to help shop for and deliver a ORMA 60 to the US.  On one trip we visited the yard where Moxie was being repaired from a "visit" with some rocks and somehow the cedar from the busted hull ended up in my pocket.  Treasured momento for me that only results in blank stares when people ask me what it is. 
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7 hours ago, kass said:

Oh wow, what a privilege to have known him! (I was 15 when he died, and had only set foot on a sailboat once at that point). His book is a great read and by luck rather than design the second hand copy I ordered off Abe Books was signed by him. I have an extensive collection of OSTAR books and a number have turned up signed, while other's I have gotten signed whenever possible.

 

5 hours ago, REW said:
I have a hunk of cedar from Moxie's stbd float on the book shelf in my family room.  Made several trips to France in 2014-2015 to help shop for and deliver a ORMA 60 to the US.  On one trip we visited the yard where Moxie was being repaired from a "visit" with some rocks and somehow the cedar from the busted hull ended up in my pocket.  Treasured momento for me that only results in blank stares when people ask me what it is. 

Check out this page. Click on "photos from the book" to get an idea what a radical boat it was: https://cheersdicknewick.com

My wife re-published "Project Cheers", a monstrous undertaking. It's a good read from a very different time and a special period of the OSTAR race. Proceeds go to the Newick family. We'd like to find a way to promote this book. Any suggestions? 

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45 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

We'd like to find a way to promote this book. Any suggestions? 

Nice site.  Thanks for the link and background. Is this the same edition listed on Goodreads?

Will happily buy an ebook (old eyes need the light; searchable, quotable,  non-destructive annotations, and able to carry everywhere, especially on the water.). Would like to support the project, but am pruning my physical library. Eight boxes gone, many more to go. I'll buy the book to donate to our city's Library if that helps, but would really hope for an .epub, which can be promoted and recommended through Overdrive

Any hope of an .epub? 

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11 hours ago, stief said:

Miranda Merron's update. Might be her longest yet. Lots of reaction from @TracyEdwardsMBE and @maidenfactor

 

Bump.

Only 1 likey (from me) for this post? 

One of the best onboard reports yet, right from the heart, and a philosophical one as well.

And you know what, no so awfully English like some of the other great girls. "You know what I mean?"

Those with French partners seem less affected, unsurprisingly...

 

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from Isabelle's blog: a few more details about her keel problem and the rendezvous with Sam, Safari trans and snip.

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With Sam (Davies) we contact each other all day to find out how the night went, how it goes on board and to take stock of the condition of the boats. She has the worst boat in point of the two, which is why I got a lot ahead of her in the end, because she can't move very fast upwind or downwind. It is still quite slowed down. So we keep abreast of the conditions we have and she tells me what she can put on her veil so that I can adapt my cadence to her. Since we left, the idea is to be able to watch over each other in the event of a problem. For the moment, it is rather Sam who may have risks in his rigging. No one is ever immune. We know what it's like to have unpleasant surprises at sea. So I'm not in too hurry, I'm waiting to see what rhythm she will be able to give her boat when the wind comes back and I'll adapt my pace accordingly.

In Salvador de Bahia, my team mainly worked on the keel. The question of the cylinder was complicated because the rod was very slightly twisted and it was not possible to straighten it. So today I have a cylinder that is fixed again in the keel but with risks of breakage that are still high and risks of hydraulic fluid leakage, because the cylinder is still twisted. So I can't really quil. I made the entire crossing in the trade winds without angulating the keel and I will keel very little on the rest of the route, because the objective is to keep the main and secondary system safe. I know how precious it is to have a keel that holds. Even if I can't hang it, the fact that it doesn't move is a very valuable element, especially when approaching the coast and crossing the Bay of Biscay. In addition to this, there is also slight damage to the structure. When the boat lay down in the storm after my abandonment, the keel head got stuck against the actuator and it damaged the box in which the actuator is enclosed. Repairs have been made, but there are always some cracks and points of fragility. The boat is therefore not 100% of its capacity. I am serene, but I must navigate with caution.

full article and audio at https://isabellejoschke.com/ces-derniers-moments-sont-precieux/

English-French-German cooperation. ;) 

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Hmm. Andi R does EN podcasts. https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/22266/voices-from-the-ocean-9

In this one Clement talks about the carnage getting around Finisterre before he arrives soon, Isabelle,  Sam (who apologies to her EN audience, explains her rigging and sails issue, and talks about who does what at home with Romain), and . . .

. . .  for Varan, "discover also a few words from Sam Manuard, architect from L'Occitane in Provence, who spoke to us this morning about the performance of his first IMOCA and the challenge that he is facing."

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Sorry to post a large piece........but I think a thought provoking piece , as we are Sailors on an Ocean.....

 

Andrew "Twiggy" Forrest stands on the ocean shoreline.

 

 

LISTEN

29m 3s
 
 
 
 
 
Volume 27%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
00:00
00:00
 
Image: 

Supplied

02 | Lighting up our ocean

 

Andrew Forrest's fascination with the ocean began as a young boy camping on the picturesque Urala coast, near his childhood home Minderoo in Western Australia's Pilbara.

It's an obsession that culminated in him completing his PhD in marine ecology in 2019.

In the second of his 2020 Boyer Lectures, Dr Forrest mounts a passionate defence of our oceans.

Dr Forrest argues the key issues facing our oceans — deoxygenation, overfishing and plastic pollution — are our fault, and it's us who must fix them.

He says it's philanthropic and government interventions, at a scale not yet seen, that will save our seas.

Duration: 29min 3sec
Broadcast: Sun 31 Jan 2021, 12:00pm
 
More Information

Dr Andrew Forrest is a leading businessman and active philanthropist. He and wife Nicola co-founded the Minderoo Foundation in 2001, and to date they have supported over 300 initiatives across Australia and internationally with their total philanthropic donations now exceeding A$2 billion.

Andrew recently completed a PhD in Marine Ecology and is passionate about ocean conservation. He is a member of the United Nations Environment Programme Scientific Advisory Committee on the Assessment on Marine Litter and Microplastics.

Dr Forrest was appointed by the Prime Minister and Cabinet of Australia to Chair the Review of Indigenous Training and Employment Programs to end Indigenous disparity through employment.

In 2017, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to the mining sector, a year later he was inducted into the Australian Prospectors & Miners' Hall of Fame. He is a recipient of the Australian Sports Medal and the Australian Centenary Medal. Andrew was Western Australia's 2017 Australian of the Year for his outstanding contribution to the community.

Transcript

minus

Geraldine Doogue: Hello, I'm Geraldine Doogue and I'm delighted to introduce this year's Boyer lectures. This ABC flagship series of talks began in 1959, and each year a prominent Australian is invited to share their views on the challenges and the opportunities that lie ahead. This year's Boyer lecturer is leading Australian businessman Dr Andrew Forrest AO, with a series titled Rebooting Australia: How Ethical Entrepreneurs Can Help Shape a Better Future.

Dr Forrest is the founder and chairman of Fortescue Metals Group. He is also a leading philanthropist, having co-founded the Minderoo Foundation with his wife Nicola in 2001.

In this, the second of his Boyer lectures, Dr Forrest turns his attention to environmental problems and some possible solutions for the world's oceans, which is one of his preoccupations, as you'll hear. Here now is Dr Forrest with Lighting Up Our Ocean.

Andrew Forrest: Lighting Up Our Ocean.

The Urala coast is a landscape of burnt orange earth that meets bright blue water, near Minderoo Station, where I grew up. I remember camping on the beach when I was 10 or 11, looking out of the dark waters of the Indian Ocean and noticing that for every star I could see in the sky, there was a light twinkling on the ocean. I remember asking Dad what all the lights were. He said they were prawn trawlers, a relatively new industry in the area. Dad explained that the reason the clear, coral-rich waters near our station were turning murky was because they were dragging dredge-nets over the pristine ocean floor. This was a defining point in my life.

The ocean, I've learned more and more since that day, is far from the pure untouched wilderness I had imagined as a child. And the scale of the problems facing our oceans is not limited to a handful of trawlers. I say 'ocean' in the singular. Our planet is one interconnected ocean that doesn't care about political borders or indeed political leaders.

Over the last few years, struggling between philanthropy and business, I've completed a PhD in marine science. When I started the PhD I had a number of common misconceptions. I saw pollution in our rivers and on our beaches, and assumed this problem was limited to waters near our shore. It's not. Our trash is now at the bottom of the deepest ocean trenches and on the most remote tropical beaches.

I thought over-fishing was a local problem. It's not. Subsidised fishing fleets now menace every corner of our own policed waters. I thought the ocean was known. It's not. We know less about the depths of our oceans than the surface of the Moon. The problems facing our ocean are utterly enormous and, at the same time, completely heartbreaking.

We have a relatively clear picture of the amount of carbon emitted into the atmosphere. But we have virtually no idea how many fish are in the sea, how many are caught, or what decades of treating our ocean as a rubbish dump means for these ecosystems. The ocean didn't create these problems, they are all due to us, and it's we who must fix it.

If business holds the key to climate change and therefore ocean deoxygenation, as argued in my first lecture, it's philanthropic and government interventions at a scale not yet seen that will save our seas. To put it simply, all the problems of the ocean can be distilled into three simple areas; the deoxygenation of our oceans, overfishing, and plastic pollution. These problems are fixable.

Humans have been fishing, largely sustainably, for an unbelievably long time, almost 100,000 years. And we have been pretty good at it for a long time too. Like the prawn trawlers I saw as a child, humans have used bonfires, torches and other forms of light to lure prey into the shallows for thousands of years. We invented the fishing hook almost 10,000 years ago, and by the 1600s the Dutch were using drift nets, vast nets that float through the ocean, catching and killing everything in their path.

Today, the global fishing industry is worth well over $200 billion, with more than 4.5 million boats fishing our oceans. Nations that have exhausted their own supplies of seafood now subsidise vast fishing fleets that roam the ocean, with the capacity to decimate entire populations of ocean wildlife, like they have done in their own seas, in just a few years. Everyone is in on the act.

The spotlights illegal fishing fleets use are so powerful, they can be detected from space. The EU, the world's champion of sustainability, takes home almost a quarter of the yellowfin tuna court in our Indian Ocean, a species that has been overfished for years and is on the brink of collapse. Iran's fishing fleet illegally plunders the water of Yemen and Somalia, where millions of children are on the brink of starvation. And our own Australian trawlers fished out 90% of the population of orange roughy, a deep-sea perch, before we realised that this fish grows incredibly slowly and lives for up to 200 years.

In 2017, I was sitting in the audience of a lecture hall, listening to a talk by one of my PhD supervisors, the very famous Professor Daniel Pauly from the University of British Columbia. At the end, someone in the audience asked, 'Do we know what caused all the big fish to disappear from the Caribbean?' I'll never forget his reply, he just shrugged, 'Nothing remarkable or noteworthy happened, they simply got eaten.'

Fishing is, at least, something we regulate, even if rather badly. But our oceans are not only our food bowl, they have also become our garbage bin. For decades, the petrochemical companies that manufacture plastic from fossil fuel have peddled the myth that it's okay to keep churning out huge quantities of the stuff, as long as we make token efforts to recycle. But you have been lied to. The reality is that these companies have been knowingly overselling and underfunding the recycling system. Why? Because recycling reduces demand for new plastic products, the ones they make. These companies are dinosaurs. They don't like change, but if they don't change, they are going to take the planet down with them. As a result, plastic is piling up in our landfills, on our beaches, in our rivers, in our oceans, and in ourselves, certainly in the stomachs of our sea life.

If a fish or seabird is lucky, the plastic it eats pierces its insides and kills it quickly. But it's more likely that it will die slowly, from unrelenting hunger, its belly full of plastic junk. It will die of starvation without even realising it was starving.

Plastic is such a wonder material, that it never truly disappears, it just gets smaller and smaller, and that's where it is most dangerous. It becomes so tiny that it can enter your bloodstream, it can enter your brain. It enters through the air that you breathe, through the seafood you eat, the water you drink. You, me, unborn babies, we are all accumulating these tiny plastic particles in our bodies and the toxic chemicals they release. And it's not a question of if plastics are making us sick, it's a question of how much. The chemicals in plastic are reducing our fertility, it's reducing our birth weights, and increasing cancer risk in all of us, not to mention lung disease, heart disease and diabetes.

My foundation, Minderoo, is taking this research one step further. We are starting to look at whether plastic particles are also entering our brains, crossing the biological blood-brain barrier that normally keeps all the bad stuff out. With micro-nano-plastic, it's not working. Once it is in there, it will wreak havoc to your brain. And these early warning signs will only get worse the more plastic we produce because it doesn't go away, it accumulates.

Only about 100 companies produce the vast majority of polymers, the building blocks to all plastic, and they are responsible for inflicting this slow violence on human health and the ocean. Don't tell me we can't change the behaviour of just 100 companies, I know we can. They are quite comfortable producing plastic from oil and creating plastic products that are very hard, if not impossible to recycle.

Modern plastics are designed to be cheap and easy to produce, not cheap and easy to recycle. And so they aren't recycled. Instead, they are dumped or burned. Pressure from multiple directions can change this. Companies that use plastic must demand recycled plastic from the major petrochemical producers. Consumers need to boycott products that aren't recycled. Governments need to step in and ban (many have) the worst products, including those with toxic additives. Chemists need to design new plastics that are engineered right from the beginning for reuse. Plastics that can be cheaply recycled back to clean, pure polymer and reused responsibly.

We need a circular economy that isn't a myth or a green-washing exercise but a genuine and fully functioning economic system. This needs to be led by the big petrochemical and plastic companies of the world. They must dump their old model and vigorously adopt a new one, supporting reuse and recycling all the way through the chain. The honourable path is through voluntary action, but the likely path for many of the worst actors will be through regulation.

We have used light to draw out creatures from the sea for thousands of years, to catch them in our nets, on our hooks and spears. But it's now time to shine a different light on our oceans, one of knowledge and of care. We face a major inflection point and it's time to make a major course correction. See, 99% of the liveable space that organisms can survive in isn't the atmosphere or the surface of the Earth, it's the ocean. It's time to make a major course correction because if we help destroy 99% of the liveable space of our planet, what chance do you think we have?

The fishing industry has been light years ahead of marine science for way too long, efficiently finding and annihilating what was in the oceans before researchers even knew it was there, or indeed policymakers could protect it. We have to flip that situation. The sea life in our oceans is priceless. It is being destroyed before we even know what is there. We need a massive scalable and automated system that tells us if a species, if a fish stock, or a critical ecosystem is spiralling out of control and we could destroy it, before we destroy it. And this includes tracking pollution and revealing the true toll of our immense plastic consumption on ocean ecology.

For me, coming from a background in industry, tempered by a humbling education in science, the answer lies in genomics, big data approaches, and meaningful collaboration across governments. Most surveys of sea life, if not drawn from the fishing industry, are done at a tediously small scale, with small research vessels deploying cameras that drift through tiny areas of the ocean. Someone then literally has to count the fish by watching hours and hours of video. Usually this is a humble PhD student. I know because I was one. Eventually that data gets published in a journal and is read by just a handful of people. That's about a two-year process. And we don't have time for this.

I believe there is another way, and it's as simple as collecting cells from the water. Already scientists have started playing with eDNA, the fragments of genetic material floating in the ocean, to try and better understand the diversity of life in our seas. eDNA are the tiny scraps of genetic information left behind by sea creatures as they feed, shed their scales, and decompose. These clues give us a highly accurate picture of what fish are in a specific area and how many of them. We don't do this on land because cells break down so quickly in a terrestrial dry environment. Applying these genomic tools at scale across our oceans will allow us to take large-scale snapshots of the health of fish stocks or entire marine ecosystems, using nothing more than samples of seawater.

The team at Minderoo Foundation is launching a program to do just this. It's called OceanOmics, and it will help identify where there are endangered species and the feeding and breeding grounds of species, like the shortfin mako. And we will be able to sequence entire cells, as well as these snippets of DNA. Today, we have only sequenced the genomes of 20 of Australia's 4,000-odd marine fish species. But, using these technologies, we could feasibly sequence the genome of every marine species on Earth. It's a technique that has been around for some time in medicine and cancer research, but it needs to be adapted and fine-tuned in the ocean, then massively scaled. A fast boat with a single genomic sequencing machine, and a dozen technicians aboard, could learn more about fish stocks in a week than we would traditionally discover using fishing data or video cameras in a decade.

PhD students could spend 99% of their time sifting through real live data to uncover the secrets of the ocean, rather than compiling data from a fishing trawler or counting fish on a computer screen. Artificial intelligence will do the identification for us, allowing researchers to get on with the job of determining the health of the ocean.

A global fleet of these boats, supported by a small army of steadfast marine scientists could shine a light on the whole ocean so we can know it and we can protect it. It is no use protecting a species once it has already been destroyed by the fishing industry. We must work out what is there before it's destroyed by overfishing.

Approaches like OceanOmics will also help governments decide which bits of the planet's 360 million square kilometres of ocean to protect. Currently, just 2% of the ocean is protected from commercial fishing. Scientists across the world agree that figure needs to rise to 30%, and the communities that rely on unsustainable fishing need our support to transition to new industries, like agriculture and sustainable fishing.

Through the Blue Nature Alliance, Pew, Conservation International, and the Minderoo Foundation have made huge strides in establishing this network of global marine reserves. Our foundation has committed US$25 million, and by 2025 we aim to establish or grow 50 marine parks. But we all know laws must be policed to have any effect. Even on the Great Barrier Reef, which has dedicated air and water patrols, there are 600 cases of illegal fishing detected every year, both by holidaymakers and the commercial fishing industry. Just imagine how bad the problem is elsewhere.

On best estimate, 20% of the world's fish catch is illegal, unregulated and unreported, and it costs the industry more than $40 billion a year. Yet, it is becoming possible to detect illegal fishing efficiently. Like planes, most big boats automatically send out location pings, largely to avoid smashing into other boats. Fishing vessels that want to sneak into a marine park can simply turn these pingers off or 'go dark', to use the lingo. This is where innovations in satellite technology and artificial intelligence step in.

Satellite images used to cost thousands of dollars, and even then we had to wait days for them, assuming the military didn't just jump the queue. By the time you had your image, the guy doing the illegal fishing had long gone. But satellite data is increasingly lower cost, quick to access, and much higher resolution. Some satellite technologies can find illegal fishing boats based simply on the brightness of their lights, and other satellites that measure the roughness of the planet's surface can detect the presence of any ship, 24 hours a day, regardless of the weather and regardless of whether or not its location pinger is on.

Merging these diverse satellite technologies with powerful algorithms is how we will develop a single, scalable fabric of surveillance, one that will allow us to automate the process of detecting illegal activity. The beauty of such a system is that law-abiding fishers, the trusted travellers, can be rewarded, ushered into ports, fast-tracked through inspections, whereas dodgy vessels can be rejected. Indeed, ports are the ultimate leverage, as Japan found out in 1998 when we banned them from our ports for fishing our depleted stocks of southern bluefin tuna. To make this happen, we must work together at the country level to share our vessel data. Currently, only a handful of countries, including Indonesia, have taken this step, yet we all must step up.

Perhaps all of these problems seem very far away to you. Maybe you are thinking; illegal fishing is sad, but what does that have to do with me? But guess what? Australia imports around 70% of the seafood it eats, and most of that comes from countries like Vietnam and Thailand, where illegal fishing and modern slavery are rife. For a nation girt by sea, with the third-largest exclusive economic zone in the world, it's a pretty embarrassing state of affairs.

While we love to brag about where our local seafood comes from, oysters from Coffin Bay, blue swimmer crab from Mandurah, and hold our own fisheries to the highest standards, we are quite happy to throw those standards out the window when it comes to the canned tuna or the ready to eat prawns we import. In fact, Australia is currently one of the most backward of the developed countries in the world when it comes to the laxness of our own import laws. The EU and the US are leaders in this space, but not us. Even Japan, the long-time wild child of the seafood industry, is taking action.

But without import laws, how do we stop illegal seafood from ending up on our plates? We need to make sure that little children, or adults like Tin Nyo Win, a Burmese migrant enslaved by a Thai factory, didn't peel our prawns. Often these children are woken up at 2am, made to stand with aching hands in icy water for 16 hours a day, captured if they try to escape, and kids so small they have to stand on stools to reach the prawns. Is this an Australia we are proud of?

We need an import law that rejects illegal seafood products at our border, and we need to clearly label what we do import. What species is it? Where was it caught or farmed? Is it slavery free? Right now, most of our imported seafood is basically anonymous, and frankly we should be ashamed of ourselves. When it's anonymous you'd likely know it's illegal and modern slavery is involved, otherwise label it. Australia can and we must do so much better.

To conclude I want to share the plot of a science-fiction story. This is a sci-fi plot that marine researchers recently put together to attempt to visualise possible futures for our oceans. A company bioengineers and copyrights a new species called Super Tuna. Underwater drones act as sheepdogs, herding the fish along their migration routes, and artificially fertilising prey supplies as they go. This might sound utterly ludicrous, but the way we produce seafood is already verging on dystopia.

In Australia, we lasso schools of wild baby bluefin tuna in huge nets and toe them to floating farms where we fatten them to precise Japanese eating standards. Humans are starving across the planet, yet we feed almost every single fish caught by the largest fishery in the world, the Peruvian anchovy fishery, to cattle and farmed salmon. And more than 70% of the plastic that washes up on Australia's beaches comes from Indonesia. And ironically a lot of it has Australian labels because we shipped it there in the first place because we didn't have the factories to recycle it. It has come boomerang right back to us.

Millennia of innovation have landed us here at the absolute nadir of ocean exploitation. We've thrown every last scrap of technology and intellect at the ocean to dredge up its last remaining prizes. We have almost lured that last sea creature from the deep. Soon we may turn to the ocean for more of its bounty, just to find there's nothing left.

Now is the moment to stop, now is the moment to think. The super predator must become the super defender.

I discuss climate change in my last essay. Now we must address overfishing and plastics. We defeat these two giants, we win the oceans forever. The accountability, transparency and governance which we expect from every company on the Australian stock exchange must apply to our oceans. We need to figure out the rhythms and movements of our sea life and then carve out serious large-scale marine reserves that enables these species to both recover and flourish. We need to protect these areas with the same diligence we protect our own borders. We need to be sharing economic and satellite data, sharing science and sharing enforcement resources. We need to understand the immense value of our oceans and its tremendous resources.

It's time to light up our seas, to heal our ocean environment, to stop the destruction of our ocean, to light it up, and this time for good.

Geraldine Doogue: You've been listening to the second of this Boyer series, Rebooting Australia: How Ethical Entrepreneurs Can Help Shape a Better Future. It's presented by Dr Andrew Forrest. I'm Geraldine Doogue. I do hope you can join me at the same time next week, when Dr Forrest addresses the issue of inequality.

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2 hours ago, huey 2 said:

Satellite images used to cost thousands of dollars, and even then we had to wait days for them, assuming the military didn't just jump the queue. By the time you had your image, the guy doing the illegal fishing had long gone. But satellite data is increasingly lower cost, quick to access, and much higher resolution. Some satellite technologies can find illegal fishing boats based simply on the brightness of their lights, and other satellites that measure the roughness of the planet's surface can detect the presence of any ship, 24 hours a day, regardless of the weather and regardless of whether or not its location pinger is on.

The comms cost is more and more becoming the unexpected new development of this edition of the VG. Ironic when I figured it would be about foiling. Thanks for the long post (it was surprisingly easy to read).

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On 2/15/2021 at 8:24 AM, Fiji Bitter said:

Bump.

Only 1 likey (from me) for this post? 

One of the best onboard reports yet, right from the heart, and a philosophical one as well.

And you know what, no so awfully English like some of the other great girls. "You know what I mean?"

Those with French partners seem less affected, unsurprisingly...

 

I'm fresh out of likes for today, but it's very cool B)

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On 2/16/2021 at 5:34 AM, stief said:

 Thanks for the long post (it was surprisingly easy to read).

yes indeed, the short version of Andrew Forrest  is also very memorable:

'Do we know what caused all the big fish to disappear from the Caribbean?'  he just shrugged, 'Nothing remarkable or noteworthy happened, they simply got eaten.'

 

exists a night fish or whale image on a monitor of oscar?
and by the way, helped oscar in the search of escoffier?

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Congrats, Miranda. Quite the history. 

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With her usual quiet, understated efficiency British skipper Miranda Merron completed the Vendée Globe solo round the world race quest this Wednesday night, breaking the finish line off Les Sables d’Olonne, France at 22:16:51hrs UTC after 101 days 8hrs 56mins 51secs at sea to take 22nd place in the race on her IMOCA 60 Campagne de France. She finishes 21d 5hrs 12mins after winner Yannick Bestaven and 1d 12hrs 48mins after 21st placed French skipper Clement Giraud. 

Her result is highly commendable and fulfils the simple target she set herself, to finish the course bringing her boat and herself back to Les Sables d’Olonne in good shape, having fully embraced and enjoyed all of the challenges that came her way on a race she considered she was peaking for at ‘just the right age for me’,  51 years old.

Backed by a leading French dairy and farming cooperative, Merron achieved her Vendée Globe success on a modest budget thanks to a carefully executed preparation period working long days and evenings alongside her hugely experienced life partner Halvard Mabire with occasional outside help. Largely unflappable on the water thanks to her tens of thousands of ocean racing miles and her naturally calm demeanour, Merron has cherished each day, and although she visibly missed her nearest and dearest, she proved a sailor well able to choose her optimal route and press hard enough to make good average speeds for her reliable, solid, boat without putting herself or her boat in danger.

Her elapsed time places her between that of Swiss skipper Dominique Wavre who placed seventh in 2012-13 at 90 days when her Owen Clarke design was newer and the 107 days of Rich Wilson on the last edition when the boat was Great American IV.  

The Vendée Globe is very much the peak of her ocean racing career, a professional career which really started in 1998 when she was part of Tracy Edwards 1998 crew to take on the Trophée Jules Verne record – alongside a young Sam Davies – intensifying in 1999 when she won the 50 foot class of the Transat Jacques Vabre with Emma Richards.

Back then the Cambridge educated Merron, was just ‘taking a short break’ from a flourishing career in advertising, working in Tokyo, Paris and Sydney. But she has never looked back since then and her own pride today is magnified by many of the sailors – both female and male – who she has sailed with over her 25 year career.

Starting out crewing for her father in an International 14 at the age of nine, by 1979 she had already completed her first Transatlantic, west to east as her family returned from Canada to the UK for her father to take up a new job,  At Cambridge she was a contemporary of Volvo Ocean Race winning skipper and double Olympic silver medallist Ian Walker, who reminded her during her Vendée Globe

“Back then who would have ever thought we would both have gone on to race round the world. We used to spend hours practising gybing in strong winds, I think we called it gybe ‘til you die!” Walker chuckled…

Since then Merron has raced the Route du Rhum with a career best sixth in Class 40 in 2014, the Transat Québec St Malo and the Volvo Ocean Race as navigator on Amer Sports TOO. She won the Transat Jacques Vabre, Quebec - Saint Malo, the RORC Transatlantic. As part of an all female crew of Aviva in 2009 they set a new record around the British Isle.

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And some 23 years later, Tracy Edwards last night expressed the feelings of so many of Merron's legions of friends and peers "You are my absolute hero.”  

Full article on the VG site

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On 2/17/2021 at 3:29 AM, haribo said:

exists a night fish or whale image on a monitor of oscar?
and by the way, helped oscar in the search of escoffier?

Not sure I fully understand, but OSCAR can only recognize disruptions in the wave patterns (so nothing under the water). Hoping to hear more about how well it worked this VG.

Have you heard more about why Boris Herrmann's systems didn't prevent his collision with the fishing boat? Not much i the English press recently, and our German anarchists have been pretty busy elsewhere recently.

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5 hours ago, stief said:

Not sure I fully understand, but OSCAR can only recognize disruptions in the wave patterns (so nothing under the water). Hoping to hear more about how well it worked this VG.

Have you heard more about why Boris Herrmann's systems didn't prevent his collision with the fishing boat? Not much i the English press recently, and our German anarchists have been pretty busy elsewhere recently.

it recognizes temperature differences in the infrared range, i.e. a delphin floating in the bow wave or a flying marlin in front would be an exciting picture, but I do not know whether they store pictures, and also not how far can be seen. but a rescue boat with a people at night must be well recognizable, or?

from boris you hear little here, once he said the fishing boat was green, and not red as it was depicted in the newspaper...

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