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The funny thing with routing. Garbage in garbage out. If your computer routing sends an imoca upwind down the south Atlantic or thru the east side of a northern hemisphere a storm system - probably need to update your polars   

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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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Wow what a race so far and some damn fine sailing and routing.  Alex on HB in the lead.  Gotta admit I am pulling for him after his bad luck last round.  And to those talking no sleep on US subs... thanks for your service and yea, I know what you mean... have a daughter following in your footsteps who has described sleeping while standing against bulkhead, knees locked.  I can't imagine...  Hats off for what you folks do...

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14 minutes ago, Herman said:

Thanks for sharing again. Does he do this every 2nd day or on certain weekdays? I was not able to understand that in his first vlog.

His initial plan was to do it every Monday at 21:30 CET,  and he did yesterday's one due to the "hot" situation, but he is saying in yesterday's that next one will be next Monday. And it could be live both on FB and YT at the same time, do automatic subtitles on YT work on the lives btw ?

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Kevin on depression

gtrans excerpt

Quote

“I still had a big night with a lot of sail changes up front and gybes. I don't know how many I did but a lot! Problems are resolved on board PRB. Since I saw that this tropical depression was forming, I decided not to go. It's way too strong. I will choose which force of wind I want to go. She's super active, we'll have to be careful. Of course, it is the object of all my attentions today. This crazy rhythm that we have had from the start! There were a lot of different systems, very complicated choices to make, a lot of maneuvers,… But I have a good pace. I'm happy with my speed. My troubles yesterday caused me to lose some ground but I remember especially that after my depression,I was not far behind Alex Thomson or Charlie Dalin. " 

 

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46 minutes ago, dolphinmaster said:

I read his description as the turning block for the sheet ripped out and began the cascade of onboard failures etc.   

Yes, the backstay was clearly a consequence of turning block breakage apparently, but hitting the OFNI right afterwards is "pure Murphy" (or law of series as we say in french).

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30 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The funny thing with routing. Garbage in garbage out. If your computer routing sends an imoca upwind down the south Atlantic or thru the east side of a northern hemisphere a storm system - probably need to update your polars   

Yeah 100% 

Routing is just something I use as a "sanity check" or to work out the most efficient angles to sail.

 

If the routing is sending me opposite of where I think I should go, I won't follow it 

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I don't see Charal restarting. Jeremie still has quite a way to go, the boat will then need a bit of work, and the deadline for restarting will be creeping up close. 

And I'm not sure a top team like Charal will be willing to go back to it only to finish 6th or 7th at best.

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3 minutes ago, GibGibGib said:

I don't see Charal restarting. Jeremie still has quite a way to go, the boat will then need a bit of work, and the deadline for restarting will be creeping up close. 

And I'm not sure a top team like Charal will be willing to go back only to finish 6th or 7th at best.

Yes, although if the new starting window was looking good up to the doldrums, then he could restart both for a potential solo monohull record and the race, but don't think it looks very good unfortunately. Then what Charal (the company) thinks might be in the balance.

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5 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Yes, although if the new starting window was looking good up to the doldrums, then he could restart both for a potential solo monohull record and the race, but don't think it looks very good unfortunately. Then what Charal (the company) thinks might be in the balance.

To the contrary even if the event’s start date passes, I think Charal is going to start for the challenge. They have a strong enough PR arm to run a website and live tracker and make a story of it. I don’t see Beyou saying no the last four years of work are finished and I’m not sailing if I can’t win. 

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11 minutes ago, Icedtea said:

If the routing is sending me opposite of where I think I should go, I won't follow it 

That's roughly what Will Oxley says in his book about routing, i.e. you need to understand why the computer is saying what it does and what the sensitivities on weather + boat performance are.

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On the 14:30 tracker we have some more interesting speed comparisons. Lots of boats at over 18 knots, V & B fastest I think at over 20. The figures for the 4 in line astern following the leader in presumably similar conditions over the 4 hours being as follows, with V&B for comparison,

image.png.f885ea836ccdbbb3d125d38bf15f6c64.png

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56 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

The ice limit in the Atlantic is so far north that the usual nice downwind conditions may turn out to be below the limit.  If that happens, then the non-traditional route East of St. Helena could make more sense than beating into the northen side of a weather system along the ice limit.

Isn't the north side the 'good' side of the weather systems in the South?  If the lows turn clockwise there, I think the racers try to hook into the north side and move downwind at speed with the system.  The St Helena high would have to be in a weird position to make going east of it viable.

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1 hour ago, Your Mom said:

The ice limit in the Atlantic is so far north that the usual nice downwind conditions may turn out to be below the limit.  If that happens, then the non-traditional route East of St. Helena could make more sense than beating into the northen side of a weather system along the ice limit.

I second this, on the one hand it’s annoying, on the other imagine the terror of hitting an iceberg. I still think the old system of gates was better. 

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9 minutes ago, Raptorsailor said:

I second this, on the one hand it’s annoying, on the other imagine the terror of hitting an iceberg. I still think the old system of gates was better. 

This time the ice limit is also driven by requests from the Australian coast guards, that's why you have the limit going up around the longitue of Leuwin.

But it seems to me that in the South Atlantic it is low enough to make the top of the Southern lows fully reachable.

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New weather guesstimate.

Input

  • Positions 11:30 CET For Thompson, Ruyant and Dutreux
  • IMOCA 60 polars not adjusted 
  • GFS 10 days (0,25 degrees / 3 hr interval)
  • And beyond that forecast horizon the climate plugin (see altered isochrone colors)
  • FNMOC WW3 GLOBAL (7 days 1x1 degree) for waves/swell
  • Towards a virtual waypoint below Capetown
  • GFS and EMWCF for the fleet plus theta via windity (thanks @stief for that tip)

Output

  • Thompson first to exit Theta, but has higher forecasted max wind and max wind gusts than the other two boats. Arrival at the virtual waypoint a couple of hours after each other. As no boat-specific polars have been used, it's a very close call.
  • But GFS and EMWCF do not align for the exact position of Theta, and also not for max expected windspeeds. EMWCF predicts a larger hurricane in size, coming further north and wider too. GFS could understate the max wind at 48 kts, EMWCF gives 64 kts which is more in line with a tropical cyclone. Getting in the NW quadrant of the hurricane is key. But not loosing important parts of the boat, or the boat itself,  too. The mark 1 eyeball, the barometer and anemometer will be king here. Still I would trust EMWCF and go south from Vila do Porto Island along 25 West. Or close there. Maybe wait a bit longer until the worst has passed. The 3 boats are expected to engage Theta in the night of Friday to Saturday. Exact timing is depending on the actual weather there at that time. Probably around midnight or in the hours of the early morning.
  • The good part is that before hitting Theta, there is a light patch of air with a reaching wind angle offering the option of much needed sleep/rest before the deep dive in. See the light green patches between the fleet positions @ 11:30 and Theta to the SW of the fleet.
  • St Helena is left to the left it seems, as usual. The HP zone has gone to lunch for days now and not returned yet.

Now let's all pray/keep our fingers crossed that things will not turn more sour on the fleet than already has happened with the passing front.

global view routing HB to Cape of Good Hope 12-11-20.png

routing detail 12-11-20.png

statistics 12-11-20.png

EMWCF_Theta.png

GFS_Theta.png

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59 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The funny thing with routing. Garbage in garbage out. If your computer routing sends an imoca upwind down the south Atlantic or thru the east side of a northern hemisphere a storm system - probably need to update your polars   

Or set the max allowed wind for routing to a certain level - good point

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28 minutes ago, DaveK said:

So what is the thing on the port side of Alex's cabin that swings back and forth during the videos?

The rudder(tiller) !!

And I noticed in one of the last video that you also have a transversal carbon piece moving in front of the bulkhead, linking port and starboard side of where he can "plug" it.

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1 minute ago, tallyho said:

Do you mean his starboard side? thats the tiller ...

I thought he was facing backwards in the video.... guess I'm wrong about that. It's still weird to have a tiller moving up and down. I don't really get it....

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Does anyone here has access to VG media team? If yes, can you PLEASE ask them to at least switch on freaking automatic subtitle feature for youtube videos? It's 5 clicks, WTF?

  1. Sign in to YouTube Studio.
  2. From the left menu, select Subtitles.
  3. Click the video you want to add captions or subtitles to.
  4. Under “Subtitles”, click More e76r_RF5u4d8F2EpJfsc7taQT9fr9JvJ5yhNtWmV next to the subtitles you want to edit.
  5. Review automatic captions and edit or remove any parts that haven't been properly transcribed.
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7 minutes ago, vesa said:

Does anyone here has access to VG media team? If yes, can you PLEASE ask them to at least switch on freaking automatic subtitle feature for youtube videos? It's 5 clicks, WTF?

  1. Sign in to YouTube Studio.
  2. From the left menu, select Subtitles.
  3. Click the video you want to add captions or subtitles to.
  4. Under “Subtitles”, click More e76r_RF5u4d8F2EpJfsc7taQT9fr9JvJ5yhNtWmV next to the subtitles you want to edit.
  5. Review automatic captions and edit or remove any parts that haven't been properly transcribed.

I will ask one of them,

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Just now, james_007_bond said:

And talking about Kojiro, I thing he wins the best sailor haircut. He looks like he had a brushing done before starting the camera. Especially compared to the dishevelled frenchmen :)

Didn't he bring his sword for this? :D

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Just now, troll99 said:

last 4 hours

Hugo - 64nm
Corum - 73nm 

 

I will keep checking on that. 

and not only Corum.  That seems to have been the case for quite a few hours.  Anyone else here think that HB is not going anywhere near as fast as it's hype? Is something wrong on board?

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2 minutes ago, staysail said:

and not only Corum.  That seems to have been the case for quite a few hours.  Anyone else here think that HB is not going anywhere near as fast as it's hype? Is something wrong on board?

He is still in the lead, so I have problems seeing he would have a major performance problem.

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2 minutes ago, james_007_bond said:

Wow. Louis Burton on BVII is in full carbon repair mode, a bulkhead is seriously cracked… Plus a leaking keel ram, his hands are full for a while.

BVII was Banque Populaire VIII but had some work done to the foil casing & adjustment system during the build up to 2020. Shame. 

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2 minutes ago, Nubben said:

He is still in the lead, so I have problems seeing he would have a major performance problem.

He probably likes what he sees in the coming hours & avoiding the island shadows altogether. If I were a gambling person I'd wager he's going to hold course until he finds the storm cyclone veer and then turn starboard and head 240-270 and ride behind the storm across the equator. 

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Just now, XTR said:

Looking at his bios it looks like Alex has actually been sleeping for the last 3 hours. 

If going to sleep costs you 3 to 5 knots, this race in these foiling boats really is going to become a serious test of human endurance! More of a test than boat endurance!

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32 minutes ago, DaveK said:

I thought he was facing backwards in the video.... guess I'm wrong about that. It's still weird to have a tiller moving up and down. I don't really get it....

In below vid you can see the tiller on starboard, and the transversal piece moving linking starboard and port attachment points for the tiller :

 

 

 

HB.PNG

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14 minutes ago, staysail said:

and not only Corum.  That seems to have been the case for quite a few hours.  Anyone else here think that HB is not going anywhere near as fast as it's hype? Is something wrong on board?

I think the boats are sailing into lighter air between the first low and Theta.  Makes sense that the leaders slow down first.

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55 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Isn't the north side the 'good' side of the weather systems in the South?  If the lows turn clockwise there, I think the racers try to hook into the north side and move downwind at speed with the system.  The St Helena high would have to be in a weird position to make going east of it viable.

My bad.  You are correct.  I've been looking at long-term forecasts for the South Atlantic, and have sometimes seen what I described, but didn't make the mental connection that what I was looking at was the St. Helena High in an odd position rather than a low.  A couple days ago, the long-term forecast was showing the St. Helena High quite far South, producing a scenario like I described.  But now it looks more normal.  Of course, as others have said, the forecast is unreliable 2 weeks out, so routing that far South now is unreliable.  It's moot for now anyway...  The plan for the next several days will be all about Theta and then a good path through the Doldrums.  By the time they get that far, the forecast for the far South will start to be more useful.

Anyway...  I guess a corrected version of my point was...  If the St. Helena High is well established and unusually South when they get there, a more Easterly routing could make sense.  I agree that in any other case, it'll be wrong.  (And when I say more Easterly, I mean more toward the middle than usual...  I can't see it ever making sense to sail close to Africa.)

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2 minutes ago, staysail said:

More of a test than boat endurance!

True that. Also mentioned by Juan K in today's Live, like so many commentators on the edition of the VG have been saying for months.

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2 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

If the St. Helena High is well established and unusually South when they get there, a more Easterly routing could make sense.  I agree that in any other case, it'll be wrong.  (And when I say more Easterly, I mean more toward the middle than usual...  I can't see it ever making sense to sail close to Africa.)

It just doesn't - imocas are dramatically slower upwind than downwind or reaching and when it takes 30-60 minutes to complete a tack; there's no just reason to break the boat, go upwind along the African coast when the prevailing winds are all against you and you can instead just reach down as far south as Salvador and hook to port onto a system that's constantly moving west to east and essentially make up the extra distance sailed in one day.

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32 minutes ago, XTR said:

Looking at his bios it looks like Alex has actually been sleeping some in the last 3 hours. 

I do not believe the sleep monitoring of Alex is correct.
He is dozing of , nappin as he calls it, but the monitor doesn't register that.
His position in the fleet is leading but according to monitoring, he's on the edge of a nervous breakdown?
Back to sleepreseach is my suggestion.
1378954070_sleepalex.thumb.PNG.ae31a1aa63bde21c65b4b6887386546f.PNG

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43 minutes ago, Miffy said:

It just doesn't - imocas are dramatically slower upwind than downwind or reaching and when it takes 30-60 minutes to complete a tack; there's no just reason to break the boat, go upwind along the African coast when the prevailing winds are all against you and you can instead just reach down as far south as Salvador and hook to port onto a system that's constantly moving west to east and essentially make up the extra distance sailed in one day.

I'll drop it.  I'm not talking about sailing to Africa.  I'm just talking about a long-term forecast I was seeing a couple days ago, which no longer exists, which showed a very large anticyclone in the South Atlantic, where all of the winds between the ice limit and about 30S were from the East, and you were going to have to be below the ice limit to get winds from the West.  Very unusual, so it caught my attention as "wow, that's not what these boats were built for".  It made me wonder what the best routing would look like in a case like that.  I wasn't trying to suggest beating down the African coast...  Just saying that they might be stuck in some upwind stuff regardless, if that were to occur.

But that's highly atypical, and now it's gone from the forecast, so having brought it up, I look like an idiot.

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I’m not calling you an idiot - I’m just saying I struggle with the assumptions. 

I think looking so far ahead, esp with boats of unknown potential (none of us have their polars or what the skippers are capable of) - it just makes sense to assume the conventional. 
 

We take the Monday forecast, rewind it a week or two, forward it a week. You see the clear patterns. There’s an established highway to get to the southern ocean and no one wants to deal with the high pressure ridge that forms every few days off Africa that cruisers use to get away from Cape Town. 

C8C777FC-F4E3-40B9-B354-65FBB50D693F.jpeg

E1C859DA-1C8C-4F6D-8A78-DB8676739D0C.jpeg

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11 minutes ago, Rocky said:

Boris seems tired as well.

That howling sound for me is a sign to get to the harbour, those guys have to live with it.
At 0:49 he calls it stressfull noises and sounds.
Great, it's extreme sport...
 

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1 hour ago, staysail said:

and not only Corum.  That seems to have been the case for quite a few hours.  Anyone else here think that HB is not going anywhere near as fast as it's hype? Is something wrong on board?

take sailor´s performance into account..

Alex hadn't much sleep so he has to sleep in order to be awake during the Theta storm Friday. 

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19 minutes ago, troll99 said:

take sailor´s performance into account..

Alex hadn't much sleep so he has to sleep in order to be awake during the Theta storm Friday. 

I think thats more the issue he needs some sleep and can't trim the boat during that period when the others can. He may surrender the lead but don't think that will bother him he will know be confident with the boat.

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9 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

I think thats more the issue he needs some sleep and can't trim the boat during that period when the others can. He may surrender the lead but don't think that will bother him he will know be confident with the boat.

My point is that if it costs him excessive mental and physical effort to sail that boat to greater speeds than his competitors, even if the boat is inherently faster, he may exhaust himself, mental and/or physical deterioration, before he gets to the finish. Isn't that basically what happened in the TJV with the same boat (faster than all the others) and a shorter race?
If he takes enough rest to stay fit and able, can he keep ahead?

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I think there is a bit of pixellation here. Thompson put himself in the red to catch up & get positioned over the last 48 hrs and is paying it back now. I don't think it tells you much about the relative effort/speed ratio of Boss vs Corum.

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3 minutes ago, staysail said:

My point is that if it costs him excessive mental and physical effort to sail that boat to greater speeds than his competitors, even if the boat is inherently faster, he may exhaust himself, mental and/or physical deterioration, before he gets to the finish. Isn't that basically what happened in the TJV with the same boat (faster than all the others) and a shorter race?
If he takes enough rest to stay fit and able, can he keep ahead?

?

he lost his keel in TJV and was 2 up in that race!

I really don't get what you are trying to say. I think you just overestimated the performance of the boat. 

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I think he's conflating TJV and Route du Rhum. FWIW - AT was pretty candid about what went wrong on the Route du Rhum - in many ways it was harder than VG because there was higher intensity and shorter amount of time & many skippers find it hard to make the transition from land to solo at sea in such a short time. The VG's most tiring moments is always during periods of transition - some skippers get sea sick, others need time to catch a routine - give it time it'll be fine. Once everyone gets into the warmer sunny skies before the southern ocean, everyone will have footage of themselves cleaning the boat, eating, having sea legs.

More immediately it looks like Apivia, PRB, LinkedOut sailed themselves into a windhole that's gonna get worse in the shadow of the islands. If the forecasts are correct - some boats have a chance to basically immediately slingshot behind the storm into the southern edge of the north atlantic gyre - melt some butter and smooth reaching sailing and hasta la vista everyone else.

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

Do we ever usually see  AT anything but manic, punched-up, delirious, etc?

Gracious in losing. I always thought he gives very good interviews at the dock - be great if he can talk about winning this time.

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

Do we ever usually see  AT anything but manic, punched-up, delirious, etc?

Maybe after he broke the foil during the last VG? Lower expectations after that happened, less pressure on him, and then he performed really well.

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18 minutes ago, staysail said:

Maybe after he broke the foil during the last VG? Lower expectations after that happened, less pressure on him, and then he performed really well.

Hmm. In contrast, gimme a mo--I'm thinking of his last interview approaching  the finish, where he shocked Stu Hosford by conceding to ALC  . .. .  I think. Off to find the vid.

 

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2 hours ago, Snowden said:

That's roughly what Will Oxley says in his book about routing, i.e. you need to understand why the computer is saying what it does and what the sensitivities on weather + boat performance are.

So true.  many people are quick to blame deficient Polars.  The truth is you have to understand the base software's algorithm for computing the polars and the grib. Classic example is Transpac where Exp will nearly always favour the shorter northern route, even though the southern route will often yield more pressure. Knowing when to gybe away is critical and the software will not always yield the right solution.

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There is a short interview of Jeremy Beyou on the French side of the official web site, but I see no translation in English on the "other" side of the website, so here is my translation. Points in italic are my own addition/interpretation.

"First news from Jérémie Beyou (Charal) - joined in visio conference this morning...

There are worse things in the world when you look at everything happening around us. That being said, when you are a sportman, you live only through the lense of your objective. For the past 4 years, my goal has been to try to win the Vendée Globe. I am 100% in it. I do not see anything else outside this goal. When everything falls apart so abruptly, like this, it is very violent.  That is why it took me so long to turn around. Most likely, I should have turned around right away, instead of going through the front with the boat in that state. Obviously, it created other collateral damages, but I could not believe it. The wake up call has been hard on me.

 

Earlier in the day, when the wind was not too strong, I tore apart from deck a pulley for my staysail sheet (I do not know if he is talking about the first pulley the sheet goes through from the clew of the jib, or one completely aft on deck, before it comes back to a winch.). It blew up the bulkhead for the traveler (once again, I do not know if he is talking about the main sheet traveler, or the track to adjust the pull angle on the jib sheet). It has torn apart the deck on the starboard side. While I was down below to inspect the damage, I hit something and the rudder was kicked up, halfway up. There is a hole in the leading edge of the rudder and the trailing edge is broken.

And stronger winds were coming in; so it was either I turn around right now, or I continue. We decided with the team that the rudder was going to hold on through the front and I put together a makeshift repair for the jib sheet. The front passed through. It went superfast. I went from 45 knots on one tack to 45 knots on the opposite tack. I jibed, and I trimed in the runner, but with all the carbon fiber shrapnel on deck, it cut through the runner and I lost the runner. I also broke my mast head wind indicator a few hours prior. The runner, it was the straw that broke the camel's back. I had to bear off and turn around.

Right now, there are still heavy seas, but I am sailing downwind with about 15 knots of wind and the sea is from behind, so it is OK. On the other tack, port tack, the rudder starts to be seriously damaged, I cannot go very fast. I think my ETA is on the 14th, in the morning. After that I don't know... The rudder can be changed. The traveler and the bulkhead, I have to admit I don't know if we can fix it. Quite frankly, I am waking up from 4 years of trying to win the Vendée Globe, and it is over. My dad is in the hospital; he had a stroke one week before the start. And I completely shunted that aside. Obviously, right now, all of that is blowing up in my face.

I am bringing back the boat. We will see after that. I do not know, I do not know about restarting..."

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25 minutes ago, Haji said:

Who wants to bet that HB will toss in a jibe to get closer to JLC's line?

Me!

Apivia, Linked Out and PRB are in prefably position for the slingshot approach towards cyclone Theta.
Nerve wrecking but very exciting. He, AT, will stay on course.
1741675038_Vendeeglobe7.PNG.f1df4364f9bbe2048cdeb597c4ed8c35.PNG
Time for world records and disasters.
985769633_Vendeeglobe8.thumb.PNG.f3a79ccc0c2125f1abc614c5eb3eb134.PNG

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I'm with Shakel, AT is where he wants to be, for once not taking a flyer but sticking to the middle of the fleet.

While I'm here, just asking folks who quote things from videos to post the video so we don't have to hunt for it.

And so, here's Sam with her delightful smile, enjoy!

 

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10 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Me!

Apivia, Linked Out and PRB are in prefably position for the slingshot approach towards cyclone Theta.
Nerve wrecking but very exciting. He, AT, will stay on course.
1741675038_Vendeeglobe7.PNG.f1df4364f9bbe2048cdeb597c4ed8c35.PNG

Yeah. I was wondering the same. Were ATs maneuvers a short term gain and a (slightly) longer term mistake? On the other hand, Le Cam seems to be happy with his position and is not shooting west. Next tracker update should be interesting.

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25 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Quite frankly, I am waking up from 4 years of trying to win the Vendée Globe, and it is over. My dad is in the hospital; he had a stroke one week before the start. And I completely shunted that aside. Obviously, right now, all of that is blowing up in my face.

I am bringing back the boat. We will see after that. I do not know, I do not know about restarting..."

Really disappointing, reading that last part, i would be surprised if he goes back out. 

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12 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Me!

Apivia, Linked Out and PRB are in prefably position for the slingshot approach towards cyclone Theta.
Nerve wrecking but very exciting. He, AT, will stay on course.
1741675038_Vendeeglobe7.PNG.f1df4364f9bbe2048cdeb597c4ed8c35.PNG

I'll bet that the Three Musketeers (Apivia, Linked Out and PRB) have already jibed since the 1630 positions...to miss the island if nothing else...;-)  But more seriously because of the lift and to get more wind. Perhaps a bit later than them (however by now is likely) HB will take a hitch to port as well, also due to the lift and to get into more wind.  Obviously not too far though, only far enough to get enough wind to put the pedals down.  

But only guessing.

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Some news from Miranda.

"A busy race so far, and it looks set to continue with the complicated weather ahead. This time yesterday, there were 30 - 40 knots with the approaching cold front, pretty rough in the pitch black night, three reefs and the storm jib (this is the first time it's been used in anger since we acquired this boat). The front went through at dawn, and the wind shifted from south to northwest. Tacking an immediate priority to go in the right direction. Empty the ballast and put the keel in the middle. Tack successful. Furl the storm jib and unfurl staysail and shake 3rd reef. Be careful not to fall back in to the front which is clearly visible to leeward. Start moving the gear uphill - it's ALL on the wrong side of the boat as there was no time before the tack. Shake 2nd reef, furl staysail, unfurl genoa etc. All of this in the left over sloppy sea-state. Inspect the boat thoroughly for damage after the bashing it has taken. Mark a minute of silence at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. Silent most of the day. Hoist a reaching sail, drop the storm jib, go nowhere for a while since there is now no wind. It's got dark again in the meantime... gybe the boat for the new wind direction, rearrange the entire interior again... Next up - work out how to avoid being clobbered by tropical low Theta!"

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24 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The ocean and the VG is a merciless heartless beast. :( 

Indeed they are, Miffy. Which is precisely why these super heroes set out to tame them. Fewer than 100 have succeeded.

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2 minutes ago, Haji said:

I'll bet that the Three Musketeers (Apivia, Linked Out and PRB) have already jibed since the 1630 positions...to miss the island if nothing else...;-)  But more seriously because of the lift and to get more wind. Perhaps a bit later than them (however by now is likely) HB will take a hitch to port as well, also due to the lift and to get into more wind.  Obviously not too far though, only far enough to get enough wind to put the pedals down.  

But only guessing.

I think the strategy is to go as close as you dare to the West side of Theta, as you say for breeze & left shift?

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8 hours ago, Herman said:

Open the weather routing screen first. After that you can add weather routing points with right mouse click. Or after opening the weather routing screen select an existing waypoint as weather routing start or finish. That latter is what I do.

My problem is that, when adding weather routing points with right mouse, the actual point isn't where the cursor is, it seems to be a random distance away. I guess I'll just make waypoints.

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2 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

I'm with Shakel, AT is where he wants to be, for once not taking a flyer but sticking to the middle of the fleet.

While I'm here, just asking folks who quote things from videos to post the video so we don't have to hunt for it.

And so, here's Sam with her delightful smile, enjoy!

 

Flat seas in the Sam video.
This what those foilers are designed for isn't it?
These are the records they have to beat,

24 hour monohull
24 hour record set by skipper Ken Read (USA) and 20 crew on the 100-foot Comanche on July 10-11. While competing in the 2015 Transatlantic Race, Comanche covered a distance of 618.01 nm, averaging 25.75 knots.
https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2015/07/20/new-monohull-24-hour-record-confirmed/

Imoca  record 24 hours:
World Sailing Speed Record Council has ratified a new 60-foot monohull 24 hour record set by Alex Thomson (GBR) on his IMOCA Hugo Boss. Thomson covered a distance of 539.71nm (22.49 knot avg) on July 19-20, 2018. Thomson beat his previous record set in 2017 of 536.81nm.
https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2018/10/24/new-60-foot-monohull-24-hour-record/

Flat seas is one condition for a record.

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