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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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Why wouldn't Kevin have set off a flare after not seeing JLC for an hour or whatever?  He knows a boat is in the vicinity, actively searching.  That is the exact time to set off a flare.

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Feel for the skippers in the area the conditions are terrible for a look and retrieve exercise and communicate at the same time. Also the cockpits do not lend themselves to looking out of for this sought of thing.  

 

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Handheld radios also have GPS/DSC.....   in my personal ditch bag I carry that, PLB, strobe, AIS transmitter, signal mirror, flares, whistle.  In the main ditch bag is another whistle, strobe, VHF, manual fog horn, SOLAS flares, search light, Class 2 EPIRB.  

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2 minutes ago, Roleur said:

Why wouldn't Kevin have set off a flare after not seeing JLC for an hour or whatever?  He knows a boat is in the vicinity, actively searching.  That is the exact time to set off a flare.

I would speculate that he has satcoms and will be advised when to use his flares. No point firing them in hope. Better wait until you know the searcher is close. 

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2 minutes ago, Roleur said:

Why wouldn't Kevin have set off a flare after not seeing JLC for an hour or whatever?  He knows a boat is in the vicinity, actively searching.  That is the exact time to set off a flare.

He might have... but I am sure he will not want to use them all at once.

Could they deploy a SAR plane from SA to assist in locating him?

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23 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

This event was activated when Kevin turned on his EPIRB and radioed his condition.  My question is, would he have a portable EPIRB going into the lift raft (I've read these are things) and if he did, then can monitoring agency direct help to a close proximity?  As in, he is not so lost, but at the moment...separated?  

First EPIRB activated would be main one on board registered to vessel. 

3 EPIRB'S on board. That one registered to boat, one packed in and registered to raft and PLB variety registered to person and attached to vessel. 

AIS PLB on person you would think when things going to shit or at least in grab bag. 

AIS PLB small so small battery lower operational battery life and as TX/RX two signals, one GPS other AIS/VHF band. 24 hours operation normally.

Getting two packets of uncorrupted data is the weak link when that AIS PLB is at sea level or dunked below. The first packet from GPS satellite and second to vessel masthead joint VHF/AIS antenna.

The only signal vessels in vicinity see is AIS PLB. EPIRBs go to satellite then coordinating SAR with time lag. Then time lag communicating that position to vessels in vicinity via GMDS sat transceiver on board. 

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47 minutes ago, CordRipper said:

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/20687/four-vendee-globe-skippers-are-in-the-zone-to-help-in-rescue-of-kevin-escoffier

Article

2200hrs UTC NEWS UPDATE 
Race Direction of the Vendée Globe requested the assistance of three competing skippers, Germany’s Boris Herrmann (Seaexplorer-Yacht Club de Monaco), Yannick Bestaven (Maître CoQ IV) and Sébastien Simon (ARKEA PAPREC) to help Jean Le Cam (Yes We Cam!) in the mission to retrieve solo skipper Kevin Escoffier from his life raft after the 40 year old from Saint Malo had to abandon his IMOCA 60 PRB this Monday afternoon after activating his distress beacon.

Escoffier was racing in third place on the 22nd day of the solo non stop around the world race, at some 840 nautical miles SW of Cape Town, when his PRB got into difficulties and he was forced to take to his liferaft.

He alerted his technical team at 1346hrs UTC this afternoon, telling them he had significant amounts of water coming into the boat and immediately triggered his yacht's distress beacon. PRB was positioned at 40deg55S 9deg16E at the time the distress beacon was activated.

Race Direction of the Vendée Globe alerted MRCC Cape Town and CROSS Griz Nez who have been collaborating in a rescue operation. The skipper closest to Escoffier’s position, Jean Le Cam, who is competing on his fifth Vendée Globe, immediately responded to the request to divert to Escoffier’s position.

Guided by Race Direction Le Cam arrived on zone around 1615hrs UTC and quickly established visual and voice contact with Escoffier who was in his liferaft but he was unable to retrieve him in the big, 5m, seas and 20-25 knot winds.  

As he was manoeuvring to prepare to get closer to the liferaft Le Cam lost sight of the liferaft and could not establish radio contact nor to pick up the signal from the AIS the range of which was reduced by the heavy seas.

He lost sight of Escoffier in the dying light but has continued to try and locate him, Le Cam is communicating regularly with Race Direction and the rescue authorities. The three other skippers are now in, or are approaching the search area.  The positioning of Kevin Escoffier's personal beacon (AIS MOB Man Over Board) emits HF radiowaves and will only be detected in the local zone.

The four skippers will follow a protocol established by Race Direction in coordination with Jean Le Cam. They will approach with three reefs in the mainsail and the engine idling. A grid search area for the zone has been established and will be carried out by the four IMOCAs who are set to provide assistance.

The PRB shore crew said that besides his AIS Mob, Kevin Escoffier also means to signal his presence in the liferaft. Daybreak tomorrow morning is around 0340hrs UTC in this zone and the search will be ongoing.

This press release has been drawn up jointly with the Vendée Globe and Team PRB.

Fuck; prayers for all these folks.

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“Race Direction of the Vendée Globe alerted MRCC Cape Town and CROSS Griz Nez who have been collaborating in a rescue operation.”

Any chance of South African SAR fixed wing orbiting with flares to light the area to assist surface search? There was a mention upthread that mentioned Hercules C130.  Sometimes illumination just helps keep up motivation and spirits of searchers and those at risk.  Not sure of the cloud ceiling out there and life of dropped illumination flares in 25 knot winds.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Getting two packets of uncorrupted data is the weak link when that AIS PLB is at sea level or dunked below. The first packet from GPS satellite and second to vessel masthead joint VHF/AIS antenna.

The only signal vessels in vicinity see is AIS PLB. EPIRBs go to satellite then coordinating SAR with time lag.

The time lag could be huge? GPS info would be relayed by Race Office back to the skippers in the area I presume?

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24 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

He might have... but I am sure he will not want to use them all at once.

Could they deploy a SAR plane from SA to assist in locating him?

Sad to say the  South African Air Force MPA (Maritime Patrol Aircraft) capability consists of 7 C-47's...

Yes. Eight decade old DC-3's.

https://www.saairforce.co.za/the-airforce/aircraft/19/c-47tp-turbo-dakota

Pretty much useless.

https://www.africanaerospace.aero/tons-of-problems-for-the-saaf.html

When Abhilash Tomy was capsized in the Golden Globe Race and severity injured, the Indian Navy deployed their spanking new P-8's (737 derivatives) from Mauritius, and the Aussies contributed theirs as well.

Would think the MRCC (and the French) are making some phone calls about getting something staged down to CPT to help.

 

 

c-47tp.jpg

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29 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Raft's are custom packed.

You could put a blow up women in there for company and flotation redundancy if you wanted to. 

The race requirements for the rafts mentioned mandatory flares. The blow up woman can go to but only in left over space.

 

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Just now, Buck Turgidson said:

Boris has just turned onto 320 . 20° port heading change. 

Probably getting set up to do a grid search set up from Race HQ. Having 4 boats there is going to be vital to success. They can cover so much more area than just one boat. 

It's going to be a long, lonely night for Kevin...

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You  never know what can happen... it's cold, electronics (beyond their specced limitations, range, battery life) can fail, and liferafts... are the last backup, the sooner he's out of there, the better. They probably want to keep tabs on him as much as they can (I hope they have tabs on him now), and will try to get him out at the first real opportunity they get to do so.

It's baseless speculation but they might be circling him right now, looking for an opportunity to get him out.

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Just now, ant1 said:

You  never know what can happen... it's cold, electronics (beyond their specced limitations, range, battery life) can fail, and liferafts... are the last backup, the sooner he's out of there, the better. They probably want to keep tabs on him as much as they can (I hope they have tabs on him now), and will try to get him out at the first real opportunity they get to do so.

It's baseless speculation but they might be circling him right now, looking for an opportunity to get him out.

Not according to the latest update from race HQ. JLC lost sight of him just before nightfall.

 

Quote

He lost sight of Escoffier in the dying light but has continued to try and locate him, Le Cam is communicating regularly with Race Direction and the rescue authorities.

 

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2 minutes ago, sidmon said:

Sad to say the  South African Air Force MPA (Maritime Patrol Aircraft) capability consists of 7 C-47's...

Yes. Eight decade old DC-3's.

https://www.saairforce.co.za/the-airforce/aircraft/19/c-47tp-turbo-dakota

 

 

 

c-47tp.jpg

Don't knock these planes...they have a long hang time and slow flight capability.  At @ 150 kts they could be over a position in 4 hours, circle for a time and head back.  Two on rotation could provide as much air support as a C130.

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It is inconceivable to me that in these modern times, with low cost (I can afford it so that means it has to be low cost) VHF handhelds with GPS/DSC, PLBs, and two way Satellite trackers (inReach) - that these would not be standard items to pack not only in in a life raft, but also in a ditch bag and worn on your person when conditions get serious.

That is in addition to the standard things like strobes, flares, parachutes, smoke and dye.

Losing sight does not mean lost.

Do they really rely on a single short range PLB for tracking position? That is what is inconceivable to me. Even I, (an amateur) am better equipped.

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3 minutes ago, Just A Skosh said:

Not according to the latest update from race HQ. JLC lost sight of him just before nightfall.

 

 

Yes, but the report is old now, and posting public press releases is not a priority, things may have changed, I'm speculating based on the marine traffic tracks right now

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1 minute ago, Thread Killer said:

It is inconceivable to me that in these modern times, with low cost (I can afford it so that means it has to be low cost) VHF handhelds with GPS/DSC, PLBs, and two way Satellite trackers (inReach) - that these would not be standard items to pack not only in in a life raft, but also in a ditch bag and worn on your person when conditions get serious.

That is in addition to the standard things like strobes, flares, parachutes, smoke and dye.

Losing sight does not mean lost.

Do they really rely on a single short range PLB for tracking position? That is what is inconceivable to me. Even I, (an amateur) am better equipped.

no

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14 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

The time lag could be huge? 

Yep. Everyone assumes receipt of EPIRB position from satellite is instantaneous. It is not and up to an hour lag is not unheard of.

'Instant' is also the fallacy that many cruisers go with when stupidly thinking an EPIRB one way communication platform can make do instead of a GMDS two-way communication platform which is proprietary satellite or DSC HF direct to SAR terrestrial or vessel to vessel.  

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I am in awe that from 10's of thousands of miles away, that we can witness the heroics of those directly involved in this SAR via AIS. No matter the outcome, their efforts are truly impressive. Getting four 60'ers in those conditions into a formal search pattern.. Gotta be the first time, right? I'd be so damn happy to see not just one masthead light around, but 4. I wish everyone involved in the operation the best.

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3 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Yep. Everyone assumes receipt of EPIRB position from satellite is instantaneous. It is not and up to an hour lag is not unheard of.

'Instant' is also the fallacy that many cruisers go with when stupidly thinking an EPIRB one way communication platform can make do instead of a GMDS two-way communicationon platform which is proprietary satellite or DSC HF direct to SAR terrestrial or vessel to vessel.  

If you click on a boat in marine traffic, it tells you when the last data (indicating that position) was received, even when you don't have an account. Right now i'm seeeing satelitte positions received 2, 7, and 11 minutes ago by satelitte for the three circling boats.

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10 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

Don't knock these planes...they have a long hang time and slow flight capability.  At @ 150 kts they could be over a position in 4 hours, circle for a time and head back.  Two on rotation could provide as much air support as a C130.

If any are actually flying. And low and slow a C-47 would have a tough time being effective at a ~600nm radius.

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7 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Welcome to the developing world. 

And unless South Africa has changed in the lash 8 years, I’d venture a guess their operational capability is even less than they were in the 1980-1970s. Not exactly militarized with foreign aid or domestic extreme neglect now. 

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22 minutes ago, sidmon said:

Sad to say the  South African Air Force MPA (Maritime Patrol Aircraft) capability consists of 7 C-47's...

Yes. Eight decade old DC-3's.

https://www.saairforce.co.za/the-airforce/aircraft/19/c-47tp-turbo-dakota

Pretty much useless.

https://www.africanaerospace.aero/tons-of-problems-for-the-saaf.html

When Abhilash Tomy was capsized in the Golden Globe Race and severity injured, the Indian Navy deployed their spanking new P-8's (737 derivatives) from Mauritius, and the Aussies contributed theirs as well.

Would think the MRCC (and the French) are making some phone calls about getting something staged down to CPT to help.

 

 

c-47tp.jpg

Their air force has multiple C-130s

image.png.10fae66a9146a1d7ff7657e1a6e3454c.png

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6 minutes ago, Thread Killer said:

Do they really rely on a single short range PLB for tracking position? That is what is inconceivable to me. Even I, (an amateur) am better equipped.

DIRECT vessel to PLB/vessel via AIS and DSC VHF/HF are the only 'instant' position communication technologies available. 

Everything else is via a terrestrial third party and via satellite with a time lag.

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6 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:

Notice to race has all the details. It's on the Vendee site. 

I read that, but it does not detail what is required to be stowed with the life raft. Only mentions that a VHF with long life batteries must be in the grab bag. 

I'm guessing the IMOCA class rules have those details.

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EPIRB positions can be way over an hour old in open ocean, since the sat must pass over a land receiving station to deliver the message. The AIS will only be Class B and as good as a hand held VHF- line of sight, at sea level, and in 5m waves (which are huge by the way)...

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13 minutes ago, ant1 said:
15 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Yep. Everyone assumes receipt of EPIRB position from satellite is instantaneous. It is not and up to an hour lag is not unheard of.

'Instant' is also the fallacy that many cruisers go with when stupidly thinking an EPIRB one way communication platform can make do instead of a GMDS two-way communicationon platform which is proprietary satellite or DSC HF direct to SAR terrestrial or vessel to vessel.  

If you click on a boat in marine traffic, it tells you when the last data (indicating that position) was received, even when you don't have an account. Right now i'm seeeing satelitte positions received 2, 7, and 11 minutes ago by satelitte for the three circling boats.

Try reading before replying. 

I said nothing about AIS positions, ONLY EPIRB positions.

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2 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

DIRECT vessel to PLB/vessel via AIS and DSC VHF/HF are the only 'instant' position communication technologies available. 

Everything else is via a terrestrial third party and via satellite with a time lag.

I think a certain amount of time lag is acceptable. My inReach generally has no more than a few minutes lag, occasionally considerably more but not generally. It would certainly be better than no information at all.

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12 minutes ago, ivansh said:

Their air force has multiple C-130s

image.png.10fae66a9146a1d7ff7657e1a6e3454c.png

You didnt read the article I linked...

Here it is again. None are currently airworthy:

https://www.africanaerospace.aero/tons-of-problems-for-the-saaf.html

The SAAF is believed to have no airworthy C-130 Hercules transports available, following a landing accident at Goma in January 2020, and a nosewheel collapse at Waterkloof in April,

And even if any of the 5 unpranged aircraft left can get in the air, their search capability would be limited to the Mk 1 MOD 0 eyeballs onboard.

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, solosailor said:

Maybe when you reach 50 posts.

 

Offtopic while we're waiting for good news, I think I sailed with you on your boat couple of years ago, you took me out for a regatta in a Bay,  thanks for that again! And also to @Coolerboy from this forum as well, couple of days before or after I don't remember, though not racing but also very nice sailing (and barbecue afterwards:)

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12 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:
15 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

DIRECT vessel to PLB/vessel via AIS and DSC VHF/HF are the only 'instant' position communication technologies available. 

Everything else is via a terrestrial third party and via satellite with a time lag.

Yes but iridium voice isn't too laggy

Context with positional data??????

Iridium or Inmarsat sat phone voice DOES  NOT transmit a GPS position.  It can 'relay' a 'dated' GPS position by voice and 'direct' a 'dated' position to SAR ONLY if you dial up a maritime SAR 24/7 manned phone number. 

Unless you know a vessels sat phone number and it is turned ON, or visa versa, a sat phone is then about as usefull as a house brick. 

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3 minutes ago, sidmon said:

You didnt read the article I linked...

Here it is again. None are currently airworthy:

https://www.africanaerospace.aero/tons-of-problems-for-the-saaf.html

The SAAF is believed to have no airworthy C-130 Hercules transports available, following a landing accident at Goma in January 2020, and a nosewheel collapse at Waterkloof in April,

 

 

Sounds like the NZ air force has some competition as the worlds most inept, How is there Navy ?

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

In a twitchy 60 footer single handed in a seaway with breeze, trying to preserve it and yourself, you don't turn on a dime every 3 minutes.

You are not much use with boat fucked and you're fucked.

Running backs too, right? so even tacking with just the main (probably not possible in those conditions, might have to "wear ship") would be an adventure for us armchair admirals.

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Just now, jack_sparrow said:

Context?????

Iridium or Inmarsat sat phone voice DOES  NOT transmit a GPS position.  It can 'relay' a 'dated' GPS position by voice and 'direct' a 'dated' position ONLY if you dial up a maritime SAR 24/7 manned phone number. 

or if you are sitting in your life raft with your DSC VHF in front of you you can send your real time position by voice. Like what we used to do over HF in the old days. 

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9 minutes ago, sidmon said:

You didnt read the article I linked...

Here it is again. None are currently airworthy:

https://www.africanaerospace.aero/tons-of-problems-for-the-saaf.html

The SAAF is believed to have no airworthy C-130 Hercules transports available, following a landing accident at Goma in January 2020, and a nosewheel collapse at Waterkloof in April,

And even if any of the 5 unpranged aircraft left can get in the air, their search capability would be limited to the Mk 1 MOD 0 eyeballs onboard.

 

 

 

 

15 minutes ago, ivansh said:

Their air force has multiple C-130s

image.png.10fae66a9146a1d7ff7657e1a6e3454c.png

FlightAware doesn’t show everything, especially Military, but right now there’s no known air traffic in the area.

7E275B6C-3136-4A24-9602-982EFA595817.png

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11 minutes ago, sidmon said:

You didnt read the article I linked...

Here it is again. None are currently airworthy:

https://www.africanaerospace.aero/tons-of-problems-for-the-saaf.html

The SAAF is believed to have no airworthy C-130 Hercules transports available, following a landing accident at Goma in January 2020, and a nosewheel collapse at Waterkloof in April,

 

 

SAAF has seven in service, the article you link mentions two. Perhaps they mean the two C-130BZs, but that leaves out the C-130Bs. I'm going to go with the IISS over "It is believed" by some blogger.

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Just now, joeboy said:

It looks like there's at least one cargo vessel in the area, near Dutreux looks like.

Would they be any better suited for a pickup? More eyes available, if nothing else, and more stable?

yes

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33 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:

Boris has just turned onto 320 . 20° port heading change. 

Thank you, DVV, weightless and all others for keeping up-to-date regarding boat position.

 

I still struggle with the highlighted text from VG

Quote

Guided by Race Direction Le Cam arrived on zone around 1615hrs UTC and quickly established visual and voice contact with Escoffier who was in his liferaft but he was unable to retrieve him in the big, 5m, seas and 20-25 knot winds.  

As he was manoeuvring to prepare to get closer to the liferaft Le Cam lost sight of the liferaft and could not establish radio contact nor to pick up the signal from the AIS the range of which was reduced by the heavy seas.

He is in visual/voice contact, maneuvers to get closer and then nothing.

Perhaps that is when JLC had engine troubles, but there is no mention of it in this article, nor is the a timeline for piecing events together.

He must have been so close. Another sleepless night for these crews. Best wishes to all.

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1 minute ago, joeboy said:

It looks like there's at least one cargo vessel in the area, near Dutreux looks like.

Would they be any better suited for a pickup? More eyes available, if nothing else, and more stable?

Would at least be able to create a bit of a lee for the other boats to do a nimble pick-up. Picking up a liferaft in a cargo vessel seems less safe than a bucking IMOCA IMHO.

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Just now, silent bob said:

 

FlightAware doesn’t show everything, especially Military, but right now there’s no known air traffic in the area.

7E275B6C-3136-4A24-9602-982EFA595817.png

True. Those sights rely on volunteer receivers called ADS-B pretty much like the AIS websights do. Big difference is that, in that part of the world, the satellite receive systems for ATC do not exist. And the more global stuff isn't public.

Interestingly, during the effort to rescue Tomy during the GGR, the P-8's showed up quite well. A couple reasons for that though. Better ADS-B coverage, and the Aussies and Indians also wanted to advertise their capability to the Chinese...

 

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4 minutes ago, ivansh said:

SAAF has seven in service, the article you link mentions two. Perhaps they mean the two C-130BZs, but that leaves out the C-130Bs. I'm going to go with the IISS over "It is believed" by some blogger.

Ok.

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3 minutes ago, Coconuts.is said:

When PRB was launched some ladies came on board and there shoes punched holes in the deck because it was so light!

I assume they wore high heel shoes. 

I checked Histoiredeshalfs http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Histoire des 60'/A29.htm

I noticed this sentence. November 11, 2011. Breakage of a watertight partition and stop in Horta during TJV.

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Gotta wonder if the rescuers will try to get shifts of sleep at some point.  Having all of them go straight through the night could result in none of them being mentally sharp enough tomorrow to execute a rescue.  But I also can't imagine trying to sleep while knowing someone is lost in a raft.  Maybe an hour if you know the others are still actively searching?

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27 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:

Yes but iridium voice isn't too laggy. 

or Iridium SMS...

there are many devices that will send a GPS position to a pre-configured list of recipients over the iridium constellation, with no one else involved.

for example - from one Garmin InReach to another.., a position usually arrives in less than a minute via iridium sms

note that this SMS does not use the private rescue system - it's just an SMS from one iridium device to another

 

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For the record that's a heavily rebuilt DC-3 with turboprops (I believe).
I think it's one of these, although I don't see them listed as an operator.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basler_BT-67

It seems insane that he does not have some sort of sat phone in the raft?  Or does he?  I as a poor sailor had a Delorme with me at all times and ready to go over the side.  I'm sure his winch handles cost more.

Very scary.  I would imagine there's no point in searching in the dark, more chance of running him down than anything. 

Also rescuing someone when you have gigantic wings coming off your boat seems pretty complicated. 
 

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Just now, us7070 said:

or Iridium SMS...

there are many devices that will send a GPS position to a pre-configured list of recipients over the iridium constellation, with no one else involved.

for example - from one Garmin InReach to another.., a position usually arrives in less than a minute via iridium sms

 

 

Yes I have one. 

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6 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

How long does your handheld VHF hold a charge, assuming it was fully charged to start?

Depends upon usage, and which batteries are installed. About ten hours I think is reasonable to expect.

A spare rechargeable battery is common sense to have, in addition it comes with a battery tray so that you can use AA alkalines in it. 

So how long it lasts very much depends upon what spares you have.

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1 hour ago, Roleur said:

Why wouldn't Kevin have set off a flare after not seeing JLC for an hour or whatever?  He knows a boat is in the vicinity, actively searching.  That is the exact time to set off a flare.

Because you only fire your flares when you know somebody is in a position to see them. So in a situation like this it would be when you could see the tri-color coming towards you. 

 

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Just now, sully75 said:

For the record that's a heavily rebuilt DC-3 with turboprops (I believe).
I think it's one of these, although I don't see them listed as an operator.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basler_BT-67

It seems insane that he does not have some sort of sat phone in the raft?  Or does he?  I as a poor sailor had a Delorme with me at all times and ready to go over the side.  I'm sure his winch handles cost more.

Very scary.  I would imagine there's no point in searching in the dark, more chance of running him down than anything. 

Also rescuing someone when you have gigantic wings coming off your boat seems pretty complicated. 
 

He is required to have a portable iridium phone. IMOCA are not required to tell us everything they know. Knowing his position is one thing. Finding him in the prevailing conditions is another. 

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1 minute ago, Thread Killer said:

Depends upon usage, and which batteries are installed. About ten hours I think is reasonable to expect.

A spare rechargeable battery is common sense to have, in addition it comes with a battery tray so that you can use AA alkalines in it. 

So how long it lasts very much depends upon what spares you have.

and your schedule for turning it on. 

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21 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:
35 minutes ago, Thread Killer said:

Do they really rely on a single short range PLB for tracking position? That is what is inconceivable to me. Even I, (an amateur) am better equipped.

DIRECT vessel to PLB/vessel via AIS and DSC VHF/HF are the only 'instant' position communication technologies available. 

Everything else is via a terrestrial third party and via satellite with a time lag.

18 minutes ago, Thread Killer said:

I think a certain amount of time lag is acceptable. My inReach generally has no more than a few minutes lag, occasionally considerably more but not generally. It would certainly be better than no information at all.

 

You started 'vessel to vessel' positional data.

"Do they really rely on a single short range PLB for tracking position?" 

Now you go 'vessel to satellite to terrestrial' position via voice. 

"I think a certain amount of time lag is acceptable. My inReach generally has no more than a few  minutes lag,"

You know beer is not just for breakfast don't you?

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1 minute ago, sully75 said:

For the record that's a heavily rebuilt DC-3 with turboprops (I believe).
I think it's one of these, although I don't see them listed as an operator.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basler_BT-67

It seems insane that he does not have some sort of sat phone in the raft?  Or does he?  I as a poor sailor had a Delorme with me at all times and ready to go over the side.  I'm sure his winch handles cost more.

Very scary.  I would imagine there's no point in searching in the dark, more chance of running him down than anything. 

Also rescuing someone when you have gigantic wings coming off your boat seems pretty complicated
 

Makes you wonder how on earth you could manage a rescue on Hugo Boss. How do you manœuvre alongside a liferaft or throw a line from inside the cockpit? 

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Just now, sidmon said:

Ok.

April article in Defense World mentions at least 1 C-130 taking part in Covid relief efforts, and another mentions the crashed one in Goma will be used to keep the rest of the fleet airborne.

https://www.defenseworld.net/news/26804/South_African_C_130_Hercules_Suffers_Nose_Wheel_Collapse

https://www.defenceweb.co.za/aerospace/aerospace-aerospace/end-of-the-runway-for-hercules-403/

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