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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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3 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Still can’t sleep trying to imagine what it looked like to see your boat crack in half & the bow straight up in the air and the ocean down below in the cabin.  Hellacious image.

Don’t Google Bernard Stamm Juan K

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48 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Now let's talk T Rudders. :lol:

Large_18527457_10155423020817437_3920873945489469445_o1 (1).jpg

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Mr Mermod (IMOCA president) and comitees are indeed looking closely to the OR (VOR) and talking about it, (and limiting the foils size for 2024 VG).

Alltough first for sure the thread will have a nice and long drift, w/ the carbon & engineering experts, the eco warriors with Ruyant's foil tip and PRB sunken ship... and how fckg good the young padawan gBoy2 Dalin is :D

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Very fortunate he was on deck when it went. If he didn't have time to get his grab bag,  sounds like it went straight down.  Imagine being inside, having a quick nap...

 

The bow section is a water tight compartment,  so will have broken aft of that.  Maybe around the foil casings? 

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44 minutes ago, gaw said:

The last few days of sport have been a horrible rollercoaster with French competitors. There was no way Romain Grosjean was going to survive that fireball but he did, and then Kevin _should_ survive once he was in the life-raft but was not 100% sure. Thank goodness.

 

Well the week isn't going too fucking brilliant for the Brits in the VG/F1 double either.

Joining Alex... Lewis Hamilton will be missing this weekend's Sakhir Grand Prix in Bahrain after just testing positive for Covid. 

 

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Fuck I saw that video with Kevin saying the bow just folded.

Stunned. You might expect that on an AC boat where safety factors are so low but on these boats. Time for the medicinal brandy. He won't be sleeping well for awhile.

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53 minutes ago, Laurent said:

[Kevin:] But, fuck, folding a boat in two, for boats that are supposed to do a Vendée Globe... We will have to look in depth into that stuff...

Another look at watertight compartments and their operation. Keeping more of them closed. Oh, and make them more pressure resistant...
Not so much to keep the boar afloat if when the front falls off but to buy more time.

On the somewhat positive side the will be an up to date review of the materials packed in the life raft and what the boats carry as rescue equipment.

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2 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Certainly Verdier are doing some very good things ATM. So we had 2 x VPLP's, 2 x JuanK's and 2 x Verdier boats this time (New). Certainly the Juan K boat remaining Arkea is also doing well. The Verdier boats have been the fastest in my book. There was a lot of talk about the SO and Alex's boat in terms of speed but not sure about that? Before we compare designers and boats we also need to compare the skipper's ability on each boat which makes it harder.

Might be prudent to see which designs make the finish  - and that will take a wee while yet.

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Article on the PRB site: https://sport.prb.fr/en-mer/actus/250-le-recit-de-kevin-escoffier-sur-sa-terrible-avarie-et-son-sauvetage-par-jean-le-cam
Deepl transcript:
 

THE STORY OF KEVIN ESCOFFIER ON HIS TERRIBLE DAMAGE AND HIS RESCUE BY JEAN LE CAM
 DECEMBER 1, 2020
Kevin Escoffier joined his shore crew at 8:00 am this morning and gave an account of his terrible damage and the exceptional rescue by Jean Le Cam last night southwest of the Cape of Good Hope.


KEVIN'S STORY : 

"It's surreal what happened. The boat folded back on itself in a 27-knot wave. I heard a crack, but honestly, I didn't need the noise to understand. I looked at the bow, it was at 90°. In a few seconds, there was water everywhere. The back of the boat was under water and the bow was pointing to the sky. The boat broke in two in front of the mast bulkhead. It seemed to fold back. I assure you, I'm not exaggerating... there was a 90° angle between the back and the front of the boat. 

I had no time to do anything. I could just send a message to my team "I'm sinking. It's not a joke. MAYDAY". 

Between the time I was on deck trimming the sails and the time I was in TPS, it didn't even take two minutes. It was extremely fast.

I got out of the boat, put on the TPS (survival suit) as fast as I could.  I saw smoke, the electronics burning. Everything was shutting down.  The only reflex I had was to grab the phone to send this message and take the TPS that I never put on. I wanted to take the grab bag but I couldn't because the water was rising. 

I took the bib (life raft) from the back. The front bib was not accessible, it was already three meters below the water. The water was in the cockpit up to the door. 

I would have liked to stay a little longer on board but I could see that everything was going very fast and then I caught a breaker and went into the water with the raft. 

At that moment, I was not at all reassured... You are in a raft with 35 knots of wind. No, it's not reassuring. I was only reassured when I saw Jean. But the problem was how to get on board with him. 

We said 2-3 words to each other. It was Verdun on the water. He was forced to move away a little and then afterwards, I saw that he was still on the zone. I stayed in the raft until early morning. 

I didn't know if the weather was going to get soft enough to allow for a maneuver. He was 2 meters away from me, he sent me the fry with a link but it was hard to stop the boat. Finally, I managed to catch a tube, a bar to get on board. There was still sea, about 3.50 meters. It's an ordeal in these conditions to get on board a 60', especially when you're constrained in your movements by the TPS. Honestly, fortunately I'm in good shape because I assure you it's not easy. 

When I found myself on board with Jean, we fell into each other's arms. He said, "Fuck, you're on board! It was hot! ». And I said, "Fuck your race, you were having a great race". He said, "That's okay, the last time it was me who had put Vincent's race to bed". 

At the moment, I have no idea what's next. We will see with the race direction.  There, I slept well 2 hours, rested, I ate. I did everything I could for the boat. I had reinforced it, I did everything, I have no regrets about what I did. »

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Ref where will Escoffier will disembark, I have read someone (but can't find it anymore) talking about the Kerguelens... I guess we will know more today.

La Cam and others will of course get redress in time, and believe me, when Le Cam arrives back in Les Sables, he is in for a hell of a welcome. PRB is a local company there, and I am sure there will be present in force.

 

The 2011 Cheminees Poujoulat (Juan K design - https://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Histoire des 60'/E50.htm) broke in half in 2013. If I recall right, the conclusion was that water got into the honeycomb and slowly corroded or destroyed it.

 

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https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/20697/escoffier-s-rescue-mission-accomplished-yes-he-did

After eleven and a half hours in his liferaft since being forced to abandon his IMOCA 60 PRB in strong winds and big seas 840  nautical miles SW of Cape Town, Vendée Globe skipper Kevin Escoffier was dramtically rescued by fellow competitor Jean Le Cam at around 0118hrs UTC this Tuesday morning.

Escoffier was racing in third place on the 22nd day of the Vendée Globe solo round the world race in 25-30kts SWly winds and big seas when his boat nosedived into a wave and, he reported after his rescue, literally broke in two, giving him minutes to grab his survival suit and take to his liferaft.

His boat’s emergency distress beacon was automatically activated. The emergency signal was transmitted to CROSS Griz Nez which immediately alerted Vendée Globe Race Direction in Les Sables d’Olonne.

At the same time 40 year old Escoffier from Saint Malo, a very experienced southern ocean racer who has won the crewed Volvo Ocean Race and held the Trophée Jules Verne record for the crewed  speed record round the world, called his technical team with the terse message "I need assistance. I am sinking. This is not a joke."

Race Direction called on Jean Le Cam, the racer closest to PRB’s position, to divert his course immediately to the zone. The veteran 61 year old who is on his fifth Vendée Globe race, arrived at around  1615hrs UTC and located Escoffier’s liferaft, establishing visual and voice contact despite the big, unruly seas and winds gusting to 35kts.

But Le Cam's repeated initial efforts failed and Race Direction had to escalate the operation.

Remarkably it was hours later,  only when Escoffier appeared in the background of a video call that Le Cam had left running through the entire proceedure, that Race Direction fully realised Le Cam had rescued the stricken solo racer. 

Le Cam recalled “Because I had a good position. I told him I will be back there was no need to rush things. I had just the main with two reefs in 30-32 knots with the rough seas it was not easy to manoeuvre. I came back to the spot where I left him but there was no one there.” Le Cam reported early this morning, “ I went there (looking for him) five or six times which means I had to tack five or six times because of the mishaps that happened all the time, the sea state and so on, I ended up going backwards and lost sight of him.

Because of the pitch black night and the bad wind and sea conditions, Race Direction requested three other skippers to divert to the rescue zone, Germany’s Germany’s Boris Herrmann (Seaexplorer-Yacht Club de Monaco), Yannick Bestaven (Maître CoQ IV) and Sébastien Simon (ARKEA PAPREC).

Race Direction drew up a search protocol using Meteo France’s MOTHY (Modèle Océanique de Transport d'HYdrocarbures). drift prediction programme and engaged the three solo skippers in a triangle search pattern. They had intermittent distress beacon signals which appeared to follow no pattern.

Race Director Jacques Caraës explained, “We always had a signal. The only position we were getting was the MOB but we did not know if it was attached to Kevin as it appeared to be quite random and moving a lot from one place to another. And so we did not know if the EPIRB was in the liferaft or close to the boat or what. At some point we thought we thought the EPIRB could be in the liferaft, it could be with him, the EPRB could be drifting in the water or it could be attached to the IMOCA (yacht). And so it was not easy. But when we saw that the EPIRB position was lining up with the drift prediction track we sent Jean to that point.

We had organised a triangle search scan pattern with Yannick Bestaven, who went seven miles away, then Boris was closer and Sébastien was closer. They did seven miles across by 0.3 of a mile apart on each scan. They sailed with three reefs. Jean Le Cam recommended that because it was a battle. The wind was dropping a bit. But at the beginning when Jean saw Kevin the weather was bad. Jean did seven scans.

Speaking on a video link this morning a relieved Le Cam said, “I arrived, it was all good, I saw him. Kevin in his liferaft. Because I had a good position. I told him I will be back there was no need to rush things. I had just the main with two reefs in 30-32 knots with the rough seas it was not easy to manoeuvre. I came back to the spot where I left him but there was no one there.  I went there (looking for him) five or six times which means I had to tack five or six times because of the mishaps that happened all the time, the sea state and so on, I ended up going backwards.

I told myself I would stay on standby and wait for daylight. Then I thought that in the dark it might be easier to see his light. One moment when I was on deck I saw a flash, but in fact it was a reflection that glinted off a wave. But the more I got closer to the light I saw it more and more. It is amazing because you switch from despair to an unreal moment in an instant.

I put myself to windward of him, I saw Kevin. Kevin asked me ‘will you be back?’ I said, ‘No we are doing this now!’ Then at one point the boat was falling backwards  too fast in reverse and he was just there, two metres off the stern, and thank goodness I had prepared the red life ring that is usually in the cockpit. I throw it to him, and he catches it.I threw him the life ring. And he caught it and then he managed to pull himself in to catch the transmission bar (rudder link arm). And that was it.”

Escoffier described the moment the boat literally folded from the bow, “You see the images of shipwrecks? It was like that, but worse. In four seconds the boat nosedived, the bow folded at 90°. I put my head down in the cockpit, a wave was coming. I had time to send one text before the wave fried the electronics. It was completely crazy. It folded the boat in two. I’ve seen a lot before but this one…

Caraës praised his team and the collaboration of the rescue authorities and Jean-Jacques Laurent the CEO of PRB, a long time sponsor of entries into the Vendée Globe who was at Race HQ all night, assisting and supporting the mission,
It is the outcome we were hoping for. It was pitch black, not easy conditions but finally the outcome is almost a miracle. It was not easy to pick Kevin up in the middle of the night, Jean is an extremely experienced sailor and he always followed our instructions to the letter. And we were lucky enough to have experts helping us on all sides, Meteo France with their drift simulation programme that corresponded with our EPIRB tracking. But we had lots of unknowns, lots of different positions. We had to be positive all the time and believe in things. We were lucky, luck was on our side. It is a very happy outcome and we at Race Direction are very happy.”
 

This amazing rescue reverses roles played out between 5th and 6th January 2009, during the 2008-2009 Vendée Globe. Vincent Riou, the then the skipper of PRB, rescued Jean Le Cam from his upturned IMOCA 60 which had capsized 200 miles west of Cape Horn. Le Cam was trapped inside his upturned VM Materiaux for 16 hours during which time it was not known for certain  if Le Cam was safe inside his boat or not.

Asked this morning if he was scared or worried during his ordeal in his liferaft Escoffier replied, “No. As soon as I had seen Jean I was sure I would be saved.”

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10 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Ref where will Escoffier will disembark, I have read someone (but can't find it anymore) talking about the Kerguelens... I guess we will know more today.

La Cam and others will of course get redress in time, and believe me, when Le Cam arrives back in Les Sables, he is in for a hell of a welcome. PRB is a local company there, and I am sure there will be present in force.

 

The 2011 Cheminees Poujoulat C(Juan K design - https://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Histoire des 60'/E50.htm) broke in half in 2013. If I recall right, the conclusion was that water got into the honeycomb and slowly corroded or destroyed it.

 

Pretty sure Cheminees Poujoulat's honeycomb core was aluminium. 

Also, the International Jury will review the PRB sinking/rescue on Monday and Tuesday morning. See: https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/20695/dalin-crosses-cape-of-good-hope?utm_source=email&utm_medium=cpm&utm_campaign=20201201-La-NL-quotidienne_-_EN

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Incroyable, I go to bed and wake up with VG twitter alerts, SA exploding with 5 pages of posts and that Lady Fortuna has rolled the dice again. L'histoire se répète, with roles reversed. You cannot come up with a script like that. Thank God that Kevin has been safely recovered. Boat full of water in 4 secs, I guess it was a good thing that Kevin was on deck when it happened and not below sleeping. Seems that JLC will be tasting Capewine soon with his former savior and drink to life and sailing. I will tonight!

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6 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Are the French Navy stationed at the Kerguelen Islands?

Maybe, Jean can offload Kevin there, to be picked up by a navy helicopter?

 
 
 

The Kerguelens are about 5+ days away for le Cam at least. And once he's there Kevin would be stuck until the next rotation of French personnel - no air access AFAIK.
Plus le Cam is heading slightly further north than the boats around him. Not quite heading to Cape Town maybe, but hoping to get close enough for a ship transfer?

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Teared up watching the video from Kevin and Jean, thank you Neptune for releasing Kevin to the waiting arms of King Cam! Very grateful Jean was able to rescue Kevin safely. 

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30 minutes ago, Chasm said:

When I found myself on board with Jean, we fell into each other's arms. He said, "Fuck, you're on board! It was hot! ». And I said, "Fuck your race, you were having a great race". He said, "That's okay, the last time it was me who had put Vincent's race to bed".

If I may, a slight correction. Rather than "Fuck your race" as offered by Deepl, I'd translate Kevin's words more along the lines of "Sorry I have fucked your race, you were doing great".  ;)

M - Online translation works great, except for some details sometimes :D

 

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58 minutes ago, Chasm said:

Another look at watertight compartments and their operation. Keeping more of them closed. Oh, and make them more pressure resistant...
Not so much to keep the boar afloat if when the front falls off but to buy more time.

On the somewhat positive side the will be an up to date review of the materials packed in the life raft and what the boats carry as rescue equipment.

Not much help when the entire watertight compartment breaks off.

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I keep re-reading these words ...

You see the images of shipwrecks? It was like that, but worse. In four seconds the boat nosedived, the bow folded at 90°. I put my head down in the cockpit, a wave was coming. I had time to send one text before the wave fried the electronics. It was completely crazy. It folded the boat in two. I’ve seen a lot before but this one…

To imagine your state of the art boat, literally fold in half, fill with water and sink in seconds sends shivers up my spine. Fucking terrifying. I told my 13 year old son this evening - I'll support you in sailing but fucked if you're doing the Vendee!

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Jacques Caraes interview (he is the race director) : https://www.ouest-france.fr/vendee-globe/video-vendee-globe-le-bateau-de-kevin-etait-casse-en-deux-7068312 gives some insight on how the research was organised.

Quick translation:

Quote

The rescue happened earlier then we thought, because it was completly dark and it was not easy. The final conclusion is almost miraculous, it was far from easy to rescur Kevin in the night - Jean is a hell of a seaman and also followed instructions we gave him. We were also lucky to have experts from Meteo France involved, their drifting model matched the EPIRB position. There were lots of unknowns, several different positions. You have to stay positive, and I also think we got a bit lucky, the conclusion is a good one and the whole race team is very happy.

It all happened very quickly, we got a call from CROSS Griz-Nez to let us know the beacon was activated, this was a top priority request. At the same time, Jean-Marc Lefailler, PRB team manager, called us to tell us he got a message from Kevin "I request assistance, I am sinking, this is no bullshit". It all happened brutally quick. From what we know from talking to Kevin after the rescue, the boat literally broke in half, the bow popped up 90 degrees and the boat started to sink, he was just able to grab and put his TPS survival suit on and then jump in the water with his liferaft. He just had an EPIRB and small personal AIS/HF beacon.

Last night, when it was still daylight, we requested Jean Le Cam, the closest skipper, to divert to the area, which he did immediately. The waves were big, 4/5 m or maybe even a bit more, a SW wind of about 30 knots, not easy conditions. Jean diverted to the position we gave him. He quickly found the liferaft, but was uneable to perform the rescue in daylight due to the conditions. By the time he re-organised himself and started his engine, which didn't happen quickly, he had lost sight of the liferaft. He came round 5 times and didn't find him. It was dark then, so we diverted the other boats, starting with Bestaven (Maitre Coq), who was second on the scene. At that time, we didn't have the drift prediction, so we asked him to stay to leward. Boris Hermann then arrived and focused on the middle area (between Le Cam and Bestaven). Because the night was so dark and chances to find the liferaft were quite small, we also asked Simon (Arkea-Paprec) to divert to a potential position we got from a beacon via CROSS.

After he rested a bit hove to, Jean La Cam came back towards that point, arriving very slowly. Wind was dropping, and waves were possibly getting smaller too, which allowed for a slower and more conttroled approach. He didn't see the raft at that particular position, but he briefly spotted a light. The rescue itself must have been sporty, I am assuming he had to throw a line, tow the liferaft, etc. It must have been a bit of a mess. I think Kevin ended up in the water at the end of the line. In this case, you rely on survival instinct. We don't have all the details yet, but getting back onboard was a big effort. I don't know everything, but I think in this sort of moment, you kind of become superhuman.

Lots of emotions. You have to remain calm, but at the same time you have to be there. I am lucky the team is great, the all stayed calm. Jean, Kevin and the others around are all great seamen, which made for a great rescue.

 

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Shang keep weeping ....the missus will then console you with more than breakfast. :rolleyes:

ha ha, that would have been a neat trick, she's at the other end of the country on sailing business.

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23 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Are the French Navy stationed at the Kerguelen Islands?

Maybe, Jean can offload Kevin there, to be picked up by a navy helicopter?

Kerguelens have a bunch on scientists, and there is a boat (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Dufresne_(1995)) that comes about once a month for resupply. That boat rescued Kito de PAvant in the 2016 VG.

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So to summarize: PRB surfed down a wave in 30-35 kn of wind doing 27kn of boat speed. The bow dug in, the bending moment in the hull exceeded its structural strength and it snapped, breaking the whole bow to mast section of the hull.

I thought nose dives were pretty common in modern IMOCA's. Still don't get why the hull failed

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1 minute ago, minca3 said:

So to summarize: PRB surfed down a wave in 30-35 kn of wind doing 27kn of boat speed. The bow dug in, the bending moment in the hull exceeded its structural strength and it snapped, breaking the whole bow to mast section of the hull of the rest.

I thought nose dives were pretty common in modern IMOCA's. Still don't get why the hull failed

sends shivers up the spine - i always thought losing a keel and then flipping almost immediately was my worst nightmare - snapping your boat in two is on another level. Says volumes about their training, liferaft location, and survival suit location. Fuck.

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7 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Kerguelens have a bunch on scientists, and there is a boat (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Dufresne_(1995)) that comes about once a month for resupply. That boat rescued Kito de PAvant in the 2016 VG.

Then there’s the flyby the French navy did of Armel & Alex wailing away in ‘16 near Kerguelen.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Then there’s the flyby the French navy did of Armel & Alex wailing away in ‘16 near Kerguelen.

That was a deal between the TVs and the French Navy. I think they changed the schedule of one of the french frigates to match the race. Flyby was done by the frigate helicopter.

The French Navy doesn't keep ships in the Kerguelens.

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Transmission bar is correctly translated above as rudder link bar. So I guess he got in over the stern. Makes sense. Not sure from what has been said so far if he was direct from raft to boat, or on an MOB line recovery thing (banane) that JLC threw him, and he managed to grab.

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40 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Are the French Navy stationed at the Kerguelen Islands?

Maybe, Jean can offload Kevin there, to be picked up by a navy helicopter?

I think CT it is. In 2008 and 2016 the French research and supply vessel Marion Dufresne picked up Bernard Stamm and respectively Kito de Pavant near The Kerguelen. There is a research station on the main island. And +/- 14 soldiers, but AFAIK no helicopter base with working helicopters. Nor a landing strip either, as there is not enough flat land available. LJC could drop-off Kevin at The Kerguelen, but my guess is that without beds for 2 crewman in the boat that it is not ideal to sleep on sail. Or do hot bunking.

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6 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

That was a deal between the TVs and the French Navy. I think they changed the schedule of one of the french frigates to match the race. Flyby was done by the frigate helicopter.

The French Navy doesn't keep ships in the Kerguelens.


I stand corrected.

‘Twas Spectacular images no?

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9 hours ago, chuso007 said:

Last I heard was S.A.  was actually developing backwards. 

That's confirmed 100% looking at some of the dumbfuckery being posted here the last few days. 

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9 hours ago, bucc5062 said:

it has now been a few hours since this emergency started.  In that time Kevin was able to contact authorities and activate an EPIRB, JLC was able to come within close proximity and communicate that Keven was in a life raft (which would indicate his boat sank).  After losing sight the primary authorities redirected not one, but three boats inside 100 nm to assist Cam.

 

Dems da facts.

 

We folk sitting comfortable know no more really.  What we hope is that (1) Kevin is okay, still alive, and bouncing in a very uncomfortable life raft.  (2)  That three IMOCA 60s, ill equipped to perform a rescue are doing their damnest to find then maintain contact with Kevin till (3), come dawn and lessening WX effect a rescue where one of three boats will have the honor of hauling his ass back to Cape Town.

Planes are not facts.  Commercials vessels are at the moment not facts and other than AIS Sat posts, we really don't have real time understanding like those three skippers and the monitoring authorities.

Soon I need to sleep and when I wake tomorrow I hope this, Kevin is alive, he is on a boat heading towards CT.  That the race goes on, that either Sam gets her ass in gear or Isabelle rolls over her and keeps on trucking.  All I can do is done, which is support and hope.

Joker Clap GIFs - Get the best GIF on GIPHY

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Now let's talk T Rudders. :lol:

Large_18527457_10155423020817437_3920873945489469445_o1 (1).jpg

render_NEW_B-copy.jpg

Yes and because of the rudders and a few other elements the Super Sixty wouldn't measure as an IMOCA 60. More solidly built than most. I still have the designer's initial presentation somewhere.

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9 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

I just have to look back at this. The BOSS sailing looks like a complete animal, in the best way possible. So bummed we're not gonna see the new boat in state like this... 

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1 minute ago, Barons said:

I just have to look back at this. The BOSS sailing looks like a complete animal, in the best way possible. So bummed we're not gonna see the new boat in state like this... 

Maybe Charlie gets the shots this time.   Looking forward to it.

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The videos of JLC explanations have been edited, I guess for length. The audio clip on the audio page however is not edited and contains additional details I haven't seen anywhere else (8minutes and 29s long).

First of all when JLC saw KE in his life raft he was with two reefs, no head sails and not slow enough. He was close enough to tell KE he was coming back. He lost sight not because he started the engine, but because he had to take another reef. Then he came back 5 times to the site but failed to locate the raft in the decreasing light and huge waves.

He then continued to search, following the instructions from the race war room. At some point during the night CROSS Gris-Nez got a position from a beacon, transmitted to JLC via the race HQ. JLC turned around and went there, but didn't see anything. But a few minutes later he spotted a flash for a few seconds between two waves a mile and 1/2 away. He did follow the light, came very close with the intention of bumping the raft on the windward side, but despite going full reverse on the engine he missed it. With the raft slipping two meters behind the stern he threw the "banana" and its yellow polypro line (that he had prepared when he took the reef) and KE was able to catch it. It then took a lot of effort to bring the raft close enough for KE to climb aboard as the combination of the sea anchors on the life raft and Hubert drifting at 3 knots was not ideal.

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3 hours ago, Miffy said:

There’s... substantial compression loads on the hull and PRB was light even when launched - subsequent additions of foils only meant higher loads. We will see how much Kevin will share on the future  

anyway from JLC man of the hour himself

 

Awesome... (and a little up the thread Laurent posted a translation in english if you don't understand french, the google video translation skips over some of the exchanges)

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43 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

One of the most amazing footage of this race my eyes have seen. No wonder the awards received. Big Kudos to the french navy and the producers

32 minutes ago, Barons said:

I just have to look back at this. The BOSS sailing looks like a complete animal, in the best way possible. So bummed we're not gonna see the new boat in state like this... 

With the starboard foil amputated and chasing le Chacal... Indeed! a real pity...

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In this interview : https://sport.francetvinfo.fr/voile/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-jean-le-cam-le-sauve-devenu-sauveur-tu-passes-du-desespoir-au-truc.amp?__twitter_impression=true

Jean le Cam says:

Quote

I have no idea what will happen next, if a boat is going to come pick him up or not. Drop him in the Kerguelens? No it's not on the way, I have a race to race.

If he doesn't like Kerguelens, I doubt he will consider Cape Town. Wait and see.

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So great to wake up to the great news about KE's rescue this morning. The worrying kept me up half the night, I can't imagine what it was like for his family and friends!

I can claim to have a small idea of what it was like for the other skippers who weren't directly involved in the rescue, as a competitor in the 2017 OSTAR/TWOSTAR who rode out a vicious depression while being drip fed accounts of the rescues of six fellow competitors forced to abandon their boats. Again, I am in awe of my hero (and friend) Pip Hare, who has managed to write an excellent blog post in response to the rescue: 

https://www.piphare.com/blog/i219yeg52bn803fw8sef3097a9jb4a

I am constantly amazed at how she can be so articulate under such trying conditions.

 

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8 hours ago, Notquitecapnron said:

Is it possible that Boris has been released and is back to racing?  On course.  Check rig loads and boat speed.

 

7 hours ago, Muzza said:

The cargo ship (41 56S 7 04E)  that was steaming to the search zone, appears to have resumed its course to the east and is no longer en route to the search zone.

Well spotted, guys. Indicators of the successful rescue before the official release was out. 

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Kev: "Hey Jean, do you think we should slow this thing down a bit?"

Jean: "Wha?  Are U crazzie?  We are racing no?"

Kev: "Yeah but, you know, if you push these things too hard ... just sayin."

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1 hour ago, Mash said:

If I may, a slight correction. Rather than "Fuck your race" as offered by Deepl, I'd translate Kevin's words more along the lines of "Sorry I have fucked your race, you were doing great".  ;)

M - Online translation works great, except for some details sometimes :D

 

My guess is KE said "Fuck!  Your race!", and autotranslate (or the voice recognition) got the words, but didnt' add any punctuation to make it read properly.

Kind of like the difference between "Call me Ishmael" and "Call me, Ishmael"

 

I know everyone else has already said this, but glad to wake up to good news - was worried what I'd read when I tuned in.  Now for more coffee.

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1 hour ago, Sea Breeze 74 said:

To imagine your state of the art boat, literally fold in half, fill with water and sink in seconds sends shivers up my spine. Fucking terrifying. I told my 13 year old son this evening - I'll support you in sailing but fucked if you're doing the Vendee!

It didn't sink in second more like minutes. Otherwise Kevin wouldn't have been able to get the survival suit on, send text message and get into life raft. I think the seconds refer to the water coming into the hull.

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28 minutes ago, astro said:

Kev: "Hey Jean, do you think we should slow this thing down a bit?"

Jean: "Wha?  Are U crazzie?  We are racing no?"

Kev: "Yeah but, you know, if you push these things too hard ... just sayin."

 

 

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4 hours ago, Fintho said:

Sorry WHAT??? How much needs to go catastrophically wrong for a boat like that to fold in two in 4 seconds? I guess when carbon fails it really REALLY fails

Carbon has one mode of failure, catastrophic! 

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Amazing the F1 driver escaped over 15-18 seconds from the horrific crash then rushed to hospital with full medical backup and the media is full of it.

Kevin had 4 seconds to get off a sinking boat 500+ miles from shore with no backup other than his fellow competitors, spent an uncertain long cold night on his own in the Southern Ocean before, thank goodness, being rescued and the coverage outside the specialist media - zip.

Funny old world or perhaps as a sport we are not very good at telling our story  

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The four seconds, now part of sailing folklore, has to be bullshit.

He could not have done what he said he did in four fucking seconds.  Let's all just accept that and stop perpetuating bullshit.

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4 minutes ago, astro said:

The four seconds, now part of sailing folklore, has to be bullshit.

He could not have done what he said he did in four fucking seconds.  Let's all just accept that and stop perpetuating bullshit.

you sound like have never left the couch. get some carbon gear, go offshore on 20kt boat speed, then you will understand what 4sec is

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It will be super interesting to hear if the OSCAR systems were of help in this SAR operation (and generally interesting to know how useful they were overall).

Has anyone seen a definitive list of which IMOCAs have been fitted? I know there are (er, were) 18 of them. What I know:

listed on the OSCAR website:

  • Initiatives-cœur
  • PRB
  • V and B – Mayenne
  • Sea Explorer – Yacht Club De Monaco
  • Time for Oceans

have mentioned it in interviews/videos:

  • Hugo Boss
  • LinkedOut

Which are the remaining 11? There are 13 foilers not listed above, and they're probably more likely to have the budget (and a stronger case for needing it).

 

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18 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Amazing the F1 driver escaped over 15-18 seconds from the horrific crash then rushed to hospital with full medical backup and the media is full of it.

Kevin had 4 seconds to get off a sinking boat 500+ miles from shore with no backup other than his fellow competitors, spent an uncertain long cold night on his own in the Southern Ocean before, thank goodness, being rescued and the coverage outside the specialist media - zip.

Funny old world or perhaps as a sport we are not very good at telling our story  

How come you compare these two accidents? I guess just because they both happened recently (ok, and both involve a Frenchman). Otherwise they have nothing in common. So no point in drawing conclusions about media coverage and storytelling. 

And as others have said, the 4 seconds is not about getting off the boat but more about the time it took to flood the boat. 2 minutes between the breakage and him being in the TPS (cf. the PRB article) 

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19 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Amazing the F1 driver escaped over 15-18 seconds from the horrific crash then rushed to hospital with full medical backup and the media is full of it.

Kevin had 4 seconds to get off a sinking boat 500+ miles from shore with no backup other than his fellow competitors, spent an uncertain long cold night on his own in the Southern Ocean before, thank goodness, being rescued and the coverage outside the specialist media - zip.

Funny old world or perhaps as a sport we are not very good at telling our story  

One big difference is that the F1 has detailed footage of the horrific crash, complete with fireball to show on the evening news. (or so I assume, I haven't watched it).

Ocean racing has little boat icons moving slowly across a computer screen, then some grainy video of a couple of guys talking on the radio in a cramped boat.  Most news execs will take one look at the guy with the wild hair going "Clack, Clack, Clack... why are you looking at me?"  and think to themselves, good question.

Ocean racing just isn't going to produce the same visual footage.

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18 minutes ago, carlosgp5 said:

you sound like have never left the couch. get some carbon gear, go offshore on 20kt boat speed, then you will understand what 4sec is

Sounds like you never tried on a TPS, I have one and use it every year to check it. 4 seconds to get into your TPS, that alone is impossible. Then sending a message and get the Bib (one of the two onboard) nay. Minutes...lets say 4 minutes.

Thanks for the translators, it speaks more then my rude understanding of French. The talk between the 4 skippers was excellent to know that the group spirit is alive and well. Even with million Euro projects.

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31 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Amazing the F1 driver escaped over 15-18 seconds from the horrific crash then rushed to hospital with full medical backup and the media is full of it.

Kevin had 4 seconds to get off a sinking boat 500+ miles from shore with no backup other than his fellow competitors, spent an uncertain long cold night on his own in the Southern Ocean before, thank goodness, being rescued and the coverage outside the specialist media - zip.

Funny old world or perhaps as a sport we are not very good at telling our story  

It is all over french media, specialist and more generic. I believe Kevin has spent the whole morning on the phone talking to everyone.

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1 minute ago, LeoV said:

Sounds like you never tried on a TPS, I have one and use it every year to check it. 4 seconds to get into your TPS, that alone is impossible. Then sending a message and get the Bib (one of the two onboard) nay. Minutes...lets say 4 minutes.

Thanks for the translators, it speaks more then my rude understanding of French. The talk between the 4 skippers was excellent to know that the group spirit is alive and well. Even with million Euro projects.

true never been in one; just didnt hear kevin reporting that got in the tps in 4 sec; he said the boat broke in 4 sec, and the other guy said it is impossible and he was lying; i just found like that was disrespctuful given the situation

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2 hours ago, Barons said:

I just have to look back at this. The BOSS sailing looks like a complete animal, in the best way possible. So bummed we're not gonna see the new boat in state like this... 

She was sailing with that much heel because she was missing her port foil and he was pushing to keep up with Armel.

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10 minutes ago, dmjburrows said:

How much food does Jean le Cam have on board?  If Kevin is lifted or transferred off, but stays on for a few days, will Jean end up hungry on the way North?

Yea, thats a good question.

For what I see, they often do not carry too much spare food.

Also true that if Kevin cannot do anything on board Yes we Cam, he will probably be the first to be considerate with Le cam's food. Imo he will be hungry all the time in this coming week.

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10 minutes ago, carlosgp5 said:

true never been in one; just didnt hear kevin reporting that got in the tps in 4 sec; he said the boat broke in 4 sec, and the other guy said it is impossible and he was lying; i just found like that was disrespctuful given the situation

@astro was a bit imprecise with his words and understanding of what was written before. Kevin never said he did everything and got off the boat in 4 seconds. It's more like just under 2 minutes, as stated in the PRB article. 4 seconds for the bow to fold 90° up and the cabin being flooded. 

From the french live I understood that until he was in his TPS (approx. 2 minutes after breakage), the cabin / boat was flooded about 3/4. (happy to be corrected on that as my french is far from perfect)

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They're saying right now on the Vende Live that he could be picked up by the french Navy vessel Nivose (yep, the one that was already  involved with the heli shots of BP & Hugo Boss last time around) 7 days from now north of the Kerguelen, to be confirmed

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42 minutes ago, kass said:

It will be super interesting to hear if the OSCAR systems were of help in this SAR operation (and generally interesting to know how useful they were overall).

Has anyone seen a definitive list of which IMOCAs have been fitted? I know there are (er, were) 18 of them. What I know:

listed on the OSCAR website:

  • Initiatives-cœur
  • PRB
  • V and B – Mayenne
  • Sea Explorer – Yacht Club De Monaco
  • Time for Oceans

have mentioned it in interviews/videos:

  • Hugo Boss
  • LinkedOut

Which are the remaining 11? There are 13 foilers not listed above, and they're probably more likely to have the budget (and a stronger case for needing it).

 

@KlaasWiersma Do you have a list you could share from the vid you did before?

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Hoping we get some more JLC / KE footage while KE is still on board YWC. Some fun videos could include Kevin playing with JLC’s dolls , KE and JLC sharing some wine together, KE saying “clac clac clac,” JLC refusing to let KE rest where the dolls “live” because that is their space, and JLC and KE enjoying each other’s company after weeks of being solo. Could be a good sit com. 
 

In all seriousness, a huge congratulations to JLC and the other skippers who diverted for an incredibly difficult job done so professionally. And feeling thankful that KE is now safe on board YWC. A great result for all involved. 

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2 hours ago, Mash said:

M - Online translation works great, except for some details sometimes :D

Yeah, they are always a lot of fun. usually deepl is a bit better than that.

 

2 hours ago, European Bloke said:

Not much help when the entire watertight compartment breaks off.

There was some overlap with the news that PRB broke in front of the mast instead of much more closer to the bow.
The boats must have at least 6 compartments or 5 bulkheads. In most videos the one in the front is closed. (As seen on HB only a manhole.) We rarely see the one in the back, probably also closed. (The risk of rudder damage and a hole is real.) The the videos the middle bulkheads tend to be open.
I initially thought he lost the bow, opening up the second compartment and then flooding the rest through open or damaged bulkheads.
Does not really help if the boat breaks the way it apparently did...
 

 

51 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Sounds like you never tried on a TPS, I have one and use it every year to check it. 4 seconds to get into your TPS, that alone is impossible. Then sending a message and get the Bib (one of the two onboard) nay. Minutes...lets say 4 minutes.

Thanks for the translators, it speaks more then my rude understanding of French. The talk between the 4 skippers was excellent to know that the group spirit is alive and well. Even with million Euro projects.

The way I read it the 4 seconds were from bang to fold to there really is a lot of water in the boat. First reaction to send a text. (Getting a reaction ASAP.) Then very little time to grab anything and launch the raft. I doubt Kevin had an idea that the boat would sink that fast. 
I guess one of the results will be to pack more stuff into the hard shell raft in case you can't get the grab bags. Perhaps a second survival suit as well. 

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Kevin in the EN live telling that moonlight helped to locate each other in the night. And he did not jump in the water during the transfer, unlike the race director speculated in his interview.

Also, he'll take a sponge to bail a bit everywhere (as an excuse) to keep looking for Jean's red wine cache :D

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From this video, we can hear Kevin in the background at the end:

Quote

We need to have a look at all this (with the structures guys).

The other thing we need to look if the foils didn't invert. Seb, we spoke about ut once.

This means the load case could become a foil pushing down plus all the added mass of the water on top of the deck.

 

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These people are superhuman.  They seem pretty chill on top of being brave.

"One of the other skippers; yeah, I guess so... Even my girlfriend was in tears when she learned what happened... So I can imagine for your mother...

Kevin: yeah, but that's because your girlfriend likes me very much...."

I hope after my boat breaks in half I can still crack some jokes.

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3 minutes ago, k-f-u said:

Also, he'll take a sponge to bail a bit everywhere (as an excuse) to keep looking for Jean's red wine cache :D

*g* Probably also to reassure him that this boat is not starting to fall apart.
I wonder what JLC will have to say about hitchhikers once Kevin gets transferred.

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