Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 13.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

Posted Images

Fell into a rabbit hole wandering around the Indian ocean on Google Earth.  

Found this pic on Kerguelen Island near an abandoned outpost:  Labelled "Drums of radioactive waste waiting burial for 80 years".

Working as a team, we collectively can mess up just about anyplace it seems.

Screen_Shot_2020-12-15_at_1_54.50_PM.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Fell into a rabbit hole wandering around the Indian ocean on Google Earth.  

Found this pic on Kerguelen Island near an abandoned outpost:  Labelled "Drums of radioactive waste waiting burial for 80 years".

Working as a team, we collectively can mess up just about anyplace it seems.

 

Pretty sure that's mis-labelled.  Even if the pic was taken yesterday, 80 years ago (1940) probably pre-dates any sort of nuclear power beyond a few experiments.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Pretty sure that's mis-labelled.  Even if the pic was taken yesterday, 80 years ago (1940) probably pre-dates any sort of nuclear power beyond a few experiments.

I certainly hope so.   Also pretty sure I wouldn't want to be the photographer standing next to those barrels.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Pretty sure that's mis-labelled.  Even if the pic was taken yesterday, 80 years ago (1940) probably pre-dates any sort of nuclear power beyond a few experiments.

Steel drums thin enough to bend like that will not be looking that good after 80 years in a marine environment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems to be a bit of interest in Icebergs and South Georgia. I took this panorama from just inshore of Annenkov Island (IIRC - I could check) on a cracker of a day around 10 years back. The Willis Islands on the left of the photo around to Cape Disappointment on the right. 

I've compressed it a lot down to a height of 1024 px and very wide, but SA won't process it as an image perhaps because the aspect ratio is so great. So if you want a good look at it download the zip file extract the pic and open it in an image viewer, expand to fit the screen in height and scroll around.

This is the coast line off which the iceberg lays. Rarely visited by anybody let alone explored. 

SG_Pano_1.zip

SG_Pano_preview.jpg

  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

I certainly hope so.   Also pretty sure I wouldn't want to be the photographer standing next to those barrels.

Whale or seal oil barrels.. Certainly pre WWII judging but the iron hoops.... the modern form of the drum as invented during WWII 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, littlechay said:

Whale or seal oil barrels.. Certainly pre WWII judging but the iron hoops.... the modern form of the drum as invented during WWII 

Makes sense.  More sense than the "radioactive" in the caption.  There are many other signs of whaling stations in the posted pics.  And some very sad and lonely cross-marked burial sites.  I might go back and pick out and post some of them.  A not-so-random southern ocean photo thread.

Your panorama is fabulous.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, huey 2 said:

BAS Part of NERC.  2 week quarantine period then 42 day expedition

My head just exploded. Copy pasting whole articles incl pics in large font is PIA.

Think of people here using small devices. It being thread drift worse.

Brief description and link copy ONLY please - NOT both

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, littlechay said:

This is the coast line off which the iceberg lays. Rarely visited by anybody let alone explored. 

Chay you appear keen photographer? Do you take good gear and then the hassle of pelican cases etc to keep it alive or just small marine rated equip?

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, cortosam said:

Alex Thomson is the english Bernard Stamm :)

 

9 hours ago, CARBONINIT said:

No, he is not that. Stop trying to compare. French are far superior at this ocean sailing. The French invest at an early stage ie school kids in dinghies and progress through the ranks. The Brits think it's still for the few who do not know how to deliver or sail.    

Saying that the French are far superior at ocean sailing is a stretch ... I'd agree they are awesome at short handed / solo sailing and multis of all kinds probably due to their upbringing / environment.
They seem to love the rush and are prepared to take the risks and I personally love the contribution they have made as I'm a multi nut...
I don't agree with the Alex Thompson hate here. He is one of the few that races boats "French style" and he is very good at it. I believe his fewer years of experience in the beginning led him to pushing his boats too hard and yes he has broken some boats like Stamm. This edition, his new boat has sensors and i believed this would force him to use science to tell him to back off instead of his instincts. Shame we won't get to find out.
This year the boat broke but we don't know why. Sure he could have over tensioned a 2:1 sail on his J3 or 5 or something similar or the boat just had a design floor in that area but that's all speculation.
Then there was falling asleep at the finish recently but before that he was impressive on that Atlantic crossing... 
Just look at how many times he sailed himself into the lead over the last 12 years......  
He's not my favorite campaigner but in my eyes and IMHO, he will go down in the all time top group of offshore shorthanded hell men .... 
I'd be curious to know how his French competitors honestly feel about him.... anyone know...?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The French can be pretty flippant about tossing nuclear waste or testing in the pacific - but they’re not stupid. It takes more effort to load/unload in the Kerguelen Islands than to just sail to the deepest waters in the pacific and toss the barrels for safe disposal. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Chay you appear keen photographer? Do you take good gear and then the hassle of pelican cases etc to keep it alive or just small marine rated equip?

I used to take a largish peli case with a Canon 7d and a selection of long lens'. Most of that gear succumbed to mould in the tropics. Now I use Sony a6500 and a smaller selection of lenses, much easier to keep in a good environment. I don't carry the long lens' anymore. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

I'd be curious to know how his French competitors honestly feel about him.... anyone know...?

Ha, ha. Born in Britain is not born in Brittany.

Even Paris born is derided.

Pew...Parisian, merde!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Short summary of the French Live video of today.

 

The issue on Apivia is not the foil itself (like on Linked Out). It is the bottom part of the case, holding the foil as it exits the hull. There is no water ingress either. So it seems that Charlie has to find a way to repair that piece holding the foil at the bottom...

Video link with Romain Attanasio; he is the husband of Sam Davies and he is super happy that she was able to restart, even if it is out of the race. For him and Sam, they had talked about that possibility and they are clearly in the camp of "if you can finish it, even outside the official race, do it!" and admire Isabelle Autissier who did the same thing a long time ago.

On the repairs on boad Pure-Best Western, he has a main sail luff track carrier stuck up the mast, he cannot sail with full main and can only do one reef at the max. He climbed twice the mast to try to fix it to no avail. A short wile ago, he carried his big gennaker in maybe a bit too much wind (trying to contain Clarrise Cremer, chasing him) and his rudder kicked up, the boat rounded up and tacked, and he shredded his big gennaker, so now he is sailing with the small gennaker and one reef. This is why Clarisse passed him. His big genaker is down. It is not clear if he is going to try or be able to fix it. Later on, in the show, we see some of his videos where he is apologizing to the primary school teacher of his son; his videos are watched in the class room and he is saying to much a word that starts with P, and finishes with 'utain'... = putain (literral translation: whore. In English, you would say Fuck. So he says to his son's teacher that he will no longer use the word starting by F and finishg by 'uck'...)

Maxime Sorel, on V&B Mayenne spent 9 hours rebuilding his J2... He patched more than 4 meters of the sail along the leech. On top of that, apparently, he has to climb the mast to latch it at the top. So he had to climb the mast to lower the sail, get it inside to fix it. He will have to put it back on deck, raise it, and climb the mast again to latch it at the head... ANd he has to do it now, before the forecast becomes too hairy to climb the mast.

Also, apparently Louis Burton is also limited to 1 reef in the main.

 

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, littlechay said:

Seems to be a bit of interest in Icebergs and South Georgia. I took this panorama from just inshore of Annenkov Island (IIRC - I could check) on a cracker of a day around 10 years back. The Willis Islands on the left of the photo around to Cape Disappointment on the right. 

I've compressed it a lot down to a height of 1024 px and very wide, but SA won't process it as an image perhaps because the aspect ratio is so great. So if you want a good look at it download the zip file extract the pic and open it in an image viewer, expand to fit the screen in height and scroll around.

This is the coast line off which the iceberg lays. Rarely visited by anybody let alone explored. 

SG_Pano_1.zip

SG_Pano_preview.jpg

If you expect another day like that, and should happen to need crew...

 

 

Thank you for sharing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The French can be pretty flippant about tossing nuclear waste or testing in the pacific - but they’re not stupid.

The Brits testing in Aust desert (with desert people still in place) as knocked back by both the US and Canada and the French really loved the Pacific and southern hemisphere. The US BBQ'd the western Pacific far away from home.

The Brits even tested missiles that would carry nuc in other people's back yards. That red line Maralinga to Broome is distance London to Moscow.

I recall reading that French were pioneers and advocates of proper waste disposal in the early 50's???

5a73e8830d64f8af40cc6e762fb0c6e1.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

My head just exploded. Copy pasting whole articles incl pics in large font is PIA.

Think of people here using small devices. It being thread drift worse.

Brief description and link copy ONLY please - NOT both

 

Sorry Jack, I only do SA with my Sumsung phone and Huey's post displayed fine. I rather enjoyed reading it, admittedly a bit of a thread drift, but interesting. Likely would have skipped over a link, so thank you Huey for posting it. That being said, please do not quote his post. That is what I personally find annoying. Several reposts of one rather lengthy post.

So not to piss anyone off, peace!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, wanted to note how cool this race is to have so many different potential podium finishers at this stage.

20201215_163550.thumb.jpg.001860f8dba8866a588cdb8d35d32fb1.jpg

And still such a long way to go...

Edit, while Charal is in the passing lane, but what's up with Kojiro?

20201215_164159.jpg.a57f598ecaf474967f7c6e155725c29c.jpg

Charal made a negative VMG drive north earlier. Hopefully Kojiro is doing the same.

 

Oh ya.. way to go Sam. Real courage to get back on the saddle and ride. +1 for your cause, courage and dedication.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vendée Globe, Armel Tripon's logbook: "Feel this desolation" of the southern seas

ByAFP,published on 12/15/2020 at 2:03 PM , updated to 15:14

Photo of Armel Tripon provided on December 15, 2020 by the French skipper while he sails in southern waters aboard "L'Occitane", during the Vendée Globe

Photo of Armel Tripon provided on December 15, 2020 by the French skipper while he sails in southern waters aboard "L'Occitane", during the Vendée Globe

 

afp.com/Armel TRIPON

At sea - "Alone in the southern world": Armel Tripon sails in the dreaded and formidable southern seas, a "landscape of desolation" which gives him "a flavor that is difficult to explain", as he tells AFP in his journal of on board the Vendée Globe.

The 45-year-old sailor from Nantes, who is taking part in his first solo round-the-world tour, is one of the 33 skippers to have started on November 8. At the helm of a very latest generation boat capable of " flying ", he occupies 14th place on Tuesday. 

 

" Alone in the southern world 

"After 35 days of racing aboard + L'Occitane en Provence +, I went 400 km north of the Kerguelen Islands, southern French land since 1893! With the nose and beard of the English. Yes, James Cook has arrived there one year after our navigator Yves Joseph de Kerguelen who landed there in 1776!  

It's amazing to put into perspective their blind navigation, in these lands so wild, so inhospitable, where there are only birds to live there serenely and travel miles and miles, going upwind with an intelligence and incredible energy saving and fascinating to watch. 

 

And our flight, our rush to the East, as quickly as possible, always looking in the rear-view mirror twice a day at least to scrutinize the depressions that will potentially catch us cold! 

I am sailing at 47 ° South, surrounded by birds, clouds and the sea. That night I went out to change sails, it was daylight at 1 am, somewhat unsettling!  

The cold was so piercing that my hands had difficulty finding their usual uses. It took me 50 minutes when a few days before I put 30!  

So I find myself in this sumptuous setting with these shades of gray that make you confuse the horizon (with) the sea, there is only the swell and its breaking white foam at the top to stand out from the picture!  

It is 1:00 am, I am alone on the deck of my boat, in the dawn of a late southern night and I smile at the life that led me to be here, to call out to the albatrosses who are laughing well of my strange flying boat which only knows how to be pushed by the wind, and accelerate in spurts, when a wave wants to push it.  

Alone at sea, alone in my strategic choices, in my maneuvers, alone in my frenzied racing nights, alone in my meals, alone and confined in 4m2, alone but happy with a chosen destiny, with a choice of free life as were those intrepid sailors. 

Our adventure is more marked out, better known and without surprises from the land and our theoretical knowledge of the terrain that I conscientiously prepared before my race. But to live it alone is a whole different story, to experience this race is incredible and to feel this desolation, this landscape which is not made to linger, has a flavor that is difficult to explain; I measure the intensity and beauty every day. " 

Interview by Sabine COLPART 

p.s. write a book plz!

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Nixon said:

He'd have to use the outrigges on the side for that Tuna! Hopefully Herman has integrated the drag for the trolling into the polars...

I think he needed the help of Boris. What happened in the video, is censored. Not sure how they were able to clean up the blood everywhere on their decks. I guess they shared fish meat between 5 skippers. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, Varan said:

If you expect another day like that, and should happen to need crew...

 

 

Thank you for sharing. 

Your welcome. The problem is that to get a day like that you have to suffer quite a few fresh days! That particular trip was about 6 weeks duration out of Stanley. We were acting as safety vessel for a kayak circumnavigation. They had the best weather imaginable, it was just incredibly good, and I think they only lost about four days due to weather and one or two of those where because they couldn't launch off the beach to surf. On the way back to Stanley we had  30 knots or so with one six hour period of around 50 knots so all in all not bad. 

So yes... Those days are not too uncommon, but usually they only the days between LPs coming through .. so I guess you could say 1:5 or something like that. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Your welcome. The problem is that to get a day like that you have to suffer quite a few fresh days! That particular trip was about 6 weeks duration out of Stanley. We were acting as safety vessel for a kayak circumnavigation. They had the best weather imaginable, it was just incredibly good, and I think they only lost about four days due to weather and one or two of those where because they couldn't launch off the beach to surf. On the way back to Stanley we had  30 knots or so with one six hour period of around 50 knots so all in all not bad. 

So yes... Those days are not too uncommon, but usually they only the days between LPs coming through .. so I guess you could say 1:5 or something like that. 

you need to write a book, or do a video, or a podcast - share more of your seriously amazing stories, thanks for sharing bits here

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, troll99 said:

Vendée Globe, Armel Tripon's logbook: "Feel this desolation" of the southern seas

ByAFP,published on 12/15/2020 at 2:03 PM , updated to 15:14

Photo of Armel Tripon provided on December 15, 2020 by the French skipper while he sails in southern waters aboard "L'Occitane", during the Vendée Globe

Photo of Armel Tripon provided on December 15, 2020 by the French skipper while he sails in southern waters aboard "L'Occitane", during the Vendée Globe

 

afp.com/Armel TRIPON

At sea - "Alone in the southern world": Armel Tripon sails in the dreaded and formidable southern seas, a "landscape of desolation" which gives him "a flavor that is difficult to explain", as he tells AFP in his journal of on board the Vendée Globe.

The 45-year-old sailor from Nantes, who is taking part in his first solo round-the-world tour, is one of the 33 skippers to have started on November 8. At the helm of a very latest generation boat capable of " flying ", he occupies 14th place on Tuesday. 

 

" Alone in the southern world 

"After 35 days of racing aboard + L'Occitane en Provence +, I went 400 km north of the Kerguelen Islands, southern French land since 1893! With the nose and beard of the English. Yes, James Cook has arrived there one year after our navigator Yves Joseph de Kerguelen who landed there in 1776!  

It's amazing to put into perspective their blind navigation, in these lands so wild, so inhospitable, where there are only birds to live there serenely and travel miles and miles, going upwind with an intelligence and incredible energy saving and fascinating to watch. 

 

And our flight, our rush to the East, as quickly as possible, always looking in the rear-view mirror twice a day at least to scrutinize the depressions that will potentially catch us cold! 

I am sailing at 47 ° South, surrounded by birds, clouds and the sea. That night I went out to change sails, it was daylight at 1 am, somewhat unsettling!  

The cold was so piercing that my hands had difficulty finding their usual uses. It took me 50 minutes when a few days before I put 30!  

So I find myself in this sumptuous setting with these shades of gray that make you confuse the horizon (with) the sea, there is only the swell and its breaking white foam at the top to stand out from the picture!  

It is 1:00 am, I am alone on the deck of my boat, in the dawn of a late southern night and I smile at the life that led me to be here, to call out to the albatrosses who are laughing well of my strange flying boat which only knows how to be pushed by the wind, and accelerate in spurts, when a wave wants to push it.  

Alone at sea, alone in my strategic choices, in my maneuvers, alone in my frenzied racing nights, alone in my meals, alone and confined in 4m2, alone but happy with a chosen destiny, with a choice of free life as were those intrepid sailors. 

Our adventure is more marked out, better known and without surprises from the land and our theoretical knowledge of the terrain that I conscientiously prepared before my race. But to live it alone is a whole different story, to experience this race is incredible and to feel this desolation, this landscape which is not made to linger, has a flavor that is difficult to explain; I measure the intensity and beauty every day. " 

Interview by Sabine COLPART 

p.s. write a book plz!

Did he sneak some LSD on board? And what's with the black eye? Personal fight club?

 

^^^blue font

 

I love this guy.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, littlechay said:

Your welcome. The problem is that to get a day like that you have to suffer quite a few fresh days! That particular trip was about 6 weeks duration out of Stanley. We were acting as safety vessel for a kayak circumnavigation. They had the best weather imaginable, it was just incredibly good, and I think they only lost about four days due to weather and one or two of those where because they couldn't launch off the beach to surf. On the way back to Stanley we had  30 knots or so with one six hour period of around 50 knots so all in all not bad. 

So yes... Those days are not too uncommon, but usually they only the days between LPs coming through .. so I guess you could say 1:5 or something like that. 

'luxury adventure', cool.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, CARBONINIT said:

No, he is not that. Stop trying to compare. French are far superior at this ocean sailing. The French invest at an early stage ie school kids in dinghies and progress through the ranks. The Brits think it's still for the few who do not know how to deliver or sail.    

Ist it Stamm Swiss? Am I wrong?!

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, remenich said:

Yes. A legend, but not so lucky in the VG.

If I'm not mistaking, now on Pangea of Mike Horn (the explorer).

Very tough vessel ;)

pangea.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Rocky said:

Yannick leading now on the tracker. On the former Safran of Morgan Lagraviere in 2016.

 image.png.ed2c43f6ec111b138598e3250a3ae35b.png

Maitre Coq team manager Anne Combier was in yesterday Pos Report podcast (https://www.tipandshaft.com/podcasts/posreport/episode7-franck-cammas-anne-combier/)

 

She insisted that When Bestaven purchased the boat early 2019, they decided to do a very limited optimisation (nothing on foils in particular) and focus on reliability and time at sea. They entered every possible race and built the miles. Bestaven started the race with 100% confidence in the boat and his own abilities. This was driven by the memory of the 2008 VG, when Bestaven dismasted very early in the race.

She also talked about the redress and how the process works. They were asked by the international jury to estimate the time they should get. She said there is not only the time spent rerouting and during the rescue, but also the time spet repairing a couple of small things that broke in the rescue manoeuvers, and finally the time when the skippers that participated took to recover mentally. They estimate that Bestaven was not sailing 100% during th two days after the rescue. They will not criticise the jury decision, and it is believed there is no possibility of challenging it anyway. She has also confirmed decision should be announced today. Both her and Frank Cammas said that the time bonus will likely not come into play until quite late in the race in terms of strategy, probably in the last week or so.

Finally Anne Combier praised Whatsapp and how easy it is to use it to talk with the skippers. They have different groups depending on what needs to be discussed. The skippers just use the boat wifi. Some of them use their personal phones, some of them use a boat phone, and sometimes both.

 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, DVV said:

If I'm not mistaking, now on Pangea of Mike Horn (the explorer).

Very tough vessel ;)

pangea.jpeg

Mike sailed the Pangaea from Japan to Nome, Alaska in the fall of 2019, immediately following an unsuccessful attempt to summit K2. In Nome, he met up with Norwegian explorer Barge Ousland, the first person to ski alone to the North Pole, and the first to cross Antarctica alone and unsupported.  In December 2019, Horn and Ousland completed the first ever full crossing of the Arctic Ocean via the North Pole from Alaska to Norway. The trip took 87 days, 57 of which were spent in total darkness.  A documentary film of their trip, consisting mostly of an interview with Ousland, interspersed with photographs and film clips taken during the preparation for and during the expedition, , titled "barge Ousland - North Pole Winter Expedition", was an entry and award winner in the Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival, which was held virtually in November 2020. I purchased a package to see all the films and this  particular film was truly mind-boggling; a stark depiction of an adventure fraught with challenges that almost caused them to abort the trip on a couple of occasions. The problems they encountered included the rapidly shifting sea ice, and the thinness of the ice, due to climate change, causing Ousland to break through while on skis, into the water. His credits his intense pre trip training including anticipating such an event, in the cold waters off Norway, as well as his experience as a cold water diver, for saving his life and enabling him to get out of the water and into a tent to warm up. One of the most interesting scenes was Horn showing what they had to do every day in their tents. Due to the extreme cold, frost quickly covered the interior of the tent, the sleeping bags, and their clothes. They literally had to brush off the frost from all the surfaces, otherwise everything would become soaked and stay that way.  The original plan was to be picked up by the Pangea on the Norwegian side because there was open water beyond the ice. However, the men experienced severe food shortages because of the delays due to the moving sea ice pushing them away from the Pole, and also, Mike was concerned about potential damage to Pangaea from the ice, so a larger boat that could go further north into the ice  picked them up. 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, DVV said:

If I'm not mistaking, now on Pangea of Mike Horn (the explorer).

Very tough vessel ;)

pangea.jpeg

Version 2 of Amyr Klinks Parattii II. This one had a lot of problems early on due to cutting too many corners and budget. Stamm would not have been impressed with it early on :) 

Amyr Klink

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, yl75 said:

like ? " the hull damage was too serious anyway", or something else ? In fact I still think the rudder story and fishing gear happened, but then why not release some footage, after having been totally transparent on the hull structure issues ?

Just my  2pcs. now is the time of Claim adjusters and Surveyors, better keep HB's cards close to their chest ;)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yannick has 84 days of food, so he won't hunger even though this vendee is not going to break the last record of 74 days. (the leaders are 6 days late on armel 4 years ago)

Thompson with his 67 days of food would have had a hard time. But again, maybe it was just "intox" (lies, to psychologically impact the concurrents).

Source : T&S podcast

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, despacio avenue said:

Mike sailed the Pangaea from Japan to Nome, Alaska in the fall of 2019, immediately following an unsuccessful attempt to summit K2. In Nome, he met up with Norwegian explorer Barge Ousland, the first person to ski alone to the North Pole, and the first to cross Antarctica alone and unsupported.  In December 2019, Horn and Ousland completed the first ever full crossing of the Arctic Ocean via the North Pole from Alaska to Norway. The trip took 87 days, 57 of which were spent in total darkness.  A documentary film of their trip, consisting mostly of an interview with Ousland, interspersed with photographs and film clips taken during the preparation for and during the expedition, , titled "barge Ousland - North Pole Winter Expedition", was an entry and award winner in the Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival, which was held virtually in November 2020. I purchased a package to see all the films and this  particular film was truly mind-boggling; a stark depiction of an adventure fraught with challenges that almost caused them to abort the trip on a couple of occasions. The problems they encountered included the rapidly shifting sea ice, and the thinness of the ice, due to climate change, causing Ousland to break through while on skis, into the water. His credits his intense pre trip training including anticipating such an event, in the cold waters off Norway, as well as his experience as a cold water diver, for saving his life and enabling him to get out of the water and into a tent to warm up. One of the most interesting scenes was Horn showing what they had to do every day in their tents. Due to the extreme cold, frost quickly covered the interior of the tent, the sleeping bags, and their clothes. They literally had to brush off the frost from all the surfaces, otherwise everything would become soaked and stay that way.  The original plan was to be picked up by the Pangea on the Norwegian side because there was open water beyond the ice. However, the men experienced severe food shortages because of the delays due to the moving sea ice pushing them away from the Pole, and also, Mike was concerned about potential damage to Pangaea from the ice, so a larger boat that could go further north into the ice  picked them up. 

 

 I saw the footage of the boat picking them up, it was amazing

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Maitre Coq team manager Anne Combier was in yesterday Pos Report podcast (https://www.tipandshaft.com/podcasts/posreport/episode7-franck-cammas-anne-combier/)

 

She insisted that When Bestaven purchased the boat early 2019, they decided to do a very limited optimisation (nothing on foils in particular) and focus on reliability and time at sea. They entered every possible race and built the miles. Bestaven started the race with 100% confidence in the boat and his own abilities. This was driven by the memory of the 2008 VG, when Bestaven dismasted very early in the race.

She also talked about the redress and how the process works. They were asked by the international jury to estimate the time they should get. She said there is not only the time spent rerouting and during the rescue, but also the time spet repairing a couple of small things that broke in the rescue manoeuvers, and finally the time when the skippers that participated took to recover mentally. They estimate that Bestaven was not sailing 100% during th two days after the rescue. They will not criticise the jury decision, and it is believed there is no possibility of challenging it anyway. She has also confirmed decision should be announced today. Both her and Frank Cammas said that the time bonus will likely not come into play until quite late in the race in terms of strategy, probably in the last week or so.

Finally Anne Combier praised Whatsapp and how easy it is to use it to talk with the skippers. They have different groups depending on what needs to be discussed. The skippers just use the boat wifi. Some of them use their personal phones, some of them use a boat phone, and sometimes both.

 

Every skippers were impacted mentally by what happened, not only thoses who participate to the rescue, to be honest, but yes he deserves a good Time compensation

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, littlechay said:

Version 2 of Amyr Klinks Parattii II. This one had a lot of problems early on due to cutting too many corners and budget. Stamm would not have been impressed with it early on :)

Amyr Klink

Very interesting. You mean Pangea had problems or Paratii II?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rocky said:

Yannick leading now on the tracker. On the former Safran of Morgan Lagraviere in 2016.

 image.png.ed2c43f6ec111b138598e3250a3ae35b.png

So sad Safran choose stupidly Morgan Lagraviere rather than Charles Caudrelier for its Vendée Globe project, because they think he was too old, he was 40 years old.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, DVV said:

Very interesting. You mean Pangea had problems or Paratii II?

I was referring to Pangea.... Never heard too many bad stories about Paratii II .. Usually very competently crewed and equipped; capable of fixing just about everything. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, CARBONINIT said:

Go and look at the names on the Vendee Trophy any britsin 1st?  Go and look at the Jules Verne Trophy any brits in 1st?  Thompson's record? he will go down in the all-time top group of offshore shorthanded, KIN ELL, GET REAL yeah as sinking and not finishing or hitting an island.   The boats are breaking due to compression failure and rudders dropping off. Nuf said. 

There have been no non-french winners of the Vendee Globe, Alex and Ellen have both had 2nd place on the water finishes, Alex's with a damaged boat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21075/time-compensations-to-skippers-involved-in-the-rescue-of-kevin-escoffier

Quote

Regarding Boris Herrmann (SeaExplorer - Yacht Club de Monaco): "The majority international jury gives redress to MON10 as follows: the finish time of MON10 will be the time at which it finishes minus 6 hours".

Regarding Yannick Bestaven (Maître CoQ IV): "The majority international jury gives redress to FRA 17 as follows: the finish time of FRA17 will be the time at which he finishes minus 10hrs 15mins".

Regarding Jean le Cam (Yes We Cam!): "The majority international jury gives redress to FRA01 as follows: FRA01's finish time will be the time at which he finishes minus 16hrs 15mins".

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yannick is in the lead now so add his 10 hours and 15 minutes and that puts him a fair way ahead.! Given he is in good nick with his boat and the 2 new boats wounded this put's him up there. WOW. What a race. So Yannick is effectively around 11 hours ahead of Thomas and around 19 hours ahead of Charlie. 

Jean Le Cam gets 16 hours and 15 minutes at 15 knots puts him 240NM ahead of where he is now just for numbers sake. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bestaven being in the actual lead, and having a time allowance, to boot, due to helping saving a competitor, must be a great feeling.
How the f***k did I end up here.. must be his thinking.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Bestaven being in the actual lead, and having a time allowance, to boot, due to helping saving a competitor, must be a great feeling.
How the f***k did I end up here.. must be his thinking.

He declared before the race he was aiming at the Top 5, so he had good confidence in his boat and abilities.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aiming 5 and being actual in the lead with what happened before is a different thing. Bet he is smiling now. Life feels good.
His last VG was 3 cycles before and cut short.

All 3 in the lead are deserving it. No lucky breaks, but endurance sailing ability.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Did I hear it right that Dalin made a chock and inserted it from outside hanging on a halyard ? With 30 transitions from hull to hanging on trapeze style... that will sap energy.
(source VG live)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.tipandshaft.com/vendee-globe/guillaume-verdier/

Interview with Guillaume Verdier, i would have liked his insights on the scow l'Occitane as well and wonder what's Switchback project looks like.

 

Tip and Shaft :The two boats that your firm has designed for the 2020 Vendée Globe, Apivia and LinkedOut, are currently in the lead, we imagine you are satisfied?

Guillaume Verdier: Yes, it's always satisfying to have your boats in the lead rather than behind. Now, it's a very complex race, with so many hazards that you have to remain measured. Overall, they're going slowly compared to previous editions, it's not related to the boats, but to the conditions: they all got stuck in St. Helena and they had some particular weather in the South. According to Team New Zealand's forecaster, there is a seasonal weather shift of almost three weeks: summer in the Deep South is just settling in, they arrived too early! That's why we're seeing these constant fronts and erratic zones passing, the more stable flow is setting in for the boats behind.

 

Tip and Shaft : How do you explain the fact that there is little difference between the new foilers and those of the previous generation, or even with the daggerboard boats?

Guillaume Verdier : You have to know that before the arrival of the foils, the progress deltas every four years were around 0.05 knots; now they are 2-2.5 knots, so the difference is significant. Afterwards, the foils cannot be used all the time, it is clear that there are very difficult conditions in which they do not work. So we can't say that the foils are useless: the new boats are often ahead of the others, they have a throttle button which allows them to have a huge speed gain for upwind and crosswind. And this is still going to progress a lot, we are experiencing an architectural turning point that will last maybe ten years.

 

Tip and Shaft : Thomas Ruyant broke his port foil, can you tell us how you talked to him and his team to find a solution?

Guillaume Verdier: Exchanges are very factual: we ask them what is damaged and send us pictures to determine what can be repaired. There, we found that the fibre was not broken and that the foil had peeled through, so we did some calculations to determine the strength of the two half-thicknesses, that's why we asked him to cut his foil. The aim was to reduce the stress, to prevent the foil from breaking between the bearings, which can lead to water ingress. In principle, even if we see it in use, he can still use half the potential of his foil. Sam Davies's damage was different, with fractured bulkheads on the keel well; in this case, we are trying to give him a view of the structural integrity of the vessel and the level of risk in relation to its condition. We soon saw that it was too dangerous to continue.

 

Tip and Shaft : Let's talk about what happened to PRB, which you had designed with VPLP, how do you analyse this unprecedented breakage?

Guillaume Verdier : I was inevitably surprised. After that, we need to put things in context: it's a boat that was designed in 2009, a sistership of Safran (now MACSF), which was then no longer monitored and which, what's more, had a long history of damage. Architects installed the foils [Juan Kouyoumdjian's firm, although he was indeed involved in the installation of the foils, "designed the geometry"...]. but was not involved "in the design, calculations or monitoring of the hull structures", as he told us, editor's note] and I have no idea what reinforcements were added at that time. It is not for lack of having asked for the plans and calculation reports, which I did not get until the day after the breakage. For me, it's not necessarily good that there is no tracking of a boat from A to Z. Afterwards, you can't impose it if the skipper decides to work with others.

 

Tip and shaft : What other lessons can be learned?

Guillaume Verdier: I think that at the very least, before launching certain boats on such a perilous circumnavigation of the world, we should ask the teams to bend them on a test bench to see if they resist and thus be sure that they won't break at sea. This is what is done, for example, in the America's Cup, but also for planes, on which lives can be committed. You have to understand that when it bent, it was probably already broken, because it is very often the result of a succession of progressive damages.

 

Tip and Shaft : Now let's talk about the Cup: the first training regattas started on Wednesday, are there already some indications about the performances of the various teams?

Guillaume Verdier : Everyone is happy to train against each other, but as far as the lessons we learn from them, I have to kick in. What is certain is that everyone is progressing. The lessons we learned from the previous editions are that we must avoid being too confident, we lost the America's Cup like that in San Francisco, we haven't forgotten that.

 

Tip and Shaft : You told us a year ago that the AC75s were the most complex boats you had worked on, what are the key elements of performance?

Guillaume Verdier : The problem with these boats is that the rules dictate that we have to have stability at rest, so they need a sufficiently wide waterline. If there were no rules, we would surely have a hull close to the central hull of a trimaran, but which would be absolutely unstable. So we are navigating in this compromise, everyone has tried to find the best solution to develop an aerodynamic object that is at the same time easy to take off, well in the air and that generates the least possible drag when it is immersed. Ease of manoeuvring is also an important criterion, and this is linked to the organisation in the cockpit. In fact, we see quite different things: at Luna Rossa, two people share the helm, while at others, the helmsman changes sides.

 

Tip and Shaft : Let's finish with the firm's other projects: where do you stand on the future Imoca of The Ocean Race?

Guillaume Verdier : We have two projects in progress: firstly the two 11th Hour Racing boats, the old Hugo Boss on which new foils have been put, and the new one, currently under construction at MerConcept. Secondly, I would like to finish Switchback, which is on a break [the project, led by Daryl Wislang, was interrupted following the withdrawal of the sponsor, editor's note]. The boat is for sale, I hope there will be a sequel, because it is the most accomplished architecture that has been designed to date on this type of boat. As for 11th Hour, the design budgets were higher than usual, which allowed us to work more in detail, notably in the aero and on the ergonomics. It's frustrating to have stopped at nine-tenths of the plans made. We are also working a lot on the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild, thinking about new parts: foils, mechanical systems, rudders...

 

Tip and Shaft : You have also designed the new Pogo40 under construction at the Structures yard, what specifications did you define?

Guillaume Verdier : There's no point in doing the same thing as it was done! So we tried to take a substantial step forward, we really dug into the subject, we spent a lot of hours on it, it was undoubtedly quite disproportionate for this kind of project, quite modest financially. I hope it will work!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, huey 2 said:

A68_14th-Dec-v2-736x488.png

Mapping experts at British Antarctic Survey are tracking the route of the iceberg from satellite.

Nice find on A86A. Grandma is moving a lot quicker than I thought possible. And depending how much is under water,  it could collide with South Georgia itself. As sea depth is 40 meters up to 1 NM from the SW part of the island.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Weather update

Big picture in pic 1 with MSLP and accumulated rain. Cold front coming in from the west, see the blue line. Moving at 25 KTs east. HPs to the north of the fleet. Two tropical cyclones top right, no impact for the VG expected.

Routing succeeded only for JLC, but the top-3 routings were invalid for no apparent reason. Bumpy ride projected for JLC to the virtual WP, which is actually very nice for these latitudes. 

Pic 3 has the Windy Regadata GFS routings with wind and waves and polars from www.greatcircle.be. ECMWF and GFS agree on a smaller scale. Situation for the coming days will be hard to catch in the models. Lighter patches of wind expected Friday to the LP moving closer from their north to the top-3 boats. These could stall them. 

 

 

Big pc 161220.jpg

JLC 161220.png

routing top-4 GFS 161220.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks again Herman. Dateline issue?

Could be, but the weather routing plugin has crashed lately very often. And also probably a dateline issue, as the AEZ line disappears east of 180 East. I just update the plugins and restarted OpenCPN, but to no avail. I'll have a look tomorrow if I can find time. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, steinbrenner said:

16 hours and 15 minutes for JLC sounds reasonable when around 11 hours on station plus pick up and drop off times when not disadvantaged by dropping out of weather system.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, littlechay said:

Version 2 of Amyr Klinks Parattii II. This one had a lot of problems early on due to cutting too many corners and budget. Stamm would not have been impressed with it early on :)

Amyr Klink

Do you know anything else about this, by any chance?

French court seizes Swiss explorer's sailboat (2013)

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, sunol said:

Yannick in the lead outright plus the time from the Jury. The Coq will be hard to beat.

Phrasing!

... but yeah, Yannick is really sending it the past little while.  Still, I wouldn't count any un-hatched chickens just yet.  Quite a few strong showings have dropped back when issues arise.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Laurent said:

Short summary of the French Live video of today.

A short wile ago, he carried his big gennaker in maybe a bit too much wind (trying to contain Clarrise Cremer, chasing him) and his rudder kicked up, the boat rounded up and tacked, and he shredded his big gennaker, so now he is sailing with the small gennaker and one reef. This is why Clarisse passed him. His big genaker is down.

Typical. B)

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The most personality on Apivia since the start of the race. 

His interview on today's Live is pretty good: 

(Starts at around 12 minutes if the time link doesn't work)

Link to post
Share on other sites