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8 hours ago, cortosam said:

So sad Safran choose stupidly Morgan Lagraviere rather than Charles Caudrelier for its Vendée Globe project, because they think he was too old, he was 40 years old.

How do you know this? I did read in a recent interview after Kevin's rescue that, when asked, Charles said he was unlikely to do the VG as he would be 45 for the next edition. 

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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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16 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

How do you know this? I did read in a recent interview after Kevin's rescue that, when asked, Charles said he was unlikely to do the VG as he would be 45 for the next edition. 

It is common knowledge he was part of the Safran skipper selection back then.

Actually he didn't say he will be too old, he said he would be too old got a winning project, but he could envoy it more as an adventure.

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4 hours ago, stief said:

Worked well--even the missus was wowed. Thanks for sharing.

Speaking of uncommon great light for pics, Herrmann agrees.

https://youtu.be/BHvYbLvKy_U?t=2

 

Does that get you some relief from nagging ..."get off that computer and stop watching that damned stupid race"?

I love those evenings at sea looking for the green flash.

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It looks like Clarisse, Romain and Armel will be getting some very helpful winds in the next few days, the leaders not so much as they appear to be headed for a wide patch of light winds. Of cause we have to assume the forecasts are correct.

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If I understood him correctly he is essentially adrift trying to figure out a fix with a low coming. Not a good position to be in. He didn't sound as if there was an obvious fix at present. 

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1 minute ago, Cwinsor said:

If I understood him correctly he is essentially adrift trying to figure out a fix with a low coming. Not a good position to be in. He didn't sound as if there was an obvious fix at present. 

Yes, that's exactly it...

Don't know how you can really repair something like that sufficiently to go on... chances are high he'll be diverting to safe harbor

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13 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Yes, that's exactly it...

Don't know how you can really repair something like that sufficiently to go on... chances are high he'll be diverting to safe harbor

And of top of that, he says in the video that both his autopilots are out of service... So he is heaving to, with a LP system coming in...

Looking at the video, I believe it is the center pad, between both rods going to each rudder that broke off. Right? So he has lost both rudders...

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Charlie Dalin was interviewed during the French daily video.

Nothing very new from what already said about his repair. At 18:45 in the video below, you can see him preparing his repair.

So his first reaction when the breakage occurred was to think that it was game over. He was already wondering which port in Australia he would reach...

But then, with the advice of his shore team, he got the geometry of the part to build sent t him. Then he cut 2 carbon fiber plates to the dimensions, and created a composite part with some foam core. He then had to lower himself to the lower entrance point of the foil in the hull, from the outside, hanging from an halyard; as stated earlier. But he had to do that a multitude of times, to go back and forth with the part he built to adjust the geometry and grind off some areas.

He is now back on track, doing 20 knots, at the time of the video; but he does not say if he is truly back to 100% capability...

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, littlechay said:

Does that get you some relief from nagging ..."get off that computer and stop watching that damned stupid race"?

I love those evenings at sea looking for the green flash.

Did you hack my laptop's microphone??? That's almost exactly what she said and says! :lol:

(speaking of the green flash, will miss the happy hour ritual of catching it through the binoculars down in Costa Rica this year)

[edit] ouch--sorry to hear of the troubles for Ruyant and Destremau

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

It is common knowledge he was part of the Safran skipper selection back then.

Actually he didn't say he will be too old, he said he would be too old got a winning project, but he could envoy it more as an adventure.

I did not know that (he was part of the Safran skipper selection). Thanks. I am a Charles fan going back to his Figaro days and the first VOR DongFeng participated in. He seems to be pretty happy with the current Project with MDR he's been involved in with Frank Cammas, news waiting to restart the Jules Verne. 

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Funny video by Romain Attanasio, doing some "product placement" for his sponsors.

He is presenting the whole boat as a bedroom from a Best Western Hotel, with kingsize bed, office space with computer so the kids can play video game, kitchen with espresso machine, and simple bathroom... (the bucket) He also "promotes" the use of Pure cleaning products, (his other main sponsor), totally safe for the enviroment, and even recommend to "oil yourself" with some honey from "Famille Marie" (his former main sponsor) after the shower... And icing on the cake, the 180° sea view from the patio...

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/fr/actualites/21079/visite-guidee-de-la-chambre-avec-vue-best-western

 

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1 hour ago, ant1 said:

Big damage to the rudder system for Sebatien Destremeau, the rudder articulation system broke off at the attachment point (the upper metal plate in the video)...

 

Is that rust on it? 

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58 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Yah it doesn't look good

On tracker playback, 18:23 first round up, then slow, then final round up at 20:00. So, has been having troubles for 3 hrs before sked time. Water in the hold

"Newsflash // In the early evening of French time, Thomas Rettant noticed that the front hold of his LinkedOut was filled with water. He immediately stopped the boat and caped himself head to wind."

 

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Thomas Ruyant noticed that the front compartment of the boat was flooded. He is currently running the pumps and once the boat is dry, he will carry on a ful inspection.

 

Source : Jacques Guyader, journalist for Ouest-France

  https://twitter.com/JacquesGuyader/status/1339329468847026176?s=20

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1 hour ago, ant1 said:

Yes, that's exactly it...

Don't know how you can really repair something like that sufficiently to go on... chances are high he'll be diverting to safe harbor

1 hour ago, Laurent said:

And of top of that, he says in the video that both his autopilots are out of service... So he is heaving to, with a LP system coming in...

Looking at the video, I believe it is the center pad, between both rods going to each rudder that broke off. Right? So he has lost both rudders...

It'll be hard to head for a safe harbour without at least one rudder.  Probably difficult to even heave to!  I don't know how these guys manage to stay so calm in situations like this.

With luck the worst of the low will pass south of him.

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11 minutes ago, The Tug said:

Prob have to wait a bit for conformation,but certainly wrong course and slow speed.

Official confirmation of water in the boat (en français) https://www.vendeeglobe.org/fr/actualites/21082/linkedout-de-l-eau-dans-la-soute-avant 

Translated it says he found water in the forward compartment, stopped the boat to run pumps, living compartment is dry but he doesn't know the source yet.

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17 minutes ago, stief said:

On tracker playback, 18:23 first round up, then slow, then final round up at 20:00. So, has been having troubles for 3 hrs before sked time. Water in the hold

"Newsflash // In the early evening of French time, Thomas Rettant noticed that the front hold of his LinkedOut was filled with water. He immediately stopped the boat and caped himself head to wind."

 

 

This seems to be more of a race of attrition than the last go around.  

I was going to post that the lead boats ought to be gybing very soon to stay ahead of the lighter winds in the low pressure front following them.  But not so for Ryuant apparently. As an aside, people have to stop crashing their boats into each other, so that I can spend more time suck on this race and this thread! You should see the Olson 25 I just looked at that got run over by a Jeanneau 53.  Literally crushed.

Anyway, Maitre Coq still posting the best numbers.  But, it's all going to go pear shaped near Macquarie Island.

Fingers crossed for Thomas.

Vendee20.JPG

Vendeesum.JPG

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19 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

is seems to be more of a race of attrition than the last go around.

After spending most of the last day reading about the 1998 race . . . *that* was attrition.  Too many to list just now, but if the link works, many listed in Chapter 4 in Derek Lundy's book

Hope all is well with all. Hate to watch any attrition. Would rather be studying weather routing. ;) 

edit--I notice you set the waypoint at the date line, and no comment about Jeanneau being FR

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Don’t forget last time around... Ruyant had to nurse a broken bow to NZ. He’s really struggled to put this impressive campaign together, minimal funding, took the hull/deck to France and finished it with a small team. 
 

For his sake, even if his VG is over, I hope he’s able to nurse the boat to shore and preserve the asset. Unlike the old guys throwing darts from financial security, it ain’t worth losing a boat over. 

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2 minutes ago, troll99 said:

behind watertight bulkhead?

EN news has it too now. Sounds like it's under control

Quote

This evening (French time) Thomas Ruyant, who is lying in second place in the Vendée Globe, has slowed his boat to a near halt after discovering that the front bow compartment of his IMOCA LinkedOut was filling with water.
Shortly before 2100hrs TU he has engaged both his main pumps to drain this usually watertight compartment. The bulkhead doors are closed and so the main living space on the boat is not affected.
As soon as the water is fully evacuated Ruyant will make a complete examination of the boat to make a definitive diagnosis of the problem.

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21083/linkedout-has-taken-water-into-bow-compartment

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4 minutes ago, SCARECROW said:

weather guys...

Is Yannick going to manage to stay in front of the glass out forming under NZ?  If he does it'll become his race to loose because no-one else will.

Herman and Hitch would know best. Will be close. He'll have to hunt a lucky bridge, avoid the ice fence, and hope those in the pursuing pack don't ride the following low right up his stern. And if the views can see past the date line ;) 

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7 minutes ago, SCARECROW said:

weather guys...

Is Yannick going to manage to stay in front of the glass out forming under NZ?  If he does it'll become his race to loose because no-one else will.

He'll consistently be in one or two more knots pressure than the closest boats behind him. But that could well change.  From MacQaurie to the dateline is all looking to be lighter air high pressure sailing 

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56 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

 

 I don't know how these guys manage to stay so calm in situations like this.

 

what's he going to do, lose his shit? he doesn't have the luxury.

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40 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

This seems to be more of a race of attrition than the last go around.  

I was going to post that the lead boats ought to be gybing very soon to stay ahead of the lighter winds in the low pressure front following them.  But not so for Ryuant apparently. As an aside, people have to stop crashing their boats into each other, so that I can spend more time suck on this race and this thread! You should see the Olson 25 I just looked at that got run over by a Jeanneau 53.  Literally crushed.

Anyway, Maitre Coq still posting the best numbers.  But, it's all going to go pear shaped near Macquarie Island.

Fingers crossed for Thomas.

Vendee20.JPG

Vendeesum.JPG

Gutted for Thomas. After he sacrificed a big chunk of his port foil, he had done an impressive job of hanging onto Apivia. I recall alot of broken keels and rigs in previous editions.  But, I don't recall as many structural issues with the bows. Sounds like the slamming loads have gone up exponentially. 

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slamming is bad enough on a non-foiler, I've wondered myself how the boat deals with it numerous times. the slamming on the foilers must get pretty fk'd up.

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On sleds there's usually a little wiggle room to ease the slam. On the TP52  there have been a few instances where you don't have any other  options and the driver has to just send it into the back of the wave ahead. I can only imagine it gets much worse on foilers.

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3 hours ago, littlechay said:

Does that get you some relief from nagging ..."get off that computer and stop watching that damned stupid race"?

 

2 hours ago, stief said:

Did you hack my laptop's microphone??? That's almost exactly what she said and says! :lol:

Well, perhaps I don't spend as much time as others do here (who knows?), just this morning I still managed hastily to switch to a porn site just in time before she caught me...

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1 hour ago, 3to1 said:

slamming is bad enough on a non-foiler, I've wondered myself how the boat deals with it numerous times. the slamming on the foilers must get pretty fk'd up.

Did you see that early video of Sam on the edge of that storm a few days after the start?  She looked very uncomfortable as the boat slammed.  Someone commented on that at the time.  Not at all like someone who'd been around the globe a few times. 

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Drill through the axis and the plate a put a pin through it. Problem is it will never be as strong if you could TIG weld it back together. But, that's unlikely to happen there 

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5 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

How do you know this? I did read in a recent interview after Kevin's rescue that, when asked, Charles said he was unlikely to do the VG as he would be 45 for the next edition. 

There was a long interview on tip and shaft podcast when he talked about his sailing carreer, and the fact Morgan Lagraviere was chosen rather than him, because François Gabart just happened to win the Vendée, and Safran told him he was too old.

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Just now, Tom O'Keefe said:

Drill through the axis and the plate a put a pin through it. Problem is it will never be as strong if you could TIG weld it back together. But, that's unlikely to happen there 

I was thinking like to do a job under the hull and make a few rivets over a sheet piece that is flexible enough and is covered with some sealant. So you can repair epoxy inside the hull. It will not be pretty but why not?

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6 hours ago, troll99 said:

ok, Im relieved!

i have no idea how he will repair it if water will continue to come in. It will be interesting to watch.

Flex Seal GIFs | Tenor

LOL! Reminded me of 10 days ago when my frozen pipe burst, got the main water supply turned off and slapped on some Flex Tape to stop the dripping until I could get a plumber there!

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VG EN has it now. Hatch failure

Quote

Ruyant 'My Two Hatches Had Opened But I Thought History Was Repeating Itself'

Back on course after a scare which required him to stop his LinkedOut last night Thomas Ruyant explained this morning that his bow compartment filled up in less than 30 minutes because his hatches had been forced open by the water pressure. 

He was stopped for several hours and reported this morning, "The two front hatch latches opened because of the waves. At the time I was sailing at over 25 knots. The boat filled up in 30 minutes while I was asleep. I really believed history repeating itself! "

Recall that at almost the same point in the race, on December 18, 2016, between Tasmania and New Zealand, Ruyant's Le Souffle du Nord Pour le Projet Imagine nearly broke in half and Ruyant had to nurse his broken boat to New Zealand. 

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21092/ruyant-my-two-hatches-had-opened-but-i-thought-history-was-repeating-itself

Nothing on Destremau?

Edited by stief
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From Ruyant's official Facebook page:

Quote
La mauvaise blague !
C’est un bien mauvais coup que le sort a joué la nuit dernière à Thomas Ruyant. Alors que vers 21 heures le skipper de LinkedOut s’offrait une petite sieste, il sentit brutalement son voilier « partir au tas », piquer du nez dans les vagues de manière incontrôlable. Se précipitant aux écoutes, Thomas réalisa très vite que quelque chose d’anormal se passait à l’avant de son bateau. Il trouva avec consternation la soute avant complètement remplie d’eau. Craignant le pire, il entreprit immédiatement d’arrêter son bateau, travers à la route, et de mettre en action ses deux pompes du bord.
Peu après minuit, il annonçait à son équipe à terre être en mesure de reprendre prudemment sa route, sous grand-voile et J3, tout en poursuivant l’assèchement des compartiments avant.
Plusieurs heures plus tard, ayant repris confiance dans le bon comportement du monocoque, il pouvait livrer un premier diagnostic : « Les deux loquets avant de la trappe se sont ouverts sous l’effet des vagues. Je marchais alors à plus de 25 noeuds. Le bateau s’est rempli en 30 minutes pendant que je dormais. J’ai vraiment cru que l’histoire se répétait ! »
On se souvient en effet qu’à quasiment ce même point de la course, un 18 décembre 2016, entre la Tasmanie et la Nouvelle-Zélande, Le Souffle du Nord pour Le Projet Imagine se désintégrait littéralement.

What a bad joke!

IT was a bit of a blow that fate played last night on Thomas Ruyant. Whilst the skipper was enjoying a nap around 21.00, he suddenly felt his boat broaching and with a nose down trim into the waves. Whilst he rushed to the sheets, Thomas quickly realised that something was wrong at the bow of the boat. He was very surprised to see that the forward compartment fully flooded. Fearing for the worse, he immediatly stopeed the boat and turn the two pumps on.

Shortly after midday, he told his shoreteam that he was able to slowly start racing again, with the main and J3 up, whilst still working on drying the forward compartment.

Several hours later, when he was fully confident in the boat behaviour again, he was able to deliver a first diagnostic: "The two latches on the forward hatch came open due to the action of the waves. I was sailing at more than 25 knots. The bow got full in 30 minutes whilst I was sleeping. I really thought history was repeating itself !"

We can all remember that on the 18/12/2016, Ruyant's boat Le Souffle du Nord broke in half very much in the same area, between Tasmania and New Zealand.

 

 

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15 hours ago, stief said:

Minor funny note: A few minutes ago Dalin's Twitter feed had a clickbait title "After being attacked by pirates in the Indian Ocean, Charlie's Instagram page is back up".

The tweet is now gone. 

15 hrs later it's back 

 

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Sebastien Destremeau was able to install a Tiller on his rudders, to control the boat, he worked on it all night, managed to connect his two rudders together and install a new autopilot ram, he needs to finalize the installation and will then be able to make way slowly.

There aren't a lot of details

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/fr/actualites/21091/merci-tout-juste-manoeuvrant

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2 minutes ago, staysail said:

Yes and it will be good if he gets a new boat with PRB.

I think the MD of PRB has already come out and said that they are too small a company to fund a full new boat campaign. I don't know whether that means they won't buy an older boat for the next edition though.

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4 minutes ago, Snowden said:

I think the MD of PRB has already come out and said that they are too small a company to fund a full new boat campaign. I don't know whether that means they won't buy an older boat for the next edition though.

What he said is that they want to go with Kevin for 2024 with a competitive boat, but will need to find a partner sponsor.

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4 minutes ago, Snowden said:

I think the MD of PRB has already come out and said that they are too small a company to fund a full new boat campaign. I don't know whether that means they won't buy an older boat for the next edition though.

Either would be good. Hard to imagine a Vendee Globe without a PRB, and Kevin does a good PR job as well as being a top sailor.

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Bit of a history lesson from Sail-World :

"...the Pacific, while generally considered to offer longer, rolling swells to surf - as compared to the disorderly Indian - it is still strewn with pitfalls despite its name given by Magellan exactly 500 years ago. The Portuguese navigator who was heading to Indonesia found the sailing conditions peaceful, hence the name he gave it."

And after 40 days, JLC is still kicking it. Masterful sailing with a somewhat historic boat. Yes We Cam!

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

Still mulling the unintended consequences of the safety seals. KE points out that the fear of the penalty for breaking the seal meant he (they) put the grab bag down low and taped it. Good to see the RC quickly removed that handicap in the rules.

Definitely an unintended consequence - the rules were put in place so people wouldn't use grab bags as stack weight and like all safety equipment, remain in situ at a location a skipper can locate regardless of boat orientation. Removing the rule lets skippers place it at will but there's still potential for unintended consequences - and rules can only address the contingencies people think of (informed by experience and estimation).

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You can always think of an edge case where the location of the grab bag is less than optimal. Say the skipper puts it by the liferaft required to be aft of the companionway hatch - oops the boat breaks apart ahead of the keel box & the aft of the boat sinks and the skipper is hanging on to the bow section that's afloat. I just don't think there's a need to overpolice this one - let whom he/she has to live with the decision make the decision. 

 

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1 hour ago, furler49 said:

Thought this was quite cool - Ian Lipinski talk's about the SCOW bow and how he thinks it's the way forward... 

https://www.theracearound.com/post/let-s-open-the-debate-ian-lipinski-talk-s-scow-bows-and-the-vendée-globe

"Let's open the debate" Ian Lipinski talk's SCOW Bows and the Vendée Globe

 
230899_8dee4597ae544d128c1cd8446e31a06f~mv2.webp
 
 

When one of the most accomplished Mini6.50 and Class40 sailors gives their opinion on the state of play within IMOCA, well, we listen! Ian Lipinski, speaks to Emmanuel Versace about his views on traditional IMOCAs, the latest generation of foilers and the constraints imposed by IMOCA on the maximum bow volume.

 

It is safe to say that Ian Lipinski is a fan of a “Scow” designed boat. It is a familiar type of boat to him and one he’s won races and broken records on. According to him, these voluminous bows could also be the solution to (finally?) reducing the exponential cost associated to the research and development of foils whilst also increasing reliability and reducing the risks associated to striking UFOs!

 

“I’m currently in Thomas Ruyant’s (LinkedOUT) boat yard and I’m so happy with the race he’s racing! He’s about to pass the place in which his race came to an end in 2016. I’m also in admiration of guys like Benjamin Dutreux (OMIA-Water Family) and Damien Seguin (APICIL). I think it's great that they're rookies, racing at the forefront, with older generation boats.

 

At the front, Yannick Bestaven (Maître CoQ), Thomas and Charlie Dalin (Apivia) remain well grouped. Material damage will remain an important element in major races such as the Vendée Globe. The slightest problem immediately reshuffles the cards! I was seriously impressed with how little time in took Charlie Dalin to repair his broken port foil system. Let’s see if the repair holds but it seemed like a good and incredibly efficient fix!

 

Let’s open the debate

 

We can see the limits of these new, large and latest generation foilers in these big solo races. The average speeds have been relatively low, that said I think they’re going as fast as they can! It difficult for them to go any faster. The question is, is it the violence and discomfort of being onboard or the fear of the catastrophic damage that limits the speeds we’re seeing, we won’t have an answer to that question for a while yet.

 

I am quite convinced that under the conditions currently seen by the Vendée Globe fleet, and even without foils, a “scow” type boat would be hugely competitive. I’m thinking particularly of the boats from David Raison (the designer of Class40 #158 Crédit Mutuel, editor’s note) and Samuel Manuard, the designer of L’Occitane en Provence skippered by Armel Tripon.

230899_096214e061cf46f3b63b8477ac7a47ba~mv2.webp
 
 

I think we should open the debate on limiting bow volumes within IMOCA. I think it would be interesting to really open up the possibilities – after all it is a Class born out of continual innovation. The conversation could also bring about solutions to reduce costs. It would increase the reliability by reducing the complexity of parts like foils, their manufacturing and design costs. It would also decrease the likelihood of a collision with an ‘UFO’ in our ever more polluted oceans!

 

600,000 € for a pair of foils

 

While it is hard to compare Armel’s speed with those leading the front of the fleet, Armel proved earlier in the season that his boat was quick, perhaps even considerably faster than others. He’s very quick at the moment and I think life on board for him probably remains much simpler too. The scow concept is limited to certain constraints, but you can imagine going much further than we have before with the IMOCA60. It’s surely an interesting avenue to explore.

 

Today we see historic Vendée Globe sponsors such as PRB, who according to what they say, are struggling to finance new projects like they always have. It’s too bad!

 

It is true that the technological race is hugely exciting but when you see the cost of the foils, and the big teams that replace them once, twice, or even three times before for the start of the Vendée Globe before hitting or breaking them less than one month in, at €600,000 a pair the maths and unsustainability of it becomes pretty clear, pretty quickly.

230899_f2bf029b19254f66b200f4e9b9e7bbf9~mv2.webp
 
 

Since discovering the ‘scow’, one thing is sure, performance levels increase substantially quicker than the financial ask made to a sponsor. In this Vendée Globe, when we see the boats of Benjamin Dutreux (OMIA - Water Family), Damien Seguin (APICIL) or Jean Le Cam (Yes We Cam!) performing so well, posting big averages and exceeding all expectations let’s imagine what they could have done with a ‘scow’…

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Vendée Globe. Charlie Dalin: "I thought it was over ..."

Reading: 4 minutes.

Charlie Dalin spent Tuesday repairing the low hold of his port foil. Now third, 150 miles from the first two, the skipper of “Apivia” is back in the race. And no question of giving up ...

Videoon board - Charlie DALIN | APIVIA - 16.12

“It was a hard working day aboard Apivia. When the damage happened, it was a shock and a huge disappointment because the first thing I said to myself was that it was over, that I couldn't continue like this. It was a difficult moment to see this damage, ”said Charlie Dalin on Tuesday morning, joined by the Vendée Globe CP.

 

"My team mobilized in" Apollo 13 ""

After discovering that the foil system was broken, it took him a while and contact with his technical team to take matters into his own hands. “My team mobilized in“ Apollo 13 ”mode. They have the list of equipment I have on board, they offered me a solution to repair.