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2 hours ago, stief said:

Boris using 88% polar; 140% wind speed of model, and more about his routing options. 

 

140% windspeed!  For route planning purposes I often route at 110% to 120% for pacific races.  He must be seeing some noticeable difference in the strip charts.

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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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4 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

140% windspeed!  For route planning purposes I often route at 110% to 120% for pacific races.  He must be seeing some noticeable difference in the strip charts.

indeed. it would be interesting to see how the 140% of grib and 88% of bsp interact with each other - if the foils get increasingly less efficient with seastate you would expect the performance to drop off more up the wind range.

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1 hour ago, tama_manu said:

Pip's boat Medallia is Stamm's from 2000, and she just passed Hugo Boss from 2008.  She has shaken off Ellen Mac Arthur's 2000 boat too.  I'm sure the preparation of these older boats is more important than the pedigree, as I can distantly relate having a boat around the same age, but that chart from upthread is amusing.

No doubt PH is doing a great job for her own race, but we should remember the routing is so much better, sails are so much better - boats also carry less weight in consumables now. The freeze dried is better, the watermaker more efficient, and thus less diesel in the whole energy budget. 

If we stepped abroad a fairly normal IRC 1/2 boat that’s well prepped in 2020, you’ll find advances made in the last 15 years that used to be theoretical or achievable by a select few. 

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1 minute ago, Hitchhiker said:

140% windspeed!  For route planning purposes I often route at 110% to 120% for pacific races.  He must be seeing some noticeable difference in the strip charts.

Ah. Wondered about that. Didn't seem close enough for the 'denser air down there' to be in play, especially since the flow is from the north, so not sure why he uses 140%. On my little lake, I just take the km/hr forecasts and plan for it to be in knots. ;) 

btw--is he being unusually open about his routing? With so many chances to be wrong, I'm not surprised so many navs keep quiet about their calls. Yoann seems awfully bold in his predictions too. 

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2 minutes ago, Snowden said:

indeed. it would be interesting to see how the 140% of grib and 88% of bsp interact with each other - if the foils get increasingly less efficient with seastate you would expect the performance to drop off more up the wind range.

Good point.  Also, note he capped max windspeed at 36 knots.  I capped it at 40 knots.

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"And why be stubborn? And why go back? And why jostle everybody to go back as fast as possible, to join the other riders, to continue as if we weren't disqualified. And why? For nothing? No for everything... for the loyalty to one's life choices, for the tribute to those who believed in it, who financed, built, worked, dreamed with me. For the principle of not giving up. For the happiness of continuing to fight or play in the seas of the Great South. For the honour of the captains who never abandon their ships. For, at last, that life goes on, full, dense, sometimes bitter, sometimes caressing. And then, finally, so that one day I can bring my boat back to Les Sables-d'Olonne, as planned, quite simply. "Isabelle Autissier.

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And from Ch 12 of The God Forsaken Sea . . . 

Quote

It seemed odd to realize that after all the years Autissier had been racing alone around the world, the newcomer Chabaud turned out to be the first woman to succeed in doing it nonstop and without assistance. Her place in the elite single-handers’ club, alongside Autissier, was secure. She had sailed the race with a combination of tenacity and a kind of gracefulness that, so the media said, only a woman could bring to the whole enterprise. She was tough when she had to be—managing her boat in the Southern Ocean and bringing it through, slowly to be sure—but she had realistically evaluated her abilities and stayed within them with a steady and hard-eyed determination.

Chabaud’s romanticism also struck a chord with the public. The French responded warmly to her recognition of Moitessier (who had died just two years before the race) as a source of technical advice and inspiration, as well as her fancy that her accompanying albatross, Bernard, was a reincarnation of Moitessier, the perfect symbol of freedom and the wilderness, watching over her. Her evocation of him resonated in a country for whom he symbolized the charismatic and courageous outsider—the quintessential lone sailor. He had always been present in the story she herself was living, she said. Through him, she was brought to the great questions about life that only solitude allows a person to truly contemplate. Like the prime minister’s claim of moral significance for Auguin’s victory, this was serious and heady stuff. It confirmed what everyone believed about the Vendée Globe: it was far more than a harsh, manly bash around the world in the roaring forties. The vivacious, attractive, forthright woman seemed to embody so much of the essential meaning of single-handed sailing in the Great South.

“This is happiness!” she said as she stepped ashore for the first time in 140 days. “My race was a good one, but very hard. I have a few regrets: I never did actually see an iceberg; I wasn’t able to keep talking to Isabelle by fax or to Pete by radio. But Cape Horn! It was truly beautiful. The light was glorious. By then, I’d been in the Southern Ocean for sixty days. I had the feeling that it would never end. Finally, I really wanted the race to be over, to get off the boat. It lasted about a month too long for me.”

(I'll save the anti-romanticism of Pete Goss for later)

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1 minute ago, stief said:

And from Ch 12 of The God Forsaken Sea . . . 

(I'll save the anti-romanticism of Pete Goss for later)

wasn't it Goss whose keel box leaked all the way round and ultimately the keel fell off in the car park when they lifted the boat afterwards? can't blame him for not being too romantic in that situation!

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35 minutes ago, stief said:

"In January, @JeanLecam will be made an officer in the order of maritime merit. Jacques Caraës, race director, and Christophe Gaumont, president of the race committee, will become knights. Announcement made today by the Minister @AnnickGirardi. #VG2020"

https://twitter.com/CapVG20/status/1341142280745398277?s=20

 

How "old school".  The guys who fill up the chairs (Loius XV I supect) and do the money side get knighthoods and the actual sailor gets a handshake.

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Just now, Snowden said:

wasn't it Goss whose keel box leaked all the way round and ultimately the keel fell off in the car park when they lifted the boat afterwards? can't blame him for not being too romantic in that situation!

Not sure. Will watch for that.I was thinking of his rescue of Dinelli

Quote

Dinelli was too cold. He knew he couldn’t survive until a ship got to him. Everyone involved in the rescue knew that, too. No ship was dispatched. Goss was Dinelli’s only hope—his ferry away from death.

It took Goss the rest of that day and until midnight the next night to get to the general area of Dinelli’s Mayday. He was, after all, still beating to windward into the teeth of a strong gale (force 9 on the Beaufort scale), with big seas left over from the storm system. He searched for Dinelli’s life raft for the rest of the night, but the Mayday position fix kept jumping, a quarter mile or so every two hours. [. . . ]

When Dinelli first saw Goss’s boat, he thought it must be de Radiguès; he thought it very unlikely that Goss could make it back to be his rescuer. The pickup went like clockwork; it was clinical, Goss said. He beat to windward of the raft, then turned downwind and ran toward it. Two boat-lengths away, he rounded up into the wind again. He backed his little storm jib and drifted down beside the raft, the boat rolling violently but creating a slightly calmer lee for the raft, smoothing the transfer. Stricken though he was, Dinelli came aboard Aqua Quorum with professional panache. He handed up his emergency beacons to Goss so they wouldn’t keep transmitting Maydays. Then, to Goss’s astonishment, and in a quintessential Gallic gesture, Dinelli handed him a bottle of champagne. He’d managed to hang on to it through everything, in a pocket of his survival suit. Goss hauled him aboard.

Dinelli’s coolness masked his desperate condition.

“I got him onto the boat,” Goss said, “and we were rolling violently and I thought, All right, I’ll leave him there, he’s fine, and put the storm jib about, and get the boat going downwind, and I can come back to him.”

But when Goss let go of Dinelli, the French sailor fell flat on his face, almost breaking his nose. He was as stiff as a board and could barely move by himself. Then Goss realized how far gone Dinelli was. He rolled him over onto his back. “And all you could see was his eyes,” Goss said. “And it was just . . . the emotion in the pair of eyes was just amazing, really. He was trying to say ‘Thank you, thank you’; he couldn’t really talk. He was very cold.”

And the two men hugged each other.

As he was telling me this, Goss paused for a few seconds, staring out Aqua Quorum’s hatch at the tarred and barnacled Southampton dock nearby. Six months afterward, the emotion of the moment of rescue—when he returned Dinelli’s life to him—was still strong.

Goss dragged Dinelli to the shelter of his cockpit spray hood and propped him on a little seat. He got the jib trimmed and turned the boat downwind under autopilot. Dinelli was so stiff that Goss had trouble bending his arms and legs to angle him in through the small companionway hatch and into the cabin. He stripped off Dinelli’s sodden survival suit and got him into his own thermal suit and then into his sleeping bag. He radioed the Australian plane and asked them to tell Dinelli’s family that he would survive and that he could handle the situation—not that there was a lot they could do anyway.

“Raphaël is on board,” Goss told them. “He is very cold and happy. He has no injuries. I have just given him a cup of tea. I have all his ARGOS on board. Cheers.”

In an exchange of national stereotypes, Goss replied to Dinelli’s gift of champagne with his now-famous English cup of tea. It was a cyclist’s bottle, to be precise—warm, very sugary tea that Dinelli could suck up through the nipple on the bottle. It was important to get his core body temperature up again.

And then, I was absolutely knackered,” said Goss. “Oh, completely shagged, and I thought, Great, I need an hour’s sleep, and I’ll get back to it.” But Dinelli was high on the adrenaline rush of his own, unexpected survival. He wouldn’t shut up.

“He was bloody rabbiting away,” said Goss.

“Poor Pete,” Dinelli said. “He had to look after me during the day, and then I kept him up all night talking.”

 

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Yohann Richomme routes Yannick to the Horn He boldly goes where no router has gone before. No CC, no transcript, so no comment, other than he uses Saliou's squid/windy for an intro before switching to Adrena, and has trouble with zoom.

 

Its a long video so I did a summarized (not literal and lively) transcription/translation of the first part of the video, the Yannick and Jean routing part

(0:10 to 1:20)

Hello, welcome, I'm on vacation in the mountains, my routing software just crashed... and its back, sorry we're recording this a little of the fly tonight, we'll look at the weather, there are interesting situations today, as usual we'll analyze the leaders race, up to the horn this time, and then we'll look at the weather for Clarisse, and will then take your questions

(1:35 to  2:26)

Looking at he weather situation today, they are getting close to a HP that's turning this way, the ice limit is in white underneath that blocks them from going south where they would be happy to go despite the ice, they could take a shorter route with less winds, rather than skirting the ice limits which complicates things

(2:35 to 5:12)

We can see that the hunters are approximately in the same system in a HP, and we can see Armel Tripon that will be caught up by this LP which will give him a good wind angle without to much seas as we've seen recently that in front of LPs is where the sea is flat and therefore where its fast....
So I've prepared a little routing for Maitre Coque...(computer problems)... we can see Yannick continuing to navigate to the south of the HP, which is very stretched out, he'll be chased by the HP's bubble which will stay with him, at some point I think he'll be caught by the bubble, right here he's just in front of it, a little by magic, its going to be complicated for him anyways... and now we're the 28th a little further, he'll get a LP that will allow him to o a little faster because he will have pretty light and complicated week.. and then it will be the approach to the horn with a tightening corridor, we should see this starting next week.. so yeah now its poetry its a little to far in the future, with a very big LP anticipated for the next week, but all this is pretty delicate.

(5:15 to 6:40)

We can now look at other routings, notably Jean Le Cam's, we can see the differences, like the maneuvers Yannick will have to do, whereas Jean's route is relatively simple, nothing dramatic, Jean benefits from the wind behind the HP, a north north westerly, he won't be able to break through, he'll have to live with its speed, maybe even see his competitors come back from behind because they will have more wind behind Jean... we can imagine that the competitors that are here or here will get more wind for a couple of days and come back on him.

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2 hours ago, ant1 said:
2 hours ago, SCARECROW said:

Yep.  Especially if as stated above he's heading to Western Australia, where the government is hanging their hat on building covid walls.

But isn't Qld eastern australia ? Maybe western australia health officials are more discerning than their eastern counterparts...

Yes the fellow running WA is very discerning.

On current Covid record he will discern "no entry" and towed back more than 3 miles offshore beyond the State coastal/Australian waters boundary. Then Australian finishing at 12 miles then International beyond that.

Once done that turnip will ring the Navy.

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50 minutes ago, stief said:

Not sure. Will watch for that.I was thinking of his rescue of Dinelli

"Then, to Goss’s astonishment, and in a quintessential Gallic gesture, Dinelli handed him a bottle of champagne. "

" Goss replied to Dinelli’s gift of champagne with his now-famous English cup of tea. "

Easily the most memorable bit of Godforsaken Sea.

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9 hours ago, stief said:

Herrmann uses Béyou's comments to compare his setup and JLC's. Backs up what Cape and Nick Bice were saying about the difference a few degrees would make on this leg of the course.

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21172/message-from-boris-herrmann

I found Nick Bice, whose voice and accent always make me smile, and Ryan’s conversation quite informative. Ryan in particular was pretty candid about was and wasn’t working in the VG race, and why, and a bit cagey about what he would design if given unlimited funds and discretion. 
Other thread drift: amusing talk about the just then cancelled STH. 

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13 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Easily the most memorable bit of Godforsaken Sea.

Couldn't resist. So many good 'uns. 

Quote

For the ex-soldier, there were no allusions to combat in explaining why he was doing this: “I’m not going out to change myself, or dig deeper, or any of that shit.” He simply loved sailing. 

 

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24 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Its a long video so I did a summarized (not literal and lively) transcription/translation of the first part of the video, the Yannick and Jean routing part

(0:10 to 1:20)

Hello, welcome, I'm on vacation in the mountains, my routing software just crashed... and its back, sorry we're recording this a little of the fly tonight, we'll look at the weather, there are interesting situations today, as usual we'll analyze the leaders race, up to the horn this time, and then we'll look at the weather for Clarisse, and will then take your questions

(1:35 to  2:26)

Looking at he weather situation today, they are getting close to a HP that's turning this way, the ice limit is in white underneath that blocks them from going south where they would be happy to go despite the ice, they could take a shorter route with less winds, rather than skirting the ice limits which complicates things

(2:35 to 5:12)

We can see that the hunters are approximately in the same system in a HP, and we can see Armel Tripon that will be caught up by this LP which will give him a good wind angle without to much seas as we've seen recently that in front of LPs is where the sea is flat and therefore where its fast....
So I've prepared a little routing for Maitre Coque...(computer problems)... we can see Yannick continuing to navigate to the south of the HP, which is very stretched out, he'll be chased by the HP's bubble which will stay with him, at some point I think he'll be caught by the bubble, right here he's just in front of it, a little by magic, its going to be complicated for him anyways... and now we're the 28th a little further, he'll get a LP that will allow him to o a little faster because he will have pretty light and complicated week.. and then it will be the approach to the horn with a tightening corridor, we should see this starting next week.. so yeah now its poetry its a little to far in the future, with a very big LP anticipated for the next week, but all this is pretty delicate.

(5:15 to 6:40)

We can now look at other routings, notably Jean Le Cam's, we can see the differences, like the maneuvers Yannick will have to do, whereas Jean's route is relatively simple, nothing dramatic, Jean benefits from the wind behind the HP, a north north westerly, he won't be able to break through, he'll have to live with its speed, maybe even see his competitors come back from behind because they will have more wind behind Jean... we can imagine that the competitors that are here or here will get more wind for a couple of days and come back on him.

Thanks!  My French wasn't quite up to it.   I lost the thread a bit when he was talking (I believe) about Clarisse and a very northerly route possibility.  Or maybe I completely lost the thread.

 

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5 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Thanks!  My French wasn't quite up to it.   I lost the thread when he was talkint (I believe) about Clarisse and a very northerly route possibility.

Yes, I only translated up to 6:40, its interesting after that, he talks about the general layout of the weather systems on the route, the blocking points, where they can hope to gain, he routes clarisse as an example, etc.. but its loooong. I'm sorry, but my brain is really too tired tonight to translate the whole thing

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37 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Yes, I only translated up to 6:40, its interesting after that, he talks about the general layout of the weather systems on the route, the blocking points, where they can hope to gain, he routes clarisse as an example, etc.. but its loooong. I'm sorry, but my brain is really too tired tonight to translate the whole thing

Thanks,  Don't bother for my sake.  I get the gist. 

For some obscure reason, I've been following Clarisse.  

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2 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

For some obscure reason, I've been following Clarisse.  

I’ve been following BP because SMA is a really known quantity & she’s been sailing the smart conservative race 

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2 hours ago, cortosam said:

"And why be stubborn? And why go back? And why jostle everybody to go back as fast as possible, to join the other riders, to continue as if we weren't disqualified. And why? For nothing? No for everything... for the loyalty to one's life choices, for the tribute to those who believed in it, who financed, built, worked, dreamed with me. For the principle of not giving up. For the happiness of continuing to fight or play in the seas of the Great South. For the honour of the captains who never abandon their ships. For, at last, that life goes on, full, dense, sometimes bitter, sometimes caressing. And then, finally, so that one day I can bring my boat back to Les Sables-d'Olonne, as planned, quite simply. "Isabelle Autissier.

Isabelle has a very pragmatic view on most things. I remember her telling me "anybody can sail around the world, but to do it fast and finish takes a very special person". 

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6 hours ago, stief said:

Boris using 88% polar; 140% wind speed of model, and more about his routing options. 

 

The routing/chart software does not look like Expedition, does anyone know what software he is using?

That is a great insight into an IMOCA routing software and his comments!

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10 minutes ago, Chucky said:

The routing/chart software does not look like Expedition, does anyone know what software he is using?

That is a great insight into an IMOCA routing software and his comments!

He's running Adrena.  I think you will find that nearly all of the French teams use Adrena.  Hmm, maybe nearly all of the Imocas come to think of it.  Anyone know what AT was using?

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1 hour ago, Hitchhiker said:

He's running Adrena.  I think you will find that nearly all of the French teams use Adrena.  Hmm, maybe nearly all of the Imocas come to think of it.  Anyone know what AT was using?

Expedition and Adrena follow the Anglo/Continental divide except VG/IMOCA 100%. Maybe Conrad being a Kiwi and Rich Wilson American last edition used Exp, but I doubt it. 

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Found this on a German site:

 https://segelreporter.com/regatta/vendee-globe-studenten-meister-dutreux-mischt-auf-13-jahre-altem-imoca-vorne-mit-portraet/?fbclid=IwAR13zOei5Sl71ztnNgiwM7QYsQIPOIHQ-p2ikG5SaKUPsPqHK5nmgxOsB2I

Vendée Globe: "Student champion" Dutreux in top group with old IMOCA - Portrait

Young Rookie on Old Racer

18.12.2020 by Michael Kunst

Benjamin Dutreux has been sailing his old non-foiler OMIA/Water Family at the Vendée Globe for the past 14 days almost on par with Boris Herrmann. What kind of guy is he?

The other day, on the edge of the Vendée Globe. For lack of open pubs, the (self-proclaimed) very best ocean sailors of this planet, training world champions and born all-rounders meet at aperitif time on the IMOCA jetty of La Base in Lorient. There, where now there is a yawning emptiness, because most of the 60-foot racers with their skippers are currently sailing through the Indian and Southern Oceans.

Bravely behind the mask the news about the top ten of the regatta are exchanged, last damages on the boats are analyzed from a distance and of course verbally repaired in no time, the sensitivities of the skippers are discussed and smiled at.

There is something to say and to smile about each and every one: Dalin, Ruyant, Bestaven, Herrmann, Joschke, etc. And then someone mentions that this Dutreux has been sailing along on his old box for a long time now - silence in the round. Dutreux? Benjamin? 

Rarely heard of*)

In fact, the only 30-year-old Benjamin Dutreux is rather unknown even among the young, supposed scene connoisseurs. Which may be because he has spent little to no time in the training centers of Lorient or Port la Foret.

Moreover, he has left no scent marks in the minis and has not yet made any mark in Class 40 or IMOCA. Only those who have been following the Figaro scene for years can relate to the name: "That's right, one Dutreux, he used to be fifth in the Solitaire du Figaro, in 2018 or so. But other than that?"

Of course, Benjamin Dutreux has more "up his sleeve" than the all-knowing scene attests to him here. Because the skipper from the north of France - a Sch'ti, which is roughly equivalent to the East Frisians in Germany (German rednecks*) - has chosen a different course than most of his competitors in the current Vendée Globe.

Although born in the north, Benjamin spent his childhood in his grandmother's small cottage on the island of Yeu, 20 km off the French Atlantic coast of the department of Vendée. Living "in the middle of the Atlantic" inevitably exposes you to sailing - and Benjamin was a particularly inquisitive and studious student. Sailing dinghy and beach cat, he was considered a sporty and particularly ambitious sailor. 

Student World Champion

As a student of materials engineering, he participates in the university sailing championships, becomes French, European and world champion of sailing students and makes his first Figaro experiences on old, rocked boats. In 2015, as a 25-year-old, Dutreux finishes (disappointed) 29th in the Solitaire du Figaro.

At first, things went better professionally. Towards the end of his studies, Dutreux received his first tempting offers in the automotive and yacht building industries. 

It was logical that Benjamin Dutreux would remain true to his sport. At the end of his twenties, he was already technical director at the Sirena Voile catamaran shipyard, and as a sideline he threw himself into ocean sailing.

In the meantime he had joined the Figaro circus, the "big names" became aware of him, gave him hints*), lent him equipment and Benjamin sailed his own campaign for three years. What follows is a rise in small steps: in 2016 Dutreux finishes 14th in the Solitaire, in 2017 12th, and in 2018 - surprisingly even for him - fifth.

Committed environmental activist

Digression. In addition to his job and sailing, Dutreux is committed to environmental and marine protection, calls for tougher measures in the fight against climate change and distinguishes himself as a competent activist. Consequently, in 2018 he ended up with the environmental protection association "Water Family," which brings together many companies, groups, cities and departments in France in the fight against environmental pollution, especially water pollution. So unlike some of the other skippers in the Vendée Globe family, Benjamin Dutreux didn't get this sponsor like the "Virgin got the Child*)." 

Speaking of sponsors. In 2018, when France's leading automotive and yacht paint booth manufacturing company OMIA (key words: master of materials engineering) also began to take an interest in the young sailor, Benjamin's dream of participating in the Vendée Globe (the realization of which he had actually only planned for the second half of his life) suddenly came within reach. The budgets of the sponsors were added up and after a few meetings it was clear: financially it should be enough, if not a brand new foiler is built for the campaign. So: Buy a boat yes, but at a ridiculous price.

Finally an affordable IMOCA

So in 2019, Benjamin Dutreux traveled to... Japan! Because in the land of the rising sun, FRA 09 was up for sale - Kojiro Shiraishi's IMOCA, with which the current DMG Mori skipper made it to the gates of the Indian Ocean at the last Vendée Globe in 2016, where he suffered a broken mast.

Benjamin Dutreux examined the boat expertly and came to the conclusion: The IMOCA is perfectly okay, there are only "cosmetic repairs" and additions to be made. The rest is the story of the sometimes hair-raising economic ups and downs of the campaign - until the very end it was not clear whether he would really be able to finance the Vendée Globe and whether Dutreux would actually sail across the Vendée Globe start line.

But perseverance pays off, as we all know. And so it came to pass that one of the youngest participants in the Vendée Globe is currently putting in a performance on one of the oldest, still active IMOCAs.

The young Frenchman has been mixing up the top ten since the beginning of the regatta. Right at the beginning he made his way to the front, in the southern Atlantic he showed slight weaknesses and fell back to 13th place. But since entering the Indian Ocean, again under adverse weather and sea conditions, boat and skipper showed their full potential with consistent top ten finishes up to fifth place. The "old" non-foiler from 2007 had some spectacular head-to-head races with foilers of the newer generation - including Boris Herrmann's "Sea Explorer/Malizia".

Just do it

Benjamin got involved by sailing relatively carefree, without much pressure like a self-confident Figarist "just do it". In the videos from aboard, Dutreux affectionately calls his "OMIA Water Family" "Papa," alluding to the confidence he has in the boat.

Which in turn is not surprising, because the FRA 09 has a lot "under its belt" and has long been considered by (true) specialists to be one of the most robust boats in the class. By the way, no other boat of this Vendée Globe has completed as many nautical miles as the OMIA Water Family. The IMOCA alone has three circumnavigations of the world in its wake!

Launched in Cowes in mid-2007, the Bruce Farr design was considered the ultimate on the IMOCA scene at the time. But it was initially dogged by bad luck. At the Barcelona World Race, Altadill and the American McKee crash into a UFO - two rudder blades broken, abandonment. Sebastien Josse has to cancel the same at "The Transat" a year later because of a defective mainsail. And the chaos continues: capsizing off New Zealand, water ingress at the TJV with Cuzon as skipper - abandonment! 

Maximum penalty: The "most technically mature" boat of that time is now three years old and has not yet finished an ocean race. Then, finally, things start to move forward: In 2010, Roland Jourdain takes the IMOCA under his wing under the name "Veolia" and wins the Route du Rhum. A year later, Thomson and Altadill finish second in the TJV.

And Thomson manages to set the solo transat record (8:22 days). He keeps the "Hugo Boss" and becomes third at the Vendée Globe 2012 and under Spanish flag the IMOCA becomes second at the Barcelona World Race 2015. Shortly after in the hands of the "samurai" Kojiro, result: see above. 

With respect and nonchalance

For more than four weeks now, the boat and skipper have been out-sailing the foil competitors. Together with the non-foilers "Groupe Apicil" of the one-armed Damien Seguin and with "Yes We Cam" of the veteran Jean le Cam, they are developing into a kind of nightmare for all foilers in the class.

And in the middle of it all Benjamin Dutreux, who sails quite carefree and - according to his own statements - with the luck of the class beginner just the way he was taught: With respect for wind and waves, with confidence in the boat and blessed with a nonchalance that one can only envy the young skipper. Keep it up, man and boat!

Translated with https://www.deepl.com/translator
*) corrections / remarks

 

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4 hours ago, Miffy said:

I’ve been following BP because SMA is a really known quantity & she’s been sailing the smart conservative race 

Seemed like she was a little hesitant for the first week, just like Joschke, but now she seems to be enjoying her self and rock steady.  

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19 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Not looking good for Destremeau "ca sent le sapin"

http://www.courseaularge.com/vendee-globe-direction-laustralie-pour-sebastien-destremau.html?fbclid=IwAR3TEPLzvXBcrk09jj34nLt808YRzxddngfCwn3pGnYSKEypw6bnU3wG5r4

His rudder repair is not really working. He needs to rebuils some sort of structure to be able to mound the rudder angle sensor.

He is heading for Australia, and he is already talking about maybe collect some parts and continue outside the race.

Let's just hope he doesn't try and anchor anywhere near an environmentalist and make an effectve repair himself and stay in the race, eh?

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Some time links for today's Live. 

Charlie Dalin (tired) talks about the HP and how he uses the leaders routes to check the models

Jean-Luc Van Den Heede likes Tripon; contrasts the use of What's App with the past sailor-sailor-family comms.

Nándor Fa always ran the routing of the surrounding boats,  

Didac Costa Happy Birthday (via translator), Didac joined JLC for the delivery back story

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Sounds like a worthwhile hour for those who can listen to T&S's latest FR podcast

Quote

For this eighth episode of Pos. Report, the Tip & Shaft podcast dedicated every week to the Vendée Globe, we hear from Sam Manuard , the naval architect who designed L'Occitane , Armel Tripon's Imoca, and Antoine Gautier , MerConcept's research director, who takes care of the Apivia project. 

With the latter, we talk about the repair that Charlie Dalin had to make to the low hold of his starboard foil, just before entering the Pacific, and the three-way fight he is fighting with Yannick Bestaven and Thomas Rettant leading the race. With hours to come that Antoine Gautier perhaps considers crucial if the skipper of Maître CoQmanages to escape.

Sam Manuard talks about the way in which he follows Armel Tripon's "remount", now 14th, and the performance of a boat that was eagerly awaited on this round the world trip. We also discuss the few differences between Imoca with large foils and the others, but also the favorites of our respective guests, especially for the Englis

 

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Gra

2 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Enjoying the little pleasures in life... :D

 

Grain de Sail is going to have to compete with Jean Le Cam now for carrying chocolate under sail?

 

 

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Sounds like a worthwhile hour for those who can listen to T&S's latest FR podcast

Yes, there are some good info, but its so painful to listen to, not engaging at all. I don't know why they are so speed, drop the amphetamines guys... feels like the audio speed has been accelerated (while preserving pitch) and heavily edited to remove any micro breather (like they do for newsflash segments on some FM radio stations). Its like listening to someone reading the phone book as fast as they can, extremely unpleasant... my ears are still bleeding.

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I'm enjoying following the race through this thread -- many thanks to the many contributors, especially those who have taken the time to translate.

In the spirit of "newbies should be silent unless contributing or tits", I don't think this article on Didac Costa's sails has been posted yet. :)

Also, count another supporter of Armel Tripon -- at first I was a fan because our boats have the same designer :lol: but now I also appreciate his personality, going by his videos and posts.

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Nice old tits.

Anyway, HeartofGold contributed more than just a trite opinion, AND linked to something new and useful.

Thought carbon wasn't allowed in IMOCA sails ("Class Rules: G.5  SAIL MATERIAL To obtain a CMC, carbon fibre shall not be used in sails."), but Didac's FR0 and A5 use some carbon.

Didn't know CMC is a "crewed" MC. Learned something new.

Link, + checked the thread + new content? He's OK so far. ;) 

Now, why is carbon not allowed? Comms? Cost? There's got to be a story there . . .

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4 minutes ago, stief said:

He's OK so far. ;) 

Grazie! In the spirit of "not leaving well enough alone", another note: the "YES WE CAM" t-shirt is back in stock on Armor-lux, for those who are interested. Shipping to the US is 25 Euros (as much as the shirt itself) for 1 through 7 t-shirts, but if you order 8, shipping is free. I assume that some portion of the proceeds goes to King Jean, but I'm disinclined to give that much to UPS along the way. Hopefully someone will bring some to a local webstore...

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12 minutes ago, HeartOfGold said:

Grazie! In the spirit of "not leaving well enough alone", another note: the "YES WE CAM" t-shirt is back in stock on Armor-lux, for those who are interested. Shipping to the US is 25 Euros (as much as the shirt itself) for 1 through 7 t-shirts, but if you order 8, shipping is free. I assume that some portion of the proceeds goes to King Jean, but I'm disinclined to give that much to UPS along the way. Hopefully someone will bring some to a local webstore...

Thanks for the literate  link. I wonder if his many sponsors will get the publicity or something in "the order of maritime merit." I hope the big name sponsors who turned him down are deeply regretting the opportunity to ride his train.

JLC is making his move.2058157350_ScreenShot2020-12-22at3_39_52PM.thumb.png.90973d61dfee69bcd384af518bc6f7d1.png

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I know it's just a forecast, but I'm doubtful that the leaders can duck under this high, squashed as they are against the ice limit, in which case we have a massive compression coming up and then a major acceleration.

 

Screen Shot 2020-12-22 at 4.09.05 PM.png

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1 minute ago, TheDragon said:

I know it's just a forecast, but I'm doubtful that the leaders can duck under this high, squashed as they are against the ice limit, in which case we have a massive compression coming up and then a major acceleration.

Agree, it's going to be an interesting 24-48 hours for sure

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1 hour ago, TheDragon said:

I know it's just a forecast, but I'm doubtful that the leaders can duck under this high, squashed as they are against the ice limit, in which case we have a massive compression coming up and then a major acceleration.

Squid sees a split, where the two leaders escape up and over, but the next 4 get hung up for Christmas.1655123279_ScreenShot2020-12-22at5_57_18PM.thumb.png.5929207670ae09875d6edc84364514f7.png

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JLC, thanks to Safari trans

Quote

Jean Le Cam's words Tuesday, December 22:
"
I'm pretty happy to be where I'm actually. No one can pass underneath. The pressure comes rather from above. The conditions are super pleasant. The sea is flat, no water in the cockpit, I even slept very well last night! There is no one in the area, except cute little birds perhaps from Macquarie Island. I turned on the heating, it's good. I will never be able to go around the world without heating. It dries up the equipment, it's nice. Everything is dry, so is the equipment! The ZEA forces us to go north, I prefer as much not to come across icebergs... As a result, the temperature warms up."

 

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Wow. Safari trans really is beta, judging by this news from Didac Costa:D

Quote

Among the most of 30 participants n'hi there is one from Barcelona. It is a tract of Didac Costa, which per segona vegada faces this repte, the first will be 2017. A més, the Dídac Costa tea makes it difficult that he is not a sailing professional. In reality, he is a bomber i through a micro-mecenate has managed to participate-hi amb el vaixell One Ocean, One Planet.

Update of the Dídac Costa race

The great illusion of the Dídac Costa is to finish the prova i, if possible, millorar the classification i the temps of the first seva participation. 2017 will end in the 14th position and will finish 108 dies to complete the volta al món. From betevé periòdicament anirem actualitzant the Barcelona race.

December 22

Dia molt especial per a Dídac Costa. The Barcelona sailor has complert 40 years enmig de la Vendée Globe. Costa es troba in the nineteenth position and is creuant the Australian costs. During the next day I will overcome Leeuwin's Cap

I don't think he is going to die as an amateur in a bomb raid during the Barcelona World Race

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Imagine if they come across one these.

Australian tuna fisherman drag into the Sth Ocean a giant ocean-going fish farm like cages and divers do the fish wrangling, cage repairs and wrestling the sharks out. A school swimming in one direction, the vortex can drag them under.

These structures, full of up to 3000-4000 fish, are then towed at a snail’s pace back over a thousand mile to South Australia, feed on the way and when there, so they double in size and much more in price for sale.

This system of replacing traditional poles, fill up and return to port was started by a penniless sailor from Germany called Hagen Stehr who jumped ship there in early 60's. He is now a wealthy guy.

This a documentary 'Tuna Cowboys' of the guys who do the wrangling. This is the craziest job going in the world. Though catch numbers very regulated unfortunately it doesn't touch on downside of harvesting tuna.

Pretty sure they don't have these things in their UFO avoidance system data base. Image ploughing into one and waking up getting attacked by tuna. 

Full doc but just introduction gives you an idea.

 

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From the weather forecast shown on the tracker, it appears the first 8 or 9 boats may restart the race so its going to be very interesting in the next couple of days once the leading 3 boats get their parking tickets!

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Imagine if they come across one these.

Australian tuna fisherman drag into the Sth Ocean a giant ocean-going fish farm like cages and divers do the fish wrangling, cage repairs and wrestling the sharks out. A school swimming in one direction, the vortex can drag them under.

These structures, full of up to 3000-4000 fish, are then towed at a snail’s pace back over a thousand mile to South Australia, feed on the way and when there, so they double in size and much more in price for sale.

This system of replacing traditional poles, fill up and return to port was started by a penniless sailor from Germany called Hagen Stehr who jumped ship there in early 60's. He is now a wealthy guy.

This a documentary 'Tuna Cowboys' of the guys who do the wrangling. This is the craziest job going in the world. Though catch numbers very regulated unfortunately it doesn't touch on downside of harvesting tuna.

Pretty sure they don't have these things in their UFO avoidance system data base. Image ploughing into one and waking up getting attacked by tuna. 

Full doc but just introduction gives you an idea.

Thanks Jack--much better watching tuna wrestling than troll riding.

An hour well spent: always a good reminder to contrast  the adventurers with those who work on the sea. 

As for the risk to shipping--AIS had better work, or Dinko would be on his radio and have his plane buzzing the sleepy sailor. ;) 

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Dalin: "The weather we have in the Pacific is weird, I feel like I am more sailing a Figaro leg than the Vendée Globe. It is full on racing at the moment. I have got as many square metres of sail up that I can have up. It is really weird. Before the start of the race I was not expecting to be sailing like this at 55 degrees south."

Day 45

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And for us Tripon fans...

Quote

And the best in the South Pacific had been consistently Armel Tripon on L'Occitane in Provence. He posted the best average speed of the fleet today: 446 miles 24 hours compared to just 257 for Thomas Ruyant. "Numbers speak louder than words." Tripon wrote this morning after entering the South Pacific: "To my right, Antarctica, an immense continent that I dream of seeing up close one day, and in front of me, far, very far, Cape Horn! Between us, a gigantic ocean and in front a whole lot of tiny boats I dream of overtaking!" One part of that dream seems sure to come true.

 

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Isa is really quick again.  Fastest 24 hours of the top 10, by far.  She's about to overhaul Damien for 7th.  Shame she had a wobble back under Australia just after getting ahead of Boris and then ended up 150nm behind him.  Clawing it back now though.  

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2 hours ago, stief said:

Thanks Jack--much better watching tuna wrestling than troll riding.

An hour well spent: always a good reminder to contrast  the adventurers with those who work on the sea. 

As for the risk to shipping--AIS had better work, or Dinko would be on his radio and have his plane buzzing the sleepy sailor. ;) 

Not for the first time has Jack revealed something I had no idea existed: tuna wrangling. For someone intimately familiar with commercial fishing in some of the roughest seas in the world, as well as diving around sharks (not in a cage), this work truly is one of the most dangerous I have ever seen. I had to tear myself away from reading "godforsaken Sea" to watch the entire video but it was well worth it. Jaw dropping. I won't touch the subject of the sustainability of the blue fin tuna. But thanks, Jack,  for once again expanding my world of knowledge. I would hope that the pens in addition to the mothership are lit.

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40 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

This postcode is now the mono foiling capital of the world.

Here the 75 footers in Auckland doing 45k+ in 15k of breeze.

Prada Series - Day 1 Race 1 - Luna Rossa v Team NZ

I'm not a big AC fan but this is infectious.

IMG_20201223_140738.jpg

For the second time in an hour, I am astonished. Wow. As an aside, seeing the crowd watching the race on shore in Auckland was, from someone living in a place on lockdown and where masks and SD required in all public places in town, in the largest city in the State which has only 2 ICU beds available, was an alternate reality to see no masks, no SD. Long for those days....

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1 hour ago, despacio avenue said:

 I won't touch the subject of the sustainability of the blue fin tuna. But thanks, Jack,  for once again expanding my world of knowledge. I would hope that the pens in addition to the mothership are lit.

But I will.

How fuking hard is it?  The fish are trapped.  The oceans are fucked because humans keep on inventing new ways to fuck them.

Then they feed them fish raped from some other part of the planet.  It's disgusting and should be banned to save what's left.

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1 hour ago, astro said:
3 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

 I won't touch the subject of the sustainability of the blue fin tuna. But thanks, Jack,  for once again expanding my world of knowledge. I would hope that the pens in addition to the mothership are lit.

But I will.

How fuking hard is it?  The fish are trapped.  The oceans are fucked because humans keep on inventing new ways to fuck them....

"The oceans are fucked because humans keep on inventing new ways to fuck them."

Randumb what about inventing new ways to save them??

My bet is you eat Australian 'Clean Seas' tuna maybe because it is sustainable??

That is Hagen Stehr's company the same company featured in that vid.

6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

This system of replacing traditional poles, fill up and return to port was started by a penniless sailor from Germany called Hagen Stehr who jumped ship there in early 60's.

Stehr took the money he made (and losing a lot of it) ploughed it into the quantum leap of breeding his own bluefin rather than relying on wild stocks.

The feat was recognised by Time magazine, which named it the second-best invention of 2009, behind NASA’s Ares 1 rocket. The “University of the Sunshine Coast" just down the road from you saw fit to bestow upon him an honorary doctorate for his work.

He also has pioneered Yellowtail Kingfish farming where his Arno Bay facility is now one of the biggest hatcheries in the Southern hemisphere.

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23 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

My bet is you eat Australian 'Clean Seas' tuna maybe because it is sustainable??

That is Hagen Stehr's company the same company featured in that vid.

Ask him where he gets the food he feeds them.

The seas of Chile are being raped so that the SA tuna are suspainable?

FUCKING BULLSHIT!

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13 minutes ago, astro said:

Ask him where he gets the food he feeds them.

The seas of Chile are being raped so that the SA tuna are suspainable?

FUCKING BULLSHIT!

This is true.. but the wealthy prefer to eat tuna rather than anchovies and sardines, only the wealthy can save the planet / can afford to save the planet. 

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20 minutes ago, littlechay said:

This is true.. but the wealthy prefer to eat tuna rather than anchovies and sardines, only the wealthy can save the planet / can afford to save the planet. 

bullshit, eight billion hairless monkeys can 'save the planet'; where there's a will, there's a way.

fkn' sucks it appears there's not enough will even as the Mother ship is going down.

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23 minutes ago, littlechay said:

This is true.. but the wealthy prefer to eat tuna rather than anchovies and sardines, only the wealthy can save the planet / can afford to save the planet. 

You mean the wealthy guy who is making millions from stealing tuna from our ocean can save us?

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