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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

Posted Images

Lots of good insight from Barrier, in addition to her delightful Christmas meal of guinea hen and four gras. As well as from Dee and from Nick Maloney. To race a sailboat solo in these conditions  for this length of time is no easy feat. Nick talks about having to be brave and push out fear; Dee discusses the need for communication from others, and the benefit as well as the burden of contemporary communication (with the VG, for sponsors, tram members, sponsors, etc.) and there are myriad formats now: video/selfie, drones, internet, etc. and as she mentions the ability thanks to What’s App to talk/commiserate with your fellow racers. It is both a solitary race and one with many different people providing input. The participants need to have a many abilities to be able to respond  with all the potential issues that can arise and be able to do so without physical in person assistance or face disqualification assuming they wanted /needed help and it was available. 
so it is a real pick me up when a friend or family member calls you on a holiday like Christmas, or had hidden a note or a package in your gear. Spending Christmas at sea is special; spending it alone can be too. In many ways it is just another day but it is always uplifting to be remembered. 

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Great to see Yannick battle Charlie for the lead. Older gen boat vs new. I wonder if Alex would have been better off with his older boat? A battle of tactics at the front makes for a great race and what do you know all of a sudden Jean is back in a podium position chance. 

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46 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

I wonder if Alex would have been better off with his older boat?

his previous boat could have easily won this round (didn't have that ugly pink shit all over the sail plan, either).

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Thomas is looking for a slingshot effect around the LP....?, whilst Yannick and Charlie may get headed...?.meanwhile Jean just keeps being efficient with course changes and clicking of the miles.....the lead pack is constantly jockeying and changing...some from behind a coming in to them but will have to transition some light then the next system starts to push...Jeremie ticking of the countdown numbers.    but there is some energy coming into the weather so things will change once again......like a 3D chess board when you include the weather and icebergs and currents....thanks Kevin for the work and plugin....lots of overlays that may have a clue wrapped in a kernel....the hardest place to get satellite coverage and data.     being in a glider is one thing but the forces of water and air interacting with a shorthanded boat are altogether different especially in the open southern pacific.  So what will the constant juggling and jockeying reveal before the Horn...the weather throws the dice

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Alan Roura has a hydrulic problem on its keel again : https://www.lafabriquesailingteam.ch/fr/blog/avarie-de-quille-a-bord-de-la-fabrique

After he gybed, and when he was lifting the keel, a hydraulix pipe bursted. He has secured the keel in the middle position and is looking into the problem.

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In the daily French version of news; Giancarlo Pedote explained that he climbed the mast 3 times in 48 hours, to repair his wind indicator. FIrst time, he could not get it off, it was too high, higher than his highest halyard. He climbed again, with a purchase system, took the wind indicator down to repair it on deck and climbed back to re-install his repaired wind indicator. It is now working.

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ARMEL TRIPON IS ALREADY THINKING OF ANOTHER VENDÉE GLOBE AND SHARES HIS LOVE FOR HIS BOAT

12/26/2020 
SKIPPER
TRIPON vg2020 20201225 tripon photo3350b high definition vi

If you had the chance to speak to Armel Tripon during this Vendée Globe, you would interact with a man who savored every minute of his first solo round-the-world tour and a skipper bubbling with positive energy and enthusiasm.

We contacted Armel to ask him a few questions as his IMOCA L'Occitane en Provence, designed by Sam Manuard, was still sailing east, 500 miles south of the South Island of New Zealand.

Armel started this race dealing with a halyard jam problem that required him to climb up his mast twice. The delays pushed him away from the leading pack but since then the 45-year-old sailor, originally from Nantes and based in La Trinité-sur-Mer, has made a spectacular comeback.

After clocking up to 24th place, more than 2,000 miles behind the leaders at the entrance to the Deep South, the skipper is now in 14th position, 1,340 miles from the leading group and catches up with Romain Attanasio who is only 160 miles ahead of it.

We started by asking Armel for his opinion on his friend and architect, Sam Manuard, who designed his first IMOCA here, a boat that arouses a lot of interest, as much for its elegance as for its rounded bow, its original foils or even its lightning accelerations.
 

 

B9A3319© Pierre Bouras
His skipper fell in love with it

"My message for Sam?" asks Armel. "This is a maverick, an incredible man and someone able to draw this kind of boat," the he dence. "I think this boat is not far from the perfect boat" he continues, before adding: "I think that we can surely improve some details still and be more precise sometimes but, from my point of view, this boat is really perfect. "

It's a great recognition from a skipper on a race where this is not always the case and where sometimes love-hate relationships develop between sailors and their boats."With the IMOCA rules for next year, we will be able to add a little more mast 'rake' (toggle)and it will be even faster. "

 

 

PIERRE BOURAS 7n4a2362© PIERRE BOURAS

Coming back in four years

It's his first Vendée Globe but Armel already knows it won't be his last. In this edition, he wants to try to catch as many boats as possible but he says he will not be done with the Vendée Globe when he returns to Les Sables d'Olonne.

 

"Of course I'd like to fight with the leaders," to eClare -t it. "I like the Vendée Globe and this kind of race but it will be different if I'm at the forefront. And I will come back with better knowledge, because I lack experience and more miles on this boat. I will be more still confident to push harder. "

We also asked Armel about life on board after 46 days at sea and he says his boat is "cut out for a sailor" (again, that's not what we usually hear about Modern IMOCAs that offer their skippers an uncompromising experience in almost all conditions).

Armel listens to music to relax; he likes rock when the boat is going fast or classical and jazz for the quieter moments and in the light airs. "Music is really important because it stops the noise of the boat and that kind of boat is really loud."

Then he talks about the sheer pleasure of his incredible adventure - sailing alone around the world on one of the fastest monohulls ever built."I really like living this race ... living and enjoying this kind of trip ... and really, at the beginning you don't know how or where you will go ... but the Vendée Globe is just a dream and it becomes a reality day after day, night after night; wow! this is incredible ".

 

Vg2020 20201203 tripon photo2609b low definition vi

 

He also says he doesn't miss his family too much, because he has prepared himself mentally, in a bubble away. Apart from a few moments, the method seems to work. “Sometimes, for sure, I miss them,” he said. "But I was prepared and I knew it was three months without seeing them and I'm not sad."

Finally, for our last question, we told him about his sponsor L'Occitane en Provence, a large Swiss company that has outlets in main streets around the world. And the skipper wished a Merry Christmas to all the staff of the company.

"I am really proud and happy to participate in this race around the world, under the colors of L'Occitane en Provence. The brand is huge all over the world and to be represented by a small boat that goes around the world, it's great, " he concludes.

Interview by Ed Gorman (translated from English)

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Armel has about 250 nm to go before he catches Clarisse.  She has about 500 nm to join the peleton.   Armel is closing on Clarisse by about 10 - 50 nm a day and Clarisse is gaining on the peleton by about the same for the last few days.    The weather looks like it is on their side.

What are their chances?

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12 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Great to see Yannick battle Charlie for the lead. Older gen boat vs new. I wonder if Alex would have been better off with his older boat? A battle of tactics at the front makes for a great race and what do you know all of a sudden Jean is back in a podium position chance. 

I was thinking the same as the old HB would also be further optimised with new foils and using the new foil controls as allowed with the revised OMOCA rules. It was a pity that a VD globe sailor did not buy the old HB boat for this race.

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9 minutes ago, Chucky said:

I was thinking the same as the old HB would also be further optimised with new foils and using the new foil controls as allowed with the revised OMOCA rules. It was a pity that a VD globe sailor did not buy the old HB boat for this race.

I may be remembering wrong here but I think the old HB was sold with a clause specifically stating that it was not to be raced in the 2020 VG.  I think this thread may have been where I read it though, because I can't find any source after 20 minutes of trying on google... So take what I say with a grain of salt!

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Kito de Pavant plays the Grinch with his bah humbug about the Christmas media coming off the boats: :P

Quote

- What is this mania of these sailors to absolutely want to look like earthlings? December 25 becomes the farce of the Vendée Globe. Garlands, Santa Claus costumes, Christmas trees... With the generalization of plush toys on board, it becomes completely ridiculous. We are far from the runners who cut the handle of their toothbrush to gain a few grams!

TBF, he does give kudos as well, especially to Pip, in https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-kito-de-pavant-decerne-les-tops-et-les-flops-de-la-semaine-ecoulee-5dc998c2-4785-11eb-8721-1f932910601f

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11 hours ago, huey 2 said:

Thomas is looking for a slingshot effect around the LP....?, whilst Yannick and Charlie may get headed...?.meanwhile Jean just keeps being efficient with course changes and clicking of the miles.....the lead pack is constantly jockeying and changing...some from behind a coming in to them but will have to transition some light then the next system starts to push...Jeremie ticking of the countdown numbers.    but there is some energy coming into the weather so things will change once again......like a 3D chess board when you include the weather and icebergs and currents....thanks Kevin for the work and plugin....lots of overlays that may have a clue wrapped in a kernel....the hardest place to get satellite coverage and data.     being in a glider is one thing but the forces of water and air interacting with a shorthanded boat are altogether different especially in the open southern pacific.  So what will the constant juggling and jockeying reveal before the Horn...the weather throws the dice

Is he clicking or clacking?

:)

But indeed he is getting closer.

I think Thomas indeed is hoping to get into reaching conditions while the others are bound for some more upwind work, which sucks in these boats.

The biggest gainer is Armel, but it seems these HP systems are going to linger and make for a difficult time for him as well.  

 

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Armel was 2500NM behind at one stage, he is now 1100nm behind. Some of this has been better weather for him. If he can keep gaining he is only 800nm behind the 3-4th place boats Who knows what he can do but so much will depend on his weather vs the leaders. Thomas in better pressure now and could cut the deficit to the leaders with some luck. Jeremie in 30-40 Knots will be interesting to see what he does?

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Recent forecast shows the LP a bigger factor for the first three now. LP movement faster, out running the fleet, and more to SE. Could be trouble for the leaders? The chasing pack would seem to remain in westerly flow, while the leaders continue with NE winds. 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cszh60 yachting rescue that gripped the world

Sporting WitneBritish sailor Pete Goss was taking part in the Vendee Globe single-handed round-the-world yacht race in 1996 when he received a distress call from another participant. French sailor Raphael Dinelli was 160 miles away in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica – but Pete Goss went back through hurricane force winds to rescue him.

Photo: Vendee Globe round-the-world race yacht "Aqua Quorum" carrying rescued French sailor Raphael Dinelli and British sailor Peter Goss off the southern coast of Tasmania 07 January. (Photo credit STR/AFP via Getty Images)

p0926hkt.jpg

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Jeremie Beyou aboard Charal is making a good comeback.

He restarted from les Sables d'Olonne 2700 nm behind the leaders.

He had poor luck with the weather opportunities in the South Atlantic well into the Indian Ocean arriving at a maximum of 3900 nm behind.

Right now he is 'only' 2600 nm back and looks to be in a good weather window compared to the leaders.

Bull Power !charal.thumb.png.13f768e8275cb949432a36bbdadc21de.png

 

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54 minutes ago, t.rex said:

Jeremie Beyou aboard Charal is making a good comeback.

Right now he is 'only' 2600 nm back and looks to be in a good weather window compared to the leaders.

Bull Power !

 

Well, right now he is in a 40kts storm with 6m waves and doing 10kts. Not so pleasant.

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They are now just less than one week to Cape Horn which all of the top three skippers should round for their first time. Certainly for the two leaders the forecast suggests they will get the full Cape Horn experience with winds in the Drake Strait exceeding 45kts with big seas and as of just now it is hard to see how they will avoid it without slowing down from the middle of the week.

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21299/splendid-isolation-point-nemo-beckons

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16 hours ago, Tylo said:

I may be remembering wrong here but I think the old HB was sold with a clause specifically stating that it was not to be raced in the 2020 VG.

Yes, it was said on here.

There is also this; Our boat won’t do the Vendée. There is not a possibility of that for a multitude of reasons – one being we need a platform to train on during the Vendée and the other being here we are working with MerConcept and I’m sure the last thing Charlie Dalin would want is the platform that he helped develop sailing against him around the world!

https://www.tipandshaft.com/en/transat-jacques-vabre-en/charlie-enright-our-boat-wont-do-the-vendee-globe/

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Lois Burton strategy update:

Quote

We have been out here for a few days and not everything is as strong and reliable as at the beginning. I have to pay attention to the material: there is more compression in the mast for example. Technical problems are a game-changer now. Unless an option can offer a sensible bonus, I won't risk going into "hot" situations anymore if I can do without. In addition, we are going to have the next few days downwind in the breeze and these are not the conditions that the foil boats are the fastest in the fleet. My strategy now is to get into and stick with the pack until Cape Horn. There will be more opportunities in the North and South Atlantic!

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21304/strategy-v-2-0-for-bureau-vallee-2

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A while back, I argued that Tripon would have to be 30% faster than the leaders to catch up by the horn, which would be awfully impressive.  That was when he was 1700 nm behind, and now he's only 1000-ish nm behind.  Which is indeed 30% faster VMG, so colour me impressed!  (Not gonna lie, I'm eating a little crow here).

I still think this is mostly the result of that obliging high pressure blob slowing up the leaders.  Now that it appears to be out of the way, I'll be interested to see how much more ground Tripon can make up.  Still an impressive race.

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51 minutes ago, stief said:

Sounds like he regrets his bold southern routing earlier, and he did not quite catch the chasing group before this low intensified, so might slip off the back of it.

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39 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Sounds like he regrets his bold southern routing earlier, and he did not quite catch the chasing group before this low intensified, so might slip off the back of it.

Yes. Must have been tiring, too, staying so close to the AEZ. Maybe he just needed a break, and decided  gettingcaught in the light air ahead was not worthwhile

Couldn't make sense of his latest gybe north (other than the models were more unreliable than usual). Perhaps he's catching a ride on local ocean currents? About a knot's worth of boost around the light air forecast.699905181_ScreenShot2020-12-27at1_22_03PM.png.89a979ea1e9387bb590d1d66ced89efa.png 

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2 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

A while back, I argued that Tripon would have to be 30% faster than the leaders to catch up by the horn, which would be awfully impressive.  That was when he was 1700 nm behind, and now he's only 1000-ish nm behind.  Which is indeed 30% faster VMG, so colour me impressed!  (Not gonna lie, I'm eating a little crow here).

I didn't know this one: eating crow.

I've been eating crows all my life without realizing.

Thanks. :)

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25 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

I didn't know this one: eating crow.

I've been eating crows all my life without realizing.

Thanks. :)

Article today in the New York Times about Brazilians going vegetarian.  Maybe this is why? 

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36 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Charal has an issue ? quite slow for sometime ..

He said earlier that "My goal is to have a boat in good condition, at 100% of its potential at Cape Horn," so probably won't make a big push until the Horn. 

Plus, the waves are really rough for him recently. "Jérémie is currently experiencing a major depression. With speed, the boat hits the waves quite violently. The shocks on board are permanent. Jeremie must remain sheathed and stand constantly to avoid injuries."

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Hmm. Yannick has gybed back south east. Almost looks like he's using the clouds (in this sat photo) to decide what models to trust.530239400_ScreenShot2020-12-27at3_48_03PM.thumb.png.45c0979706b55d4d7db725873b255e58.png He can probably see that 'ridge' to his north as marking the road ahead.

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I think Yannick and Charlie definitely made the break. They are both on the right side of the LP center and nobody else is, or will be. They should be able to ride this LP much longer than anybody else, even if it might be a bit tighter for Apivia to do so.

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8 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

A while back, I argued that Tripon would have to be 30% faster than the leaders to catch up by the horn, which would be awfully impressive.  That was when he was 1700 nm behind, and now he's only 1000-ish nm behind.  Which is indeed 30% faster VMG, so colour me impressed!  (Not gonna lie, I'm eating a little crow here).

I still think this is mostly the result of that obliging high pressure blob slowing up the leaders.  Now that it appears to be out of the way, I'll be interested to see how much more ground Tripon can make up.  Still an impressive race.

I've been watching the chasers of the peloton a good bit.  Armel has been slowly closing on Clarisse, but both of them have been taking big bites out of the peloton.  750 nm for Clarisse to the leaders, 250 nm to Burton.  Armel certainly has the faster boat, however lately she hasn't given away that much.  Obviously a bit of good timing with the weather systems, but they seem to be working it.  If they stay this close to the pack up to Cape Horn, there have been lots or previous races where a 1-2 day deficit has been made up going up the Atlantic.  

Although the three leaders have likely broken free of the pack in the weather systems, it may still be a 13 boat boat race up the Atlantic.  Something never seen before.  Maybe 14, but Anastassio seems a bit off the pace.  

 

 

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11 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

Don't even joke about that. My country is being ravaged by this plague of hipsterism.

Your country was ravaged by fast food which made the obesity rate and cardiovascular diseases go way up in the last 20 years. People are going vegetarian mostly out of health and environmental reasons.

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For the last few days both Pip and Arnaud have been around the top of the speed and distance list. They appear to have been in decent conditions ahead of an advancing low. As ever hugely impressed with Pip, it is great that she is actually racing that boat  - It may be old but it's doing what it was built for - I love this.

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2 hours ago, ant1 said:

The telegramme's mini end of the year assessment of the surprises and unexpected scenarios of the 2020 Vendee Globe.

If we had been told that ...

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=&sl=fr&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.letelegramme.fr%2Fvoile%2Fvendee-globe%2Fsi-on-nous-avait-dit-que-26-12-2020-12680447.php

 

I do also think that Charlie Dalin would have been way faster if he had Alex Thomson to fight with, the love for speed of Thomson is really missed.

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35 minutes ago, serialsailor said:

Your country was ravaged by fast food which made the obesity rate and cardiovascular diseases go way up in the last 20 years. People are going vegetarian mostly out of health and environmental reasons.

Was impressed how many fat people i saw when i was impressed when i went to brazil, as for the myth of brazilian girls, even if Las gauchas in the south of brazil are really beautiful :)

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1 hour ago, triumph72 said:

For the last few days both Pip and Arnaud have been around the top of the speed and distance list. They appear to have been in decent conditions ahead of an advancing low. As ever hugely impressed with Pip, it is great that she is actually racing that boat  - It may be old but it's doing what it was built for - I love this.

Pip is doing brilliantly! Another great blog today from her talking about her approach to risk v speed and how much she can push her small code zero at the top of its wind range:

https://www.piphare.com/blog/4g9otvgog125yttpa3fj967ay3sewb

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1 hour ago, cortosam said:

I do also think that Charlie Dalin would have been way faster if he had Alex Thomson to fight with, the love for speed of Thomson is really missed.

That’s a very triggering thing to post on this board ;-). I’m not sure it’s true in any case. 

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31 minutes ago, Snowden said:

That’s a very triggering thing to post on this board ;-). I’m not sure it’s true in any case. 

Samuel Manuard in a Tip and Shaft Podcast described Bestaven as a beast as well, and i Dalin has all the skills to win, can't wait to see the final rush with Dalin pushing at max to overcome Bestaven time compensations :)

Was listening to Yann Riou podcast, the media man on the Volvo Ocean Race for Groupama, and also Brunel in the last VOR, it was interesting as he described the deep differences between french crew and anglo-saxons crew, the last one is way more compartmentalized, to a point that the sailors didnt even know where the were apart from the navigator, because it was not their duty to care about, you have to excel in what you re doing but it's not relevant to get the big picture. Got the same feeling when i was sailing with anglo-saxon crew at Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez and personnaly i hated not knowing anything about the strategy :)

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-sam-manuard-architecte-de-l-occitane-ces-bateaux-sont-assez-monstrueux-b7f74daa-08a4-11eb-91e6-7f067659a861

 

One of the features of the new boat - which was built in Hungary and then completed at Black Pepper Yachts in Nantes - is that the foils can be completely retracted while remaining well covered at the bow. For Sam Manuard, this is an important virtue because Armel Tripon can thus control the power of the boat whenever he wants.

 

"We said to ourselves that there could be moments in the race when we would like to deactivate the 'flight' mode or reduce it. It's a very demanding race and it is possible, in a difficult environment, to make sure the boat doesn't accelerate too much. So we wanted to be able to retract the foils for safety reasons. »

 

This possibility could also be useful if the boat participates in The Ocean Race in 2022, when the fleet is likely to encounter light winds, at the start and finish of the stages for example. Generally speaking, the architect believes that his Imoca could be adapted for a crewed round the world race. "What is important for The Ocean Race is also important for the Vendée Globe: to be super-efficient in the waves, reaching and downwind. »

 

Manuard also believes that the boat will easily accommodate a full crew on board. "We've been 100% focused on the Vendée Globe: all the architectural features and decisions were made with that in mind," he says. "Nevertheless, there are many similarities between what is important for a Vendée Globe boat and what is important for The Ocean Race. Some decisions have also been made in line with the needs of a crewed round the world race. For example, the cockpit is located well aft, with a wide companionway for easy access to a spacious interior space. I'm sure that five or six people could perfectly live on board. »

 

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12 minutes ago, cortosam said:

can't wait to see the final rush with Dalin pushing at max to overcome Bestaven time compensations :)

I would love to see Isabelle Joschke, Jean Le Cam, and Damien Seguin going for the win in the final rush too... I would be ecstatic. Bestaven and Dalin are sure going to be hard to catch up with though, and there are serious contenders behind... but who knows, so far the race has been anything but predictable.

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2 hours ago, jimmyuk81 said:

Pip is doing brilliantly! Another great blog today from her talking about her approach to risk v speed and how much she can push her small code zero at the top of its wind range:

https://www.piphare.com/blog/4g9otvgog125yttpa3fj967ay3sewb

She really is - elastic between her and the group she was with well and truly snapped now. There's 700nm between her and Costa. Can't wait to see how far up she can get, though will be a massive ask to make up the difference to the boats in front. 

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3 hours ago, jimmyuk81 said:

Pip is doing brilliantly! Another great blog today from her talking about her approach to risk v speed and how much she can push her small code zero at the top of its wind range:

https://www.piphare.com/blog/4g9otvgog125yttpa3fj967ay3sewb

Great link--best reading I've had for a few days. 

Pip really is a sailor worth reading and following:

Quote

My competitive devil

Pip HareDec 28

The last couple of days on Medallia have been a blend of awesome sailing, blue skies, huge bright moonlit nights, elation and frustration, as I have had pedal to the metal trying to stay ahead of this front.

My objectives have been straight forward: stay ahead of the front, make the most of this breeze to drive East into the Pacific slowly dropping down towards the ice limit. The delivery of these objectives not so simple as the wind angle is a tough one for Medallia and I am as ever struggling with sail cross overs and a lack of righting moment for reaching.

Medallia only signed up as my title sponsor for the Vendee Globe Race in July this year. Before then I had planned a fantasy sail wardrobe in my head, but was looking at a reality of going around the world with my existing sails, which were used by Alan Roura in the last Vendee. When Medallia came onboard the first thing I ordered was my sails but this only gave us a window of four months, to agree, design, build, fit and test my new sails... not very long.

The sails arrived mid-September and we snatched every day we could recording polars and cross overs which have been the basis for most of my decisions and routing to date and I think we did a pretty good job. But in the last couple of days in an effort to stay ahead of this front and maybe with Cali so close and the competitive little devil sitting on my shoulder I have been testing and pushing the limits of what my small code zero is capable of.

The average wind angle has been 100-120 degrees. The wind range has been 18-35 knots. This has made hard work for me in the balance of risk and reward, speed and safety, attacking or accepting my position. According to the early cross over charts the zero was out of range in much over 22 knots and so initially and religiously I rolled it away, but the loss of performance changing down to the smaller sail would slowly eat away at my soul until I just couldn't take it anymore and the sail had to come out again. Gently I have been nudging up the wind strength and angles I'm using the zero in. I've changed the sheeting positions, altered the balance with the mainsail, all the time watching intently, listening for signs of strain or the whooshing through the hull that tells me we are slipping sideways. I've been surprised and concerned but not always willing to back off. Sometimes, launching off waves, managing to equal my boat speed to the windspeed I am holding on tight and my stomach is in a knot, 'is this too much?' ' am I taking too many risks?' but it's addictive. I won't lie - I get a huge kick out of seeing Medallia somewhere near the top of the leader board on a 24hr run. It is so very unexpected and I know I should not really be there. But now I am curious to see what else we could do.

But there has to be an off switch I know that. I am a very long way from home, the race is only half way through, so many more miles to sail, problems to solve, storms to encounter. I do know this and I have to trust myself to know where that red line is. I can normally feel it. Like now for example, literally just as I wrote these words the boat heeled just a little bit too much. I looked up and sure enough the wind speed has snuck up. Just two knots but I have registered a number that I haven't seen for a while. It's noted, I am now on amber alert.

I constantly monitor average wind angle, windspeed, boat speed on the computer. I've never been great with numbers I am much more a words kind of person so I use graphs to show averages and give me an overall picture of what is actually happening. I am constantly looking all over the boat and up the rig every few hours I will put the bow down to get the boat flat and dry then do a quick walk of the deck a two minute health check, then back on the breeze again. When I do concede and change down I make sure I use that time wisely. Maybe steering up a few degrees, to bank some height and open more possibilities for using the zero later, it's a time of less risk so I can sleep, maybe do some jobs or just give my brain a little chance to relax, to drop the stress for just a small amount of time.

I'm reading this back to myself and wondering still if I am pushing too hard. It's a question that bugs me day and night. I am a competitive person I know that; but this extra effort to stretch, to learn, to challenge the status quo of what is possible. This is not about beating other people it's about finding out what I can do with what I have. I guess it's based on the fundamental belief I have that it is always possible to do better. I know I would be devastated if I made an error that put me out of the race. I don't want to be a knuckle head with my foot on the gas that sails the boat until it breaks. I want to make that finish more than anything but equally I am driven to sail the best race I can, I owe it to myself and to everyone who has helped me get here. So, I guess I have to trust my instincts and that I will back off when I need to and as I grow in confidence and push Medallia harder my humility remains and my ego stays in check.

Very interesting team behind her too. Didn't know "her preparateur Joff Brown, of Lighthouse Yacht Services in Gosport, also prepared the boats of Dee Caffari and Rich Wilson in previous Vendée Globes."

"Helena"? Looks like she's Helena Darvelid. Quite a few records and projects. That might explain how Paul Larsen got involved with Pip's crossovers. Didn't know Helena was also involved with Maiden II and Brian Thomson. Must be a story behind her not being on Team SCA. Too bad @NORBowGirl and @Rennmaus aren't in the thread this time to tell us more. Very interesting woman.

Yep. Good link to some fine rabbit holes.

Thanks.  (Sorry about your sister's tits)

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38 minutes ago, stief said:

(...)
Too bad @NORBowGirl and @Rennmaus aren't in the thread this time to tell us more. Very interesting woman.

(...)

Hi @stief, merry (belated) Christmas, hope you and your loved ones are doing well.
It looks like you confused me with someone else, someone more knowledgeable. I've never followed the Vendée closely and was never contributing to any Vendée thread. Not that I wouldn't want to, but it's simply too much to follow and care about these days. Maybe next time.
Take care my friend and enjoy the race... Good links above, very interesting.

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17 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

Hi @stief, merry (belated) Christmas, hope you and your loved ones are doing well.
It looks like you confused me with someone else, someone more knowledgeable. I've never followed the Vendée closely and was never contributing to any Vendée thread. Not that I wouldn't want to, but it's simply too much to follow nd care about these days. Maybe next time.
Take care my fried and enjoy the race... Good links above, very interesting.

Hey rennie--hope you and yours are healthy, surviving the covid fun, and the AC misery. No confusion: Was trolling you to come over from the dark side, especially since this VG is much more civilized, and figured you'd have some keen insights about Herrmann and the many women in the race.

Cheers. Looking forward to when we have a common thread again, and I sincerely hope you can enjoy setting the AC right. ;) 

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40 minutes ago, eastern motors said:

Is Pip's mast pre-one design?  

Very much so. The one design mast was introduced some time after the 2008 race after the power of some of the boats were getting out of hand such as the Juan K designed Kingdom of Bahrain with a 30m tall mast (later increased to 32m by Alex Thomson) and the Rogers designed Artemis II with something similar. Rigs were falling over left, right and centre

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12 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Good interview with Nicolas Troussel here: https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/nicolas-troussel-abandonner-si-tot-c-etait-hyper-dur-27-12-2020-12680399.php

They think the reason why the mast fell is that something broke (a part of the rigging) and led the mast to rotate too much.

Good link. "low-hauban" =?

Quote

Disappointment, misunderstanding, guilt: what feeling did you feel after the dismasting?

A little of all this. Guilt also because I was in a mode where the boat was going fast, I attacked but I did not endanger the boat. On the other hand, I was a little out of my line of action which was to say to myself "Nico, the Vendée Globe is long": 20 knots on average was already quite good and there, I was rather 24 knots away. Of course, you're not happy with yourself, you blame yourself for pushing a little too much but, at the moment, you don't see any danger, I just wanted to get back on the head of the race because I had been left a little stupidly behind just before and it had annoyed me a little.[snip]

A budget of 14 million euros over four years and only one week of racing: how did your sponsor react?

When your sponsor tells you that the future is 2021 and the Transat Jacques Vabre, that it doesn't question anything, necessarily, it helps you to project yourself, to forget a little what happened. Yes, that was the best news! The sponsor knows the risks of this motor sport and this type of race. I don't have the figures but I know that a study has been done and that the return on investment is not bad at all.

Do you know more about the reasons for this dismasting?

We have investigated since then, we have looked at all the data of the boat. There was sea at that time so I couldn't keep anything, not even a piece of mast that might have allowed me to understand. However, more is known about this dismasting. We know that the mast rotated more than reason, with the mast rotation sensor. The mast turned a lot, so that means that something broke. There, we work with engineers who are trying to calculate what could have broken so that the mast rotates so much. It can be a low-hauban or a lashing that gives way. We will never have the purpose of the thing but we know that the mast went beyond the normal angle of rotation.

 

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5 hours ago, jimmyuk81 said:

Pip is doing brilliantly! Another great blog today from her talking about her approach to risk v speed and how much she can push her small code zero at the top of its wind range:

https://www.piphare.com/blog/4g9otvgog125yttpa3fj967ay3sewb

Thanks for that link. I had not gone looking for individual blogs., till now...

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Broken mainsail hook car for Stéphane Le Diraison. He plans to sail without mainsail to Macquarie Island, like Louis Burton did a few days ago and climb the mast to come up with a makeshift solution, most likely an external "traditional" halyard for his mainsail.

1415541189_LeDiraison.thumb.jpg.cfb0b53052125d3a873b6ffd43364687.jpg

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I am truly enjoying like others the thoughtful and insightful blogs of Pip but I continue to be so impressed with Isabelle - quietly, without a lot of fuss and drama sailing with the big boys in 5th place.  Her routing decisions are smooth, deliberate, and error free for the most part - a most impressive woman and sailor.  I wish her well through the cold, fatigue, and sea sickness she is currently experiencing - hopefully it will be short lived.

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Conrad Humphreys also thinks the "closeness"of the fleet is unprecedented . . .  for the VG.

(he also looks at the virtual race. Gives us a chance to see where Alex and the others who are out might have been ;) )

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On 12/21/2020 at 5:06 PM, Snowden said:

wasn't it Goss whose keel box leaked all the way round and ultimately the keel fell off in the car park when they lifted the boat afterwards? can't blame him for not being too romantic in that situation!

That was on a much earlier adventure of Pete Goss. The 1986 Carlsberg TwoStar TranAt and the boat was an OOD 34 of Fastnet fame. No keel box but it did leak most of the last half of the Atlantic crossing. I was standing there next to Pete and his fellow Royal Marine mate when the keel did indeed fall to the ground after a good roundhouse by the other guy! We all got good and soused that night!

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