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15 hours ago, cortosam said:

 

One of the features of the new boat - which was built in Hungary and then completed at Black Pepper Yachts in Nantes - is that the foils can be completely retracted while remaining well covered at the bow. For Sam Manuard, this is an important virtue because Armel Tripon can thus control the power of the boat whenever he wants.

 

it's not real impressive the other design teams didn't integrate this as a core design philosophy, that and the scow like bow sections.

combining those two features would seem like a no-brainer for an automatically far more versatile and ultimately more durable offshore race boat. weird.

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":A 2h18 heure française, le team PRB a été informé du sauvetage de Kevin Escoffier par Jean Le Cam. " Kevin has been rescued.  

Give it a rest chaps. HB was another attempt at evolution, and they should be applauded for spending a fuck ton of money to do so. If you want to try and be innovative you run the risk of breakages al

VG sailors at sea in the rough A translation: JLC: Damien can you receive me ? DS: Yes Jean I can (garbled)... I don't think you're receiving me that well but I receive you very well. JL

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13 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

That was on a much earlier adventure of Pete Goss. The 1986 Carlsberg TwoStar TranAt and the boat was an OOD 34 of Fastnet fame. No keel box but it did leak most of the last half of the Atlantic crossing. I was standing there next to Pete and his fellow Royal Marine mate when the keel did indeed fall to the ground after a good roundhouse by the other guy! We all got good and soused that night!

Thanks for that!

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Weather update

First a look back at the situation at the 23rd, the last time that I did a routing. The projections suggested that Bestaven could take a NE flyer away from the AEZ and he did so. What was not in the books that Dalin, staying close to the AEZ, could get within 2 miles DTL of the leader. Before being swallowed up by the HP zone, that was clearly not on the projected position. See pic #1. 

Fast forward to current 11:30 positions and weather. Now the first boats have past Point Nemo, still no synoptic weather maps for another 700 NM. So Windy for the big picture, see pic # 2 for EUMETSAT with color enhanced IR temps and pic #3 for ECMWF with winds and MSLP. Bestaven to drop of that LP below the AEZ soon.  But enough wind will come to keep them going. Looking at the routing table in pic # 4 Dalin and Ruyant could stay close to Bestaven.  But the devil is in the details. Max winds up to to 50s for the top-5 boats. The last part to Cape Horn could prove to be the hardest. As a new LP zone is projected to start on Wednesday around 120 W and 40 S. Moving SE  and on Friday projected SW of Cape Horn. Deepening too, with increasing winds. Increasingly (very) bad sea state too. So first some AEZ-hugging for the boats, but after that LP comes in serious shit projected. Routing parameters for allowed max true wind still set to 45 kts, and apparent wind still to 50 kts. This could force Le Cam further north than the other top-4 boats. And close to a very nasty Chilean lee shore you want to stay far away from. Very far as in 50-100 NM or more imho. Only for Bestaven en Dalin no upwinds expected, for the other 3 boats 5%-8% beating due to the LP.  In pics # 5 and 6 the Friday projections for Bestaven and Le Cam. The yellow arrows indicate projected positions. In pic 6 the projected wind force is shown as a color overlay plus the MSLP. Indicating that the narrow gap, or better funnel, to pass Cape Horn offers not much space to circumvent that LP. The max distance between the AEZ and the CH lighthouse is 83 NM. So with less and less sea room to manoever and/or route, the coming days could get interesting. The timing of that LP is crucial, because if it is quicker or slower the deck of cards could get reshuffled thoroughly by lady Fortuna in the last game before rounding CH.

If JLC wants 50 NM distance to land when rounding CH he should be going SE around 200 NM west of the coast, see pic #7.

Dalin @ 241220 2100 UTC.jpg

EUMETSAT 291220 IR.jpg

ECMWF 291220.jpg

routing table 291220.png

Bestaven plus Le Cam 291220.jpg

Projection Friday MSLP and wind 291220.jpg

JLC with 50 nm distance to land 291220.jpg

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2 hours ago, dolphinmaster said:

Yes, and is the repair from two weeks ago still giving him problems?  Seems his speeds have been lower the last 48 hrs vs TR and YB.

On the French version of the Daily newscast, Charlie explained that he had to work on his repair of the port foil assembly. As you know, he did not break the foil per say, but the insert holding the foil in place at the bottom of the case. This may explain that he had to slow down for a while, but according to him during the interview, he is back to full competition mode.

 

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^^^^

Herman, thanks for that analysis, again!

FYI, the Antartic Exclusion Zone (AEZ) has been changed again. Now version 5. Jacques Caraes, the Race Director said that is will be the last version. Sorry, but I do not know where you can find it. I trust you know where to get it...

They nip out a little bit before the Cape Horn, but they greatly increase the area around Cape Horn and the Falklands. The allowed width of the Drake Passage apparently almost doubled.

If you take into account not only wind speed but also sea state, would it make sense for the sailors to pass Cape Horn way South, to avoid the toughest sea state? Listening to Jacques Caraes, he more or less implied that since the icebergs location allowed it, he wanted to "open up the game", to give more strategic options to the skippers.

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Interesting video by Boris Herrmann below, if a bit long.

He explains the effect of sleep depravation on the sharpness of your mind, to the point that he was at the bow for a staysail change and could not decide at which halyard to hook up the new sail... To the top of the mast? Or fractional?... See at 5:00 below.

 

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The Peleton is like a big magnet at the moment, dragging Ruyant and Dalin back into it and Burton back up to it, while Bestaven makes his escape.

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I know the little icons on the tracker make the boats look like they take up more water than they really do, but man that's some close racing.  They're passing point Nemo (ie middle of freaking nowhere), and still I think some of those crossings are within a mile or two of each other!  Does the ice exclusion zone count as a continuing obstruction under RRS 19.2c? :lol:

I wonder how often they radio each other to keep clear of each other during gybes and crossings.

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

^^^^

Herman, thanks for that analysis, again!

FYI, the Antartic Exclusion Zone (AEZ) has been changed again. Now version 5. Jacques Caraes, the Race Director said that is will be the last version. Sorry, but I do not know where you can find it. I trust you know where to get it...

They nip out a little bit before the Cape Horn, but they greatly increase the area around Cape Horn and the Falklands. The allowed width of the Drake Passage apparently almost doubled.

If you take into account not only wind speed but also sea state, would it make sense for the sailors to pass Cape Horn way South, to avoid the toughest sea state? Listening to Jacques Caraes, he more or less implied that since the icebergs location allowed it, he wanted to "open up the game", to give more strategic options to the skippers.

Thanks for that heads-up, the docs can be found here; https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/documents-area/official-notice-board

Opening-up the AEZ southward if that is safe for ice makes sense.

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Popping on for a second to just comment on how amazing this race has been and after all this distance we have boats still sailing in sight of each other.  Just yesterday I checked the tracker and saw JLC, Boris, and Isabelle in a close pack and now JLC has sprinted ahead and Isabelle dropped from 5th to 8th.  When you look across the fleet there are great small races going on inside the big one which has been very cool.

Speaking of JLC, it should also be noted that at the moment out of the top 7 boats, three are non-foilers, one podium positioned.  Conditions not withstanding this is an amazing effort by Damien Seguin (3rd), Jean Le Cam(5th), and Benjamin Dutreux (6th).  Maybe the Atlantic will serve up conditions that favor foilers, but then again they have not really pulled away impressively either and while I don't know much about routing, it seems that JLC has been able to put his boat in the conditions that seem to favor his boat and keeps him in the hunt.

Like others I have enjoyed Pip's video and commentary and think she could give Arnaud a run in the next few days if she can keep pushing Medallia...oh and another non-foiler making it a race :rolleyes:

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3 minutes ago, Herman said:

Thanks for that heads-up, the docs can be found here; https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/documents-area/official-notice-board

Opening-up the AEZ southward if that is safe for ice makes sense.

Was curious to see the difference.  The old AEZ is in blue, the new is in red.

Vendee20.JPG

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11 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Was curious to see the difference.  The old AEZ is in blue, the new is in red.

Vendee20.JPG

The Cape Horn-to-AEZ-gate opened from 83 nm wide to 177 nm, so doubled. But as my initial routing above in the thread indicated, it may not be necessary depending on that LP moving in. As the boats were not hugging the AEZ below CH.

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1 hour ago, Corryvreckan said:

I know the little icons on the tracker make the boats look like they take up more water than they really do, but man that's some close racing.  They're passing point Nemo (ie middle of freaking nowhere), and still I think some of those crossings are within a mile or two of each other!  Does the ice exclusion zone count as a continuing obstruction under RRS 19.2c? :lol:

I wonder how often they radio each other to keep clear of each other during gybes and crossings.

Boris might have called STARBOARD on Isabelle as he gybed off the AEZ. Pretty surprising that these two can't stay in front of the non-foilers ahead of them, plus Maxime has managed to pass Pedote, again a non-foiler doing better.

Screen Shot 2020-12-29 at 12.30.53 PM.png

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26 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Boris might have called STARBOARD on Isabelle as he gybed off the AEZ. Pretty surprising that these two can't stay in front of the non-foilers ahead of them, plus Maxime has managed to pass Pedote, again a non-foiler doing better.

 

If he did, I hope Isabelle replied: "Nice try, Boris. You're on Port!"  :P

 

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44 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

If he did, I hope Isabelle replied: "Nice try, Boris. You're on Port!"  :P

 

With a 3+ nm gap I don't think Boris would have worried about the crossing.  He does take much enjoyment in being around other sailors though, could we soon see a gybe so he can "speed test" against her? (lol)

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14 minutes ago, stief said:

For those who can view tweeted gifs--here's a nice quick animation of Armel on Tripon's progress

 

https://twitter.com/CapVG20/status/1343904864078848000?s=20

 

What's fascinating to watch in that gif is how he hangs with a pack for a while, then seems to blast off, only to hang with the next pack for a while.  Is it a particular condition that favours his boat, or is he making really good routing decisions that let him get the jump (or presumably both).

 

BTW, am I right that the starboard boat (Mapfre) gave way to Alvimedica?  Or was Alvimedica (barely) clear ahead?  Great vid.

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Just now, Corryvreckan said:

What's fascinating to watch in that gif is how he hangs with a pack for a while, then seems to blast off, only to hang with the next pack for a while.  Is it a particular condition that favours his boat, or is he making really good routing decisions that let him get the jump (or presumably both).

BTW, am I right that the starboard boat (Mapfre) gave way to Alvimedica?  Or was Alvimedica (barely) clear ahead?  Great vid.

Agree about the animation. Thought it might be an example of when foils (bow?) really pay.

Re the P/S, you're right. From what I recall, ALVI later said MAPF waved them through and did a slight duck.

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11 minutes ago, stief said:

Agree about the animation. Thought it might be an example of when foils (bow?) really pay.

Re the P/S, you're right. From what I recall, ALVI later said MAPF waved them through and did a slight duck.

Must be one of those things that goes the other way round in the southern hemisphere.

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31 minutes ago, stief said:

Ouch. Pip gets a 2.5 hr penalty for losing one of the seals on her liferafts 

cred to this tweet for the head's up, though not clear that she lost the raft on Dec 14

Correction: she did lose the life raft.

Quote

On Monday 14th December 2020 GBR77 has lost her outer liferaft and broken her seal.

I assume she will move  the inside liferaft to the cockpit? Curious that nothing was said earlier about this.

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From Sam, about her Christmas and her ribs. Posted about 6 hrs ago.

Quote

Good morning all! Soon I will have crossed the Indian Ocean! It seems to me that I left Cape Town for a long time, but in reality it's only been two weeks. I had to deal with several depressions, with winds sometimes reaching 50 knots. As expected, I am sailing safely, as there is no longer the pressure of the race and also to preserve and let my broken ribs heal. Between the low pressure systems, there has been a small ridge of high pressure, lighter winds, and a bit of sunshine, and it's always a much-loved break to relax, check the boat, tidy up, wash, get wet. change and sometimes indulge yourself by having a meal or a special treat. Fortunately for me, Christmas day was one of those "lighter wind" days and so I was able to enjoy the festive life on board a little ... It's a little "escape" away from the sea. relentless pressure of navigation on these machines that must be taken at the best speed and the best possible course across the oceans. My friends, my team and my family had put decorations on board before the departure, I even had gifts to open! Best was a USB stick with some hilarious family videos made by a good friend, and a Christmas cartoon made by my son Ruben. We organized a "family Skype" with Romain, Ruben, my parents and me all together. It was great fun to see Ruben so happy and showing us his gifts! That evening, I had a Christmas dinner "with" my best friend Miranda (Merron). We had ordered the same freeze-dried Christmas dinner and made a date to eat it at the same time while "arguing" over WhatsApp - the closest thing to a sociable dinner one can do here in the hotel. 'ocean - each of us on our boat, about 1000 nautical miles away! Since Christmas I have had a fairly quick run to Cape Leewin and should pass this second "cap" tomorrow. I also passed Sébastien Destremeau and I also caught up with Ari and Alexia. It's nice to be closer to the end of the fleet, but I still have moments of frustration when I look at where the leaders are and how far they are ahead. But my adventure has changed, I look on the positive side - I have a unique experience in this race: being the only boat to continue "out of the race", I no longer race against the others, and by far my toughest competition is against myself - to heal the pain, learn to deal with frustration, overcome the fear that lasts after my accident, and rebuild confidence in myself and my boat. Slowly, slowly we're getting there, and with every mile I go, we continue to raise money to save children's lives, and that makes me proud.

gtrans of (think this link should work) https://live.initiatives-coeur.fr/vendee-globe/2020/interventions/1842

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1 hour ago, stief said:

From Sam, about her Christmas and her ribs. Posted about 6 hrs ago.

gtrans of (think this link should work) https://live.initiatives-coeur.fr/vendee-globe/2020/interventions/1842

Am i the only one to think all the communications they get kill all the purpose of this Vendee-globe ? All this WhatsApp shit, they seem to communicate more than teenagers with smartphones.

Well, i know this is a society trends...

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4 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

What's fascinating to watch in that gif is how he hangs with a pack for a while, then seems to blast off, only to hang with the next pack for a while.  Is it a particular condition that favours his boat, or is he making really good routing decisions that let him get the jump (or presumably both).

My impression is that he has better top-end speed.  A group gets hung up in light or unfavorable conditions, and he brings the next weather system up with him, closing the gap, until he gets stuck in the same light or unfavorable stuff.  He isn't necessarily faster in the weak stuff.  Then the group gets its next batch of good weather, and he's able to get separation by doing 16-20 while they're doing 12-16.  Repeat.  Easier to do with back markers than the front pack, of course.

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Quick snipet of information on Sébastien Destremau; it is on the Frenchside of the Newsfeed but not the English one...

"I took advantage of a light winds patch in the Indian Ocean to try to work on the to do list I put together for my pitstop in the "Baie de l'Espérance" next week (in French in the original text; is it Esperance Bay in South Australia??? Somewhere else??? He talked about stopping in Tasmania and anchoring in a bay somewhere to do his repairs, and take advantage of the sail towards New Zealand to test everything; if he did not feel confidant in his repairs, he would stop in New Zealand and get external assistance, and therefore abandon. Maybe plans have changed...)

First of all, I wanted to recalibrate my rudder angle sensor for the autopilot; hoping to get a better steering for the boat. Bad choice... Nothing worked once I was done with this procedure, which is fairly simple. It is in total dispair that I called for help Julien Berthelot (BJ Nautique) this morning. Not able to figure out what the problem was, he advises me to switch to the second controller for the AP. Of course, first of all, I had to re-calibrate this controller in 24V, otherwise, where is the fun?!! Then followed another early morning phone call to my brother Jean Guillem to make sure that I can use the pilot valve designed for 12V with a 24V set up, without burning everything up,  The AP cylinder was stuck/frozen and impaired the rudder angle sensor calibration procedure. Once this was validated, and with a new pilot valve in place, "Merci" could sail again, Eastbound... And I could take a 4 hours nap..."

 

Not knowing ANYTHING about his on board systems, it looks to me that he has a hodgepodge of different bits and pieces of different set up which have lived at different periods on this boat and/or rapatriated from other boats. It seems typical of a shoe string budget endeavour.

My personal "shoot from the hip" analysis and interpretation...

 

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17 minutes ago, 3to1 said:

^^ that looks like a beautiful place to chill for a couple of days.

Pink lake at middle island ?. I’ve never seen it from that angle though spent a lot of time in the anchorage , goose island bay.

Lovely spot. 

The bay in the first photo looks like Lucky Bay ?  The anchorage behind the rocky islets in the top of the photo provides respite from summers predominant easterly, but the swell gets in and keeps things animated. 

DukeOfOrleans bay , between the two, not pictured providess the best all round protection on that piece of the coast.

Both spots some distance from Esperance bay :)

 

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7 minutes ago, thengling said:

The leaders now near the place where JF answered the final call of the southern seas, that fateful day in March 2018. Raising a glass.

I know I should know ....

 

JF ?

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A common stepping stone

The more modestly priced, but highly competitive Class 40 has proven a stepping stone on the pathway to the IMOCA and to this Vendée Globe. Six years ago in Guadeloupe the Route du Rhum Class 40 was won by the Spanish sailor Alex Pella but the class was populated by many of today's Vendée Globe racers, notably Stéphane Le Diraison who finished fourth, Miranda Merron was sixth, Yannick Bestaven, seventh, Damien Seguin eighth, Fabrice Amedeo ninth, and Giancarlo Pedote 10th. Also racing were Maxime Sorel, Alan Roura, Arnaud Boissières and Nicolas Troussel

Doesn't seem to be to CRAP.......Miranda and Halvard have been living their life shorthanded sailing and she forefills her dream......admiitedly on a sailors budget , boosted by limited sponsorship...

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I liked this post back 14 Dec on the FB site..

@campagnedefrance @normandie #manche #vendeeglobe2020 #IMOCA
A Monday morning at the office in the Indian Ocean.
Miranda Merron completes her 36th day of sea alone more than ever in her business, in this life entirely dedicated to the smooth running of her boat. Heavy maneuvers, weather analyses, road map definitions, countless DIY sessions, mostly in the areas she hates, electronics and hydraulics, composes her daily life, chanted with brief sleep and feeding breaks.
She entered the Indian Ocean last Friday, welcomed by albatrosses in the 50 shades of grey typical of latitudes between 40th and 50th parallel. Zones of high pressures in its North, rapidly developing depressions in its south, and limit of the Antarctic Exclusion Zone impose a subtle navigation on it. Miranda has positioned herself in the North of her playmates, quits slowing down a bit in more moderate winds than those enjoyed by her opponents. She took advantage of these mild conditions to dedicate her Sunday to DIY and to this piece of bravery that is the intervention on her starboard hydrogenator. A file file! She is delighted this morning with her position to cash in an acceptable angle and wind force for the new virulent Southern Depression on the move in its Southwest.
Words of the night:
′′ It must be the last few hours close. Fog to cut with a knife this morning and the freezing atmosphere that goes with it, Monday morning at the office in the Indian Ocean... That's it, I've regained happiness and good mood after a few days of softening.
Weekend of crafts, especially trying to solve the starboard hydro problem (and thanks again to Mathieu Michou who spent some time on this topic during his weekend). For now it's ′′ on hold ′′ because we have to go outside the chains for the rest, so I'm waiting for more suitable conditions. Got my good mood back! This is the Indian Ocean as I remember. There's fog! I have 20 knots of wind starting to indulge (Turn on the back of the boat ndlr). Yesterday I was close, it wasn't very nice. Hard to walk the boat, was too close to the anticyclone. But simply, I had no wind. We're a good small group, we should soon get doubled by Jeremy and I think Kojiro will go ahead, but it's nice to have comrades around where we are, there's not a lot of people around! I like the day and night lag, I like it when the day comes up super early, it makes me laugh. In all ways, we live by day and night. I had hydro generator problems, and now we know what the problem is, just need to figure it out. Wish I didn't have too many crafts in the coming days as it's going to be windy. I rotate the engine once a day, and I close everything to warm up the inside as the temperature has dropped. I'm also making water with the desalinator while the engine is running. I spent a few days less happy, but I became happy again, good because we lose energy when we're unhappy. I'm pretty happy all the time on this race. Must be age!"
Miranda Merron, France Campaign
Photos: Miranda Merron
 
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JLC appears to be slow compared to Seguin and Dutreux.

Any idea why is that? Does it have issue? Just taking a break?

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1 hour ago, huey 2 said:

JLC doing 18 knots ,   2nd highest behind Jeremie [20kts] ,  at the moment in the fleet 

Screen Shot 2020-12-30 at 7.44.01 pm.png

But on the map you posted it says JLC 12.8kn, Seguin 16.5kn, Dutreux 15.8kn..

What am I missing?!

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1 hour ago, huey 2 said:

Last post old not updated map...sorry1862938644_ScreenShot2020-12-30at8_18_40pm.thumb.png.a1e2af6a25a3cc94adbe3cdddd03afa9.png

Looking at the map attached, Dutreux and JLC seem to have lost some miles to Ruyan and Seguin. Could it be these last two have been able to stay ahead of the incoming front longer?

Schermata 2020-12-30 alle 11.24.54.png

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In the last update JLC still slower in VMG than Dutreux and much slower than Seguin.

Cant understand why...

 

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Weather update

Set AEZ to V5 - thx again @Hitchhiker for that file. Set Bestaven to 105% polars.

Routing with 08:00 positions for top-5 boats and GFS run 00:00. Away we go. The big picture is pic 1 with EUMETSAT IR pic 2 ECMWF temps and pic 3 self-made synoptic map. I have added the temperature pic in order to distinguish the two cold fronts (blue lines). In pic 3 top left you can see where the LP 3 will be starting soon and which I mentioned yesterday. That LP 3 coming SE is going to be the dominant factor in the coming days. The weather routing table for top-5 boats is in pic 4. The max winds have come down considerably compared to the projections yesterday. Into the 30s instead of the 50s. Still enough. And wind gusts well into the 40s. Routing for Bestaven, Dalin and Ruyant in pic 5. Bestaven can sail almost due east towards Cape Horn. Dalin, Ruyant and other boats can be forced more north. Gybing due to that cold front passing them. Seguin and Le Cam can expect more head winds compared to the top-3 boats.

If we roll the Windy tracker with Kevin's excellent plugin forward in the coming days, you get the next pics. Pic 6 has the projection for tomorrow 31st at 00:00 UTC. The LP can now clearly be seen top left. And moving quickly SE, see pic 7 for the 31 09:00 UTC projection. Moving forward to Jan 1st 07:00 UTC see pic 8. The LP is splitting the fleet. Finally, projections for Jan 2nd 04:00 UTC. The LP has moved below the AEZ on the SW side of Cape Horn. At the moment Bestaven looks good with the 2nd cold front and LP 3. But the projections for that LP 3 can change in the coming days. And so the impact on the fleet.

BTW: sea state will turn shitty with that LP 3. 6 meters and more south west of Chile. See pic 9. That alone would drive boats more south when rounding CH to the AEZ. Max waves are now set in OpenCPN for routing at max 7 meters. Will adjust tomorrow to 5 or 6 meters. This would impact JLC's routing, driving him more south. Other routes are more to the south already, circumventing that sea state.

 

EUMETSAT 301220.jpg

ECMWF temp 301220.jpg

ECMWF 301220.jpg

routing table 301220.png

Top 3 boats 301220.png

LP zone above fleet projected 31st 301220.jpg

LP zone above fleet projected 31st 1000 UTC 301220.jpg

LP zone above fleet projected 1st 0700 UTC 301220.jpg

 

LP zone below fleet projected 2nd 0400 UTC 301220.jpg

Sea state 2nd ECMWF WAM 301220jpg.jpg

Edited by Herman
forgot pic
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Interview / Bernard Stamm, portrait of a simply human sailor

Bernard stamm Bernard Stamm © ThMartinez / Sea & Co.

Bernard Stamm is one of those skippers whose name inevitably evokes something. He is not the star of the TV shows, any more than that of the scandals. It is, exact and simple, affordable and natural, as those who have made themselves often are, without fortune or particles. Portrait of this Swiss who became a navigator.

db84265f1f957ec9f74154e3ea366bad.jpgOlivier TourchonPublished on 30-12-2020
To follow

Last name Stamm, First name Bernard. Place of Birth, somewhere on the shores of Lake Geneva, in the Swiss Confederation. There you go, everyone thinking that Switzerland cannot give birth to good sailors. Indeed, there is no sea in the land of Bernard Stamm . But there is the lake. And not only, as he explains to us, “ We often smile when we talk about the Swiss navy. But Geneva is less far from the sea than Orleans is. ” Explanation accepted, let's get serious.

A simple man

Bernard Stamm, simply. Bernard Stamm, simply.

Humble and simple. If we had to define Bernard Stamm in just one word, this simplicity would be obvious. When we talk to the navigator, we are always afraid of saying badly, of hurting him or of going against his position. It is characteristic of autodidacts to fear these criticisms, all the more so if they are undue or arbitrary. Because Bernard made himself. Bernard Stamm's family does not ride gold. His mother was a secretary. She stopped her job to take care of her three children. Her father worked as a sales manager in a company that manufactured automatic conveyors and conveyor belts. The holidays are therefore shortest and closest, by the Lake.

Lake lovers

The skipper remains in love with his lake, you can feel it when he talks about it. "I am a child from Lake Geneva, I used my first jackets there. No one explained to me the sail or the maneuver, I learned that on my own. Sailing has become my mother tongue. Surprisingly. seen from here everyone regatta on the lake, for fun, to show off or just to get some fresh air. The level of regatta is exceptionally correct, because the practice is quite technical ", he explains to us with this passion that never seems to leave him. "Lake Geneva is an excellent laboratory for boats which must be able to move forward in light weather and in the absence of wind. There is a professional series that attracts many French people, the Décision 35, which is the follow-up to the Formula 40s, which fell into disuse at the end of the 1980s. "

A ham bread cheese race

In love with the Lake, the navigator declares his love. " My heart race, on the Lake, is the Bol d'Or. A race open to all classes of boats, a sort of Lake Geneva Fastnet. It is a high level race. But that does not prevent ham-bread-cheese participations, family and fun, during which there is an excellent atmosphere almost obligatory. "

Heading West

Apprentice lumberjack after leaving school at the age of 15, a boquillon and sailor friend gave him the idea of joining the Compagnie Suisse Atlantique when he was 18 years old.

It was especially during this career in the merchant navy, as a skipper or even on occasion the many convoys he made, that he frequently crossed the coasts of Brittany . It was also in Armorica that in 1994, he traded the Alpine peaks for the menhirs.

Chances and coincidences, this is how the episode of the installation in Brittany could be called . " I met competitors in the Mini Transat in the West Indies who offered to participate. For that, I needed a boat and they introduced me to the naval architect Pierre Roland, in Lesconil. "

Happiness, fortunate, intervenes once again in favor of the skipper " The last boat that I skippered was an owner's boat. During the construction, I came to give this owner some help. Little by little, I sympathized with the one who owned the land where the construction shed was. He suggested that I reuse this space to build my Mini Transat. What more could I ask for, I had in the same place an architect, a yard and a hangar. "

Logical, therefore. " Why would I have put my suitcases elsewhere in this case? ", Concludes Bernard Stamm .

Forward to the competition , winner

Two seasons of Mini later, everything seems to shine for the competitor. " We have, in two seasons, climbed the steps of all races. I can't say that I was starting to get bored, but I needed a challenge and to get ahead in the practice of sailing. "

Competitor Stamm is a fan of speed, all speeds. He confesses by the way, " I rode the circuit bike. I like speed, I need challenges, all challenges. And I felt the need to have my challenge shoot off, on water. "

The rest is easy to guess when we know the character of Stamm.  The offshore racing offer, at that time in the late 90s, was not bloated. There was the Figaro. But I considered these boats not fun enough and really very close to what I already knew. . "Next then. " The ORMA 60 type multihulls were totally unaffordable for me. So there was still the Vendée Globe. The 60-foot IMOCA attracted me. I contacted the architect of my Mini to ask him to help me design a 60-footer. . He explained to me frankly that he did not feel to carry out the necessary calculations. We thus composed from A to Z the whole team, engineers, computer scientists ... To build, still in this Lesconil hangar, my 60 footer. "

Finances are lacking

Once again, it is through finance that the low will hurt the most. Devoid of any clean background, the navigator will engage in search of the money necessary for the construction of his boat. He tells us about his project at the time. " The basic idea was to assemble the molds of the boat and present them to the financiers to prove to them that this project was real. We would have had to present a nearly finished boat to the sponsors for them to agree to us. help fit out this boat. Almost all of the sponsors only want one thing, to communicate. If they want to dream and make people dream, they also need visibility, which is difficult with a boat in a hangar. "

"Superbigou", under construction on the port of Lesconil, before its launch on February 11, 2000 "Superbigou", under construction on the port of Lesconil, before its launch on February 11, 2000

And the time is short, too, for those who want to do everything by themselves.  Building the mold took up a tremendous amount of time that we couldn't spend actively seeking sponsors. We got caught up in the schedule, the molds were done, time was running out, and we didn't have a sponsor. So I knocked on all doors, friends, family, neighbors. Everyone was approached. And that's when I realized the value of everyone's commitment. "

Friends, loves, hassles ...

Bernard Stamm stops for a moment. Then he talks about one of his friends, a certain Jean Le Cam . " I struggled to finance this boat as Jean struggled to finance Yes we Cam!. I know what he went through, the moments of doubt and despair. The worries, too, to pay the suppliers. part not fortunate, in this environment, it is quickly complicated. "

Collective commitment will overcome these difficulties. " I had lots of help from the people of Lesconil. Vacationers and locals alike came to help me. Some for a few hours, others for longer. This site was a real Tower of Babel. talks about collaborative projects today, that's exactly it. Friends came from Switzerland to help me, people came to spend their holidays in the surroundings to help me. "

An association created to manage all this site, a single employee, not Bernard who, of course, does not receive any income in this project. Then the calendar , always him, keeps the pressure. " It took me 14 months to build the molds and 11 months to assemble and fit out the boat. We started in 1997 by building a hangar in the harbor, the boat was launched in August 2000. "

Moral of this first part of Bernard's adventure ? " Building your boat in artisanal mode allows you to shape things without any notion of profitability, which a shipyard needs to do. It costs a lot of money to do yourself, because you go into the details of the details, you don't skimp on nothing. And we know every millimeter of the boat, because we brought it into the world. "

Vendée Globe 2000, lack of preparation

This is where the calendar takes its revenge on this race.  Normally, to validate a boat that is doing a Vendée Globe, you need 3 or 4 years of navigation. In my case, I had 3 or 4 months. I qualified at the last moment, the qualifying race (Gijon - Saint-Pierre et Miquelon) was in fact one of my races to prepare the boat. "Rocambolesque!

Starts the Vendée Globe 2000 in the colors of Armor-lux and Bizac foie gras for the competitor. " I was suitably placed despite everything, in 3rd or 4th position. In a boat, there is always water, especially in the depths. And when you have the excellent idea of fixing the intelligence of the automatic pilots precisely. in the depths, gravity takes effect and, quickly, the boxes are covered with float, and they don't like that at all. On second thought, it's obvious that they were going to be submerged, we should have fixed them on the top of the partition. "The questioning of his choices, another specificity of the Swiss. He never tries to put the responsibility for a concern on someone else. Assume, always.

Bernard takes the helm, he will be the pilot of the boat, the time to go to safety to try to repair. " A moment of calm in the early evening, I take a break to go cover myself. Gale. A little violent jibe. The bar breaks. I install the emergency bar. And I realize that I am facing a real damage that calls my race into question. "We know what follows. Bernard gives up the race, with a boat in good condition, except the helm and the autopilots. He stops in Cape Verde. Once the repairs are done, head to Guadeloupe then the Big Apple, New York.

Failure of boats, failure of records?

For the return route, Bernard embarks on a crossing of the Atlantic. By the way, because the competitor needs adrenaline and challenge, he takes the opportunity to beat the then record for crossing the Atlantic and will take the opportunity to smash the distance record twice over 24 hours. We are at the beginning of 2001.

New sponsor, new projects

In 2001, after the Atlantic record , a Swiss sponsor, Bobst Group, joined Armor Lux. The skipper and his team added to their agenda the participation in Around Alone, ex BOC Challenge at the end of 2002. Bernard explains: " I won my first round the world trip and in the process became, for the first time, world champion in ocean racing. . After this victory, the Swiss sponsor withdrew and I was contacted by Poujoulat. The partnership began at the end of 2003 and will end in 2019. "

The slab in homage to Bernard Stamm, in Brest The slab in homage to Bernard Stamm, in Brest

The navigator projects himself, again and again, into greater challenges. " The project is the Vendée Globe 2004, which unfortunately came to an abrupt end with the loss of the keel on the English Transat. "

The mythical Jules Vernes

Consolation if there is one, he has the chance to embark with Bruno Peyron. " Instead of the Vendée Globe, I am taken on by Bruno Peyron as coxswain on Orange 2 and we beat the Jules Verne trophy, the absolute speed sailing record around the world. " Things are accelerating from victory to victory. In view, the Vendée Globe 2008. " With Poujoulat, we are putting the Vendée Globe 2008 participation on the program, with the purchase of a more recent boat which I could only have at the beginning of 2007. In the meantime, I am participating a second time. in the race around the world with stopover which I win again. "

The 2010s arrive. Decade of renewal for the skipper. New boat, a 60 feet designed by Juan Kouyoumdjian and manufactured by the Décision SA shipyard in Switzerland.

In 2012, he lined up for the start of the Vendée Globe . Problems with the hydrogenerators of Cheminées Poujoulat appear. The browser, running out of energy, must repair. He anchored in New Zealand and involuntarily received assistance resulting in disqualification. We clearly feel that this episode remains painful for humans. Not because the disqualification, which he has never questioned the merits. But by these four years of work by a whole team, the hopes of all the partners came to an abrupt end. Despite this mishap, he will finish HIS Vendée Globe outside the race in 88 days and a few hours. History will never tell us whether or not he could have won the race ...

Bernard at the start of the Vendée Globe 2012 Bernard at the start of the Vendée Globe 2012

Loss of the boat

In 2013, Transat Jacque Vabre. Annus Horribilis for the browser, again. His boat broke in two, at the foot of the mast, during the return delivery . The wreckage is recovered and an expertise is carried out. The technician Bernard Stamm explains to us " This boat was built in aluminum honeycomb. Water has penetrated a cell and, by electrolysis with salt water, corrosion formed at the foot of the mast, nibbling the honeycombs one after the other. To such an extent that an invisible crack was created in the structure of the boat, from one side to the other. Basically, I no longer had any spinal columns on the boat. "

The initial reason for this defect is easy to understand " The boat has probably hit or scratched somewhere. This shock will have pierced one of the cells. " Sea water and time will have done the rest.

The state of distress

In this regard, we wanted to understand what a skipper feels in such a state of distress, what his reflexes and automatisms are. Bernard Stamm explains to us. “We try to get to personal safety first and foremost. I was lucky to be able to lock the watertight bulkheads and keep a minimum of flotation. We got to safety at the back of the boat. fight, struggle to pump the rising fleet while we call for help. You have to think for yourself and for others. Check that everyone is safe and start survival mode in your mind. no case a priori how long it will last."A trying experience, you can feel it in the skipper's voice. Losing his boat certainly represents the worst luck at sea.

The recovery of the wreck of Bernard Stamm's boat, in the Ouessant rail The recovery of the wreck of Bernard Stamm's boat, in the Ouessant rail

In 2014, we are trying to restore the navigator, failing his boat. " In 2014, it will be repair of the man. I had broken ribs, loose knee and damage to the cervical connections. In short, rest and fitness. And I rent a boat to attack the Barcelona 2015 with Jean le Cam. "

Generosity and preservation

Bernard Stamm's Diam 24 on the Tour de France Bernard Stamm's Diam 24 on the Tour de France

Wishing to keep his team employed , the skipper bought a Diam 24 so that everyone could work, prepare and fit out the boat, and maintain it. This is how an autodidact works, never impacting others.

Rental with Purchase Option

The Barcelona of 2015. " I rented this boat with an option to buy. I did not want to buy a boat, I wanted to bounce back to new projects and new challenges. Jean argued my option of buy bought this boat after we won the Barcelona It is the former Foncia of Michel Desjoyaux in the Vendée Globe 2008. "Race won for the duo of skippers .

Bernard Stamm and Jean le Cam, victorious at Barcelona 2015 Bernard Stamm and Jean Le Cam, victorious in Barcelona 2015

Things follow one another for the hyperactive skipper. " In 2015 I entered a double-handed round the world, a sailing tour of France and a round the world on the Jules Verne trophy with Francis Joyon. To my knowledge, only two human beings have made two round the world trips during of the same year. Sébastien Audigane and I. "Calm, Bernard?

Rebelote 2 years later. " In 2017, we are doing it again with Francis Joyon on Idec and this time we beat the Jules Verne Trophy. A record that we still hold today. "

The polar adventure

Always eager for adventures, the Helvète leaves in 2019 with Mike Horn, his long-time friend. The objective was to land on the ice floe, starting from Alaska, Northeast route.

Bernard Stamm and Mike Horn in Siberia, 2003 Bernard Stamm and Mike Horn in Siberia, 2003

2020 is coming ... Time is on hold for the navigator as for the whole country. Do not think that Bernard Stamm is put to sleep. He still has projects, on the water as on land.

Around the Arctic in one season

On the water, to start. " I have a project to tour the Arctic in one season. It has never been done until now. It is a project that I have been studying since 1990, before doing the Vendée Globe. C t is an ardent desire, to go running over there, in this elsewhere still little explored by sail. At the time, it was impractical, because the ice barred the way. It has become so today. unfortunately for the planet. But bad luck, the covid has arrived, all this is on hiatus. And we have to finance the daily life and the adventures, too. "

A mill too

And, for this daily life, come much more land-based projects for the sailor. " I opened cottages that I rent out in a mill, near Aber Wrach, in Plouvien. It's the oat mill, a very pleasant project. And it works well! " Bernard Exulte .

Human (s)

Talking with Bernard Stamm is above all talking with a human, who listens to his interlocutor, who explains things to him and puts himself at his level. Talking with the one who led this life is a chance to learn more about the world of the sea, ocean racing and the ups and downs that a skipper experiences.

Speaking with Bernard Stamm is to touch on the daily difficulties encountered by adventurers in setting up their adventures, financing them, leading them and coming back with the sole dream of returning.

Bernard is one of those adventurers of life, just human and accessible, grateful for those who have done things for him, aware of his mistakes and his successes. Humble, he does not give any lessons, but retains those he has lived. A lover of the sea and those who inhabit it.

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What I find amazing about this edition of the race is this "four years ago second placed Alex Thomson (HUGO BOSS) was nearly 600 miles from Le Cléac'h and third placed Jérémie Beyou was nearly 1,500 miles behind. Right now there eleven solo sailors in less than 500 miles, and the peloton of nine was within 130 miles yesterday." (From SW)

There are still a dozen legitimate contenders for first. A poor Doldrums crossing, as Jérémie knows well, could quickly ruin your placement. Watching this race unfold has, and will continue to be, captivating. 

 

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7N4A9259-1210x423.jpg

The Occitane en Provence is again very fast this morning of December 30th, averaging 19 knots. After overtaking Romain Attanasio from whom he took 13th place two days ago, Armel Tripon is now attacking 12th, held by Clarisse Crémer. Above all, the Nantes skipper has never been so close to the leading peloton and he should still regain ground by the time he crosses Cape Horn.
Armel Tripon is one of the most isolated men in the world this Wednesday, November 30, about 500 miles southeast of Point Nemo which is considered the most remote place on the planet from any civilization. But the geographical anecdote is much less important for the skipper of L'Occitane en Provence than the performances he manages to achieve in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Armel testifies to a good morale, this December 30 in the morning.

"The boat surfs effortlessly at 23 knots"

He says: “I am under a high mainsail and J2, in the middle of the Pacific! The boat is surfing effortlessly at 23 knots, I am sailing at around 19 knots on average. Suddenly, I further reduced the gap with Clarisse (Crémer) and with the leading pack. Now I can see all the outpost ships on my computer screen, which was not the case before. This kind of detail is very good for morale! "
The small sailing sake of before met yesterday is already history. Armel Tripon even jokes about the 19 places gained from the coast of Portugal (!)… And maybe 20 if he manages to overtake Banque Populaire. “When I was sailing in Figaro, there was a price for the best lifts… I hope that also exists in the Vendée Globe? (laughs). "
You have to remember that with the hook broken at the very start of the race, Armel Tripon was ranked 32nd in this Vendée Globe… which only has 27 boats still in the race today. Above all, he was up to 2,200 miles behind the leader after crossing the equator. However, this same delay is less than 860 miles this morning! Never has L'Occitane en Provence been so close to the leaders.

"Our roads converge with Clarisse, it's nice to see competitors again"

Armel Tripon is now clearly tackling the position of Clarisse Crémer, who is only sailing 39 miles ahead of the round bow of L'Occitane en Provence. “Our roads converge with Clarisse, maybe I'll see her, or even talk to her on the VHF. I saw Romain's boat (Attanasio) two days ago and tried to call him, but we couldn't reach us. It's nice anyway to see competitors again, it had been a long time since this had happened to me. I had not seen any during the crossing of the Indian Ocean and neither since the beginning of the Pacific! "Other
than that" it's very cold. When you have to go to the bridge, it's freezing ”. Barely 5 degrees in the air and in the water… “I can smell the icy breath of Antarctica! »Says Armel.

In terms of weather and strategy, conditions are still very good and conducive to speed. “So far I cannot complain about the southern seas, which I am discovering for the first time: I had a maximum of 40 knots of gusty wind and 4 meters of hollow. Nothing daunting as we can often meet here, or as Yannick (Bestaven) and Charlie (Dalin) will face when they pass Cape Horn. For me, it will remain very maneuverable: 20 to 25 knots south-southwest. I have two days of reaching (crosswind) in the program and this pace should allow me to rest to attack the rest. I think I will be at Cape Horn in 5 to 6 days and I tell myself that nothing is over yet! I can still come back to the group of hunters and anything is possible in the ascent of the Atlantic. There will be moves to play, that's for sure. It's up to me to dose well, to spare the boat when necessary, but also to support when there is a chance. "

Less than 400 miles behind the leading group at Cape Horn?

Dose and seize opportunities: that's exactly what Armel Tripon has been doing since… the Cape Verde archipelago. When you look at his trajectory, he was able to seize every opportunity in the right direction to regain ground. To regain nearly 1,400 miles and 19 places is no small feat.

Small reminder: it is customary to say that there are no losers among all the sailors who manage to finish the Vendée Globe, from first to last. Armel Tripon knows it. But he also knows that the appetite comes with eating. “For the first time I did a routing (computer calculation) of the progressions of the other boats, compared to mine. And I think I will be less than 500 miles behind the lead group, maybe even less than 400, when passing Cape Horn. So regaining more places is possible, because then there will be the whole Atlantic and another month of racing. The finish is still very far away! It will be necessary to be playful and to try blows. In the meantime I realize that I have been alone at sea for 52 days. This is twice as much as my previous record which was 25 days and I still cannot find the time long!

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20 minutes ago, Varan said:

What I find amazing about this edition of the race is this "four years ago second placed Alex Thomson (HUGO BOSS) was nearly 600 miles from Le Cléac'h and third placed Jérémie Beyou was nearly 1,500 miles behind. Right now there eleven solo sailors in less than 500 miles, and the peloton of nine was within 130 miles yesterday." (From SW)

There are still a dozen legitimate contenders for first. A poor Doldrums crossing, as Jérémie knows well, could quickly ruin your placement. Watching this race unfold has, and will continue to be, captivating. 

 

Ice limit changed everything. Now it is "Atlantic" racing all the way. 

I can imagine lighter boats are being built for the next edition as you could surf on edge of every LP.

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I feel for ya, Pip!  If I had a dollar for every time I ran over my lazy sheet... well, I wouldn't be exactly rich, but I could afford a pretty decent bottle of single malt to drown my sorrows.  And I'm only piloting a 4ksb around the cans on the harbour.

1 hour ago, troll99 said:

Go, Pip!

 

 

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13 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Ice limit changed everything. Now it is "Atlantic" racing all the way. 

Ice limits are not new, but maybe more restrictive this time. Still, I think the weather has contributed way more to the boat placements we are seeing than the AEZ. No one was able to break away on the initial push south and grab the first runaway train. By the time the AEZ came into play, there was still a large group of boats (>30%) leading the way.

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7 minutes ago, Varan said:

Ice limits are not new, but maybe more restrictive this time. Still, I think the weather has contributed way more to the boat placements we are seeing than the AEZ. No one was able to break away on the initial push south and grab the first runaway train. By the time the AEZ came into play, there was still a large group of boats (>30%) leading the way.

I have fresh memories from 2016. Yann Elles, Pierre Dick, JLP.. they could sail deep down and catch every LP. But now sailors have to wait in order to catch next LP.

It would be helpful to compare ice limits 2016 and 2020 in pictures. Indeed the weather is weaker than the year 2016 too. 

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Such a contrast of Tripon and Hare. Tripon on fantastic latest generation boat struggling to reel in non-foiling boats (Clarisse is currently keeping him at bay), while Hare on oldest boat in fleet is reeling in two foilers. What a bizarre race.

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13 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Tripon on fantastic latest generation boat struggling to reel in non-foiling boats (Clarisse is currently keeping him at bay)

If you zoom out beyond the last few days that isn't an accurate characterisation of Tripon's performance. Also worth bearing in mind that whilst the scow is pretty innovative, the project came together pretty late in the day and so hasn't had the luxury of 20 years of optimisation (cf Pip)

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