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Those Kleppers are cool boats.  I picked up an old Folbot I plan to fix up for adventures.  Sea going craft that will fit in over sized luggage on an airplane.  Awesome.

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59 minutes ago, blunderfull said:

Holly Martin took a hit in Panama - robbed of ~$6k in electronics and camera etc.

She’s looking for dollars.   Hope she gets it back/replaced.   Like her style.

That sucks she seemed one of the better ones.

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9 minutes ago, KC375 said:

That sucks she seemed one of the better ones.

Yea, and to put more pressure on she needs to get thru the P. Canal soon before the fee goes from $800 to $1700.

Said she’s rethinking her anchoring strategy.  Had been looking for quiet areas w/o many other boats.   Now she’s looking for big anchorages with plenty of neighbors.

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38 minutes ago, Zonker said:

The video looks like she was anchored in Portobello. One of the few places in the world where we locked the door at night.

Wow, that does NOT sound enjoyable.  (Our main hatch doesn’t lock from inside...never occurred to me...but then you’d feel trapped inside, no?!)

Would be tough as a lone young woman, very sad to say.  Best wishes to her - hope she stays safe.

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Well, no I'd never feel trapped. No more than having a door in your home with a deadbolt on the inside.

We had 3 barrel bolts that closed the dutch door on the inside - but had little slots in the door with an extension welded to the bolt so you could also close the door from outside (in case of bad weather). They little slots were covered with a flexible foam cover that was pretty unobtrusive. These were strictly to ease opening/closing from both sides at sea.

We had yet another barrel bolt inside that could only be opened/closed from inside. That was the inside security lock.

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We had some people try to board us in El Tigre Honduras in broad daylight anchored in front of the port captain and a naval base, with our friends anchored next to us.  They were tweakers and took off when I picked up the radio Mike, but it shows you are never really unexposed.  That said I think all of the recent incidents in eastern Panama involved boats by themselves in out of the way ancorages or know piracy areas.  It sucks as you really have to adjust your plans if you don't have someone on the same schedule and are going it alone.  I think several of the recent robbery incidents involved dirt bag cruisers and not locals.

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14 hours ago, Zonker said:

Well, no I'd never feel trapped. No more than having a door in your home with a deadbolt on the inside.

We had 3 barrel bolts that closed the dutch door on the inside - but had little slots in the door with an extension welded to the bolt so you could also close the door from outside (in case of bad weather). They little slots were covered with a flexible foam cover that was pretty unobtrusive. These were strictly to ease opening/closing from both sides at sea.

We had yet another barrel bolt inside that could only be opened/closed from inside. That was the inside security lock.

Have never locked our house in ten years of owning it (only lock works; not sure we even have keys any more!).  So, a very different state of mind for sure.
 

I’ve gat from the paranoid type, but locking oneself aboard sounds crazy.  If you’re inside and someone (or more than one) boards you, armed, determined to get inside, then what?  Hypotheticals (probably somewhat unlikely, too) better for another thread, for sure.

Holly says in her most recent vid (the only one of hers I’ve seen) that Panamanian authorities are advising people to only anchor where there’s a naval presence.  Yikes!

 

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3 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Have never locked our house in ten years of owning it (only lock works; not sure we even have keys any more!).  So, a very different state of mind for sure.
 

I’ve gat from the paranoid type, but locking oneself aboard sounds crazy.  If you’re inside and someone (or more than one) boards you, armed, determined to get inside, then what?  Hypotheticals (probably somewhat unlikely, too) better for another thread, for sure.

Holly says in her most recent vid (the only one of hers I’ve seen) that Panamanian authorities are advising people to only anchor where there’s a naval presence.  Yikes!

 

That’s gotta be pretty intense sitting in your cabin with your mom & gun toting cucharachas storm the boat and strip it.

Looking forward to seeing JaJa & Holly.   This is getting real interesting.

Can’t help but think of Sir Peter Blake.  I don’t think I would have done anything different than Holly did.   Always another day & all gear replaceable.  Fight or surrender a nightmare scenario.

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Honestly if somebody is pounding on the door with a gun, I'd get on the radio and call for help, sound the airhorn out a cracked window etc. Most robbers are lazy dudes and want an easy mark. The idea of them busting in and causing a big noise just isn't likely. Exceptions for deserted anchorages where you're the only boat and may be a target.

I'd say 99% of the time it just wasn't a worry.  We only locked our boat in a very few places, when we left it and almost never when we were aboard sleeping

- Richardsons Bay, CA, Alameda, CA and San Diego, CA (places where the local liveaboard community had more than their share of bad folks)

- Brisbane River pile moorings. Lots of locals on the moorings were permanent residents and a few were none too trust worthy. Had our dinghy stolen from the dinghy dock there by a non resident of the moorings.

- Indonesia, west side of Borneo where we were sitting out bad weather. Local police guy came by in a metallic flake ski boat and said please anchor closer to our village where we can keep an eye on you better. In bad Indonesian/English we understood that it just wasn't that safe. He did have an awesome uniform with tons of gold braid.

- Seychelles, AFTER we were boarded and robbed one night while asleep. Thief got a really bad cellphone (ha!), $5 in change, but did unstick a corroded zipper on a backpack so we called it a wash

- All of South Africa

- Panama, Pacific side of Canal anchorage, and "The Flats" near Colon

That's about all the places I can think of... 

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Until now, I haven’t watched any of Holly’s/Sea Gecko’s vids - just the most recent one above where she details her robbery.

But I like her keep-it-simple approach - so, getting “back on topic”, so to speak —going simple, going small, going now— I just had a quick glimpse at another vid —where she mentions she converted her boat from a furling jib to hank-on sails.  She said she likes it b/c it enables her to drop a sail completely (presumably for no windage) very quickly - she’s describing this as she’s talking about the possibility of squalls (en route from Curaçao to Panama).

Anyone have any thoughts about this?  I, too, have a hank-on jib (and staysail) and have long thought of doing the opposite: converting it to furling, when needed, say, before going offshore.  On the one hand, hank-on’s are dead simple with little to fail.  OTOH, my wife apparently ( :-) ) won’t necessarily like to go on the foredeck at night and wrestle with a dropped sail, tie it up, etc.  Then along comes this 27 year old “kid” (Holly/Sea Gecko), an experienced sailor, espousing the virtue of old school hank-on headsails!

Is her reasoning sound?  If you’re being approached by tropical squalls (i.e., sudden, very strong gusts of wind) and you have a furling jib, would you be concerned about having a furled jib on the furler, or would you take it down?  (I’ve limited furler experience, and none sailing offshore in the tropics/squalls.)

Starting at 1:00, as she preps for approaching squalls en route to Panama singlehanded for 8 days, she talks about her reason for swapping the furling type for hank-on sails (audio is a bit messed up in parts of the vid):  

 

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Furlers look pretty wank to me on anything under 22’ and doing harbor/near shore spins.

The Harbor 20 crowd with their jib boom & furlers are kinda silly about that gear.

I’m going with oars too.   Good workout.  My 2-stroke is breaking my balls and I have no confidence in it and do not want to buy another as that’s the $$ I could spend on a better jib.

Lin Pardey mentioned foredeck training underway with a bucket of rope in one hand, no harness.   Getting your moves sorted out and the strength/confidence built in was a good skill to develop.   Totally agree.

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Well, I happen to like furlers but they need to be carefully rigged and operated, like any gear; and they need maintenance. That plus they're expensive.

The lead to the furler drum needs to be gotten just right if you want it to work reliably and not over-ride / jam just when you need it most. I'm also a believer in taking the core out of double-braid furling line so it will roll up flat, at least all the way back to where your hand starts grabbing it. More is better. One a few occasions I've put furling lines on a winch but this is really bad practice, don't do it except once in an emergency (preferably on someody else's boat).

Hanks with a down haul threaded thru brails is a good system to positively control a headsail. And they are quite inexpensive. However In big seas, a bunched up sail on deck is going to catch a lot of solid water and possibly carry away. How rough is it going to be, exactly? I'd rather avoid bad weather.

FB- Doug

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The Volvo boats race around the world with furlers...if it works for them, should work for anyone who takes the time, as Steam says, to carefully rig and maintain them.

 

I’ve got lots of open ocean time from the old days with hanks.  They are simple and reliable.  But not as good (IMHO) as a well set up and maintained furler.  If hanks were better, then that’s what all the big round the world racers would use...

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The squalls in central am seem to be pretty consistent in there nature.  They can come up quick and don't follow any wx forecast but they behave about the same and with a good radar you can take alot of the sting out. I think the hank on simplistic approach goes out the window when you can't double hand or you get past a point in sail area.  It doesn't make much sense.  You have to think about setting as well as taking down something, wind clocking and putting you on a leeshore etc.  Being able to do both from the helm alone is way easier than going fwd.  Sometimes the rain is so much you loose gps so pretty thick. We had the Panamanian Navy swing by for visit in a squall leaving Colon, they were nice enough to not try and board but it added a nice shitshow factor to everything else, having to go dead slow.

Furlers are pretty spendy though so...

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5 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, I happen to like furlers but they need to be carefully rigged and operated, like any gear; and they need maintenance. That plus they're expensive.

I've built a copy of the Wyckham-Martin furling gear for my boat. So far it's cost me less than $100.

If you ignore the cost of the lathes & milling machines that is.....

Haven't installed it as yet though. Boat sails quite well with no jib, so not a lot of incentive. Sometime before Christmas I expect it'll get a try-out.

FKT

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I like furlers because it is faster to reef a 530 sq foot Genoa than lowering a 250 sq ft jib - if you include time to clip on and get to the foredeck and get the sail down and secured. Also I could stay in the cockpit and usually stay dry if it was a rain squall.

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10 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

The squalls in central am seem to be pretty consistent in there nature.  They can come up quick and don't follow any wx forecast but they behave about the same and with a good radar you can take alot of the sting out. I think the hank on simplistic approach goes out the window when you can't double hand or you get past a point in sail area.  It doesn't make much sense.  You have to think about setting as well as taking down something, wind clocking and putting you on a leeshore etc.  Being able to do both from the helm alone is way easier than going fwd.  Sometimes the rain is so much you loose gps so pretty thick. We had the Panamanian Navy swing by for visit in a squall leaving Colon, they were nice enough to not try and board but it added a nice shitshow factor to everything else, having to go dead slow.

Furlers are pretty spendy though so...

This, and what Zonker said, makes sense to me.  If singlehanded, being able to shorten sail quickly from the helm makes total sense.

Holly’s decision to have a furler probably makes sense in her scenario.  Smaller (27’) boat.  Limited budget (I assume).  If she converted the boat from furler to hanks, that suggests the furler that she had originally may have been old/not worth refurbishing?

But hanks are “tried and true”.  They’ve been used for a very long time, and certainly across oceans.  (I suspect we’ll keep ours for now for budget reasons, and add a furler when it makes sense.)

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11 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Well, I happen to like furlers but they need to be carefully rigged and operated, like any gear; and they need maintenance. That plus they're expensive.

The lead to the furler drum needs to be gotten just right if you want it to work reliably and not over-ride / jam just when you need it most. I'm also a believer in taking the core out of double-braid furling line so it will roll up flat, at least all the way back to where your hand starts grabbing it. More is better. One a few occasions I've put furling lines on a winch but this is really bad practice, don't do it except once in an emergency (preferably on someody else's boat).

Hanks with a down haul threaded thru brails is a good system to positively control a headsail. And they are quite inexpensive. However In big seas, a bunched up sail on deck is going to catch a lot of solid water and possibly carry away. How rough is it going to be, exactly? I'd rather avoid bad weather.

FB- Doug

Yup - I broke a furling line on a winch midway back from Hawaii.  Owner of boat pushing me to roll in sail.  I started to.  It got harder.  I kept going.  And going.  Snap!  Not a happy time, but fortunately he had lots of spare stuff on board.  Lesson learned!

Re: brail - what is this, Doug?  I always thought a downhaul line for a hank on job would be run up the forestay through a few of the hanks?  I’ve never heard of this.

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59 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Yup - I broke a furling line on a winch midway back from Hawaii.  Owner of boat pushing me to roll in sail.  I started to.  It got harder.  I kept going.  And going.  Snap!  Not a happy time, but fortunately he had lots of spare stuff on board.  Lesson learned!

Re: brail - what is this, Doug?  I always thought a downhaul line for a hank on job would be run up the forestay through a few of the hanks?  I’ve never heard of this.

A simple downhaul is exactly like that. http://impliedconsent.us/Downhaul.html

It can be fancied up a number of ways to make it work better, or whatever. I don't think it matters that much whether you go to the top hank, or the head of the sail, or use a sliding ring like this guy.

The problem with these is that it leaves the bulk of the sail free to flop around, flog like crazy, trail overboard.... and in bad weather, you know it will do whatever is the worst thing at the moment. "Brail" is probably not the most accurate word but it's the one I know, a line to gather and secure a sail in a bundle. For a jib downhaul/brail, a vertical row of grommets caries the line up from a fairlead (you can use a block if you like) on the deck so that when you pull that line, it not only pulls the sail down but holds all the grommets together.

image.png.a090046f6a304d7c88b2a61df662a978.png

Like so. Now your headsail is secured to the stay along the luff (like always) but it's also secure in the middle. Yes it can still blow around but only half as much as with just a downhaul.

FB- Doug

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6 hours ago, Zonker said:

I like furlers because it is faster to reef a 530 sq foot Genoa than lowering a 250 sq ft jib - if you include time to clip on and get to the foredeck and get the sail down and secured. Also I could stay in the cockpit and usually stay dry if it was a rain squall.

+1 ... as long as you stay within the sloop paradigm.

Furlers are not without flaws as you end up with baggy sails when you actually need flat sails and in the (unlikely but possible) event of something going wrong, you end up with a flapping sail aloft.

For these reasons, If I were to sail long distance alone with my wife I would seriously consider some kind of cat ketch with lazy jack and reefing lines brought back to the cockpit. When things go awfully wrong, there will nearly always be a way to get the sail to deck level, it can be reefed, gybed, tacked alone easily. My experience of cat boats doesn't go beyond lasers, so may be I am missing something...

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Both were offshore boats were actually cutters. The 40' cat came with a furler on the staysail too. Very easy to change gears. The little 30' mono came with hanked on sails but I changed the genoa to a furler in Panama and was happier with it. The little staysail stayed hanked on because it was tiny and easy to throw up.

 

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Both were offshore boats were actually cutters. The 40' cat came with a furler on the staysail too. Very easy to change gears. The little 30' mono came with hanked on sails but I changed the genoa to a furler in Panama and was happier with it. The little staysail stayed hanked on because it was tiny and easy to throw up.

 

Yes, true that with a cutter, you can at least have a flat staysail to go upwind in a blow.

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2 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Yes, true that with a cutter, you can at least have a flat staysail to go upwind in a blow.

A strong reason I am avoiding spending the not-insignificant money to put a furler on my genoa (which would require a new sail too).  It’s a proper cutter rig so I’ve got a staysail - the theory is to rig a good downhaul, drop the genoa, and carry on under staysail as needed - but this would still likely require going on foredeck to secure dropped genoa...........a problem that money could fix! :-) :-)

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On 11/5/2019 at 2:49 PM, TBW said:

Those Kleppers are cool boats.  I picked up an old Folbot I plan to fix up for adventures.  Sea

Yup Kleppers are incredibly seaworthy. The Folboats were not built to the same quality so inspect the connectors carefully. Both are slow. Read John Dowd's Sea Kayaking book to see what they are capable of.

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I saw this news article, but nothing else, on this expedition. Some crazy Russians made a homemade boat dash across the NWP.

I thought of Rimas. The radar unit looks unworldly mounted on that apocalyptic craft. Adventure, none the less.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/homemade-boat-nearly-through-northwest-passage-1.1078977

li-rus-620.jpg

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16 hours ago, Zonker said:

Yup Kleppers are incredibly seaworthy. The Folboats were not built to the same quality so inspect the connectors carefully. Both are slow. Read John Dowd's Sea Kayaking book to see what they are capable of.

For sure.  I have 4 kayaks, 2 set up for sailing with pop up carbon fibre sail rigs.

The Folbot is a real slug.  I have tested the Folbot and typical paddling speed for me seems to be about 2.2-2.3 knots with a green land paddle.  I will equip it with some kind of sail rig to cut down on fatigue.

The construction quality seems okay, except for the plywood frames.  The original skin and aluminum parts are in great shape.  The boat has very little in terms of outfitting.  No hatches, no perimeter lines.  Just an aluminum rudder bracket.  

The boat seems to have impressive primary stability.  The frame seems to flex and give with the waves.  Not like anything I have paddled before.

I think bouyancy bags fore and aft will be essential.

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Lord that's slow. With a wide 25" x 16' glass boat I averaged an easy 3 knots for hours.

I'm not convinced why Greenland style paddles existed except Greenlanders didn't have access to wider pieces of wood. Maybe they work well with the Greenland style skinny kayak but for a wider fatter boat I think you need more blade area.

Kleppers with their internal sponsons are very stable and the sponsons don't take up much cargo space.

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I do some expedition style paddle sailing with a custom greenland paddle.  There is no doubt it pushes less water per stroke than a euroblade or wing paddle.  But if you are paddling a heavily loaded boat into a head wind, that isn't necessarily a bad thing.  Its like having low gear in a kayak.  Just keep moving forward.  Personal preference thing I guess.

For me, where a greenland paddle really shines is kayak sailing.  Having that versatile light weight wing in your hand all the time is a real benefit for me.  My sheet, boom vang and forestay are all led down the starboard side of the boat.  I can let go of my paddle with my right hand, lay the paddle across my cockpit with the front of the blades angled up and push down with my left hand.  This effectively gives the boat wings/foils so when the boat heels in a gust or when I am changing gears, I get a solid brace with only one hand on the paddle.

Plus there are all the various sweep strokes and braces that come much easier for me with a GL paddle that make it the right choice for me when kayak sailing.

Expedition sailing kayaks fit well in the go simple go now category for coastal stuff.  Seaworthy, fast, simple, cheap.

 

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We binned the furler. As it unwound the forestay on the first delivery. Boat came with full suit of sails, storm jib to 150. The medium Genoa needed replacing, so replaced it with a reefable one. So far cruising though we’ve only really used the 150, or 90% jib. Next few passages should see the reefing foresail come into its own though. 

If I had the money I’d have a furler and swap the head sails as needed. 

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On ‎11‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 7:57 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

A strong reason I am avoiding spending the not-insignificant money to put a furler on my genoa (which would require a new sail too).  It’s a proper cutter rig so I’ve got a staysail - the theory is to rig a good downhaul, drop the genoa, and carry on under staysail as needed - but this would still likely require going on foredeck to secure dropped genoa...........a problem that money could fix! :-) :-)

In really shit weather, when we need to douse a headsail, I have somebody go up and open the foredeck hatch, take the lazy sheet, and as we ease the halyard they pull it down the hatch.  Works fine so long as you're not dousing into the V-berth bed and getting it soaked, doesn't require clipping in, keeps nervous crew in a spot where they feel comfortable.  A little hard to do single handed I expect. 

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https://www.amazon.com/Rio-Polynesia-Roberto-Barros-ebook/dp/B01N7ZPSCA

In the late 60s this young and just married Brazilian couple, yacht designer Roberto Mesquita de Barros and his wife Eileen, sailed their self designed and self built 25 foot boat from Rio de Janeiro to Polynesia, where their daughter was eventually born. A couple of years ago the whole family moved to Perth, Western Australia.

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On 11/7/2019 at 7:57 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

A strong reason I am avoiding spending the not-insignificant money to put a furler on my genoa (which would require a new sail too).  It’s a proper cutter rig so I’ve got a staysail - the theory is to rig a good downhaul, drop the genoa, and carry on under staysail as needed - but this would still likely require going on foredeck to secure dropped genoa...........a problem that money could fix! :-) :-)

My boat is state-of-the-art 1995. This means I have a genoa on a furler and a full hoist staysail on hanks with a simple down-haul and a bag attached to the stay. Short-sheeted with downhaul on it doesn’t go anywhere and stuffing it in the bag is easy.  I’ve debated getting a furler for it, but so far the current system just works. I use it a lot with a small speed penalty when short tacking and it balances a reefed main well. 

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On 11/11/2019 at 7:09 AM, TBW said:

I do some expedition style paddle sailing with a custom greenland paddle.  There is no doubt it pushes less water per stroke than a euroblade or wing paddle.  But if you are paddling a heavily loaded boat into a head wind, that isn't necessarily a bad thing.  Its like having low gear in a kayak.  Just keep moving forward.  Personal preference thing I guess.

For me, where a greenland paddle really shines is kayak sailing.  Having that versatile light weight wing in your hand all the time is a real benefit for me.  My sheet, boom vang and forestay are all led down the starboard side of the boat.  I can let go of my paddle with my right hand, lay the paddle across my cockpit with the front of the blades angled up and push down with my left hand.  This effectively gives the boat wings/foils so when the boat heels in a gust or when I am changing gears, I get a solid brace with only one hand on the paddle.

Plus there are all the various sweep strokes and braces that come much easier for me with a GL paddle that make it the right choice for me when kayak sailing.

Expedition sailing kayaks fit well in the go simple go now category for coastal stuff.  Seaworthy, fast, simple, cheap.

 

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Without amas or a keel - how do you keep it on it's belly?   I've got a downwind sail that I've hooked to my Tarpon, and it helps on open water, but, it doesn't cause the boat to heel.   I like the idea of your rig, just not understanding how you keep the boat under ya! 

 

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4 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Without amas or a keel - how do you keep it on it's belly?   I've got a downwind sail that I've hooked to my Tarpon, and it helps on open water, but, it doesn't cause the boat to heel.   I like the idea of your rig, just not understanding how you keep the boat under ya! 

 

Sail it just like a dinghy, but with a 23 inch beam.  Lean up wind, stay loose in the hips.  You can use your paddle to brace if a gust catches you off guard.  I have been out in some pretty windy/rough stuff.  It works better than you might expect.

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If I was, like, 22, or 25, or 27 and footloose and fancy free with a limited budget and ready to take off, I’d be on this quick. I’d contact James Baldwin of www.atomvoyages.com, a long time Pearson Triton owner and two-time circumnavigator, for some advice on what to look out for.  I’d have, say, 5 grand in cash ready to make a “take it or leave it” offer.  $6k or $7k absolute max.  Put in maybe, what, an extra $10K in upgrades/fix ups/basic gear, and be gone towards Polynesia or wherever.  

Not a rocket ship, but fast enough for cruising, and bulletproof - a boat that would take care of you offshore in big stuff.  Minimal financial commitment, maximum adventure! 

Is that a windvane I spy on the transom?!  Three year old standing rigging!  A few new-ish sails!  Dinghy with outboard!  Solar panel!  Decent anchoring gear!  Anchor windlass!  Autopilot! Four-batt/420A house bank!  Blue Sea panels/re-wired!

Perfect? No.  But you could sell your car and stuff and be cruising the world soon on this.

https://sancarlosyachtsales.com/product/1966-pearson-triton-28

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On 11/11/2019 at 3:19 AM, Zonker said:

...I'm not convinced why Greenland style paddles existed except Greenlanders didn't have access to wider pieces of wood. Maybe they work well with the Greenland style skinny kayak but for a wider fatter boat I think you need more blade area...

You got it. I've got a kayak inspired after Tom Yost's Sea Rider... 19" beam, 17' long ish... and a greenland paddle carved from a WRC 2x4 is great. Take that same paddle and put it a KudzuCraft MessAbout with it's 28" beam, and it leads to nothin' more than busted knuckles. It's a lot easier to get a good vertical stroke with the skinny little kayak, too. 

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13 minutes ago, Tanton Y_M said:

The story is on my Blog. Click on it, Tanton Design#936, M stands for Modern.

Kayitsiz1.jpg

Thanks - will have a read.  And I see another beautiful shot  here: https://www.tantonyachtdesign.com/boat-plans  How cool that would be to have a custom boat built.

There’s something about a pic of a small (sub-30 feet) sailboat charging ahead purposefully.  As if, being small, she’s defying the big natural forces arrayed against her...

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14 hours ago, The Lucky One said:

You got it. I've got a kayak inspired after Tom Yost's Sea Rider... 19" beam, 17' long ish... and a greenland paddle carved from a WRC 2x4 is great. Take that same paddle and put it a KudzuCraft MessAbout with it's 28" beam, and it leads to nothin' more than busted knuckles. It's a lot easier to get a good vertical stroke with the skinny little kayak, too. 

Nah.  A good paddle is a good paddle.  I prefer a greenland paddle whether I am on a tubby recreational tandem or a sleek sea kayak.  Don't see the point in switching to a Euroblade just because that day I happen to be using a slower boat.  I still get all the benfits of the GL paddle, more bracing options, more sweep strokes, easier indexing etc.  All of my kayaks that I use with any frequency are equipped with sails, so just for the sake of bracing alone I would pick a GL paddle.

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?  My primary boat is a sea kayak with sail rig. Primary paddle is a laminated western red cedar GL paddle, no hand shifting.  Secondary paddle is a laminated western red cedar storm paddle which I use a slide stroke with, so yes, shifting hands.  

Boat 2 is a rec tandem I take my son camping with.  32 inch beam.  He is 5, so stable and spacious is good.  Still use the same set of paddles.  This boat is also equipped with a sail rig.

Boat 3 is 1950s skin on frame Folbot with a 28 inch beam, still being refurbished, but I can't think of a good reason to use a crappy paddle with that boat.

In any boat, I switch to an aluminum shaft/plastic blade euroblade in classed rapids or surf.  Open water is always the GL or Storm though, regardless of boat.

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On 11/26/2019 at 5:29 AM, Tanton Y_M said:

The story is on my Blog. Click on it, Tanton Design#936, M stands for Modern.

Kayitsiz1.jpg

The split double forestay must be really useful for sail changes and it brings in redundancy, plus 2 jibs going downwind?

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On ‎10‎/‎30‎/‎2019 at 11:49 AM, SloopJonB said:

Personally I'd draw the line for outboard power somewhere around 5000 Lbs.

As so much of the fleet ages I see more & more 30 footers and bigger with outboards but it's simply cheaping out because a new or rebuilt diesel is so expensive, not really an "option" so to speak.

A 9.9 pushing a 10,000 Lb boat just doesn't cut it IMO. O/K for docking but that's about it.

I depends on the 9.9. I have a 9.9 Yamaha high thrust on an older Gemini cat (31ft x 14ft x 7000lbs) and the only thing it lacks is top end speed. When I installed it we motored from Connecticut to Minnesota and it has plenty of thrust and power to push us at 5.5 to 6 knots all day long and even into a 25knot headwind and seas to match on Georgian bay but only just. Point is not all 9.9s are created equal. I do plan on upgrading to a 25hp but only to be able to run at lower rpm so quieter and perhaps equal the excellent  fuel economy of the 9.9. I don't need more thrust .

 

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Perhaps the thread should have included a lower size limit  of maybe 20ft so we could have eliminated all the posts of dinghies and kayaks etc that were obviously not what the thread was about . There are many older production boats from the 70's and 80's that are great candidates for long distant low budget cruising from builders such as Cal, Erickson, Ranger, Lindenberg and many others  in the US. None were designed for ocean crossing so would require some modifications but are cheap and many of them sail quite well. Boats in the 20 to 25ft range are typically quite small without standing headroom but between 26 to say 32ft all that changes and many cruiser/racer types at around 26ft have 6ft headroom, more beam and are really pretty decent boats.

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On ‎11‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 3:22 AM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I've built a copy of the Wyckham-Martin furling gear for my boat. So far it's cost me less than $100.

If you ignore the cost of the lathes & milling machines that is.....

Haven't installed it as yet though. Boat sails quite well with no jib, so not a lot of incentive. Sometime before Christmas I expect it'll get a try-out.

FKT

In the US there was an early furler called the Mariner roller stay which used hank on sails, it was used to furl the sail but not to reef it. Steve Dashew has one on his Columbia 50 on their first circumnavigation and he speaks highly of it in his cruising encyclopedia book. It was a well made unit and this style of furler is making a comeback, Colligo makes one and one of the big European marine hardware companies does also, they refer to it as a structural furler.

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The OP didn't specify no boats under 20 feet and if you really want simple, that gas/deisel engine has got to go in my opinion.  I have seen boats up to about 25 feet moved about with a yuloh, but much bigger than that, most folks are going to need an internal combustion engine.

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Re: Propulsion (and instrumentation), I'm reminded of this interesting fellow who has been introduced in another thread somewhere.  He appears to have nearly circumnavigated a Bristol 27 with no auxiliary propulsion except a home-made sweep oar, and no instruments except a raspberry pi. While contributing code to OpenCPN.  It appears that getting through Panama may be beyond his means, though.  Somewhere between simple and homeless?  But he has quietly sailed that thing around the world without begging for attention.  Oh, and we can see his tender on deck too.  

 

26337.jpg

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1 hour ago, Ishmael said:

It could be fiberglass with stains from the scuppers on the topsides. Doesn't look nail-sick.

I think you're right.

It does look pretty sick though.

That's a glass boat that even BS could admire.

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Without doing more than looking at the photos, one must imagine some intense spiritual ceremony involving the wine glasses and the headphones.  

On a more quotidian boat, those compartments would probably house a sextant and perhaps harness and tether?

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6 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

But did you read about his homemade autopilot (link I posted just above, post #158)?  He seems to have other priorities than aesthetics...

The same link that I posted? Any others known? I’m thinking that this guy lives the life of the mind.  If you follow the very sparse links provided, he mentions some authority in New Zealand attempting to impound his boat. One event that harshed his otherwise mellow vibe enough to post something on line.  Some regular on here mentioned meeting him in South Africa, I think?  I won’t name names in case my memory is faulty.  

Mention is made of some shitstorm thread on some “sailing forum” when he first got the boat, ca. 2009, and was sorta clueless.  But we don’t know which forum.  It looks as if he’s filled in the footwell of the salon with foam in an attempt to add “floatation” but neglected rotten bulkheads.  Nevertheless, I’d deem him (from the authority of my La-Z-Boy) a circumnavigator, and consider him transcendent. 

Oh. None of us has mentioned his name, which is Sean D’Epagnier.  If anybody knows how to pronounce that, please let us know.

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5 minutes ago, toddster said:

The same link that I posted? Any others known? I’m thinking that this guy lives the life of the mind.  If you follow the very sparse links provided, he mentions some authority in New Zealand attempting to impound his boat. One event that harshed his otherwise mellow vibe enough to post something on line.  Some regular on here mentioned meeting him in South Africa, I think?  I won’t name names in case my memory is faulty.  

Mention is made of some shitstorm thread on some “sailing forum” when he first got the boat, ca. 2009, and was sorta clueless.  But we don’t know which forum.  It looks as if he’s filled in the footwell of the salon with foam in an attempt to add “floatation” but neglected rotten bulkheads.  Nevertheless, I’d deem him (from the authority of my La-Z-Boy) a circumnavigator, and consider him transcendent. 

Oh. None of us has mentioned his name, which is Sean D’Epagnier.  If anybody knows how to pronounce that, please let us know.

The French would say it "Shondaypanyay" but it would probably sound like "shndypny".

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10 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

But did you read about his homemade autopilot (link I posted just above, post #158)?  He seems to have other priorities than aesthetics...

Ya think?

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39 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Ya think?

Like the brilliant Albert Einstein in his appearances-can-be-deceiving rumpled suit, moth-eaten sweater and unruly hair. :-)

But maybe that was just later in life, when he was older (which seems to be when most of the iconic pics of Einstein that we all know are from), when he’d reached the age of “I just don’t give a fuck.” :-). Sean D. is starting younger - easier to do when you’re free, wandering the globe.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sailing vessel Freya, who sailed Vancouver BC to NZ and back, fits this category, more or less.
 

(30’ isn’t necessarily ‘small’, perhaps at the upper limit of the undefined “go simple, go small, go now length,” but this is a fairly simple boat: No fridge, radar, or SSB radio (no transmitter; receiver only for weather fax). 

https://www.svfreya.ca/index_freya.php

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was inspired by Duncan Ross and Beto Pandiani when they crossed Drake Passage in an open beachcat ,so I bought a tornado, put wing seats on her and log about 1000 miles a summer cruising about the Salish Sea

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On 1/4/2020 at 8:19 PM, Rasputin22 said:

Wait until your jib hanks clip themselves onto the other headstay!

Good point, I imagine you have no choice but to get everything down!

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