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SHMBO wants to spend a week cruising the San Juan's and other spots in the area in mid August 2020. 

We're looking to charter a boat that comfortably sleeps 4 couples in roughly comparable quarters.

Any suggestions on where to look?  We've already done a bit of googling and have a line on at least one potential boat out of Anacortes. 

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I own a charter boat with Anacortes Yacht Charters (but it's a power boat, yes I swing both ways!). I've also chartered a sailboat from San Juan Sailing. Both excellent companies with great boats and great customer service.

One advantage of chartering out of Anacortes is that you're right there, in the thick of the San Juan Islands. On your first and last charter days, you don't spend the entire day just getting to/from the islands like you would out of Bellingham.

One advantage of chartering out of Bellingham is it's easier to get to and from, with the airport right there.

Any way you slice it, a week sailing through the San Juans (and the Gulfs) is pure bliss. Enjoy!

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Lasal's suggestion looks like your best option for that many people. I've chartered trawlers, sail and taken my own boat up there a few times. Really enjoyed the area. I think a trawler is a great way to go with the very light and fickle wind. But it's not likely you will find a bareboat trawler to accommodate that many people.

Do you have a Waggoners guide? If not get one.

Some of my favorite memories involved:

Holly B's on Lopez

Rosario

Riding a bike to the vineyard on Lopez

Walking to the school house on Stuart, is it still open?

Sucia

So much to see and do, have fun.

 

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What I tell people who don't know this area is that if they want to go "boating" to go sail but if they want to explore to go power.

You could spend a lifetime exploring these waters and not see it all. 40,000 islands and 16,000 miles of coastline - just in B.C.,

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the feedback.

We've got a line on a 51" Benetoad that seems like it will fit the bill.  

I need to do a bit of work regarding the depth of some of the areas that we've got on the list to make sure we don't have an issue with the draft. 

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Around here that's unlikely if you stay more than 20 or 30 feet off the beach. :D There are lots of places where you can literally scrape the side of your hull on the rocks while floating in deep water.

Submerged and/or 1/2 tide rocks and flotsam are much more of a problem than the general depth of the bottom.

When laying out your planned courses and anchorages, keep in mind the 15' tides when figuring your scope. Most anchorages are real hurricane holes though so you can swing on fairly short scope, particularly if you have a new type anchor - Rocna etc. Stern lines ashore are very common and useful to limit your swing. The most popular anchorages have rings in the rocks for that purpose.

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5 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here that's unlikely if you stay more than 20 or 30 feet off the beach. :D There are lots of places where you can literally scrape the side of your hull on the rocks while floating in deep water.

Submerged and/or 1/2 tide rocks and flotsam are much more of a problem than the general depth of the bottom.

Yes, I wiped my Windex off one boat (damn trees) while I was a foot off the cliff in 60 feet of water.

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25 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Around here that's unlikely if you stay more than 20 or 30 feet off the beach. :D There are lots of places where you can literally scrape the side of your hull on the rocks while floating in deep water.

Submerged and/or 1/2 tide rocks and flotsam are much more of a problem than the general depth of the bottom.

When laying out your planned courses and anchorages, keep in mind the 15' tides when figuring your scope. Most anchorages are real hurricane holes though so you can swing on fairly short scope, particularly if you have a new type anchor - Rocna etc. Stern lines ashore are very common and useful to limit your swing. The most popular anchorages have rings in the rocks for that purpose.

I've picked off cedar branches with my shrouds getting out of the current in Seymour Narrows.  Probably not "best practices" yachting.  

When sailboat cruising around here, I've found that the best technique is to have a decent head sail on a roller furler, an assym spinnaker with a snuffer or takedown string and leave the main bundled up on the boom unless you are doing something like sailing out the straits for a full day.  

When there is breeze, unfurl the headsail or pop the kite and mosey along.  No breeze, just furl and motor on.  

The main just cast shadows on the deck, swings back and forth attempting to kill your loved ones and is generally a pain to deal with.  

And for mooring, we alway carry about 300' of polyester line (it floats) to row ashore to stern tie to a tree after we anchor, so we don't drag off the bottom into deep water on tide changes.

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Lefty, I think you mean polypropylene not polyester - which doesn't float.

Even better is a reel of polypro webbing which reels up much smaller than polypro line but is much more expensive.

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7 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Lefty, I think you mean polypropylene not polyester - which doesn't float.

Even better is a reel of polypro webbing which reels up much smaller than polypro line but is much more expensive.

Yes, I do.  Thanks for the correction of my brain fart.   

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  • 8 months later...

We are rapidly approaching our trip to the great PNW and have our general itinerary mapped out.  We would greatly appreciate any critiques, criticisms, or additions to what we’ve put together.  We (4 couples) have chartered a 51’ Benetoad that has a 7’ draft.  The crew is solid with most folks having significant offshore sailing/cruising experience.

We depart Anacortes on August 17th.

 

Day 1 Anacortes to Blakely Island

              Reserved Slip.

Doesn’t appear to be a lot to do here but suggestions regarding any hikes or “other activities” would be greatly appreciated. Our thinking is to take it easy the first day and get a feel for how the group interacts on the boat.  Plan is to have dinner on board.

Day 2 Blakely to Rosario Beach on Orcas Island

              Reserved Slip

Planning on dinner at Cascade Bay Grill.  Looks like some fun hiking, kayaking or possibly visiting the Museum (which I know is currently closed due to the Covid), to keep us out of trouble until the sun is under the yardarm.

Day 3 Orcas to Sucia Island

              No mooring reserved

Any personal preferences on where to hang our hat for the night?  Looking at Fox Cove, Fossel Bay  and Echo Bay.  We will check the Wagoner’s Guide, to make sure we don’t have any problems with the depth of any of the above.  Looks like there is some fun hiking in the park. Planning to have dinner onboard.

Day 4 Sucia to Stuart Island

              No mooring reserved

Based on previous recommendations we’re probably going to shoot for Reid Harbor and hike to the school house.  Any additional hikes or activities you can recommend?  Planning for dinner onboard the mother ship.

Day 5 Sucia to Roche Harbor

              Reserved Slip

Probably going to hike to the lime kilns and quarries.  Might take advantage of the laundry services, Dinner at McMillins and breakfast at Lime Kiln Café.

Day 6 Roche Harbor to Friday Harbor

              Reserved Slip

Back in the big city.  We’ll either hit a winery or brewery (or both) Dinner at Duck Soup Inn, thoughts on how to get 8 people to and from the marina to Duck Soup?  Any Breakfast suggestions near the marina?

Day 7 Friday Harbor to Lopez Island

              Reserved Slip

It looks like there is a lot to do here, please make recommendations. I like @BMiller ‘s idea of biking to the winery but it looks like Covid isn’t going to let that happen.  Maybe take the dinghies to the Spit Preserve?  Let us know where to eat dinner.  The plan is to do a grab and go from Holly B’s for the next morning’s breakfast.

Day 8 is back to reality

 

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5 hours ago, pbd said:

We are rapidly approaching our trip to the great PNW and have our general itinerary mapped out.  We would greatly appreciate any critiques, criticisms, or additions to what we’ve put together.  We (4 couples) have chartered a 51’ Benetoad that has a 7’ draft.  The crew is solid with most folks having significant offshore sailing/cruising experience.

We depart Anacortes on August 17th.

 

Day 1 Anacortes to Blakely Island

              Reserved Slip.

Doesn’t appear to be a lot to do here but suggestions regarding any hikes or “other activities” would be greatly appreciated. Our thinking is to take it easy the first day and get a feel for how the group interacts on the boat.  Plan is to have dinner on board.

Sail North through Bellingham Channel along the backside of Cypress. Pretty views of the moorages and coves. Cross Rosario into Obstruction Pass and watch your currents. Summertime gets 4-5 knot currents. Try deepzoom.com its pretty good for currents

Day 2 Blakely to Rosario Beach on Orcas Island

              Reserved Slip

Planning on dinner at Cascade Bay Grill.  Looks like some fun hiking, kayaking or possibly visiting the Museum (which I know is currently closed due to the Covid), to keep us out of trouble until the sun is under the yardarm.

Before you go into Rosario, sail further North into Eastsound and anchor by the County Dock. You can dinghy over and then its a 5 minute walk into Eastsound. Cute little town with excellent coffee and pastry shops.

Day 3 Orcas to Sucia Island

              No mooring reserved

Any personal preferences on where to hang our hat for the night?  Looking at Fox Cove, Fossel Bay  and Echo Bay.  We will check the Wagoner’s Guide, to make sure we don’t have any problems with the depth of any of the above.  Looks like there is some fun hiking in the park. Planning to have dinner onboard.

Go along the South side of Orcas to the West and then North to Sucia, very pretty trip. There is a day dock at the Orcas Ferry landing and you can walk up to the store for an ice cream break. With a 50' boat go straight to Echo Bay and find a decent spot to drop the hook. Dinghy or Kayak along the fingers of sandstone to the north.

Day 4 Sucia to Stuart Island

              No mooring reserved

Based on previous recommendations we’re probably going to shoot for Reid Harbor and hike to the school house.  Any additional hikes or activities you can recommend?  Planning for dinner onboard the mother ship.

Day 5 Sucia to Roche Harbor

              Reserved Slip

Probably going to hike to the lime kilns and quarries.  Might take advantage of the laundry services, Dinner at McMillins and breakfast at Lime Kiln Café.

This is probably your best spot to find Orcas. Sail out into Haro Strait and look for a boat called Island Explorer 4 or 5 on the ship tracker app. They will usually be where the whales are. Also sail close along the Southern side of Spieden, just outside Roche. At one time was going to be a big game hunting resort. Lots of bighorn sheep and gazelles(??) Long horned critters that you can see from the boat

Day 6 Roche Harbor to Friday Harbor

              Reserved Slip

Back in the big city.  We’ll either hit a winery or brewery (or both) Dinner at Duck Soup Inn, thoughts on how to get 8 people to and from the marina to Duck Soup?  Any Breakfast suggestions near the marina?

Hit and miss on what's open and what's closed for good due to the shutdown

Day 7 Friday Harbor to Lopez Island

              Reserved Slip

It looks like there is a lot to do here, please make recommendations. I like @BMiller ‘s idea of biking to the winery but it looks like Covid isn’t going to let that happen.  Maybe take the dinghies to the Spit Preserve?  Let us know where to eat dinner.  The plan is to do a grab and go from Holly B’s for the next morning’s breakfast.

This is a really shoal entrance. You need lots of water to get in and out. I've run aground probably 3-4 times in 30 years, all of them there. Short walk from the marina to the shopping village that had decent shops and bookstores last I was there

Day 8 is back to reality

Watch the ebb as you leave Thatcher Pass, stay well North and avoid the tidal confluence where Guemes channel, Bellingham channel, Rosario Strait and Thatcher Pass all dump into Rosario. It can get 3-4' tall tide rips

 

Summer tides around here are low in the morning with big ebbs through early afternoon. Winds are a crap shoot, but you can find some really nice sailing in Rosario as well as the West side of Orcas when you are headed up to Sucia.

 

PM me if you want more

Wl

5 hours ago, pbd said:

 

 

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That's a busy itinerary. You might consider spending two nights in one place. Here are my thoughts in no particular order.

Anacortes: don't know what they're doing during Covid times but Dad's Diner serves an excellent breakfast that'll hold you all day.

Rosario: I'd recommend a hike up the hill above Rosario at least to the lake. Take your bathing suits if it's hot, the swimming is great. If you're feeling ambitious and have time, go all the way to the falls.

Roche: visit the outdoor sculpture garden and hike up through the old cemetery to the McMillin Mausoleum. 

Sucia: no matter where you anchor, you can't go wrong from a scenic standpoint but I tend to prefer Fossil Bay. It's protected from north winds, which tend to be predominant this time of year. The entry is dramatic and the bay itself is very quiet.

Friday Harbor: I really have no use for it. Ferries coming and going, lots of people and noise, not-good food. And I say this as a person who tends to like crowds. I'd much sooner spend the day at Eastsound on Orcas.

FWIW. 

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On 10/30/2019 at 4:45 AM, bmiller said:

Lasal's suggestion looks like your best option for that many people. I've chartered trawlers, sail and taken my own boat up there a few times. Really enjoyed the area. I think a trawler is a great way to go with the very light and fickle wind. But it's not likely you will find a bareboat trawler to accommodate that many people.

Do you have a Waggoners guide? If not get one.

Some of my favorite memories involved:

Holly B's on Lopez

Rosario

Riding a bike to the vineyard on Lopez

Walking to the school house on Stuart, is it still open?

Sucia

So much to see and do, have fun.

 

My cousin, Holly, is Holly B. :)

The butter horns and cinnamon rolls are epic, especially if you love butter!

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4 hours ago, IStream said:

That's a busy itinerary. You might consider spending two nights in one place. Here are my thoughts in no particular order.

Anacortes: don't know what they're doing during Covid times but Dad's Diner serves an excellent breakfast that'll hold you all day.

Rosario: I'd recommend a hike up the hill above Rosario at least to the lake. Take your bathing suits if it's hot, the swimming is great. If you're feeling ambitious and have time, go all the way to the falls.

Roche: visit the outdoor sculpture garden and hike up through the old cemetery to the McMillin Mausoleum. 

Sucia: no matter where you anchor, you can't go wrong from a scenic standpoint but I tend to prefer Fossil Bay. It's protected from north winds, which tend to be predominant this time of year. The entry is dramatic and the bay itself is very quiet.

Friday Harbor: I really have no use for it. Ferries coming and going, lots of people and noise, not-good food. And I say this as a person who tends to like crowds. I'd much sooner spend the day at Eastsound on Orcas.

FWIW. 

All of the Anacortes restaurants and bars are open in some capacity for dine-in/take-out/dine and drink outside/etc.  Dad's Diner included.  However, by mid-August who knows?  There are three takeaway food vendors adjacent to the parking lot at Cap Sante for a quick al fresco lunch: Mexican, Chinese buns, and a great hot dog/chile/clam chowder place.  There is plenty of seating there or at tables scattered around the marina.

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As to my earlier suggestion....this was on the county scanner a bit ago...

Double Drug Overdose in a vehicle at the top of Cap Sante Lookout: PD/EMS en route #scanner.

Okay, it's still a good little hike from the marina with a great view of the area, just keep your radar on I guess.

:(

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7 hours ago, IStream said:

That's a busy itinerary. You might consider spending two nights in one place. Here are my thoughts in no particular order.

Anacortes: don't know what they're doing during Covid times but Dad's Diner serves an excellent breakfast that'll hold you all day.

Rosario: I'd recommend a hike up the hill above Rosario at least to the lake. Take your bathing suits if it's hot, the swimming is great. If you're feeling ambitious and have time, go all the way to the falls.

Roche: visit the outdoor sculpture garden and hike up through the old cemetery to the McMillin Mausoleum. 

Sucia: no matter where you anchor, you can't go wrong from a scenic standpoint but I tend to prefer Fossil Bay. It's protected from north winds, which tend to be predominant this time of year. The entry is dramatic and the bay itself is very quiet.

Friday Harbor: I really have no use for it. Ferries coming and going, lots of people and noise, not-good food. And I say this as a person who tends to like crowds. I'd much sooner spend the day at Eastsound on Orcas.

FWIW. 

Too busy an itinerary.  

Be aware that with Canada closed, the US boats are packing the marinas.  Last I heard Roche and Friday were operating at 50% occupancy.  I doubt you'll find indoor dining.  Outdoor and takeout yep.  

Do you have a dinghy or kayaks?  Rowing or paddling around is a number one activity.  

Dress in layers.  Always expect the temperature to change.  

Stuart Island:   Hike out to the lighthouse with a picnic lunch.  Be prepared to anchor.

Orcas:  East Sound is a real small town.  Less traffic, fewer tourists, short walk to the northshore.

Roche:  Second on the sculpture garden.  

Friday :  Rent bikes if you can and head south or west until you run out of land.  

Lopez:  Try Fisherman's Bay if the depth is OK.

Whales:  Best place is either in Haro Strait or outside of Cattle Pass.  Keep an eye for for other boats going slow or acting funny.  Obey the rules.  The poor buggers are getting harassed.

 

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On 8/3/2020 at 8:35 PM, White Lightning2 said:

Wl

 

Lot's of good info here, many thanks for the input we have updated our itinerary.

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On 8/4/2020 at 7:19 AM, IStream said:

That's a busy itinerary. You might consider spending two nights in one place. Here are my thoughts in no particular order.

Anacortes: don't know what they're doing during Covid times but Dad's Diner serves an excellent breakfast that'll hold you all day.

Rosario: I'd recommend a hike up the hill above Rosario at least to the lake. Take your bathing suits if it's hot, the swimming is great. If you're feeling ambitious and have time, go all the way to the falls. 

Roche: visit the outdoor sculpture garden and hike up through the old cemetery to the McMillin Mausoleum. 

Sucia: no matter where you anchor, you can't go wrong from a scenic standpoint but I tend to prefer Fossil Bay. It's protected from north winds, which tend to be predominant this time of year. The entry is dramatic and the bay itself is very quiet. 

Friday Harbor: I really have no use for it. Ferries coming and going, lots of people and noise, not-good food. And I say this as a person who tends to like crowds. I'd much sooner spend the day at Eastsound on Orcas.

FWIW. 

Good input thanks for playing along

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Sounds like a fun itinerary. Some comments:

Day 1 Anacortes to Blakely Island

             You're right, absolutely nothing to do at the Blakely Island Marina. There's even no trespassing signs bordering the marina so there's really nowhere to go. But ... still an excellent stop, especially for your first night. Picturesque, low key friendly marina with a cute little store that serves beer, ice cream, pizza, and great breakfast burritos. I assume you'll be leaving Bellingham mid-day, so you won't get there till evening. But if you can leave earlier, I recommend a stop at either Eagle Harbor or Pelican Beach on Cypress Island on your way. Do the fantastic hike up to Eagle Cliff.

Day 2 Blakely to Rosario Beach on Orcas Island

           That's a tight little marina, and you're going to attempt it in a 51' sailboat you're not real familiar with. Good luck! Fortunately, they employ lots of dock hands who are well versed at roping and wrangling errant charter boats before they turn into insurance claims.

Day 3 Orcas to Sucia Island

              My favorite is Shallow Bay, the sunsets can't be beat! But with 7' draft you'd want to stay to the center of the bay, maybe not feasible if it's too crowded in there.

Day 5 Sucia to Roche Harbor

              You've already reserved your slip, so that's cool. However, my favorite way to do Roche is to either anchor out or guest dock, explore and hike around, then motor around to Garrison Bay for the night, probably my favorite spot in the islands.

Day 7 Friday Harbor to Lopez Island

              I assume your slip is in Fishermans Bay? With 7' draft, don't attempt that anywhere near low tide! Seriously, the local entertainment is to hang out at the entrance at low tide and watch boats ground. In fact, some charter companies flag Fishermans Bay as a red zone, might want to check on that. But ... if you do go there, then yes, renting bikes and exploring is the hot ticket. 

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2 hours ago, wristwister said:

Sounds like a fun itinerary. Some comments:

Day 1 Anacortes to Blakely Island

             You're right, absolutely nothing to do at the Blakely Island Marina. There's even no trespassing signs bordering the marina so there's really nowhere to go. But ... still an excellent stop, especially for your first night. Picturesque, low key friendly marina with a cute little store that serves beer, ice cream, pizza, and great breakfast burritos. I assume you'll be leaving Bellingham mid-day, so you won't get there till evening. But if you can leave earlier, I recommend a stop at either Eagle Harbor or Pelican Beach on Cypress Island on your way. Do the fantastic hike up to Eagle Cliff.

Day 2 Blakely to Rosario Beach on Orcas Island

           That's a tight little marina, and you're going to attempt it in a 51' sailboat you're not real familiar with. Good luck! Fortunately, they employ lots of dock hands who are well versed at roping and wrangling errant charter boats before they turn into insurance claims.

Day 3 Orcas to Sucia Island

              My favorite is Shallow Bay, the sunsets can't be beat! But with 7' draft you'd want to stay to the center of the bay, maybe not feasible if it's too crowded in there.

Day 5 Sucia to Roche Harbor

              You've already reserved your slip, so that's cool. However, my favorite way to do Roche is to either anchor out or guest dock, explore and hike around, then motor around to Garrison Bay for the night, probably my favorite spot in the islands.

Day 7 Friday Harbor to Lopez Island

              I assume your slip is in Fishermans Bay? With 7' draft, don't attempt that anywhere near low tide! Seriously, the local entertainment is to hang out at the entrance at low tide and watch boats ground. In fact, some charter companies flag Fishermans Bay as a red zone, might want to check on that. But ... if you do go there, then yes, renting bikes and exploring is the hot ticket. 

Thanks for the great info.

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On 8/4/2020 at 11:23 AM, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

My cousin, Holly, is Holly B. :)

The butter horns and cinnamon rolls are epic, especially if you love butter!

Didn't she write a cookbook? Love and Butter or something?? 

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On ‎8‎/‎3‎/‎2020 at 3:09 PM, pbd said:

 

Day 1 Anacortes to Blakely Island

Day 2 Blakely to Rosario Beach on Orcas Island

Day 3 Orcas to Sucia Island

Day 4 Sucia to Stuart Island

Day 5 Sucia to Roche Harbor

Day 6 Roche Harbor to Friday Harbor

Day 7 Friday Harbor to Lopez Island

Day 8 is back to reality

My two cents:

-- there's really not much at Blakely Island.  Hiking, yes, but no real facilities except the marina store, and that's really only interesting for the donuts.  Recommend skipping Blakely and doing a second night at Rosario.  The grill is open (and good), it's a very relaxing peaceful little place, with stuff to do (hikes, the mansion, etc)

-- if either Sucia or Stuart don't work out, you could bail to Deer Harbor on the west side of Orcas.  quiet little place, almost always has capacity, the restaurant at the Inn is pretty good, and stuff to see/do in the area.

-- Friday Harbor (as others have said) is busy and crowded and noisy.  Might skip that one and spend two nights at Roche.  Still pretty busy, but shops and stuff along the pier, the restaurant at the hotel is good, and lots of stuff to hike to.

-- Lopez (as others have said) the entrance to Fisherman is *very* shallow.  I draw 6 feet and have bumped the bottom 2 hours after a zero low.  For-sure check your tides, stay in the channel, and as someone once told me, "if you stick, you'll have plenty of time to think about the fact that you did it in front of the whole town".  Holly B's is good, there is also a decent breakfast place to the south of the marina (I don't remember the name).  Lopez Island Resort claims to have a phenomenal prime-rib dinner, but it's not worth it IMO

-- take your time, enjoy the sights, smell the flowers.  Frenetically going point-to-point-to-point is a good way to miss out on the magic of the San Juans.

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I talked to a knowledgeable sailor today, who is also runs a very good sail loft. He backs up Left's report of the San Juans being very busy. I suspect you will still have fun, but plan to anchor rather than pick up a mooring in some areas. Do some research so you have back up options for nights you do not have a reserved spot, and if you end up in good place or score a park bouy, consider spending an extra night. I would rather spend 2 nights at Sucia or Stuart than one in Friday Habor.

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4 hours ago, wristwister said:

Day 2 Blakely to Rosario Beach on Orcas Island

           That's a tight little marina, and you're going to attempt it in a 51' sailboat you're not real familiar with. Good luck! Fortunately, they employ lots of dock hands who are well versed at roping and wrangling errant charter boats before they turn into insurance claims.

Rosario's tight but it's a lot better than it used to be since they re-modeled the marina and built the linear dock:

image.png.3579ea35bb47f6a81e42291a8053cc94.png

Our 50'er fit nicely tucked in to that NW corner behind the linear dock (no issues with the 6' draft):

large.IMG_20180808_094750.jpg.c130e3daec84766dd37b833ae975c49b.jpg

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