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Works quite well, tho as with all strippers there is both luck and art to it. Don't overbrush, keep the place warm (but not too warm) and out of drafts, put on more than you think wise, and give it time. I find the greasy residue left behind a bit concerning, but it does seem to evaporate with scraping, mineral spirits, and sanding. Didn't have adhesion troubles anyhow, even with waterbased topcoats. Did use a dewaxed shellac primer/tiecoat, just to be sure.

Beats the hell out of methylene chloride. And I find it at least as effective as the mild-distillates 'contractor' strippers next to it on the shelf. Oddly, it seems to work better on urethanes than on alkyd varnishes, which I don't understand.

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13 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Works quite well, tho as with all strippers there is both luck and art to it. Don't overbrush, keep the place warm (but not too warm) and out of drafts, put on more than you think wise, and give it time. I find the greasy residue left behind a bit concerning, but it does seem to evaporate with scraping, mineral spirits, and sanding. Didn't have adhesion troubles anyhow, even with waterbased topcoats. Did use a dewaxed shellac primer/tiecoat, just to be sure.

Beats the hell out of methylene chloride. And I find it at least as effective as the mild-distillates 'contractor' strippers next to it on the shelf. Oddly, it seems to work better on urethanes than on alkyd varnishes, which I don't understand.

Agreed.  might need a second application and a light scrape, then clean with paint thinner.

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On 11/1/2019 at 11:19 AM, MaxDog said:

A heat gun still works better, in my experience.

Agreed.

Once the bulk of the varnish/paint has been removed, if you keep the heat going and run gently over the area with coarse (100g) sandpaper, you get the last bits out of the grain very easily. Saves a heap of time with the sanding process, and no residue.

Paint strippers work, but way more effort than a heat gun. YMMV.

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17 hours ago, charisma94 said:

Agreed.

Once the bulk of the varnish/paint has been removed, if you keep the heat going and run gently over the area with coarse (100g) sandpaper, you get the last bits out of the grain very easily. Saves a heap of time with the sanding process, and no residue.

Paint strippers work, but way more effort than a heat gun. YMMV.

One thing to watch with a heat gun is releasing any glue, however. Phenolics are pretty heat-resistant (resorcinol), but urea resins less so and epoxies or PVAs can be quite easily activated by heat. If the floorboards are laminated solid wood, or if they are veneered, best be cautious with the heat gun. A spreader tip is useful.

I tend to skip the whole business & go straight to scraping and/or abrasive stripping, unless it is a gummy varnish or a complex profile like a raised panel door. 

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We have a disturbing amount of time into removing coatings from wood into our boat.  After lots of trial and error a heat gun and really good carbide scrapers have been the most effective.  You have alot of control with a heat gun and scrapers have to be very sharp to be effective, I tried the file method and after getting some good scandvik never went back.  You can just sand stuff out but without scraping first you will always loose a fair bit of wood.  Alot of the old timers who know what they are doing will advocate a chem removal on painted surfaces and scraping on bright.

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