Jump to content

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, LeoV said:

Jamba is funny, really a Brexit dinosaur. Fixed in his believes. He should be placed in the Brexit Museum.
Is that museum still going on ? Empty shelves the newest addition ?

Forst is going back to 2016 again in speech the eve before EU to publish NIP solutions, workarounds.
Frost setting red line that is impossible and rejecting it before he has seen them.
Very May-ish. Nothing changed. Arguing for No Deal again. As if the EU is impressed by that.
Best qoute;
Frost: "Hard Brexit" the only version that allows UK to "experiment" and "freedom to act". Says Brexit is an experiment in alternative futures. 

Experiment, normally you do them with an outlined plan. Brexit seems to be a experiment without plan or preparations.
Take it to the chin.
 

Playing the man not the ball Leo. Classic technique used by Remain which saw them lose. Cheap and ignorant pot shots.

 

Panic buying fuel is over in UK, garages stocked. No EU drivers have arrived and only 27 applied for a visa anyway. Now appears low stocks were due to switch from E5 to E10 fuel.  In Paris supermarket today and my wife was complaining about the number of items out stock, supposedly there is a shortage of paper pulp for loo rolls here too.

 

I watched Lord Frost's speech. He was spot on. 
 

The plan Leo is global Britain and a rotation away from EU. Regulatory  divergence where it makes sense. Frost touched on all of that too.

 

Frost Speech

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 19.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • jack_sparrow

    7717

  • LeoV

    2488

  • Waynemarlow

    2174

  • mad

    1399

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Old, but gold. Explains so much of what Whyne and Jambalaya wax lyrical about. And the guy was a mate of Boris.   A.A. Gill (Sunday Times journalist and food critic) writing about Brexit bef

No way I'm going to PA. This was a top thread, now it's fucked. Thank you fucking idiots.

I was thinking for the last few days that  as a pro union lifelong Alliance voter I should respond to this post but turning on the radio this morning and hearing Mike Nesbitt made me decide to act.

Posted Images

3 minutes ago, Jambalaya said:

Playing the man not the ball Leo.

Euh, you played the man on me before, you Duffus. Do not play the victimhood card.

FBhIVqoWUAY1x0p?format=png&name=small
Frost words, he recognizes that UK is dependable on the EU. A bit strange he only became clear of it after Brexit :)
A real Raab experience, I did not know Dover was important.
The UK never can turn away from the EU, its needs it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

GOLD

You've chosen to ignore content by  Waynemarlow No options 

You've chosen to ignore content by  The Dark Knight. No options 

You've chosen to ignore content by   LB 15. No options 

You've chosen to ignore content by  Kate short for Bob. No options 

 

This was a unique "screenshot" in the Jack_Sparrow memorial thread, in Corona Anarchy. The 4 most notorious serial Deplorables in a gangwank!

BTW, Whine has been on ignore since his 2nd post here. Occasionally quoting him is ok though, just to remind me why we all like him so much.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Aaah poor little Jack is back, couldn't keep away, won't be long and that addiction of his, that itsy bitsy fuzzy feeling he gets tappety tap tapping away on his keyboard, will get him flicked.

Shall we run a sweepstake between us how long he lasts before he pushes over the Ed's red lines ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fiji, just focus on the NIP Frost speech, it is comedy gold.(unless you are living/have relatives in the UK)

If he won’t stick the first deal he agreed why would he stick to a new one. Especially as the first deal was one he wanted…

This governments arrogance is unreal. They were warned that their Brexit was going to unsettle the delicate situation in Ireland, but now its the EUs fault.

He claims the EU 'doesn't always look like it wants UK to succeed'.

He lists the things he misses from the EU.

He wants to work with the EU, bad calls them idiots.

He claims the UK sees a bonfire of red tape.

And the best one;
Frost on NI protocol "We now face a very serious situation. The protocol is not working, has completely lost consent in one community"
Same for Brexit, can we redo the referendum about Brexit please.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Fiji, just focus on the NIP Frost speech, it is comedy gold.(unless you are living/have relatives in the UK)

This is exactly what made me to become a bit sentimental earlier on. On the one hand I enjoy seeing the Brexshit becoming epidemic, but on the other hand I feel the pain that so many suffer, and the great friendship and cooperation that we build since racing sailor and Conservative Ted Heath signed the EC accession treaty, going to shit.

But life moves on, and I'm certainly not gone cry about it. Will just spend more of my "holidays" on the continent as a consequence.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember what the EU, mainly France and Germany did to Greece.
The failed common currency project.

Not enough economists to understand you cant give 2 countries the same currency if they have different size economies.

I think you learn that in secondary school economics

 

UK saving money now
https://www.dw.com/en/brexit-hits-german-exports-to-the-uk/a-56744792

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Jambalaya said:

The UK mentality is very different to France with respect to how the economy should function. We are much less interventionalist, even the left wing Labour Party is more free market than the French right wing UMP. France has EU's largest state sector / civil service. It's a very hands on strategy in so many aspects of economic life. To be honest this is another reason why UK is better off outside EU as that French mentality is highly prevalent in Brussels

all true, can you imagine how big the pension debt is in France...its a country run like Enron

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Sailabout said:

all true, can you imagine how big the pension debt is in France...its a country run like Enron

Actually wrong. France has a large state sector because the state sector runs industries that are private in other countries, but those industries in France fund themselves, and also run similar services in other countries for profit, so the economic impact of the large state in France is not the same as in, for example, the UK, where the nearly as large state sector is entirely funded by tax from the private sector.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, hump101 said:

Actually wrong. France has a large state sector because the state sector runs industries that are private in other countries, but those industries in France fund themselves, and also run similar services in other countries for profit, so the economic impact of the large state in France is not the same as in, for example, the UK, where the nearly as large state sector is entirely funded by tax from the private sector.

what are you smoking

https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-health-coronavirus-france-debt-idUKKBN2300HE


When those state employees retire the state pays yes?
A french company making a profit, hard to think of one, can you help me out?
Is there any company in France thats not funded by the state hence all state employees when they retire?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always wondered why the EU has not been kicking off about the amount of subsidy the French state puts into its self owned industries. Surely this is just a subsidy scam on a grand scale. But then I guess France is a law unto itself, well until it wants to be part of the EU.

Hey whats this about Macron wanting the French to man up and go Commando spirit and support homegrown industries ? Seems to be everything not Euro to me or is that just Macron bluster for there is a presidential election coming ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dominic Cummings, who left No. 10 last November following a row about who became the British prime minister's next chief of staff and has been a vocal critic of his former boss ever since, hurled grenades at Johnson in a series of late-night tweets.

He said the U.K. government "wriggled through with best option we could [negotiate with the EU]" and then intended to "ditch bits we didn't like after whacking [Labour leader Jeremy] Corbyn" in the general election in December 2019. He added that the plan was to pass an Internal Market Bill, which would override parts of what had been agreed with Brussels.

The claims amount to an admission that the 2019 election was fought on entirely disingenuous grounds. John Cotter, a law lecturer at Keele university, concluded that if true, the Tories had been “playing with” the Northern Ireland peace process to win an election. He said it was “absolutely deplorable, and I don’t think the word evil is an exaggeration.”

Britain faced considerable international blowback for the strategy in September 2020, when a minister admitted the government intended to backtrack on the deal it had struck with Brussels. The government later dropped the plan.

Cummings added that the prime minister hadn't lied in the election campaign because he “never had a scoobydoo what the deal he signed meant” in the first place.
https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/london-playbook/apologies-for-brexit-cummings-microblogs-grenades-bojos-hols-diary/

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

What to expect: Almost every U.K. newspaper appears to have had the same briefing about what to expect, including the claim that up to 50 percent of customs checks could be scrapped, including on chilled meats and plants moving from Great Britain to Northern Ireland, plus the ending of checks on medicines. Goods intended for NI could pass through a “green lane” with minimal checks, while those destined for the Republic of Ireland or the wider Continent would be put in a “red lane” for more stringent procedures. Customs forms would be done for entire trucks, rather than individual goods — a proposal that will sound to traders like the sweet rattle of a fresh paracetamol blister pack. RTE’s Tony Connelly has a handy Twitter thread for those who like their Brexit customs proposals chunkified.

Trigger warning: EU diplomats speaking to the Telegraph likened it to the long-forgotten “maximum facilitation” proposal (a.k.a. the “Malthouse Compromise” plan from 2019), albeit with real tech solutions instead of imagined ones. Customs expert and trade Twitter oracle Anna Jerzewska reckons the rough briefings sound like a big deal — although stresses it’s worth waiting for the full deets. NI Retail Consortium boss Aodhán Michael Connolly also sounds positive.

But but but: The Tele notes Brussels will make the offer conditional on getting real-time access to U.K. trade databases to police the movement of products. The Brits are working on two bespoke systems, one for customs safety forms and another to track goods into Ireland, and Brussels wants in. “We always needed access to these databases, but now with these new flexibilities that are being offered it is a must-have,” the paper quotes a diplomat as saying.
https://www.politico.eu/newsletter/london-playbook/apologies-for-brexit-cummings-microblogs-grenades-bojos-hols-diary/

--------------------
UK bigging up solutions for NI/I border during years of Brexit discussions. As expected EU is slinging it back, do it between UK and NI.
So predictable, and sensible :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Sailabout said:

what are you smoking

https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-health-coronavirus-france-debt-idUKKBN2300HE


When those state employees retire the state pays yes?
A french company making a profit, hard to think of one, can you help me out?
Is there any company in France thats not funded by the state hence all state employees when they retire?

Not disputing that French debt to GDP is horrible, but unfortunately also typical of more and more nations these days, including UK.

An example of a French state company is SNCF, which is a part of the French state but has €35.1 billion/annum (2019) of sales in 120 countries, employing 275,000 people. Being state-owned their net profits hover around zero, a major benefit of state ownership for their French customers, but they make good profits on the overseas components of their portfolio which all flows back into France. They've had a big hit in the COVID crisis, like all public transport companies, but that will recover over time.

EDF is another example, 84.5% owned by the state, with €71.3 billion/annum (2019) of sales in every continent, employing 155,000 people. Again, highly profitable on its overseas operations and energy export.

There are many other examples where the French state is intertwined with industry to the benefit of both.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hump101 said:

Not disputing that French debt to GDP is horrible, but unfortunately also typical of more and more nations these days, including UK.

An example of a French state company is SNCF, which is a part of the French state but has €35.1 billion/annum (2019) of sales in 120 countries, employing 275,000 people. Being state-owned their net profits hover around zero, a major benefit of state ownership for their French customers, but they make good profits on the overseas components of their portfolio which all flows back into France. They've had a big hit in the COVID crisis, like all public transport companies, but that will recover over time.

EDF is another example, 84.5% owned by the state, with €71.3 billion/annum (2019) of sales in every continent, employing 155,000 people. Again, highly profitable on its overseas operations and energy export.

There are many other examples where the French state is intertwined with industry to the benefit of both.

yes but when they retire the state has to come up with the money for retirement.

What I am getting at is that with the retirement zero funded problem, I think France is at the top of the list on the numbers they need to support due to all the state owned businesses.

I know plenty in Italy get company pensions so can survive.

The debt to dgp is not reflective of a positive cashflow from any and all sources ( pre the wuhan, everyone is in that boat)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Sailabout said:

yes but when they retire the state has to come up with the money for retirement.

The debt to dgp is not reflective of a positive cashflow from any and all sources

Agreed, but the companies will continue to be productive, and thus the pension bill is offset by continued earnings. You can look at this two ways, either as the state being large but with additional funding streams, or the state being effectively smaller without them. Either way, the burden placed on the French economy by the large size of the state is not the same as it would be without these intertwined industrial entities.

Debt to GDP in France has been high for a long time, but the economy has been shown to be quite resilient so has not seen large increases unlike many other over the last 15 years.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, hump101 said:

Agreed, but the companies will continue to be productive, and thus the pension bill is offset by continued earnings. You can look at this two ways, either as the state being large but with additional funding streams, or the state being effectively smaller without them. Either way, the burden placed on the French economy by the large size of the state is not the same as it would be without these intertwined industrial entities.

Debt to GDP in France has been high for a long time, but the economy has been shown to be quite resilient so has not seen large increases unlike many other over the last 15 years.

so long as the ECB keeps printing money

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Sailabout said:

so long as the ECB keeps printing money

Agreed, printing money is one way out of this level of debt, a second is cronic inflation, and the third option is both at the same time! I think the rather casual attitude towards debt levels might change a bit if interest rates rise to try and combat inflation. We shall see which way it goes.

Nevertheless, having an economy in which the state has a high degree of control is more resilient in changing times than one in which the markets dictate everything, and the French decision to spend its way out of the 2008 crisis is looking pretty good right now.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, hump101 said:

Agreed, printing money is one way out of this level of debt, a second is cronic inflation, and the third option is both at the same time! I think the rather casual attitude towards debt levels might change a bit if interest rates rise to try and combat inflation. We shall see which way it goes.

Nevertheless, having an economy in which the state has a high degree of control is more resilient in changing times than one in which the markets dictate everything, and the French decision to spend its way out of the 2008 crisis is looking pretty good right now.

borrow and spend its way out of debt lol
I guess it kicks the can down the road for the next generation as many Eu members have been doing for years

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Sailabout said:

borrow and spend its way out of debt lol
I guess it kicks the can down the road for the next generation as many Eu members have been doing for years

That is the interesting thing, since the 2008 crash the French debt/gdp has increased only slightly, whereas the UK, for example, with a policy of austerity,  tripled, and both are now at similar levels, so the burden down the road for future generations is not proportionally increased.

Meanwhile, the French have a decade of repaired/upgraded infrastructure plus a retrained and now experienced workforce to show for the small increase in debt/gdp ratio. In the UK, not so much, so where did all the huge amount of borrowed money in the UK disappear to?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The BPA (British Ports Association) is complaining that it will take at least 6 to 9 months more before delays in their ports might see a stabilisation or solution, so they call on Boris and his cronies for a help, claiming also Bojo's Xmas presents are in jeopardy.

And as a result many big container ships (Maersk is very unhappy) are being diverted from Felixstowe to Rotterdam and Antwerp from where they are offloaded onto smaller ships or trucks and then back to Brexistan, good business for us in fact, thanks guys.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, hump101 said:

That is the interesting thing, since the 2008 crash the French debt/gdp has increased only slightly, whereas the UK, for example, with a policy of austerity,  tripled, and both are now at similar levels, so the burden down the road for future generations is not proportionally increased.

Meanwhile, the French have a decade of repaired/upgraded infrastructure plus a retrained and now experienced workforce to show for the small increase in debt/gdp ratio. In the UK, not so much, so where did all the huge amount of borrowed money in the UK disappear to?

when you borrow debt and gdp goes up

when you spend the new cash gdp goes up again
The key is how you measure gdp

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Sailabout said:

when you borrow debt and gdp goes up

when you spend the new cash gdp goes up again
The key is how you measure gdp

Yes, and with negative central bank interest rates, you also make a profit on what you borrow!! Must be great being in finance.......

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, hump101 said:

Yes, and with negative central bank interest rates, you also make a profit on what you borrow!! Must be great being in finance.......

Lol, I forgot about that

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Will just spend more of my "holidays" on the continent as a consequence.

Like the "Holidays" your Jack Sparrow account got from here?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fuck I love this place.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

This was a unique "screenshot" in the Jack_Sparrow memorial thread, in Corona Anarchy. The 4 most notorious serial Deplorables in a gangwank!

BTW, Whine has been on ignore since his 2nd post here. Occasionally quoting him is ok though, just to remind me why we all like him so much.

 

Hi Jack :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, LeoV said:

FBmNXHRXoAcTVcX?format=png&name=small

And W, after years of posting now wants this thread cancelled, hypocrite.

Not at all, it’s now a political thread, about the closest it’s got to sailing of late is my comparison of Laser1 to the Laser, both outdated and life has moved on.

If it goes over to PA you can still participate as will I.

Link to post
Share on other sites

the NPA (the british pork farming industry) are urging the Brexitstani govt to ease on entry visas like they have done for truck drivers and poultry industry, reason is there are about 100.000 pigs to be slaughtered but the butchers have gone home in europistan, Boris, chop chop !

how is that poll going you dolt ?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Albatros said:

the NPA (the british pork farming industry) are urging the Brexitstani govt to ease on entry visas like they have done for truck drivers and poultry industry, reason is there are about 100.000 pigs to be slaughtered but the butchers have gone home in europistan, Boris, chop chop !

how is that poll going you dolt ?

Hey Albatros, chop chop get your facts right, better go and ask the the major supermarkets why they are not taking over size pork chops ? Simply the pigs grew too large during and after the Covid mayhem to no longer fit into the supermarkets specification size of what a pork chop is.

Local butchers and small abattoirs simply can't handle the volume, but frozen as carcasses and processed later, could easily sell them. The big supermarket suppliers are kicking up a stink to try and get government cash to mitagate their costs and the big abattoirs are hoping to reduce their labour costs again. Its all about pressuring Boris to open the flood gates again of cheap labour.

And that comes from my local farmer friend and the local butcher in conversation this very morning as I bought some proper size pork chops.

EU seems to have crumbled more than a bit re NI. Will the ECJ be kicked into touch as well, may yet happen.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Albatros said:

how is that poll going you dolt ?

70 /30 at the moment, getting scared of PA are we, better man up but then the Belgiums are not exactly renown for that ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

UKG;

We plan to temporarily extend cabotage rights in the UK so foreign hauliers can make unlimited journeys for 2 weeks whilst here. It'll mean 1000s more deliveries and comes in addition to the 24 steps we've already taken to help industry tackle the global lorry driver shortage.

So nothing to do with Brexit and cabotage rules, and EU is not part of Global driver shortage if they can miss drivers to stay in the UK :)
EU to the rescue of the UK.

Link to post
Share on other sites

word from my British neighbour, whose yacht stayed on the hard for more than one year as a combination of Corona and Brexit (some of it should be in purple font)

Quote
Next season hope to be back to normal, assuming we get through the winter with no petrol or food here
 
Brexit is really working now

 

hey you dolt, have I got old news for you  "Omnium gallorum fortissimi Belgae sunt." , comes out of De Bello Gallico from a certain Julius Caesar, but then you an immigrant from the blank oppression area wouldn't know, just silly trolling as always and showing off the buffoon you are , ya nincompoop.

maybe we should start a poll "do we want to kick Wayne to the curb, as lately he feels far too much entitled, he's the real bully and thinks he can dictate what goes on here" ... but then no, that would lower us to your jurassic swamp level, so keep on denying the light of the sun and stock up on pork chops before they run out, ya dolt.

 

o, p.s., as your IQ level is not up to it, a translation reads like : of all people in Gallia the Belgians are the bravest ... little funny note to that, Rene Goscinny, the writer of the fabulous Asterix comics once admitted it was based on the Menapii, the Belgian coastal tribe, but since he was a frog he transposed it to somewhere in Brittany, probably way over you head but hah, gotcha, as always.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Albatros said:

word from my British neighbour, whose yacht stayed on the hard for more than one year as a combination of Corona and Brexit (some of it should be in purple font)

 

hey you dolt, have I got old news for you  "Omnium gallorum fortissimi Belgae sunt." , comes out of De Bello Gallico from a certain Julius Caesar, but then you an immigrant from the blank oppression area wouldn't know, just silly trolling as always and showing off the buffoon you are , ya nincompoop.

maybe we should start a poll "do we want to kick Wayne to the curb, as lately he feels far too much entitled, he's the real bully and thinks he can dictate what goes on here" ... but then no, that would lower us to your jurassic swamp level, so keep on denying the light of the sun and stock up on pork chops before they run out, ya dolt.

 

o, p.s., as your IQ level is not up to it, a translation reads like : of all people in Gallia the Belgians are the bravest ... little funny note to that, Rene Goscinny, the writer of the fabulous Asterix comics once admitted it was based on the Menapii, the Belgian coastal tribe, but since he was a frog he transposed it to somewhere in Brittany, probably way over you head but hah, gotcha, as always.

Bit of a rant, all from a man who reads Asterix comics and thinks they are factual.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/16/2021 at 8:22 AM, gewoon ik said:

they are not? 

Damn, maybe the teacher was right after all.

New Asterix book comes out on Thursday. Asterix and the Gryphon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The panic buying of petrol and diesel is now just a distant memory. Not a single extra EU driver has arrived yet and only around 100 have applied.

 

French debt/gdp now exceeds that if Ireland and Portugal at the point they needed a bailout. Italy is close to Greek levels. The French have always loved bureaucracy (look at the paper work you have to complete for a regatta, every crew member must have a licence and a doctors letter !!!) and they use tax payers money to support a ginormous civil service. It's failed model. It can't survive. As a former asset manager the belief of many that governments just just keep borrowing and at low levels is naive in the extreme.

 

I'll say again the NI Protocol was very far from the finished article, it had many gaps which were supposed to be sorted out afterwards. The EU's approach to

implementation has proven unworkable and does not have the support of Unionists. Large parts of it have been suspended. As such it's dead. The EU knows this too which is why it is renegotiating it.

 

As for not honouring agreements some here would be well served to remember the Maastricht Treaty forbade bailouts, yet Greece, Ireland and Portugal received them. Illegally. They would be well served to recall that the Article 50 process required a country's exit discussions to include any future trading relationship. The EU refused to follow it's own legal process. They would also be well served to study the ECJ's treatment of Eleanor Sharpston who was fired and when she appealed moved the date if that appeal without telling her and decided in her absence that the appeal was denied. A Mickey Mouse court like no other. A farce.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

LeoV you are deliberately missing the point of Brexit. We are free to make our own decisions, to tighten or relax rules as is appropriate for the UK. Changing cabotage as suits us all free of EU membership. Do

you follow US politics ? There is a big debate there about supply chain issues affecting  the Christmas trade. As I said before many examples of product shortages in the supermarket in Paris. Back here in Hamble the only shortage I could see in Supermarket was UK bottled water, I would guess as its a low margin product but heavy so a lot of HGV space for little profit hence not priortised

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, cms said:

I am so bored of blind propaganda...

Personally I have 35 years experience in global business including trade finance. I have worked in US and Asia and always serviced a global client base. All that has opened my eyes to the tremendous opportunities available. The EU is in the slow lane and Brexit has allowed us to break away from this economic corpse and "get with the programme" 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish you and the UK the best of luck. What Scotland's future is remains to be seen, so you may be able to add the Scots to the list of losers?

Link to post
Share on other sites

To be fair Panoramix you are reliant on the tax dodging, off shore, left leaning anti Brexit news rag, the Guardian to back up your missives. 
 

Do you read other news rags, search the internet for alternative views, even live in the U.K. to get day to day personal feedback, I guess not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Al his words say is that he is blinded by hate.

Brexit promised frictionless trade, you have less trade due to friction. So it was not a lie if you fudge the words.

“Can the UK import enough Europeans fast enough to deal with all the problems Brexit has created?”
You’d need a heart of stone not to be laughing at this point.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Waynemarlow said:

To be fair Panoramix you are reliant on the tax dodging, off shore, left leaning anti Brexit news rag, the Guardian to back up your missives. 
 

Do you read other news rags, search the internet for alternative views, even live in the U.K. to get day to day personal feedback, I guess not.

Shooting the messenger is a sign of desperation!

All the right leaning papers are behind a paywall so I can't link them but the links above are factual so should be easy to disprove if wrong.

But you can't as it is accurate that the UK needs EU employees/firms despite all the bravado.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@PanoramixThe Guardian is Remainer clickbait central, the most amusing thing is the paper is funded by a large tax avoiding offshore trust as @Waynemarlowhas pointed out

 

Upon further investigation it is now clear that the leak around the HGV driver shortage and fuel was deliberately engineered by politically motivated remainers at Haulage Association, they delivered remarks to government and then leaked them. There is no fuel shortage, the panic buying has stopped

 

It is quite comical how people are trying to interpret changes in trade figures as being due to Brexit. Trade was declining between UK/EU before Brexit and the pandemic has had a far greater impact than Brexit which is largely an irrelevance. During pandemic people could not travel freely so even with approval for work many chose to stay home, ie local. We are won't yet out of the woods wrt Covid so people are not travelling for work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

All the right leaning papers are behind a paywall

Some are even turning against BJ.
Interesting is that you can say that almost all fruit and veggies picked by hand in the UK came from Non UK hands.
Now from Russians and Ukraine, presumably Donbass, as they are in a war. Which are refused visa by the EU.
Funny no one picks that up.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

But you can't as it is accurate that the UK needs EU employees/firms despite all the bravado.

Ah but so does France and all the other EU countries that import all their labour from the former Ruski countries. Look at Germany at the moment, the powerhouse and bank of the EU.

https://www.dw.com/en/germanys-workforce-in-desperate-need-of-skilled-immigrants-warns-labor-agency/a-58974377

We have an advantage, if we so desire and want foreign employees, we are not bound by EU employment laws, we can go anywhere in the world, unlike the likes of France who are bound to employ EU citizens.

At the end of the day, the rich EU countries are going to run out of cheap EU employees much like a Ponzi scheme. As the poorer countries economies kick off as Poland is doing so as we speak, they too will need workers to fill the places their own citizens will not fill. What will the EU do, admit more European countries diluting even further the wealth of the richer countries.

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Interesting is that you can say that almost all fruit and veggies picked by hand in the UK came from Non UK hands.

LeoV, this is not new, remember what was it two years ago, Jack and I were having a discussion on mechanical Asparagus pickers and my taking flack for saying that the UK agricultural business's were addicted to cheap labour rather than invest in mechanisation, as it was more economical to pay low wages.

Well it might just look like they now are going to have to invest to survive, which if we look at outside of the EU at say New Zealand, where they have tooled up when they were almost bankrupted by the UK's entry into the EEC, they are now one of the most efficient food producers in the world.

In some ways this Covid accelerated labour shock will put us in a good place, forcing the investment of mechanisation, leaving us ahead of the likes of the EU, who will be still dependent on moving labour to the work place, which is wrong on so many moral and ethical levels, let alone economics.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember the stats of aussie vineyard and wine industry versus Europe based on man/hectare, it was almost 1000:1

There is a reason aussie wine imports to the uk are greater then all others added together
( maybe no grapes in aussie wine?)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ferk even the Champagne houses of France are abandoning ship, it’s rumoured locally that one of the larger ones has just purchased the largest vineyard in our area along with substantial farmland alongside it. Evidently with global warming and the poor quality being produced, Champagne is starting to be not quite the money spinner to the bean counters it’s once was in France. Better start stocking up on U.K. sparkling you French guys, it’s not looking good for you.

https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2021/09/extreme-weather-causes-60-drop-in-champagne-crop-for-2021/

And the U.K. Wine makers continue to strut their stuff on the worlds stage.

https://inews.co.uk/inews-lifestyle/food-and-drink/best-champagne-sparkling-wine-producer-2020-iwsc-awards-langham-wine-estate-770214

Bet LeoV has already started to form the opinion that it must be Brexit related.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sailabout said:

I remember the stats of aussie vineyard and wine industry versus Europe based on man/hectare, it was almost 1000:1

There is a reason aussie wine imports to the uk are greater then all others added together
( maybe no grapes in aussie wine?)

The actual data up to 2020 is here. France is the largest importer of wine to the UK, closely followed by Italy, with Australia, New Zealand, and Spain all fighting for third, but at only half the values of the top two. That makes Australia's share about 15% of the total.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Waynemarlow said:

Ferk even the Champagne houses of France are abandoning ship, it’s rumoured locally that one of the larger ones has just purchased the largest vineyard in our area along with substantial farmland alongside it. Evidently with global warming and the poor quality being produced, Champagne is starting to be not quite the money spinner to the bean counters it’s once was in France. Better start stocking up on U.K. sparkling you French guys, it’s not looking good for you.

https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2021/09/extreme-weather-causes-60-drop-in-champagne-crop-for-2021/

And the U.K. Wine makers continue to strut their stuff on the worlds stage.

https://inews.co.uk/inews-lifestyle/food-and-drink/best-champagne-sparkling-wine-producer-2020-iwsc-awards-langham-wine-estate-770214

Bet LeoV has already started to form the opinion that it must be Brexit related.

 

10-12 years from grape to drink champers
No wonder they are sending Processo prices up

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, hump101 said:

The actual data up to 2020 is here. France is the largest importer of wine to the UK, closely followed by Italy, with Australia, New Zealand, and Spain all fighting for third, but at only half the values of the top two. That makes Australia's share about 15% of the total.

Thats value, in volume oz is second and has been on top a few times

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sailabout said:

Thats value, in volume oz is second and has been on top a few times

Wine stats seem to be a bit confused. According to wineaustralia, Oz is the second by volume, at 1.5 billion litres, and fourth by value, as you say, but they also claim that they export $4 billion worth to the UK. Other sources say the UK only imports £3.3 billion ($4.2 billion) in total, with $2.7 billion from the EU, and the remainder from the rest of the world, so even if all the remainder was from Oz, that is only $1.5 billion, not the $4 billion quoted by wineaustralia. In any case, Latin America exports more wine to the UK than Australia does, and New Zealand exports a similar amount, implying that Oz wine by value can't be more than $0.5 billion, so I am not sure of the numbers on the wineaustralia site.

By volume Oz was top in 2016, but that year they exported only 220 million litres, and the volumes were declining, so 1.5 billion litres in 2020 would require a massive COVID up-surge!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hump101 said:

Wine stats seem to be a bit confused. According to wineaustralia, Oz is the second by volume, at 1.5 billion litres, and fourth by value, as you say, but they also claim that they export $4 billion worth to the UK. Other sources say the UK only imports £3.3 billion ($4.2 billion) in total, with $2.7 billion from the EU, and the remainder from the rest of the world, so even if all the remainder was from Oz, that is only $1.5 billion, not the $4 billion quoted by wineaustralia. In any case, Latin America exports more wine to the UK than Australia does, and New Zealand exports a similar amount, implying that Oz wine by value can't be more than $0.5 billion, so I am not sure of the numbers on the wineaustralia site.

By volume Oz was top in 2016, but that year they exported only 220 million litres, and the volumes were declining, so 1.5 billion litres in 2020 would require a massive COVID up-surge!

good old stats..
I was in the uk 95 to 2005, was big news when ozzie imports by volume made it to the top, lots of questions asked and the big supermarket chains said we can get unlimited volume with taste guaranted from winery to our shelf, so no brainer they have to sell ozzie wine as the French volumes are too small to market.

( hence the joke its just chemicals and no grapes)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

was looking for some audio stuff, found this .... was quite amazing to me that a little brand would go to such lengths explaining what's going on, but then they make good stuff too. no worry for the wayniacs, in same search found that Ruark have the MIE project, Made In England, so all good !


Please note: UK deliveries are delayed by 1-3 weeks due to Brexit, for more information click here

Dear Customer!
We are sorry that the delivery service from our online store has not been up to par lately. That is unusual and not the standard that we aim to provide for our customers.
Our state-of-the-art European logistics centre situated in the heart of Europe allows for our usually quick delivery times across different countries.
Now that the UK left the EU, new implications for our customers arose due to that. You might be already aware that there is no duty on orders. However, for every order above a particular value, custom authorities are billing a handling fee of 50£ to 90£. Because we do not want to bill any of those fees to our customers, we worked hard to create a preliminary solution to avoid that. Unfortunately, this temporary workflow is now affecting our delivery times.
Please let us explain:
To be able to handle all the customs paperwork and import fees for our customers the best way possible, we had to decide to collect all orders and bulk ship them once a week (every Tuesday morning).
All orders made via our online Shop after Tuesdays, noon will therefore be collected till the following Tuesday.
Once the bulk shipment has left our facilities, custom clearance, which is heavily affected by the staffing shortage of the authorities, and the delivery to the UK will take up to five business days.
The UPS Tracking ID of your order will show updates as soon as the package is, cleared from customs, scanned by UPS UK and ready for delivery. So while you see no update on your UPS tracking, your order is already on the way or even in the UK but not yet fully processed by the customs authorities.
This why after careful calculation we are sorry to tell you, that for deliveries to the UK, two to three weeks delivery time should be expected.
Please accept our humble apologies, as we are working hard with the authorities and carriers to speed up this process. In the meantime please do reach out to our support team via a ticket, should any additional questions arise considering your order. They will try to help as soon as possible.


With best regards and stay healthy

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Albatros said:

Our next state-of-the-art European logistics centre situated in the heart of the UK Europe allows for our usually quick delivery times across different countries.

Ferk me, fixed it for them.

Just as an aside, bought some gear from the States last Monday week ago and its here sitting on my desk, 7 days from buying to delivery to the door.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Albatros ultimately that's the sellers choice as to where to site their facilities. American bike brands I use made a point of opening a UK specific warehouse following Brexit in addition to their European site. Goods are delivered just as fast as before with no extra costs. Businesses had years to decide how to respond. It seems that company simply did a poor job

Link to post
Share on other sites

LeoV I used to work on a farm as a summer job when I was at school so I know the work a bit. The vast majority of UK farm workers are Brits. What you are discussing is highly seasonal picking/harvesting work. Over our EU membership this was increasingly done by non-Brits particularly after the big expansion of Eastern European states. Workers could come to UK for 4-6 weeks and earn double or even treble their home country wages and pay no tax either as here for such a short time. Some were students and some I am told actually used their annual leave to come. That's not a sustainable business model. It's worth noting there are many non-EU citizens who come too eg from Asia. The labour market will adjust as it always does. It is worth noting that sales of UK sourced food have increased markedly post Brexit and people are prepared to pay more to support British farmers. We now see far more Union Jacks on food products as consumers want to support British goods and British jobs

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jambalaya, LeoV is probably being somewhat short sighted as the Netherlands position is not akin to the UK's, even without the readjustments going on due to Brexit in the UK.

Randstad, one of the largest temporary employment agencies in the Netherlands and abroad, cannot keep up with the unmet need for temporary workers. According to the agency’s latest numbers, a shortage of close to 100,000 temporary workers looms. In July 2021, there were approximately 207,000 open positions, an increase of more than 63 per cent from the year before. Dominique Hermans, CEO of Randstad Netherlands, suggests that staffing difficulties have had negative consequences for economic growth: “Because of the persistent scarcity in certain sectors, a number of companies are struggling to meet their potential.”

https://www.hollandtimes.nl/2021-edition-7-september/where-have-all-the-workers-gone-dutch-employers-grapple-with-post-lockdown-staffing-shortages/

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Jambalaya said:

The vast majority of UK farm workers are Brits.

You are talking bullshit and living in a glorious past, did not say farmworkers. Read the article, UK farmworkers are overwhelmingly managers and tractor drivers, not the ones picking crops. And  months, not  weeks like when you were young, 50 years ago.

Ignorance is bless.

Please enlighten me why The City will get a tax break to stay competitive with the EU banks?
A- because they are being hurt by Brexit.
b_ because of Tory cronyism.

On NIP, EU's first reaction is that UK is out of Horizon project for the time being. Almost no press picked that up in the UK.

Please discuss with Wayne the NIP solution, he wants to give it to Ireland. You seem to want to keep it.

PS, witch "American" bike brand ?

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, LeoV said:

On NIP, EU's first reaction is that UK is out of Horizon project for the time being. Almost no press picked that up in the UK.

I thought everyone was out of the Horizon project and its replacement Horizon Europe is so cash strapped and as yet no agreed budget to go forward, it’s whole future was in doubt.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of highly amusing stories today on pro EU website Politico

1) Brussels says EU credibility on trade in tatters as  27 still haven't ratified Latin American trade deal (vetoed by France and Republic of Ireland over Argentinian beef imports I believe). Just as we said in Brexit negotiating deals with 27 different voices is chaos. As usual EU solution is more centralised power and control, no veto

 

Trade

 

2) EU members grand promises on vaccine donations to poor countries have turned out to be lies.

It's worth noting it has been confirmed that Macron blocked a shipment of Astra-Zeneca to UK. The same vaccine he claimed was only "quasi effective" 

 

Vaccine Donations

 

It's worth noting also that EU dumps milk powder (a by product of Europeans drinking more skimmed milk) into African markets thus threatening the main source of income for millions of poor African farmers and their families

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Jambalaya said:

A couple of highly amusing stories today on pro EU website Politico

1) Brussels says EU credibility on trade in tatters as  27 still haven't ratified Latin American trade deal (vetoed by France and Republic of Ireland over Argentinian beef imports I believe). Just as we said in Brexit negotiating deals with 27 different voices is chaos. As usual EU solution is more centralised power and control, no veto

 

Trade

 

2) EU members grand promises on vaccine donations to poor countries have turned out to be lies.

It's worth noting it has been confirmed that Macron blocked a shipment of Astra-Zeneca to UK. The same vaccine he claimed was only "quasi effective" 

 

Vaccine Donations

 

It's worth noting also that EU dumps milk powder (a by product of Europeans drinking more skimmed milk) into African markets thus threatening the main source of income for millions of poor African farmers and their families

The Brexiters keep saying that the EU is weak and in disarray but during the negotiations they got about 5% of what they promised during the campaign. Doesn't look good to "lose" against a weak organisation...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Jambala = Whataboutism...
Did you read the relevant to the discussion NIP article on Politico ?

Never mind. According to JReesMogg you only have another 49 1/2 years to go before you start seeing a benefit of Brexit.

Please enlighten me why The City will get a tax break to stay competitive with the EU banks?
A- because they are being hurt by Brexit.
B- because of Tory cronyism.
C - (new) RW press says it is to crush the EU banking.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Panoramix said:

The Brexiters keep saying that the EU is weak and in disarray but during the negotiations they got about 5% of what they promised during the campaign. Doesn't look good to "lose" against a weak organisation...

Of course Europe is weak. Why do you think we chose to buy quality US submarines rather than that French shit?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Of course Europe is weak. Why do you think we chose to buy quality US submarines rather than that French shit?

Europe might well be weak but at least it doesn’t have the butcher’s apron plastered across its flegs..

 

 

 

 

 

 

lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Of course Europe is weak. Why do you think we chose to buy quality US submarines rather than that French shit?

Because you are a US colony!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

So Polexit is not to be, just yet. But why would the Poles leave when they are having their cake and eating it. Having received in excess of 130 Billion in Euro bungs to date, with a further guaranteed 140 Billion to 2027, one would think Ursula would be able to do something to bring them into line using the old nutmeg of withholding the cash.

But with Poland and Hungary watching each other’s back and the EU hampered by its 27 country unanimity rules, Poland can simply continue to stick two fingers up and carry on riling the elite and still draw the cash.

And Ursula has a personal problem, Angela wants it all to be brushed under the wine mountain and the can kicked down the road.  Today however  the MEP’s have put the heat personally onto Ursula with threatening law suits being proposed unless Poland is reeled in.

Should be fun to watch the machinations of the EU dealing with a country on a roll as well as trousering the EU’s fake Euros.

Link to post
Share on other sites