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Floor board anchors screws - any good?


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https://www.pyiinc.com/floor-anchors.html

This winter I got plans to sand down and vanish the floorboards. Some of the floorboards are secured with traditional screws. Some of them have rusted away. I did the job 7-8 years ago where I replaced all the screws with marine stainless screws. Or the screws were sold to me as “marine stainless screws”. Looking at them now – I think the marine standard is questionable.

Are PYI floor anchors any good? They look good on paper? Last time I was onboard I counted the number of floorboard screws to 30 in total. So not an easy quick project to fit them all.

Has anyone retrofitted them? I got a GRP boat where some of the floorboards as screwed down. They are screwed down to GRP channels or a very flew places wood. As most boat owner, I dislike drilling in the boat! Especially when she is in the water. Can get a nightmare of less.

Have anyone done this? I am afraid this can be a very time-consuming job.

The plan is the take the boards home to the workshop, sand, fit the anchor screws and bring it back. I think the hard part would be to fit the base of the floorboard screws. 

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They look like Dzus fasteners like they used to use on race cars.

A huge pain to fit as perfection in mounting both parts is mandatory - they are only 1/4 turn to lock/unlock.

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Looks like a good idea, but I’d like something that can be opened without a tool. If a leak happens under the floorboards I’d like to be able to get at it without having to find a quarter or a screwdriver first. 

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18 hours ago, PaulK said:

Looks like a good idea, but I’d like something that can be opened without a tool. If a leak happens under the floorboards I’d like to be able to get at it without having to find a quarter or a screwdriver first. 

That is a valid point. In the event of water ingress, quick access without delay is important. 

My floorboard is well secured without any screws of fittings. They have never gone out of their position in any weather and sea condition. We have been out in some very bad seas for a long time. There are places where I keep stuff under the floorboards. In the event of pitch poling or going around I like the idea of keeping the floorboard locked down. It is safer and good practice. The main floorboards can still be lifted and some of them got small inspection hatches. 

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21 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

They look like Dzus fasteners like they used to use on race cars.

A huge pain to fit as perfection in mounting both parts is mandatory - they are only 1/4 turn to lock/unlock.

I like the 1/4 turn to unlock/lock. The perfection of mounting scares me. Is this a project that is too timeconsuming to complete? 30 anchors?

There are existing screws, some of them rusted. It will take time to remove the existing screws. Is it technically possible to fit both parts? The existing screw holds is a good marker for where to fit. There is no give in the anchor. If possible I would like to hear from someone who has retrofitted them?

My best bet would possibly to order just a few and give it a try! Thanks for the comments.

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Sorry, I don't have any photos, but:

My floorboards are held down at the ends with:

1) a 1x3-inch piece of rounded flat SS about 1/16 inch thick.  This piece is screwed into a relief under the floorboard and extends about 3/4 inches under the adjoining floorboard, where there is a matching relief.

2) the other end has the locking mechanism.  This is a normal recessed floor pull drilled to accept a 1/4 inch SS allen head machine screw.  Under the floorboard, there are a couple of washers and nuts securing a 1x1-1/2 piece of SS secured to the screw.  An Allen wrench rotates the assembly to latch under a short piece of angle stock screwed to the beam the floorboard rests on.  

Normally, I don't bother to latch the floorboard, they are fairly heavy (1-inch marine ply + 1/4 inch holly/teak laminated surface).  For passages, I latch them.  Safe and reliable. 

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On 11/7/2019 at 10:00 PM, jamhass said:

held

 

Funny, I have been looking at these for the past couple weeks as well. The prior owner buried a sea strainer under a screw-secured floorboard and it greatly annoys me.

@longy @SloopJonB - would you mind expounding on the "fiddly" aspect?

My thought was to reuse the existing holes the PYI's kit, which is just a couple drill bits and chamfered router bit. If one were to use the existing holes as a pilot hole, being very careful to be plumb and for the board not to move, it seems like the remainder would be relatively trivial. 

Is the fiddly bit getting the depth of the bayonet correct, alignment of the holes or something else?

Thanks!

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The alignment of the two pieces has to be essentially perfect in order for them to engage. In my long ago experience they were not the easiest things to do up even when properly aligned. I recall it took a fair bit of pressure down while twisting them or they wouldn't engage properly. They don't have the ability to pull the two components together the way threads do, they are only a locking device.

Personally I wouldn't use them on something like floorboards. AFAIK they are only intended to hold sheet metal components together, not thick stuff.

I think Jamhass has the best advice.

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Thanks for the advice.

I think I only will give the floorboard and sand down and some vanish! Align the two pieces of the anchor screws for 30 fittings will more likely be a project I never will be able to complete. I had the impression that these anchor screws were made for floorboard? 

I have to say the anchor screws look good - but I would rather spend the time sailing!

 

 

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I installed them in a boat that needed to have the floor boards held down for offshore racing.  I found then not that hard to install and once installed easy to use.  The set over the bilge pump was removed and tightened all the time to check the bilge .   The ones in the OP post are sold for holding down floor boards.  Only issue was one area squeaked.  I read that a few layers of duct tape can stop that. 

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18 hours ago, seaker said:

 I found then not that hard to install and once installed easy to use.   

That is what I like to hear. First-hand experience.

There is no real need for me to screw down my floorboards. Other than the old screw heads are rusty and look bad. Some of them are so rusty that I most likely have to break them apart when taking the board up. When vanishing the board this winter, I might take the time to install floorboard anchors. I got currently got full access to the bilge, that's not the problem. I do keep things under some of the floorboards, I, therefore, find it safer to keep the board secured down.  

Thank you for your comment.

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FWIW I've used these "Nut-Serts" on prior boats to hold down panels semi-permanently. They are a bit like Dzus style fasteners except they take a machine thread so not a 1/4 turn to release.

The trick to installing them is to choose the location and then drill a pilot hole simultaneously through both pieces to be joined - that gives you perfect alignment for the two parts of the fastener.

When the first one is drilled out and installed then move on to the diagonal one - when that is installed the panel pieces can't wiggle around at all and all the rest will be properly aligned.

The big difference in installing these over those Dzus style ones it that with the Dzus style the vertical distance between the two components is critical for engagement - with the Nut-Serts it isn't

image.png.171e1bc2c14773c4aed9f982c36f77e0.png

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12 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

FWIW I've used these "Nut-Serts" on prior boats to hold down panels semi-permanently. They are a bit like Dzus style fasteners except they take a machine thread so not a 1/4 turn to release.

The trick to installing them is to choose the location and then drill a pilot hole simultaneously through both pieces to be joined - that gives you perfect alignment for the two parts of the fastener.

When the first one is drilled out and installed then move on to the diagonal one - when that is installed the panel pieces can't wiggle around at all and all the rest will be properly aligned.

The big difference in installing these over those Dzus style ones it that with the Dzus style the vertical distance between the two components is critical for engagement - with the Nut-Serts it isn't

image.png.171e1bc2c14773c4aed9f982c36f77e0.png

As I prep Kahoots, I'm thinking the $10/each PYI ones for the 3 floorboards that catch the most water/have systems. The others, I'm looking at the above. Also, you don't need the fittings on both sides, as you can glue a tab on the foorboard and a receiver on the stringer for one side, and the fastener on the other.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I had them on my boat, 20 or so. I eventually took them all out. A Dzuz fastener has some spring action built into the wire catch, the PYI anchors do not. The result is the thickness and installation depth has to be perfect as there is no compliance. Getting them aligned was easy enough if a little fiddly. But keeping them tight was impossible. There is a small bump on the socket that is supposed to keep the trunnion on the fastener locked. The slightest misadjustment or variation in thickness means either you can't get it fastened, or it unfastens itself. 

I removed them and machined replacement sockets that went in the same place, with internal threads, used flat head screws in the same countersink. Something like SJB has pictured above.

I would not use those again. Their panel fasteners on the other hand work pretty well - but they have a spring built into them for thickness compliance/tolerance. 

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I have good luck using S S fender washers with@ 1/3 of the washer cut off.  You rotate the washer to hold down the floorboards.  Line up the washer cut off with the cut off section just clearing the plank overlap.  Easypeasy [though not completely flush to the surface, unless you countersink it on the floorboard].

 

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