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Bike safety--any cyclists among the sailors?


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NTSB summary sheet with recommendations for reducing cycling accidents and deaths:

https://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Pages/2019-DCA18SS002-BMG.aspx

Any commuters or exercise riders here?  Had any close calls?  The NTSB wants a bunch of things done by the individual states, mostly mandatory helmets, increasing visibility of bikes, and more bike lanes.  Scary item notes that in almost half of bike road fatalities, the driver never was aware there was a bike...  And while most vehicle/bike accidents are at intersections, the most of the fatal accidents occur "mid-block", between intersections, with vehicle overtaking cyclist.  High-up vehicles (trucks, big SUVs) put you out of driver's sight when you're alongside, you're below the window.

Riding in New Orleans is good, and bad.  Good--most folks here just aren't in that big a hurry, so speeds in the city are slower.  Fewer cars too, many folks still can't affort them.  The city has recently put in a LOT of bike lanes, with sizable fines for driving in/on them.  And there are a ample places to get an auto-free ride where you roadies can just put your head down and spin (the Mississippi river levee-top paved bike trail). Bad--the drivers here are distracted, and many of the non-major paved streets will rattle your fillings out.

 NYC is much more intense, a friend of mine got killed on his bike at an intersection in Chelsea.  

One thing I've benefited from is a clip-onto eyeglasses mirror, way better than fixed mirror or no mirror.  And allowing time to get where I'm going.  And practicing "slow and yield" at uncontrolled intersections.

 

your comments or experience welcome..

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Regular commuter here (and fellow TT-ist, although I suck), in fact I rode today.  I kind've hate the bike lanes, actually.  On the one main road I travel, they took a 4-lane road, added bike lanes and turned it into a 2-lane road.  Now *more* cars pass me closer, because there's no longer a left lane for them to get into.  Also, the motorcycles and scooters have decided that the bike lane is theirs, and the cops don't give a shit.

Was riding home one day, a dude on a motorcycle blows past me in the bike lane, right past a group of 5 cops on the sidewalk.  I pull over, and ask why they didn't do anything about that.  One shrugged.  That's their response.

I've been hit twice -- once by a guy driving a Dodge truck pulling into the intersection to have a look-see at traffic.  Luckily, it didn't knock me off the bike.  The other time I was just clipped by the rearview mirror on a full-sized van.  That van received dents in the side from my fist.  While really minor, they still count to me.

However, in 20+ years of commuting to work, I figure that's not too bad, considering how bad the drivers are around here.  And then there are the terrible cyclists. . .

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If you bike regularly, you *will* have close calls with cars. The very best thing you can do is stay away from cars...Take less busy side roads, commute when traffic is quieter, allow as much space as possible, etc.

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I commute regularly, about 20 minutes each way x 5 days/week, year round except when Vancouver gets snow. Also commuted in Annapolis MD and Brisbane QLD, Oz.

I would expect about 1 really close call/year. Dooring, people turning left in front of me and not seeing me, turning right at an intersection when I am riding in the curbe lane. I ride fast so tend to keep up with traffic.

You just have to have a lot of situational awareness and don't let your guard down. In winter / rain I have lots of lights and a hi viz jacket. Headlight, tail light, helmet back light, wrist band that glows and spoke lights. I HATE bikes without lights when I am driving in a car and have been known to roll down the passenger window at a stop light and politely tell them they are hard to see in their dark rain jacket and $20 will get you a cheap light to protect themselves.

Vancouver is really good with bike lanes or roads that are dedicated bike routes. The dedicated bike routes tend to have traffic calming measures (roundabouts, speed bumps) or other features that dissuade cars from using them. Things like blocking the cross road with a curb so cars can only turn right but bikes can carry on straight. So if you're a local driver you can get to your house on the road but it discourages commuters from driving straight on the bike routes.

Annapolis was ~20 years ago but riding on a major road I'd regularly get people telling me to ride on the sidewalk. Good clipped by a senior who the police knew her name when they arrived. Not very fun.

Brisbane downtown core was worse (2011-2014). Drivers in Australia seem very, very hostile to bikes and would regularly come very close to me as I rode. Other commuters I spoke to said the same thing. Lots of bike fatalities there.

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I  had only a bike for transport for 3 -4 yrs in college.   Visibility is a must. Tests have proven this, buy the ugliest neon jerseys you can find (usually on the sale rack, bonus!) I have been hit & taken down 5 times - every single time the driver claimed that they did not see me, both overtaking and crossing hits.  The mental picture of most drivers erases cyclists. Most times when hit I was tired, riding slow, and far to the right (in US) of the lane. Take your safety into your own hands, aggressively! Take the entire lane if the shoulder is bad/too narrow. Pick your routes so that you r speed matches vehicle speeds. Never forget physics - you will always lose in any collision. Obey traffic rules - don't cross against lights/run stop signs/swerve across traffic lanes: this only irritates the vehicle drivers, and their next encounter they will not give the bike any consideration.

  The new lights are great - but keep the batts up to charge! And two (rear) are even better. Make sure that they also show from the side.

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I commuted from Oceanside to Laguna Niguel on my bike for about 3 years (Cali - 35 miles mostly along the coast). Although I enjoyed it - at least the part on the Marine Base and old coast highway where there is little to no traffic - I had a couple close calls that if not for my own caution in riding VERY defensively could have been nasty. Eventually, the risk/benefit ratio became increasingly lopsided in my mind so I stopped and drove instead. From that limited experience, my advice is ride with paranoia as if everyone is clueless and out to hit you.....because they are. The advice above about wear clothing with good visibility is good advice as well. Frankly after years as a medic............the best advice I can give is......don't commute on your bike. Too many dumb asses behind the wheel. I have seen some really ugly shit and guess what.......it was almost never the bike riders fault.

Oh......and I rode with headphones...........really stupid..........great way to get and keep your spin rate up, and nothing like motivational music riding along at just under max effort, good sweat and riding along the ocean with the sun just coming up....but really stupid.

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Used to ride up to 100 miles a week for recreation.  Had mapped out secondary roads that tended to get little traffic.  In some ways that was almost worse than city streets because people did not expect to see a cyclist out in the middle of nowhere.  Always rode in high visibility neon yellow or green.

These days when I do ride. I put the bike on the car rack and drive the 8 miles or so to the end of a paved bike trail that I could ride for 20ish miles if I chose to.  Could add many more miles to that if I would venture out on to public streets for a few miles.

But these days it is to just ride for an hour to clear my head and get a little exercise.   Keep my cardiologist happy and quiet.

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A friend almost drilled a bike who was in all black and no lights at dusk.  Crosswalk (not an intersection) was his right of way I guess...

He was crossing at speed from behind bushes.  Not a prayer to anticipate him.

Guy was pissed, albeit not all that coherent... I thought that bikes have to behave as cars for rules of the road.

I'm left with the only logic is that he wanted to be hit.  We are being over-run with mentals/homeless.  Bikes are free, and you can get a new tent and sleeping bag each week from aid organizations.

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Walking to my commuter train in downtown Chicago this evening. Crossing a one-way street looking for on coming traffic coming from my left (have to keep a sharp eye out for Uber drivers). Jerk on a Divey (rental) bike comes blasting through the pedestrians going the wrong way down the middle of the street. Would have served him right if a bus had crushed him.

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I was run down by a pleasant seeming lady. She was turning right while looking left. Overtook me and then flattened me. Never saw me because people can only see in one direction at a time. Still have aches from time to time 30 years later. No sure how one can be visible or defensive enough to guard against that kinda thing.

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Written off two road bikes. No cars involved. Helmet, gloves and shoes at all times. The rest of the skin(less) areas seem to slowly repair themselves. 

As for cars, just treat them like they want to kill you and be visible. 

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Don't assume that any car will see you. Either make them see you or be able to get out of the way. 

Think  way ahead and don't put yourself in a dirty spot

Some of the dirtiest spots are a) between the curb and a right turning vehicle(pass on the left) b) cycling within a yard alongside parked cars c)night or poor visibility and not making yourself visible d) riding on a road with limited shoulder and unable (due to speed or type of road/highway) to establish your lane---this gets compounded in winter when snow piles up and gives the cyclist an even smaller side road space e)don't get tracked(if your city has streetcars) f)count on pedestrians being completely unaware of you, especially ones wandering into a bike lane with their head in their phone g)same goes for getting a door prize from any parked car or Uber drop off  in the vicinity of a bike lane.

Absence a bike lane, you've gotta be visible and direct and establish your presence in the lane if your about to get into a dirty spot...within reason. If you're trying to establish over a dump truck, how the fuck did you get to that point. See-'thinking ahead'.

Part of the 'think ahead' equation is habitually using the safest, least car travelled routes when and if possible.  Back streets can often be way better riding than a crowded bike lane. Just be ready for lots of intersections and the odd blind driver along the way, but it's not that bad if you 'think ahead'. Wrong way on a one way street in low car population backstreets can be a cyclists friend(some cities like Montreal actually codify this approach with less dense area bike lanes) Depending on your rig and the type of road and pedestrian count, sidewalks definitely come in to play here and there(for me, not necesarily recomending it). 

As for equipment, I'm probably negligent in not wearing a helmet at this point. I DON'T, as a rule bike without a light. As for mirrors? For city riding they're a really poor replacement for eyes in the back of ones head. 

Keep the bike in good spec. One of the worst things that ever happened to me in 4 decades of downtown riding was breaking my chain, lots of stitches on that one.

These days I seem to be driving more, and I'm not entirely happy about that. Knucklehead drivers seem to be at an all time high, and I don't think it's my imagination. On a fairly fast throughfare  near my house, I've seen three or four drivers in the last year try to pull a seriously dangerous U-turn. I don't recall seeing 1 driver doing that in the previous two decades. I blame that on inexperience combined with GPS. And, uhh texting? That sent my cousin flying 30 feet by a distracted driver and he miraculously walked away but not without some side effects. 

The way I look at it, as a cyclist I follow the rules of the road, within reason. I don't blow red lights on congested streets. Not cool. Stop signs in an empty residential neighbourhood? Look four ways and keep moving. But as for being all surprised that some knucklehead driver just cut me off and then going and rapping on his window. Not going to happen.

I'd rather assume the worst to avoid surprise. 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Wet Spreaders said:

Mountain bike. Maybe not safer, but at least your safety is under your own control - rocks and trees don't pull out onto the trail in front of you and don't blindside you from behind.

 

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I'm more of a cyclist these days than a sailor and have been so for the last 7 years and most of that on the road. Being in a regional city in West Oz the traffic is not too bad and I mostly cycle in groups and mostly very early in the morning before traffic gets too busy, however you still need to keep your wits about you, especially around roundabouts, which there are plenty of in this town, and on the busier regional roads where traffic is travellling at 90-110kmh including bloody big trucks.  Most of my closest incidents with vehicles have come at roundabouts and I make sure I OWN the lane coming into a roundabout.  I've found that riding with the expectation that you have not been seen has saved me from painful crunches a number of times. I've seen the results of a few around here who have not been attentive enough and I do not want to add my name to the list. I also ALWAYS give a thumbs up when a motorist has seen me. Helps to spread the positive vibes I reckon.

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I rode a lot until my mid-50's. My last bike was my only carbon fibre bike, a Trek 5000. My favourite bike was my Hetchins with Campagnolo Record and sew-ups!

Hetchins has the prettiest lugs I've ever seen.

This is not my old bike but it has the same style lugs.

steel-lugged-13.jpg

While living in New York City I kept my bike pump loaded with spokes for protection. The added pump weight also helped while pumping up a sew-up tire that had been repaired. Repairing sew-up's was a never ending task!

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15 hours ago, Windward said:

 We are being over-run with mentals/homeless.  Bikes are free, and you can get a new tent and sleeping bag each week from aid organizations.

It's tough having good mental health and a home. My sympathies. Btw, where do I pick up my free bike and weekly tent and sleeping bag? Mine are almost two week old!

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1 minute ago, bplipschitz said:

Cannot imagine commuting with sew-ups.  I raced with them for a little bit, but not on the road.  I need to get where I'm going.

I carried a spare and fixed the flat after I got to where I was going, at least for short rides. For longer rides I got out my thread cutter, repair kit, and needle and thread!

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I cycle extensively:  commuting (6 miles each way), road rides (most weekends when the weather is nice)  and bicycle touring (I have ridden extensively in Europe).  I live in a very cycling-friendly city and can get just about anywhere in the city on bike paths, bike lanes or quiet streets.  I probably ride 5,000 miles per year. 

I have VERY bright lights, front and rear, that I use all the time. 

I hate traffic jams. I love riding. I enjoy (and benefit from) the exercise. 

I have had some crashes, been assaulted (road rage from a motorist) and plenty of near misses.  All things considered, cycling is the the best way for me to get around.  I look forward to getting on my bike.  I am a better person for it - mentally and physically. 

 

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Most of my riding is on a mtn bike, but also have a townie that gets more service than my car around town. Especially during the summer months when we get swamped with clueless tourists. I can get a 24 pack in my carrier but not quite a 30 pack!

 

Then there's guys like this. Especially an issue around Boulder.

 

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15 minutes ago, bugger said:

I cycle extensively:  commuting (6 miles each way), road rides (most weekends when the weather is nice)  and bicycle touring (I have ridden extensively in Europe).  I live in a very cycling-friendly city and can get just about anywhere in the city on bike paths, bike lanes or quiet streets.  I probably ride 5,000 miles per year. 

I have VERY bright lights, front and rear, that I use all the time. 

I hate traffic jams. I love riding. I enjoy (and benefit from) the exercise. 

I have had some crashes, been assaulted (road rage from a motorist) and plenty of near misses.  All things considered, cycling is the the best way for me to get around.  I look forward to getting on my bike.  I am a better person for it - mentally and physically. 

 

In NYC I used a carbide lamp that lit up the night.  I'm not sure these are legal in most places nowadays.

 

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2 hours ago, albanyguy said:

I'm more of a cyclist these days than a sailor ....

Yup.  Way better exercise, more practical multipurpose, and still some of the same zen.  Finally started wearing a helmet for its sun visor and so the neighbor kid wouldn't have a bad influence, now feel naked without it.  Light and Motion lights in several places on the (Surly with Jones bar) bike and defensive riding have kept me safe so far, plus half my riding is off-road. L and M are designed and assembled in Santa Cruz, so they're kinda sail-ey...

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1 hour ago, bugger said:

I have had some crashes, been assaulted (road rage from a motorist)

Never been assaulted, but I did have one old guy (had to be in his 70s) get out of his beat up little Toyota truck at a stop light and walk back towards me, yelling.  What he didn't realize was that, since we were stopped on a steep uphill grade, I was already pumped on adrenaline.  I went from 0-100 in about a microsecond, and shouted him down quite forcefully  -- surprised even me (I'm not usually one to yell).  I think I scared him, cause he spun on his heel and ran back to his truck.

Some days, though, the commutes are just great, like yesterday's after work.  No real reason why, the weather was crappy (42F/6C), misty and dark, but the riding was very fluid and soothing and I felt strong.  It keeps me riding, and keeps me sane.

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I ride a lot in a dense city, but am increasing careful to pick my routes and always assume cars do not see me. I make eye contact whenever I can, and although I am usually a reserved person will not hesitiat to yell at someone getting too close if I think they are not paying attention. I agree drivers seem worse and more willing to take risks around cyclists than in the past, cars are also larger even as the roaods are more congested.

In our area one problem is the strange fixation with black bike gear. Most helmets are black, the bikes are painted flat colors and last time I shopped most rain gear was also black. I am a virtual clown car of color, red shoes, yellow bike, green jacket. I am not sure when style started trumping safety.

A final rant, electric bikes. Although some are pedal assist, more these days are electric motorcycles. They are much faster than most bikes, and are increaseingly crowding bike paths and lanes. When you see someone sitting bolt upright going 20 mph uphill in their work clothes talking on a mobile you know they are not paying much attention to what they are doing.

 

 

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In the Netherlands everybody rides bikes... about 1/4 doesn't have a light... 

I'm more scared of hitting a bike when driving a car than being hit by a car when riding a bike! (when on a bike i always asume nobody sees me and i have to avoid all obstacles)

 

and we don't wear helmets... and when we're drunk we asume a bike is safer than a car... so you go to the pub on a bike!

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5 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Cannot imagine commuting with sew-ups.  I raced with them for a little bit, but not on the road.  I need to get where I'm going.

This.........I raced with sew ups. I commuted with clinchers.......with big ole deep treads..........commuting on sew ups would seem to be a constant repair job.

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2 hours ago, daan62 said:

In the Netherlands everybody rides bikes... about 1/4 doesn't have a light... 

I'm more scared of hitting a bike when driving a car than being hit by a car when riding a bike! (when on a bike i always asume nobody sees me and i have to avoid all obstacles)

 

and we don't wear helmets... and when we're drunk we asume a bike is safer than a car... so you go to the pub on a bike!

Well, the helmet part has not been a problem for me since it's pretty much mandated by law around here (I was however stopped by the police once for being without one), on the other hand I would be very guilty of cycling while intoxicated, actually just a couple of nights ago when I was pretty well into my cups & out of chew, fair to say both of those things are bad habits that need breaking, but at least I didn't drive.

I'm terrible about the hi-vis gear, my only concession is the pant leg strap, otherwise I do tend to wear quite a lot of black, so lights front & rear are always in working order on my flat handle bar road machine.

Closest call with a car happened a few years ago down in Tukwila, in that case a street sweeper was blocking both my view & the driver's, good case for that "thinking ahead deal!"

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5 minutes ago, animeproblem said:

Well, the helmet part has not been a problem for me since it's pretty much mandated by law around here (I was however stopped by the police once for being without one), on the other hand I would be very guilty of cycling while intoxicated, actually just a couple of nights ago when I was pretty well into my cups & out of chew, fair to say both of those things are bad habits that need breaking, but at least I didn't drive.

I'm terrible about the hi-vis gear, my only concession is the pant leg strap, otherwise I do tend to wear quite a lot of black, so lights front & rear are always in working order on my flat handle bar road machine.

Closest call with a car happened a few years ago down in Tukwila, in that case a street sweeper was blocking both my view & the driver's, good case for that "thinking ahead deal!"

together with my brother we got to school on our bikes without guidance from the age of 9 or so... did we crash our bikes from time to time? YES!!! later on when we went to the pub on bikes, did we crash them with our drunk heads? YES!! (i've also had to drag my stepdad out of a hedge after a family party... (he was 60 or so at the time)) in total no permanent fysical damage... (maybe a scar but nothing real) it went wrong when engines came into play! (and yes, i also drove on a bike in Amserdam... just asume nobody sees you!)

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3 hours ago, daan62 said:

and we don't wear helmets... and when we're drunk we asume a bike is safer than a car... so you go to the pub on a bike

Definitely more crashes on the bike than the car when drunk, the consequences were a bit different though.

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2 minutes ago, BOI Guy said:

Definitely more crashes on the bike than the car when drunk, the consequences were a bit different though.

in a car you don't fall over... but i refuse to drive a car drunk or with a drunk driver!

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9 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Never been assaulted, but I did have one old guy (had to be in his 70s) get out of his beat up little Toyota truck at a stop light and walk back towards me, yelling.  What he didn't realize was that, since we were stopped on a steep uphill grade, I was already pumped on adrenaline.  I went from 0-100 in about a microsecond, and shouted him down quite forcefully  -- surprised even me (I'm not usually one to yell).  I think I scared him, cause he spun on his heel and ran back to his truck.

Some days, though, the commutes are just great, like yesterday's after work.  No real reason why, the weather was crappy (42F/6C), misty and dark, but the riding was very fluid and soothing and I felt strong.  It keeps me riding, and keeps me sane.

Mostly a former cyclist these days, but the idea of road rage never made sense.    If somebody gets mad at a hard ass cyclist pumping along, clearly into fitness, does he really want to get out of his air conditioned cab and try man up?    I learned in college to use my mouth as a horn, ignore one way road signs, and be assertive.   Otherwise cars mistake you for the road.   It’s also acceptable to kick at the plastic bits of cars that try to turn into you.

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I'm on my way to Amsterdam on Sunday. I find walking there terrifying. As an oblivious american and not used to the bike culture there, it's easy to lose focus and wander into a place where you should not be where you will wipe out and be wiped out by a fashionable middle aged lady commuting home from work on her bike. And it's even more likely at night in the rain after a few cocktails. Good times ahead! 

 

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27 minutes ago, MisterMoon said:

I'm on my way to Amsterdam on Sunday. I find walking there terrifying. As an oblivious american and not used to the bike culture there, it's easy to lose focus and wander into a place where you should not be where you will wipe out and be wiped out by a fashionable middle aged lady commuting home from work on her bike. And it's even more likely at night in the rain after a few cocktails. Good times ahead! 

 

To the locals, nothing sucks worse about bike commuting in Amsterdam than tourists walking onto the cycle paths without so much as a look around...

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20 minutes ago, Lima November said:

To the locals, nothing sucks worse about bike commuting in Amsterdam than tourists walking onto the cycle paths without so much as a look around...

I try hard  not to be "that guy". It's really hard to truly relax walking around that city. For those of us unaccustomed to the traffic a lot of conscious mental effort is required. 

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Having cycled in many places around the world, Netherlands has succeeded in integrating bicycles into their transportation network in a way that most North Americans wouldn't recognize.  Not just dedicated bike lanes - but whole roadways with signs and traffic lights dedicated solely to bicyclists.  Cycling is an acknowledged valid form of transportation for everyone including the very young and very old.  It is part of their culture.  

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17 hours ago, bugger said:

Having cycled in many places around the world, Netherlands has succeeded in integrating bicycles into their transportation network in a way that most North Americans wouldn't recognize.  Not just dedicated bike lanes - but whole roadways with signs and traffic lights dedicated solely to bicyclists.  Cycling is an acknowledged valid form of transportation for everyone including the very young and very old.  It is part of their culture.  

Copenhagen is right up there, too. Gotta be heads up for the hordes of Biking Vikings. 

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3 hours ago, bplipschitz said:

Copenhagen is right up there, too. Gotta be heads up for the hordes of Biking Vikings. 

Speaking of Copenhagen

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/09/world/europe/biking-copenhagen.html?action=click&module=News&pgtype=Homepage

 

In other news a woman was killed in Chicago a few days ago when a dump truck made a turn and hit her while she was biking.  Driver cited

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On 11/6/2019 at 2:40 PM, nolatom said:

Any commuters or exercise riders here? 

My brother used to ride his bike to and from work during the summer.  One day we was run off the road by some kids in a car who thought that was funny.  He went into the gravel, then went over the handle bars and landed square on his face.  He lost two front teeth and had gravel embedded in his lip.  The chin strap on his helmet probably prevented gravel from tearing up his chin. 

Though my brother's incident seemed to be deliberate, when I was 17, riding home from work on my Honda 90, a guy made a left hand turn into me.  I was thrown into the air and ended up on his hood.  When I came to, I was looking at him through his windshield.  His hands were still on the steering wheel.  He was frozen.  His eyes wide open.  I knew right then he never saw me.

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On 11/8/2019 at 6:09 PM, MisterMoon said:

I try hard  not to be "that guy". It's really hard to truly relax walking around that city. For those of us unaccustomed to the traffic a lot of conscious mental effort is required. 

True, it takes some skills to recognise bicycle paths. The locals can stroll easily because they recognise them in their sleep...

Some signs to look out for:

1) Level changes. If part of a path is 15 cm below another part, it's probably a bicycle lane.

2) White lines on a pavement. One of the sides of the line is a bicycle lane. Look for the 'pedestrian' and 'bicycle' pictogrammes to see which is which.

3) Red surfaces. Brick red roads spell danger, these are bicycle highways so people ride even faster than usual.

4) In general, look out for bicycles. There are so many, that any bicycle path is likely to have a few cyclists on it, at any time of the day.

Hope this helps... Enjoy your trip!

 

 

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Slightly off-topic, but hey, I started it so you're stuck with me ;-)

Yesterday and despite being 70, I did a short Triathlon sponsored by the Houma, Louisiana YMCA.  I was joined in this by my exercise buddy.  She  is younger and incoreasingly faster than me.  I used to do more of these, but except for the same race two years ago (which was Buddy's first tri), I hadn't done one in many years.  It was 200Y swim in the Y pool, 12 mile bike, 2 run.

She did well and finished just below mid-pack, much improved on the swim, and ended up second in her age group.  I chugged along and finished like 79th out of 87 finishers, but I was almost a decade older than anyone else, and felt good on the run, which latter I had had some doubts about because I was wobbly and had to walk some of it two years ago after taking a morning  blood pressure pill I should have skipped.

Buddy is now stoked about tri, so I may get roped into doing more of them.  Worse things could happen.  I don't feel too sore today.

Racing costs money, but they clear the streets for you, woo hoo.

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4 hours ago, Lima November said:

True, it takes some skills to recognise bicycle paths. The locals can stroll easily because they recognise them in their sleep...

Some signs to look out for:

1) Level changes. If part of a path is 15 cm below another part, it's probably a bicycle lane.

2) White lines on a pavement. One of the sides of the line is a bicycle lane. Look for the 'pedestrian' and 'bicycle' pictogrammes to see which is which.

3) Red surfaces. Brick red roads spell danger, these are bicycle highways so people ride even faster than usual.

4) In general, look out for bicycles. There are so many, that any bicycle path is likely to have a few cyclists on it, at any time of the day.

Hope this helps... Enjoy your trip!

 

 

Thanks, it's not my first rodeo in AMS, so I'm not too concerned. My big concern at the moment is after two airplanes getting knocked out by mechanical problems and then the crew running out of time last night after about 6.5 hours of delays,  I'm still trying to get there! 

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2 hours ago, nolatom said:

Slightly off-topic, but hey, I started it so you're stuck with me ;-)

Yesterday and despite being 70, I did a short Triathlon sponsored by the Houma, Louisiana YMCA.  I was joined in this by my exercise buddy.  She  is younger and incoreasingly faster than me.  I used to do more of these, but except for the same race two years ago (which was Buddy's first tri), I hadn't done one in many years.  It was 200Y swim in the Y pool, 12 mile bike, 2 run.

She did well and finished just below mid-pack, much improved on the swim, and ended up second in her age group.  I chugged along and finished like 79th out of 87 finishers, but I was almost a decade older than anyone else, and felt good on the run, which latter I had had some doubts about because I was wobbly and had to walk some of it two years ago after taking a morning  blood pressure pill I should have skipped.

Buddy is now stoked about tri, so I may get roped into doing more of them.  Worse things could happen.  I don't feel too sore today.

Racing costs money, but they clear the streets for you, woo hoo.

I sure enjoyed tri’s but since its increasingly dangerous to workout on road bikes.....I’ve stopped riding.....hip replacements ended running.......but I’m still swimming about 5 miles a week......till the shoulder finally gives up. It’s a bitch when the warranty expires.......

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2 minutes ago, Point Break said:

I sure enjoyed tri’s but since its increasingly dangerous to workout on road bikes.....I’ve stopped riding.....hip replacements ended running.......but I’m still swimming about 5 miles a week......till the shoulder finally gives up. It’s a bitch when the warranty expires.......

I used to hear, "never get shoulder surgery", but got right shoulder done a few years ago.  Wasn't that bad, I had good cartilage for them to re-anchor tendons into, didn't hurt much and only a couple of months til I could bike, then run, then eventually, swim.  Hasn't hurt since, am thinking about getting left shoulder done too but it doesn't hurt enough yet ;-)

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On 11/7/2019 at 6:08 AM, bmiller said:

Most of my riding is on a mtn bike, but also have a townie that gets more service than my car around town. Especially during the summer months when we get swamped with clueless tourists. I can get a 24 pack in my carrier but not quite a 30 pack!

 

Then there's guys like this. Especially an issue around Boulder.

 

 

Jeff.png

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