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I haven't been shooting in years, but I maintain a small collection of long guns, in a locked glass fronted display case.  And while I have had a CCW for nearly 10 years, I have yet to purchase a handgun. Starting from longest to shortest, is my Grandfathers Belgian Browning 12 guage semi-auto that he hunted timberdoodles and pheasants with.  It would be of some value, with its' Belgian steel barrel, except he installed an auto turning choke, at the barrels end, which I am told diminishes collectors value.  Next longest is a Sears JC Higgins pump, 20-12 that I acquired from a real estate client when I sold her deceased fathers house, and she didn't want anything to do with guns.  Her brother bent up the bumper on the Missus Pickup Truck when he made a dump run, so I figured keeping his Dads 3 guns was a fair trade.  Next is a Savage 22-.410 single shot from a woman Rehab Psychiatrist,  renting a house, who was also creeped out having a gun in the house. Next is a Winchester model 190, 22 semi-auto from same first client, as is the next longest Marlin 30-30 lever action.  Shortest long gun I purchased myself, with a 20 round clip, 6 months before the clip became illegal in CT, and I have a permit for the clip, although the Ruger Mini 14 in Stainless, is NOT illegal, unlike the scary black gunz, aka the AR-15, which are no more deadly, than the Mini-14.  When I can retire, in another year and a half, I will probably do some target shooting, on a 125 acre piece of woodland that's been in the family for nearly 70 years....  I am told the Mini 14 in SS, is a good boat gun for cruising, being of short barrel length, and rust resistant material.  It's not real Stainless according to my magnet, but should prevent corrosion better than a normal steel barrel and action....

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I have two Winchester Model 94's. These are part of my families history. The top one was my dads high school graduation present from 1948. It is a .32 Special. When i was young, he always promise

In wouldn't necessarily call myself a "placid" driver.  But I usually don't go out of my way to instigate confrontations either.  However, this one day on the way home from work on a fairly open fast

and some orthere stuffe to.                                    

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In the Army, I had a 45 pistol, then rode around with  30 cal and 50 cal machine guns, and  a 90mm long gun.

Now I only have a H&K 40 cal pistol, Winchester model 52 with 16X Unertl scope (from my SB silhouette days), and my dad's 22 Mossberg from the 30s.  Can't hit squat with any of them now days.

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

I haven't been shooting in years, but I maintain a small collection of long guns, in a locked glass fronted display case.  And while I have had a CCW for nearly 10 years, I have yet to purchase a handgun. Starting from longest to shortest, is my Grandfathers Belgian Browning 12 guage semi-auto that he hunted timberdoodles and pheasants with.  It would be of some value, with its' Belgian steel barrel, except he installed an auto turning choke, at the barrels end, which I am told diminishes collectors value.  Next longest is a Sears JC Higgins pump, 20-12 that I acquired from a real estate client when I sold her deceased fathers house, and she didn't want anything to do with guns.  Her brother bent up the bumper on the Missus Pickup Truck when he made a dump run, so I figured keeping his Dads 3 guns was a fair trade.  Next is a Savage 22-.410 single shot from a woman Rehab Psychiatrist,  renting a house, who was also creeped out having a gun in the house. Next is a Winchester model 190, 22 semi-auto from same first client, as is the next longest Marlin 30-30 lever action.  Shortest long gun I purchased myself, with a 20 round clip, 6 months before the clip became illegal in CT, and I have a permit for the clip, although the Ruger Mini 14 in Stainless, is NOT illegal, unlike the scary black gunz, aka the AR-15, which are no more deadly, than the Mini-14.  When I can retire, in another year and a half, I will probably do some target shooting, on a 125 acre piece of woodland that's been in the family for nearly 70 years....  I am told the Mini 14 in SS, is a good boat gun for cruising, being of short barrel length, and rust resistant material.  It's not real Stainless according to my magnet, but should prevent corrosion better than a normal steel barrel and action....

The Belgian FN shottie sounds interesting, what’s an auto turning choke?   Does it thread into the existing choke threads? 
With a 125 acres, a decent berm/backstop, I’d set up a nice little range and a clay trap or two. 
 

 

0603CB9B-4692-45D5-8F61-994EC4C45C98.jpeg

0387748E-8918-47AB-82EE-67506BA2F851.jpeg
 

28 inch, fixed choke Browning Sporter, Grade 6. A special treat for myself a few years ago.  

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52 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

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and some orthere stuffe to.                                   :)

 

I recently purchased a full auto setup for the kitchen, along with a new Global knife.  :)
 

2F7162CC-E1F1-4C27-85C9-B2F9D85CE2D6.jpeg

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Truth, experience, sarcasm, bitter passive-aggressiveness, observational humour, a knowledge of human anatomy, long-ago martial arts training. I have upped the "smile and avoid" level to make up for the growing lack of  "running away fast" ability.

Never had much interest in guns. 

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27 minutes ago, mad said:

The Belgian FN shottie sounds interesting, what’s an auto turning choke?   Does it thread into the existing choke threads? 
With a 125 acres, a decent berm/backstop, I’d set up a nice little range and a clay trap or two. 
 

 

0603CB9B-4692-45D5-8F61-994EC4C45C98.jpeg

0387748E-8918-47AB-82EE-67506BA2F851.jpeg
 

28 inch, fixed choke Browning Sporter, Grade 6. A special treat for myself a few years ago.  

 

The choke screws onto the end of the barrel, so you can adjust for pheasant, or whatever shot you are hunting with.   Mine doesn't have the beautiful engraving, like yours, but one of our mates at the local pub, does high end rifle engraving for a living, and his work is fucking awesome, but very expensive, when it's highly detailed.  He engraved our brass door knocker, with "The Final Cafe".  For 30 years when we lived on South Cove on the CT River, we had the "High Tide Cafe", because your boat could only come to our dock at high tide.  Then our small walk-up apartment in Chester Village center, for 3 years was the "16th Step cafe:, due to the steep steps needed to walk up from the street....

 

EDIT.. On our property, there is a south facing hillside, near the entry, where my cousins target shoot after Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner.  Very safe.  Used to ride dirt bikes over the miles of trails that my Grandfather used to maintain, and go fetch firewood, or stones for dock cairns, but haven't been there for years, and I expect that most of the trails are impassable now.  Another fun retirement pursuit....

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1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

23452.jpg

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and some orthere stuffe to.                                   :)

 

 

Snags, don't you at least have a proper mans locking blade pocket knife???

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30 years ago my realestate agent gofted me a Marlin lever .375 Winchester.  Son made up some rounds 5 years ago. Nice flat shooter to maybe 150 yards. Picked up a Rossi lever in .357  25 years ago. When mom sold grandpa's farm I grabbed the pistol box my dad made for grandpa. Safely retained wothin are a Colt dogballs revoler and the best of all, a 1917 Savage Arms .32 auto with maybe the most interesting action ever engineered.

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2 minutes ago, Norse Horse said:

2 border collies and a Boston Terrier.

 

Our 2 sister cats, can;t even scare the birds from the feeders!!  Hopefully they will be better with the mice, that are certain to bring the spilled bird seed into the basement, in another month or two!!!:o

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14 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

The choke screws onto the end of the barrel, so you can adjust for pheasant, or whatever shot you are hunting with.   Mine doesn't have the beautiful engraving, like yours, but one of our mates at the local pub, does high end rifle engraving for a living, and his work is fucking awesome, but very expensive, when it's highly detailed.  He engraved our brass door knocker, with "The Final Cafe".  For 30 years when we lived on South Cove on the CT River, we had the "High Tide Cafe", because your boat could only come to our dock at high tide.  Then our small walk-up apartment in Chester Village center, for 3 years was the "16th Step cafe:, due to the steep steps needed to walk up from the street....

 

EDIT.. On our property, there is a south facing hillside, near the entry, where my cousins target shoot after Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner.  Very safe.  Used to ride dirt bikes over the miles of trails that my Grandfather used to maintain, and go fetch firewood, or stones for dock cairns, but haven't been there for years, and I expect that most of the trails are impassable now.  Another fun retirement pursuit....

If it’s just a screw in choke into existing threads? It shouldn’t make any difference to the value. Chances are it was pretty open choke or nothing beforehand, so it needed it anyway. 
 

Have you got a model or picture?  I’m trying to avoid buying a new toy, but I’m always slightly tempted by the unusual. :P

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9 minutes ago, mad said:

If it’s just a screw in choke into existing threads? It shouldn’t make any difference to the value. Chances are it was pretty open choke or nothing beforehand, so it needed it anyway. 
 

Have you got a model or picture?  I’m trying to avoid buying a new toy, but I’m always slightly tempted by the unusual. :P

 

I'm no expert, but I was told that it was a modification to the original barrel that diminished collector value.  It was to allow the hunter to change choke settings for different size shot for different size birds.   Beyond that, I have no clue, as I have never hunted birds, like grandpa did....

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I was given a matched pair of Spanish AYA 20-bore sidelock ejectors by a godfather on my 21st.  Lovely guns, lightweight, fast to swing. Pheasant, snipe, pigeon in the Isle of Wight.  I gave them to my godson on his 18th when I came to live in the US 25 years ago.  I miss them because they were beautiful works of art, but would never have used them in the US.

They looked like this:

Image result for aya 20-bore sidelock

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polychoke1.jpg

I think you're talking about the Poly Choke. It did change the pattern of the shot for shorter and longer ranges.  It was the thing to do back in the day, and many, if not most, A-5 had them installed.  The downside was the heavy weight on the end of the barrel and the bulge blocking your view of the target.  So, the Poly Choke fad passed and the installation permanently reduced the value of the gun.

 

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4 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I was given a matched pair of Spanish AYA 20-bore sidelock ejectors by a godfather on my 21st.  Lovely guns, lightweight, fast to swing. Pheasant, snipe, pigeon in the Isle of Wight.  I gave them to my godson on his 18th when I came to live in the US 25 years ago.  I miss them because they were beautiful works of art, but would never have used them in the US.

They looked like this:

Image result for aya 20-bore sidelock

 

Beautiful engraving!  Our local friend does work like that, and some much smaller and more detailed.,

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2 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

I think you're talking about the Poly Choke. It did change the pattern of the shot for shorter and longer.  It was the thing to do back in the day, and many, if not most A-5 had them installed.  The downside was the heavy weight on the end of the barrel and that large bulge blocking your veiw of hte target.  So, the P;oy Choke fad passed and the permanent installation reduced the value of the gun.

 

I think that is correct,  this gun was used for hunting in the 40's and 50's, and I was told it was a common modification.  Thanks for your better explanation...

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9 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

I'm no expert, but I was told that it was a modification to the original barrel that diminished collector value.  It was to allow the hunter to change choke settings for different size shot for different size birds.   Beyond that, I have no clue, as I have never hunted birds, like grandpa did....

Interesting, keep it as something different by the sound of it. 

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6 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I was given a matched pair of Spanish AYA 20-bore sidelock ejectors by a godfather on my 21st.  Lovely guns, lightweight, fast to swing. Pheasant, snipe, pigeon in the Isle of Wight.  I gave them to my godson on his 18th when I came to live in the US 25 years ago.  I miss them because they were beautiful works of art, but would never have used them in the US.

They looked like this:

Image result for aya 20-bore sidelock

Really nice! :)

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1 hour ago, foamy1946 said:

In the Army, I had a 45 pistol, then rode around with  30 cal and 50 cal machine guns, and  a 90mm long gun.

Now I only have a H&K 40 cal pistol, Winchester model 52 with 16X Unertl scope (from my SB silhouette days), and my dad's 22 Mossberg from the 30s.  Can't hit squat with any of them now days.

Jebus, you must be pretty old!

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Never mind what's in my arsenal Billy, that's a mighty personal question.  I'll only say that I shoot blanks.* 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*I had a vasectomy years ago.  

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22 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

polychoke1.jpg

I think you're talking about the Poly Choke. It did change the pattern of the shot for shorter and longer ranges.  It was the thing to do back in the day, and many, if not most, A-5 had them installed.  The downside was the heavy weight on the end of the barrel and the bulge blocking your view of the target.  So, the Poly Choke fad passed and the installation permanently reduced the value of the gun.

 

Gotta love SA, you can always learn something new here. 
I’d not seen one of those before. 
 

edit,

Just Googled them, I can see why they fell out of favour, especially with internal chokes. 

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11 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

I have an original 1851 Navy revolver.  My father-in-law was a gun collector, and he gave it to me some years ago, with the advice to never fire it.  I never have.  Yet.

Should you ever!! Get it checked and use sympathetic powder and loads. 
Not an expert, but it’s probably worth some money, depending on condition. 
 

Or just too downright scary to think about firing. :P

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Ruger gp 100 4 in barrel,Springfield 1911 range officer, Springfield xds .45,British 303 carbine,m1 carbine  ruger mini 14 stainless, webley from ww2 colt 1911 from ww2 ruger0/Dogballs , mossberg 500 and smith and Wesson  ar 15 I don’t thing I missed anything but most likely did.I am always looking for something new.No I am not a gun nut. 

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15 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Never mind what's in my arsenal Billy, that's a mighty personal question.  I'll only say that I shoot blanks.* 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*I had a vasectomy years ago.  

Hopefully before you moved to Poland! :lol:

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a24.jpg

29 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

I have an original 1851 Navy revolver.  My father-in-law was a gun collector, and he gave it to me some years ago, with the advice to never fire it.  I never have.  Yet.

I'm the Clan's caretaker for a 1849 Colt Pocket Pistol that a GreatX uncle carried during the Civil War while aboard a Union warship. I've been itching to have it repaired and send a few balls downrange to honor the ancestors.  However, the two gunsmiths I've taken it to strongly advised against shooting a relic of that age. The metallurgy wasn't that good back then, and age hasn't improved the early steel.  They recommend getting a modern reproduction to have my fun.  

There are several beautiful Italian reproduction of the 1851 Navy.  https://www.ubertireplicas.com/product/1851-navy/

 

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6 minutes ago, mad said:

Hopefully before you moved to Poland! :lol:

Don't worry, it was about 20 years ago, so yes.  

The female doctor that did it was pretty hot but I couldn't offer her a test drive of her work because she allowed my wife at the time to watch the procedure.

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18 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

I have an original 1851 Navy revolver.  My father-in-law was a gun collector, and he gave it to me some years ago, with the advice to never fire it.  I never have.  Yet.

 

4 minutes ago, mad said:

Should you ever!! Get it checked and use sympathetic powder and loads. 
Not an expert, but it’s probably worth some money, depending on condition. 
 

Or just too downright scary to think about firing. :P

I gave my son a 1900 ish  Webley .455 revolver. He checked out the gun then researched loads. He made up brass and gives it a light black powder load. He says it is kind of funny at the range when everyone jas to wait for the smoke to clear when he shoots it.B)

 

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43 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Don't worry, it was about 20 years ago, so yes.  

The female doctor that did it was pretty hot but I couldn't offer her a test drive of her work because she allowed my wife at the time to watch the procedure.

Only you could be having the snip and still thinking of that!! :lol:

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Dammit!!!  I knew this would happen!!

just looking at a new to me (second hand) Browning semi auto, I done really need it, but........................An an almost new, in the box, all synthetic, multi choke that’ll take 3inch goose/magnum cartridges for under £400 is tempting. 
 

See what you’ve started :P

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2 hours ago, mad said:

Gotta love SA, you can always learn something new here. 
I’d not seen one of those before. 
 

edit,

Just Googled them, I can see why they fell out of favour, especially with internal chokes. 

 

Yes, that's what it looks like.  

 

And as to Ed's vasectomy, I remember that it smelled just like a yummy steak on the Barbie, when they lasered the vas deferens, or whatever it' called... As I was preparing to leave, I told the nurses that it was a piece of cake, walk in the  park and can we do it again?  They laughed!

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2 hours ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

 

 

I'm the Clan's caretaker for a 1849 Colt Pocket Pistol that a GreatX uncle carried during the Civil War while aboard a Union warship. I've been itching to have it repaired and send a few balls downrange to honor the ancestors.  However, the two gunsmiths I've taken it to strongly advised against shooting a relic of that age. The metallurgy wasn't that good back then, and age hasn't improved the early steel.  They recommend getting a modern reproduction to have my fun.  

There are several beautiful Italian reproduction of the 1851 Navy.  https://www.ubertireplicas.com/product/1851-navy/

 

 

Charlie,  Can't you use a lighter load, or black powder to safely use this antique handgun?  I also have an antique 12 gauge side by side on display, but it's Damascus steel barrel will not stand up to modern shells, and needs to be black powder only.  I bought it for 50 bucks from a Real Estate client 30 something years aqo, when the kids were little, and Missus BB made me remove the firing pins, in order to allow me to display it on a wall.  I think it's from the 1800's.  At the time, I took it to a local guy who was an expert, and had lots of books, and he found it listed in a book, but that was over 30 years ago..

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53 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Yes, that's what it looks like.  

 

And as to Ed's vasectomy, I remember that it smelled just like a yummy steak on the Barbie, when they lasered the vas deferens, or whatever it' called... As I was preparing to leave, I told the nurses that it was a piece of cake, walk in the  park and can we do it again?  They laughed!

Fucker, sitting here with my legs closed and my eyes watering........ and I hope to fuck I never to have that mental image when I cook my next steak. <_<

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42 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Charlie,  Can't you use a lighter load, or black powder to safely use this antique handgun?  I also have an antique 12 gauge side by side on display, but it's Damascus steel barrel will not stand up to modern shells, and needs to be black powder only.  I bought it for 50 bucks from a Real Estate client 30 something years aqo, when the kids were little, and Missus BB made me remove the firing pins, in order to allow me to display it on a wall.  I think it's from the 1800's.  At the time, I took it to a local guy who was an expert, and had lots of books, and he found it listed in a book, but that was over 30 years ago..

Put that in a vice with a very long string on trigger before you try that one......and film it please. :P

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

Charlie,  Can't you use a lighter load, or black powder to safely use this antique handgun?  I also have an antique 12 gauge side by side on display, but it's Damascus steel barrel will not stand up to modern shells, and needs to be black powder only.  I bought it for 50 bucks from a Real Estate client 30 something years aqo, when the kids were little, and Missus BB made me remove the firing pins, in order to allow me to display it on a wall.  I think it's from the 1800's.  At the time, I took it to a local guy who was an expert, and had lots of books, and he found it listed in a book, but that was over 30 years ago...

As the gunsmith 'spained it to me, the old steel will often develop iron crystals with use and age. That condition can destroy any strength in the metal.  A charge strong enough to force a lead ball down and out the barrel could be strong enough to destroy the cylinder and the gun. Not worth threatening the Clan's heirloom -- or my hand. 

As for Damascus barrels... they're formed by hammering steel wire together on a mandrel - and it can be as sketchy as it sounds. Fortunately, shotgun shells are innately much lower pressure, black powder ones even more so.  After a gunsmith gives it a good going over it should be fine to be occasionally shot. However, modern guns are so much better, safer and cheaper, I'd leave the old warrior on the wall. (Good call taking out the firing pins with tykes around.)  BTW: I appraised a Fox SxS made before the war, it was worth about $1.5k even in somewhat fair shape -- 5 years ago.  You might have some money on the wall.

At one of our SASS matches we had a new pard show up. After three stages, I got a good look at his SxS shotgun and immediately called a Cease Fire! He was using his Grandpappy's splattergun with modern shells -- and Damascus barrels. He wasn't at all happy to be told he couldn't shoot the gun, and was only slightly mollified when we told him he was damn lucky to still have a hand and a face.  Another pard lent him a shotgun, and he grumpily finished the match. Some people....

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2 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

As the gunsmith 'spained it to me, the old steel will often develop iron crystals with age and use. That condition can destroy any strength in the metal.  A charge strong enough to force a lead ball down the barrel could be strong enough to destroy the cylinder and the gun. Not worth threatening the Clan's heirloom -- or my hand. 

As for Damascus barrels... they're formed by hammering steel wire together on a mandrel - and it can be as sketchy as it sounds. Fortunately, shogun shells are innately lower pressure, black powder ones even more so.  After a gunsmith gives it a good going over it should be fine to be occasionally shot. However, modern guns are so much better, safer and cheaper, I'd leave the old warrior on the wall. (Good call taking out the firing pins with tykes around.)

At one of our SASS matches we had a new pard show up. After three stages, I got a good look at his SxS shotgun and immediately called a Cease Fire! He was using his Grandpappy's splattergun with modern shells -- and Damascus barrels. He wasn't happy at all to being told he couldn't shoot the gun, and was only slightly mollified when we told him he was damn lucky to still have a hand and a face.  Another pard lent him a shotgun, and he grumpily finished the match. Some people....

Good call on stopping that one!! That’s pretty scary, especially if wasn’t aware and had lent it to a kid!!

Also worth noting, older black powders are generally way more corrosive than modern ones. Clean the barrel(s) properly. 

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21 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

As the gunsmith 'spained it to me, the old steel will often develop iron crystals with age and use. That condition can destroy any strength in the metal.  A charge strong enough to force a lead ball down the barrel could be strong enough to destroy the cylinder and the gun. Not worth threatening the Clan's heirloom -- or my hand. 

As for Damascus barrels... they're formed by hammering steel wire together on a mandrel - and it can be as sketchy as it sounds. Fortunately, shogun shells are innately lower pressure, black powder ones even more so.  After a gunsmith gives it a good going over it should be fine to be occasionally shot. However, modern guns are so much better, safer and cheaper, I'd leave the old warrior on the wall. (Good call taking out the firing pins with tykes around.)

At one of our SASS matches we had a new pard show up. After three stages, I got a good look at his SxS shotgun and immediately called a Cease Fire! He was using his Grandpappy's splattergun with modern shells -- and Damascus barrels. He wasn't happy at all to being told he couldn't shoot the gun, and was only slightly mollified when we told him he was damn lucky to still have a hand and a face.  Another pard lent him a shotgun, and he grumpily finished the match. Some people....

For those few that maybe interested, Damascus barrels.  Heard of them, but had to google the process. It’s definitely not a home hobby that for sure. 
 

https://youtu.be/K7eacS2oDcs
 

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9 minutes ago, mad said:

Good call on stopping that one!! That’s pretty scary, especially if wasn’t aware and had lent it to a kid!!

Also worth noting, older black powders are generally way more corrosive than modern ones. Clean the barrel(s) properly. 

Nah, it's actually a SASS rule: NO Damascus barrels - even if you're using black powder shells. I was just the first to recognize the barrel's construction.

Yep, black powder is bad juju. The guns get cleaned immediately after shooting with a hot water and Ballistol douche.  When I shoot BP, it's always with a BP substitute, in reality Ascorbic acid - Vitamin C. Much better for the guns. Much better for me.  :rolleyes:

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30 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

Good information about the integrity of the metal over time.  Takes away my temptation to try to fire it.

 

76695075_2498433370481357_5660257916733620224_n.jpg

BEAUTIFUL piece!

And MSS, I believe that's a Remington 1858 New Army or Navy. The Navy was in a .36 caliber, the Army shot a .44 ball. Remingtons had the solid top design which was much stronger than the Colt's.  I'm no expert, but I think the 5 1/2 barrel makes it less common and more desirable to a collector.

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4 minutes ago, mad said:

 

Mad,  I wish I had some pics of my friend Franks gun engraving, it is gobsmacking, fucking amazing!!  I will get some pics and post them soon....

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16 minutes ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

BEAUTIFUL piece!

And MSS, I believe that's a Remington 1858 New Army. The Remington's had the solid top design which was much stronger than the Colt's.  I'm no expert, but I think the 5 1/2 barrel makes it less common and more desirable to a collector.

I'm no expert either, just going by what my father-in-law told me, so thanks for the information!

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1 minute ago, mainsheetsister said:

I'm no expert either, just going by what my father-in-law told me, so thanks for the information!

I finally found my reference book: it could be a Rem 1858 Navy if the caliber is .36 (should be stamped on the barrel), if it's .44, it's a 1858 Army.

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1 hour ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

As the gunsmith 'spained it to me, the old steel will often develop iron crystals with use and age. That condition can destroy any strength in the metal.  A charge strong enough to force a lead ball down and out the barrel could be strong enough to destroy the cylinder and the gun. Not worth threatening the Clan's heirloom -- or my hand. 

As for Damascus barrels... they're formed by hammering steel wire together on a mandrel - and it can be as sketchy as it sounds. Fortunately, shotgun shells are innately much lower pressure, black powder ones even more so.  After a gunsmith gives it a good going over it should be fine to be occasionally shot. However, modern guns are so much better, safer and cheaper, I'd leave the old warrior on the wall. (Good call taking out the firing pins with tykes around.)  BTW: I appraised a Fox SxS made before the war, it was worth about $1.5k even in somewhat fair shape -- 5 years ago.  You might have some money on the wall.

At one of our SASS matches we had a new pard show up. After three stages, I got a good look at his SxS shotgun and immediately called a Cease Fire! He was using his Grandpappy's splattergun with modern shells -- and Damascus barrels. He wasn't at all happy to be told he couldn't shoot the gun, and was only slightly mollified when we told him he was damn lucky to still have a hand and a face.  Another pard lent him a shotgun, and he grumpily finished the match. Some people....

What is a sass match? 

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16 minutes ago, chinabald said:

What is a sass match? 

Opps, sorry.  SASS: Single Action Shooting Society.  AKA: Cowboy Action Shooting. It's a timed match, employing 2 single action pistols (from whence the sport gets its name), a lever action rifle, and a shotgun. All firearms must be -- roughly -- from the time of about 1850 through 1903 and manually operated (no Mauser Broomhandles.) Competitors dress in -- roughly -- period correct clothing.  They shoot a variety of steel targets with real bullets, with scoring based on time, additional seconds added for misses or other infractions.  There are only two basic guiding principles: Have fun and don't hurt nobody.  All else follows.

Quite frankly, it's the most fun you can have with your spurs on. 

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 I have calibers from dogballs to .454 in pistols, dogballs to .308 in rifles, and shotguns from .410 to 10 gauge. With regular rotation everyone gets out to play about every two months or so.

If you ever get the chance to shoot an original Casull 454, the machining will amaze you. Very tight tolerances for a revolver. Well balanced for a hand cannon. Still the only handgun that I can't shoot full power loads, one handed.

For home defense I have a very alert Mini Aussie! Then me. :)

Common sense and street smarts have kept me out of trouble as a CCW holder for 35+ years. When people ask me why I carry, I tell them its because I have tremendous hope for my fellow man, but little faith in them.

 

WL2

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3 hours ago, mad said:

My late Dad shot with a lovely William Powell boxlock ejector just like that, with Damascus barrels.  Lovely gun.   

I remember watching him at the H&H Northwood Shooting School near London knocking down clays until the barrels started glowing.  You had to put a sleeve over them so the fingers of your left hand didn't cook.

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Longest to shortest?  Parker Hale 1858 3 band Enfield, Jonathan Browning .50 cal mountain rifle, Thompson Renegade with a Green Mountain .54 barrel, Thompson Seneca .45, Remington Sportsman 12 gauge, Remington Model 11 riot gun, Ithaca Model 37 Deerslayer .20 gauge, Winchester Model 69a 22cal, Savage 99 .300 Savage, Marlin 989 22cal semi, 3 Remington 1858 .44 cal revolvers(Black Powder), Custom made dueling pistol with interchangeable locks and barrels: .45 flint smoothbore, .45 flint rifled, .45 percussion; TOZ 35m 22cal Free Pistol, Daisy Avanti 747 air pistol .177, Dan Wesson .357 mag 2" to 8" barrels, 2 Springfield Range Officers; 1 .45 the other Nelson 22cal conversion, 2 Browning Buckmarks 22cal, Smith & Wesson Model 5-2 .38 Wadcutter, Smith & Wesson Model 39-2 9mm, Smith & Wesson Model 63 22cal.

I think that's it.  I like to shoot.

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My next door neighbor is a bit of a "prepper" that has a collection of AR-15's and more, that he has offered to me if the "hoards" try to come over the hill.  I let him know that I have an extreme case of essential tremor, and can hit anything within 180 degrees side to side, and 0 to 90 degrees top to bottom without any control. . . It should terrify the invaders.  I can overcome my tremor with vodka, but that is another issue.

I personally use pepper spray and wasp spray (better direction and control). The NPS at Yellowstone says that 80% of hikers that have encounters with bears who try to use guns are injured, while only 20% of those with bear spray are injured when encountered.  Don't try me?

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Most of my arsenal was given to me by my dad. When he had to leave his home for assisted living, it was prudent to store his weapons at my house. Some of the ones I really wanted are his model94 Winchester carbine (his high school graduation present from my grandparents), Remington model 511 dogballs rifle (his first rifle he bought when he was 14 yo), Mossberg 500 12gauge, Ruger single six twenty two cal revolver in stainless steel. I also have my grandfather's Mongomery Wards .22cal rifle. He gave it to me when I was 5 years old. It is not safe to shoot and was determined to be not fixable. A Benjamin 22/.177 air rifle and another clunky .177 Chinese air rifle. And most recently, I bought an AR15.

And in my state, it can be a violation if your firearms are not safely stored. So I bought a gun safe.

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21 hours ago, mad said:

Only you could be having the snip and still thinking of that!! :lol:

Actually it was a lot of fun, lots of banter back and forth.  When the doc took out the first piece of the vas deferens, she held it up and asked my wife if she wanted it to make earrings with it.  Afterward they gave me a surgical glove that had been filled with salt water, and frozen, so it wasn't rock hard (the glove you fools!), just flexible enough to cradle the affected area comfortably and nicely cold.  Very considerate.  

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28 minutes ago, kgs113 said:

So why does dogballs get substituted  for 22?

 

Same technology that when you write Dan M  E  Y  E  R  S in, it turns it into @@@@@@@  from Scot's law suit some years back....

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My Dad gave me a 1956 Belgian Browning Superposed over and under years ago. It was stolen along with a very cool 220 swift rifle

You can't replace a gun that your Dad gave you, but did find a 1958 replacement. Neither has the elegant engraving of Mad's (drool!) but they are sweet shotguns.

My grandfather gave me a saddle rifle of his with a barrel so short it is now illegal, except that I have an ATF letter permitting it as a collectible. 30/30 from about 1915 or so. Iron sights and deadly accurate (up to a point). Fun to shoot.  

Also have a nice Sako 222 from the 1970's. Beautiful woodwork.

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My Dad had one of these: Boss and Co. 20ga.  We had a lot of quail dinners over the years!

Bouth for $5,000 in 1966. Sold in early 2000's for $25K. I wish his actual investments had performed as well!

 

Boss-and-Co-20-bore-SxS_101310751_630_2758EAC456579053.JPG

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8 minutes ago, On The Hard said:

My Dad had one of these: Boss and Co. 20ga.  We had a lot of quail dinners over the years!

Bouth for $5,000 in 1966. Sold in early 2000's for $25K. I wish his actual investments had performed as well!

 

Boss-and-Co-20-bore-SxS_101310751_630_2758EAC456579053.JPG

 

That's gorgeous!!!  Many years ago I shot a 20 gauge and 12 on the same day, and for some reason, the smaller 20 gave a little more kick to my shoulder.  I was told, at the time, that was normal and to be expected...

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16 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

That's gorgeous!!!  Many years ago I shot a 20 gauge and 12 on the same day, and for some reason, the smaller 20 gave a little more kick to my shoulder.  I was told, at the time, that was normal and to be expected...

The heavier gun will absorb some of the felt recoil. 

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:
2 hours ago, kgs113 said:

So why does dogballs get substituted  for 22?

Same technology that when you write Dan M  E  Y  E  R  S in, it turns it into @@@@@@@  from Scot's law suit some years back....

So..... ist Scoottere "doggballes" ?

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2 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

You've got a drilling?   Pics!!!! 

Never shot it.  Not sure it's 30-06 either cause i just finished cleaning it up and haven't shot it yet, but the uppers are smoothbore 12 ga. I think it is a Krupp from WWI but not sure.

Screen Shot 2019-11-25 at 6.15.00 PM.png

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2 hours ago, chinabald said:

3 barrels yes?  2 shotgun and 1 rifle? 

Those are interesting guns. 

weighs as much as an olympic bar, or seems to. Idea is to hit the deer with the rifle and then finish him off with buckshot.

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