Jump to content

47' boat refit costs: Baja worth considering?


socalrider

Recommended Posts

As I started working through my list of projects for our First 405 in anticipation of a couple of months (hopefully) cruising this summer, my wonderful wife started asking me questions about whether it might make sense to get a bigger boat for our growing family and ever expanding list of boat guests.  

Never one to discourage such thoughts I started poking around.  I found this really interesting Kaufman 47 on the market locally and took a look.  Having just read John Kretschmer's "Sailing to the Edge of Time" I was particularly interested since it's the same vessel as his QUETZAL.  

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1982/kaufman-47-3599382/?refSource=standard listing

The good: Teak decks removed (!), brand new hatches installed, new bottom paint, 2014 new standing rigging, 1996 Yanmar, new rode and new headsail roller furling gear.  Fancy new stainless anchor roller.  Dry bilge.  In general built like a brick shithouse.  One owner for past 20 years.

The bad: Sails are tired.  Rigged as a sloop; cutter stay re-rigged just in front of baby stay.  Most of the unused winches are seized, including the secondaries.  Interior is rough - worse than the pictures.  Wife wasn't crazy about the darkness of the interior.  Mainsheet in the cockpit.  Narrow, awkward companionway stairs.  

I've gone through a couple of cycles on this already, from excitement about a new boat feeling overwhelmed at taking on the project.  I've decided that I'd need to hire out a big chunk of work right off the bat to get the interior and deck rigging in order.  I'm trying to figure out what that'd cost.  Part of the equation would be determining whether to return her to a cutter rig, but the biggest near-term issue would be the interior.  It basically needs a full sand/varnish job, and a bunch of cabinetry work to fix/replace hinges and latches that don't work.  The table is missing a leaf.  There's no door to the V-berth, which would be required.  Lots and lots of skilled labor hours - I think it'd be ruinous here in SoCal.  

Anyone have experience getting this kind of work done in Baja?  I've heard good things from people on this forum from Baja Naval in Ensenada, which is only a couple hours south.  Could I get this boat under control at $26/hr there versus $100/hr here?  Let me know if you've had experiences.  

http://www.bajanaval.com/02_BoatyardServices/Rates/index.htm

Finally, I'm trying to figure out how far, say, $50k or so would go.  My sense (I'd confirm this with a survey of course) is that the boat  could be sailed away now, it's just ugly below & sail controls are limited to a sloop rig.  If I could get a decent interior, a set of cruising sails (~$10k?) and some deck rigging work done without spending too much more than that it seems like I'd have a really solid foundation to work from compared to a newer production boat if we do want to upgrade.  

Thoughts welcome!

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, socalrider said:

My sense (I'd confirm this with a survey of course) is that the boat  could be sailed away now, it's just ugly below & sail controls are limited to a sloop rig.  If I could get a decent interior, a set of cruising sails (~$10k?) and some deck rigging work done without spending too much more than that it seems like I'd have a really solid foundation to work from compared to a newer production boat if we do want to upgrade.  

Thoughts welcome!

A really thorough survey would be the first order of business. And if you own a 40' boat, then you know how much more you could potentially spend refitting this one to your satisfaction due to the added scale. $10K for suit of sails sounds way low to me.  Everything will be that way compared to your First 405. But you know that. You are thinking about how you could sail that Kaufman around the world...I understand your obsession.:)

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

A really thorough survey would be the first order of business. And if you own a 40' boat, then you know how much more you could potentially spend refitting this one to your satisfaction due to the added scale. $10K for suit of sails sounds way low to me.  Everything will be that way compared to your First 405. But you know that. You are thinking about how you could sail that Kaufman around the world...I understand your obsession.:)

Thanks - yeah, it's a disease...

I'm still a step before the survey doing some back-of-the-envelope numbers.  The biggest unknown for me now is the interior re-work; intuitively 1000 hours at $26/hr (half a man-year of work) seems like it should be enough to make a huge difference if the labor is actually skilled and somewhat efficient (big ifs!)  If I set aside another $10k for moving the mainsheet & modernizing the deck layout a bit (replacing the old seized cabin top and mast winches with rope clutches) and $10-15k for some basic cruising sails that'd be around $50k for a serviceable boat.  

But I've never managed a boat project like this, particularly not in Mexico, so I don't have any idea if those numbers are reasonable.  If I'm off by 2x I'll probably just pass without bothering with the survey.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

The woodworking you are describing doesn't seem that hard to do.  Should be well within the skill level of BN (no personal experience however). 

But you are dreaming on the 10k for sails unless you mean a cheap ass dacron main &  genoa only.

The labor rate the yard is quoting is shocking. If you hired a private mexican woodworker in mexico,  you'd be paying sooo much less. I think BN is so high due to convenience/proximity to US. Thus compared to CA rates,  they seem reasonable! 

Typical rates in manufacturing 

Technician $45/day

Engineer $100/day

https://www.ivemsa.com/mexican-labor-rates-guide/

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

$26K is a very fat budget for that interior...it looks like it needs a professional cleaning before you can really sort out how much refinishing needs to be done (but of course we are looking at photos, and you've actually seen it).  Just by replacing the ugly black galley top with a standard off-white one, you would brighten that cabin. 

Figure out what $15K would get you using woodworkers in Mexico, and put the rest to your sail etc. budget.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Zonker said:

The woodworking you are describing doesn't seem that hard to do.  Should be well within the skill level of BN (no personal experience however). 

But you are dreaming on the 10k for sails unless you mean a cheap ass dacron main &  genoa only.

The labor rate the yard is quoting is shocking. If you hired a private mexican woodworker in mexico,  you'd be paying sooo much less. I think BN is so high due to convenience/proximity to US. Thus compared to CA rates,  they seem reasonable! 

Typical rates in manufacturing 

Technician $45/day

Engineer $100/day

https://www.ivemsa.com/mexican-labor-rates-guide/

Thanks - yeah I don't think the woodworking is hard, just tedious and requires a modicum of quality control.  MX labor near Tijuana is definitely higher than other areas, but yeah, high for MX in general.  I think you're right that the interior work shouldn't cost that much.  

What's a reasonable guess on a main and genoa?  1000sqft of sail area x $10/sqft is where my guess came from.  I haven't seen the asym, assuming for now that it's okay.  

Any ideas on deck work?  Seems to me that $10k should allow me to move the traveler & tidy things up a fair bit but this is something I'm pretty ignorant of.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a lovely boat and I can understand your attraction. 

I would assume that all the cushions and mattresses (and the foam inside them) need to be replaced.  That's a lot of work - include that in your budget.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Zonker on the woodwork.  Sanding and varnishing can be learnt easily enough.  Unless you are aiming for boat show gloss, it's more fiddly-slow than high-skill slow.  Making a new door and a new table leaf are relatively simple if you can live with good enough.  You could save a lot of labour, and brighten the boat up plenty, if you painted lots of the woodwork, Hereshoff-style.

The question is really how much it matters to you have the boat close to showroom condition?  The more you follow that path, the more the labour costs start to rise exponentially.

As the rig, how crucial is it to get the mainsheet out of the cockpit?   Is it worth the expense?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice boat!

The traditional root is a survey. I assume you are not financing the boat? Personally I would not go for a survey.  

You are better off contacting a yacht delivery company. Get an experienced delivery skipper to make a report. Most important be onsite with him when he makes his report. This will give you a better view of the state of the boat. Ask them to check the boat out for delivery to Mexico or something like that. Will they trust the boat with their lives? What needs to be done now, what can wait? 

I am talking out of the experience. When I got mine 10 years ago, I sent an English surveyor to France. Nothing wrong with his report. Looking back the survey was expensive and gave me nothing. We later used a yacht delivery company helping me sailing the yacht from France to UK, including crossing the Biscay in mid-November. Their report - before accepting the job was excellent. If I would purchase another boat again, I would forget the surveyor and ask a senior delivery skipper for his report. 

I used PYD - UK based company that operates worldwide. https://www.pydww.co.uk 

In terms of suggested cost. It will always cost more than you think. Looking at your boat. I think she is overpriced. Get the price down. Spend 50% on boat purchase and 50% doing her up. 

Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You could check out the cheap sail order sail companies to get budget quotes. At least you're not guessing. 

And interior cushions etc could easily be be 3K even in Mexico. 

Drilling some holes and relocating hardware is pretty easy. It gets costly when you decide to upgrade the 30 year old trav with a modern bearing car system. 

I'd sit down with a spreadsheet and add up your best guess for hours for each task. Add cost of varnish,  brushes,  thinner (all will be on your bill).  Add deck catalog hardware prices.  Add 5% to hardware for fasteners,  caulking. Then add 33% contingency.

Ask BN if quoted rates include IVA (Mexican VAT; can be 16% or 8% depending on the region). 

Just saying 10k here and 10k there is not a great way to estimate a job. 

1000 hours is 2 guys working full time x 3 months. Thats a lot of hours to varnish.  And google Hereshoff interior (white painted glass bulkhead / panels with varnished wood trim only). Much brighter. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
 
 
2
18 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Just saying 10k here and 10k there is not a great way to estimate a job. 

1000 hours is 2 guys working full time x 3 months. Thats a lot of hours to varnish.  

Estimate the big jobs. Standing rigging, deck gear (winches clutches), engine, sail, internal cushions. Are you handy? Can you do some of the jobs yourself? What spec do you want? Everything 100%, or do you want things in good working order. What is your plan with the boat? Use her for a few years then sell her? Liveonboard? Racing?

Let's say you want to keep the boat for five years, ten years and then sell? What do you expect to get back? What are you prepared to lose? I have to say, it was not a bad looking boat. You got some thinking to do..... 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again guys... yes, lots of thinking to do!  She's got great bones & could be turned into something special that would really stand the test of time.  Big question is whether I want to take her on right now.  

I'd be fixing her to keep, not to sell.  I am handy and can do work myself; but I've got a young family and a thriving consulting practice, and would rather spend my spare time sailing than varnishing.  So I don't need her in Bristol condition, I need to get the big stuff that takes lots of hours done by someone else.  

Like the idea of a Hereshoff interior - will review with the wife.  Could reduce hours and brighten the interior.  I'll also work up a spreadsheet and start asking for quotes.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, socalrider said:

Thanks again guys... yes, lots of thinking to do!  She's got great bones & could be turned into something special that would really stand the test of time.  Big question is whether I want to take her on right now.  

I'd be fixing her to keep, not to sell.  I am handy and can do work myself; but I've got a young family and a thriving consulting practice, and would rather spend my spare time sailing than varnishing.  So I don't need her in Bristol condition, I need to get the big stuff that takes lots of hours done by someone else.  

Like the idea of a Hereshoff interior - will review with the wife.  Could reduce hours and brighten the interior.  I'll also work up a spreadsheet and start asking for quotes.  

Big boats are like big houses...take longer to sell. A quick googling shows a reference to that boat being for sale at least 2 years ago.  All this to say that the seller may be "motivated" and flexible at this point.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised you even mentioned "seized winches" - stripping, polishing & lubing is 99.5% certain to be all they need.

Maybe some pawl springs but unlikely to be more than that since they haven't been getting used.

You probably will need some pry bars to get the drums off but.......

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do the math, the Zonker full Spreadsheet.  Get at least two values on everything you can for estimates.  It has to make sense on paper.  PV area MX has gotten pretty spendy.  Interior joinery is not easy and anyone who tries to sell you a quick and dirty is not doing you any favors.  All the little things add up.  I'm sure there are good people in MX I know there are in San Diego, I also know of some pretty bad ones in Baja and San Diego.

 

But above all do the math, all the math even put up basic stuff here for the herd to pick apart.  It will be worth it.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I'm surprised you even mentioned "seized winches" - stripping, polishing & lubing is 99.5% certain to be all they need.

Maybe some pawl springs but unlikely to be more than that since they haven't been getting used.

You probably will need some pry bars to get the drums off but.......

True enough.  I guess to me it's more of an indication that the gear isn't 100%.  I.e. when I dig there are likely to be blocks, shivs, etc. that are also frozen.  But point taken - small stuff in the scheme of things.  

That said, the guy seems to have taken care of the important stuff that he actually used - standing rigging, hatches, ground tackle, fridge, engine, controls for main & genoa. 

More I think about it, a 2-stage approach might work best if I were to do this:

1. Take care of interior (prob in MX). Use existing tired sails for at least a season to decide about switching back to cutter rig.  Leave deck alone. This assumes no undiscovered safety/seaworthiness issues. 

2. Sail for a couple of years, then decide about modifying the deck layout, including traveler relocation & return to cutter rig (w/ new headsails)

Broker's already mentioned $75k without me bringing up price.  Slip fees are ~$1k/mo.   

Attached a few more honest shots I took of some of the interior details.  The forward head was used as storage I believe.  Aft head is pretty well worn, and has a section of the ceiling missing.  Genoa looks tired but serviceable - what do you think?  

Fwd head floor.jpg

Aft head ceiling.jpg

IMG_3629.jpg

IMG_3625.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Do the math, the Zonker full Spreadsheet.  Get at least two values on everything you can for estimates.  It has to make sense on paper.  PV area MX has gotten pretty spendy.  Interior joinery is not easy and anyone who tries to sell you a quick and dirty is not doing you any favors.  All the little things add up.  I'm sure there are good people in MX I know there are in San Diego, I also know of some pretty bad ones in Baja and San Diego.

 

But above all do the math, all the math even put up basic stuff here for the herd to pick apart.  It will be worth it.

Thanks, will do.  Shoot me a PM if you have any recommendations for people I should contact for estimates here or in Northern Baja.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, socalrider said:

True enough.  I guess to me it's more of an indication that the gear isn't 100%.  I.e. when I dig there are likely to be blocks, shivs, etc. that are also frozen.  But point taken - small stuff in the scheme of things.  

That said, the guy seems to have taken care of the important stuff that he actually used - standing rigging, hatches, ground tackle, fridge, engine, controls for main & genoa. 

More I think about it, a 2-stage approach might work best if I were to do this:

1. Take care of interior (prob in MX). Use existing tired sails for at least a season to decide about switching back to cutter rig.  Leave deck alone. This assumes no undiscovered safety/seaworthiness issues. 

2. Sail for a couple of years, then decide about modifying the deck layout, including traveler relocation & return to cutter rig (w/ new headsails)

Broker's already mentioned $75k without me bringing up price.  Slip fees are ~$1k/mo.   

Attached a few more honest shots I took of some of the interior details.  The forward head was used as storage I believe.  Aft head is pretty well worn, and has a section of the ceiling missing.  Genoa looks tired but serviceable - what do you think?  

Fwd head floor.jpg

Aft head ceiling.jpg

IMG_3629.jpg

IMG_3625.jpg

If I was in the market for a 50 footer for the long haul I'd be on that like a rash - gorgeous boats and the expensive stuff - teak deck, standing rig etc are already paid for.

Sails are a wear item so if you get good ones - great - but how often does that happen on a used boat? That genny ain't going to point like a tourist but it looks clean and solid.

Keep in mind that if you were buying that thing new, you wouldn't have much change left from a $1,000,000 bill by the time it was fully commissioned.

I say do it - you can always repent at leisure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Just looks heavily worn to me. Looks like old leaks in a couple of places, though..

Thanks guys.  

From the research I've done the decks on these were notoriously leaky, and those leaks were impossible to trace because of the teak decks.  One guy also reported that the deck lights on his were not properly bedded from the factory.  Another that the leaks came from the thousands of screws used to hold on the teak.  

In short, I suspect that some of the interior stains may have been from leaks that would have been repaired with the deck replacement and also maybe the new hatches (which were done just a year or two ago from my memory.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, socalrider said:

Thanks guys.  

From the research I've done the decks on these were notoriously leaky, and those leaks were impossible to trace because of the teak decks.  One guy also reported that the deck lights on his were not properly bedded from the factory.  Another that the leaks came from the thousands of screws used to hold on the teak.  

In short, I suspect that some of the interior stains may have been from leaks that would have been repaired with the deck replacement and also maybe the new hatches (which were done just a year or two ago from my memory.)

yep, that's why I think the headliner is gone (the Ceiling in a boat is actually an inner lining to the hull).  Given the teak is gone, leaks are probably now minor but that's why you survey.

 

Ceiling: 1.  A lining applied to the interior of a hull for both aesthetic reasons and to bar or insulate the ship's cargo from the cold hull surface. Often made of thin strips of wood, attached horizontally with a small gap between to allow air flow to the interior hull surface.[2]

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, gn4478 said:

In terms of sail costs: My Baltic 51 main this year cost about 9k. Hydranet   
 Racing genoas 8-17k

I just got a Precision Sails (no laughing) quote 'cause it was fast.  Holy crap they are cheap.  But it's good to know the range - I'm certainly not looking for a racing genoa but I do like my current North tri-radial.  What's your mainsail made of?  image.thumb.png.2001b99d4f03f4fca84753f637094775.png

6 minutes ago, bmiller said:

How are the tanks holding up?

They are all stainless.  They look absolutely spotless from the outside, but that's all I've seen.  Don't know that I've ever seen stainless water tanks.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, socalrider said:

I just got a Precision Sails (no laughing) quote 'cause it was fast.  Holy crap they are cheap.  But it's good to know the range - I'm certainly not looking for a racing genoa but I do like my current North tri-radial.  What's your mainsail made of?  image.thumb.png.2001b99d4f03f4fca84753f637094775.png

They are all stainless.  They look absolutely spotless from the outside, but that's all I've seen.  Don't know that I've ever seen stainless water tanks.  

The main is hydranet from DP

Link to post
Share on other sites

She's got great bones & could be turned into something special that would really stand the test of time.

That's not how it works. You buy a 38 year old boat for 50K, add 100K and you have a 45 year old boat that's worth 40k. They're a dime a dozen. There's nothing special here. Could it cart your ass around the world - sure - but so could a westsail 30. Stop romancing the tupperware.

I'm surprised you even mentioned "seized winches" - stripping, polishing & lubing is 99.5% certain to be all they need. Maybe some pawl springs but unlikely to be more than that since they haven't been getting used. You probably will need some pry bars to get the drums off but.......

This is utter rubbish from an ignoramus. . Those alloy winch drums ride on stainless bearings on aluminum spindles and when the grease is gone, stainless on aluminum plus salt makes short work of the bearing surface. If you need a pry bar to get the drums off (and you probably will) just keep prying and put the entire piece of junk in the trash. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

imo, the used sailboat market in California is as soft right now as anywhere in NA. The PO has listed it with a broker, so I guess the broker hasn't given up (not yet, perhaps soon), but clearly the owner has.

after looking at boats for a couple of years (smaller boats though), I literally had two offered to me for free. Neither were in much worse than this one - but in both cases the PO had simply given up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Moonduster said:

She's got great bones & could be turned into something special that would really stand the test of time.

That's not how it works. You buy a 38 year old boat for 50K, add 100K and you have a 45 year old boat that's worth 40k. They're a dime a dozen. There's nothing special here. Could it cart your ass around the world - sure - but so could a westsail 30. Stop romancing the tupperware.

I'm surprised you even mentioned "seized winches" - stripping, polishing & lubing is 99.5% certain to be all they need. Maybe some pawl springs but unlikely to be more than that since they haven't been getting used. You probably will need some pry bars to get the drums off but.......

This is utter rubbish from an ignoramus. . Those alloy winch drums ride on stainless bearings on aluminum spindles and when the grease is gone, stainless on aluminum plus salt makes short work of the bearing surface. If you need a pry bar to get the drums off (and you probably will) just keep prying and put the entire piece of junk in the trash. 

On the other hand, you have a boat you like, or that does the job you want the way you want it. Start with your objectives, then pick your weapon. With most boats, even when new,  you are going to change them a bit before you push off. 

That said, no offense, but cruisers are generally very good at extracting the last bit of goodness out of everything . 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wildly overpriced. 

The market for 48-55' sailboats is in free fall. Much of the younger generations simply don't share our cruising desires. 

A yacht broker friend told me that they had 4-5 pedigreed 53-54 footers on the market for several years, all in great shape, asking less than 20% of replacement. Not a single offer. Not even a curiosity call. 

There's a 2001 Hinckley SW-59 with everything asking $350k.  Domestic build, not Asia, 2001 not 1982. Pedigreed boat. That's the market. Offer $300 and I'll bet they'd snap. These boats sit on the market for years. 

The market is so soft that Mass Maritime and Maine Maritime are being very picky about what they'll accept as donations.

For $75 k that thing should sparkle.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Wildly overpriced. 

For $75 k that thing should sparkle.

Thanks - good feedback.  I imagine costs to keep her floating probably approach $2k/mo all in, so time is definitely on my side  

It does beg the question of whether I could unwittingly end up with 90’ of boat should my 405 not sell. I assume 40’ is easier to sell than 50, but how much do?  I can stick one of them on a mooring for $100/mo so that helps if the process drags on. 
 

I’m getting some quotes for the work. If anyone has recommendations please shoot ‘em over.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

I see Moonbeam has added his usual negative value. Aluminium spindles on big Barients (or any winch for that matter). :lol: Yeah, the voice of experience there.

I trust you have him on ignore like the other sensible people here?

Whatever you do don't own two boats at one.

I did it once but got lucky and the old boat sold in a few months but I've seen people on the hook for double expenses for very long periods who finally resort to giveaway prices just to get out from under.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, socalrider said:

Thanks - good feedback.  I imagine costs to keep her floating probably approach $2k/mo all in, so time is definitely on my side  

It does beg the question of whether I could unwittingly end up with 90’ of boat should my 405 not sell. I assume 40’ is easier to sell than 50, but how much do?  I can stick one of them on a mooring for $100/mo so that helps if the process drags on. 
 

I’m getting some quotes for the work. If anyone has recommendations please shoot ‘em over.   

I was going to ask whether this deal was contingent on selling the 405. It may take a bit depending on what you ask.  The Kaufman hasn't moved in 2+ years, and if we have a recession, whatever its true price today is will instantly be cut in half. 

Don't end up holding 2 boats...if you do, together they will both seem like an endless liability and you'll wish you had neither.  (Edit: JonB beat me to this idea whilst I was writing...)

All that being said, I hope you figure out a way to live such a dream. There was a Nordic 44 that sat here on the market just a few hours away before eventually being sold, and I kick myself for at least not having gone to look at it...

Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, SemiSalt said:

Does the 47 actually have the additional space that you want? The fact that the forward head was used as storage space is a red flag about space and storage issues.

that's a really good question

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

that's a really good question

 

or it was owned by a cruising couple who really only had need for the head with the shower. Fairly common to turn a space like that into a shop area if distance cruising.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

or it was owned by a cruising couple who really only had need for the head with the shower. Fairly common to turn a space like that into a shop area if distance cruising.

Yeah the guy cruised it solo every summer up to SF and back for a couple of months, so it’s just an easy space to access - head and shower so it’s quite large. 
 

There’s a ton of space compared to our 405. Extra large cabin, 2’ more cockpit space, larger just about everything. I don’t love the nav table setup but really love the pilot berths. Not as big as a modern 50’ but plenty for us. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2019 at 5:17 PM, socalrider said:

Yeah the guy cruised it solo every summer up to SF and back for a couple of months, so it’s just an easy space to access - head and shower so it’s quite large. 
 

There’s a ton of space compared to our 405. Extra large cabin, 2’ more cockpit space, larger just about everything. I don’t love the nav table setup but really love the pilot berths. Not as big as a modern 50’ but plenty for us. 

So what's your thinking on the Kaufman now?  If you take the plunge, you can bring us all along for the ups and downs of your adventure of a lifetime. We need a project like this!

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

So what's your thinking on the Kaufman now?  If you take the plunge, you can bring us all along for the ups and downs of your adventure of a lifetime. We need a project like this!

I’m working on quotes to try and estimate the costs that would be involved. I’m hearing around $7500 for interior sand and 3 coats varnish (double for 7 coats) $5500 for new upholstery (w existing foam - need to quote full replacement). Per the advice I’ve received there’s a ton of nickel and dime stuff that’s hard to get budgetary estimates for.  I’ll keep refining but I think I could have a wife-accepted interior for $20k or so. 

I went ahead and put the 405 up on CL and sailboatlistings.com. No nibbles so far. 
 

In general I’m still really interested & think it’s a worthwhile project at the right price. But sailboats should be about joy and pleasure, so I’m refusing to put myself into a position where I’m uncomfortable (i.e. owning 90’ of boat, unexpectedly needing a new engine, etc.). So I’m proceeding cautiously; if she sells I’ve still got a great boat and there are other fish in the sea. 
 

I’ll keep y’all posted - this has been really helpful so far. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Closing this thread out: just heard that the Kaufman 47 is under contract.  Anyone here take the plunge?  Would love to hear her ongoing story.  

I'm sad to see her off the market, but also somewhat relieved to have a boat that's already pretty sorted.  There's not too much else on the market now that's of interest.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...