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1 hour ago, dullers said:

Is that the Cunningham race?

No. Cunningham is race 4 I think that ends with the cross. I was referring to say 3. There were two races for ineos vs LR due to the big shift causing the abandonment. Those races were close. Especially in the first one LR just gradually pulled away, boat fast and minimal mistakes. Ineos has a penalty at the start but under the conditions that was not defining. LR just better.

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shes legit ... foil arm looks to be in the front end of the box ... opposite of all other teams ... what are we going to read into that?

ETNZ are probably favorites .....but win or lose....Team New Zealand have firmly established themselves as the all time great AC nation in the modern era.   From the time they first emerged, they have

And so it begins. Image credit and copyright Allesandro Spiga  

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1 hour ago, dullers said:

We were never going to control it. Lets not kid ourselves. We have cities with a higher population than your whole country.  Covid was in the UK way before the lockdown. We get 30 million visitors a year through our country

So by that logic you can't collect tax either, just too many people...

Also 65M population & 30M visitors v 5M population & 4M visitors. The UK has massively more resources, both per capita and absolutely than NZ. They didn't control Covid because the "leadership" were too busy trying to locate both their frontal lobes and their spines, both of which turn out to be pre-requisite for actual leadership. Plus you are still a cunt.

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1 minute ago, kiwin said:

So by that logic you can't collect tax either, just too many people...

Also 65M population & 30M visitors v 5M population & 4M visitors. The UK has massively more resources, both per capita and absolutely than NZ. They didn't control Covid because the "leadership" were too busy trying to locate both their frontal lives and their spines, both of which turn out to be pre-requisite for actual leadership. Plus you are still a cunt.

I think we are becoming Friends. 

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6 minutes ago, Chris UK said:

No. Cunningham is race 4 I think that ends with the cross. I was referring to say 3. There were two races for ineos vs LR due to the big shift causing the abandonment. Those races were close. Especially in the first one LR just gradually pulled away, boat fast and minimal mistakes. Ineos has a penalty at the start but under the conditions that was not defining. LR just better.

The Cunningham race was between Ricky and Fonzie, wasn’t it?

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1 minute ago, strider470 said:

Sorry, just a stupid joke induced by lack of racings

I agree the anarchists need to see a race.

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3 minutes ago, mako23 said:

The time delay between rounds is to long. A week is ok but not two weeks

I suppose the anticipation is part of it but it does give the challengers time to develop their boats so we can get real racing in the final with the Kiwis.

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1 hour ago, mako23 said:

The time delay between rounds is to long. A week is ok but not two weeks

Yeah fuck the pricks that have to actually get organised to race in a do or die all out elimination series battle, this is all about us and our needs and our viewing pleasure. Selfish pricks !! :D

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17 minutes ago, Flippin Out said:

Yeah fuck the pricks that have to actually get organised to race in a do or die all out elimination series battle, this is all about us and our needs and our viewing pleasure. Selfish pricks !! :D

#anarchistlivesmatter

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2 minutes ago, An Interested Non-Sailor said:

If you want to get back to the boats then put your keyboard away as since you found this site 75 days ago you have posted 1042 times most of which are non-yachting related

It is called anarchy for a reason. Glad you read them all. Get used to it. Oh and learn to sail.

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11 minutes ago, An Interested Non-Sailor said:

If you want to get back to the boats then put your keyboard away as since you found this site 75 days ago you have posted 1042 times most of which are non-yachting related

Who owns this sock puppet? 

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6 hours ago, rh3000 said:

If my house is on fire, and I put it out, then I stopped it, even if yours is still burning... there's over 111k people who used to live in yours that would have appreciated that delay you imply is so trivial....

Remember when Covid first was news? It was all about delay - flattening the curve - so medical facilities could cope.

The vaccines have various questions around efficacy, particularly for future strains. Happy to be proved wrong, but no one has eliminated any corona type virus yet?

I think delay is still the right term, and we'll be delaying things as best we can for quite some time...

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39 minutes ago, An Interested Non-Sailor said:

If you want to get back to the boats then put your keyboard away as since you found this site 75 days ago you have posted 1042 times most of which are non-yachting related

Plus a good way to up the post count is to ignore the multi quote feature and post several one-liners in a row. Anyway, yes it's Anarchy, but not very... whatever. 

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Meanwhile we only have a few days until the 1st race. I don't think we'll need 13 races to decide the Prada Cup Final but wouldn't it be great. 

What did we see here..? 

 

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1 minute ago, terrafirma said:

Meanwhile we only have a few days until the 1st race. I don't think we'll need 13 races to decide the Prada Cup Final but wouldn't it be great. 

What did we see here..? 

 

InEOS racing past LR who were cruising home...

What you learn from that (nothing) is more the point...

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1 hour ago, terrafirma said:

Meanwhile we only have a few days until the 1st race. I don't think we'll need 13 races to decide the Prada Cup Final but wouldn't it be great. 

What did we see here..? 

 

Blasted container ship obscured a vital point when they were perpendicular to the POV. Had it not been there we could have roughly worked out which was travelling faster at that point.

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2 minutes ago, MaxHugen said:

Blasted container ship obscured a vital point when they were perpendicular to the POV. Had it not been there we could have roughly worked out which was travelling faster at that point.

According to Nutta Luna Rossa was only cruising home so if that were true doesn't matter. Not sure how Nutta can tell if they were cruising? Jimmy having a sandwich? :D

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6 minutes ago, MaxHugen said:

Blasted container ship obscured a vital point when they were perpendicular to the POV. Had it not been there we could have roughly worked out which was travelling faster at that point.

But would it tell us anything useful?

Who knows what each team was trying to achieve at that point.

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1 hour ago, Nutta said:

InEOS racing past LR who were cruising home...

What you learn from that (nothing) is more the point...

How do you know one boat was crusing Nutta? Please pass on your ESP skills to us mere mortals FFS..! 

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Just now, jaysper said:

But would it tell us anything useful?

Absolutely not. :)  Beats talking about covid et al though.

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20 minutes ago, Filthy Phill said:

Sports commentators always talk about momentum....not sure what Ineos GB have figured out but they sure look like they are the one too beat.

Yeah, I tend to agree despite the fact that I doubt they have the fastest boat.

It it much the same as losing being a stinky cologne.

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33 minutes ago, jaysper said:

Yeah, I tend to agree despite the fact that I doubt they have the fastest boat.

It it much the same as losing being a stinky cologne.

Whatever that means..! :D

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3 hours ago, terrafirma said:

According to Nutta Luna Rossa was only cruising home so if that were true doesn't matter. Not sure how Nutta can tell if they were cruising? Jimmy having a sandwich? :D

It's as likely as anything else. My cat told me anyway, so it's true. If they sandbaggerd in the Christmas Cup, heading home after a days training is even more likely to dredge up sand from somewhere...

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6 hours ago, Nutta said:

InEOS racing past LR who were cruising home...

What you learn from that (nothing) is more the point...

Same old! INEOS great at reaching. Seems they did the same in the Solent for a year. Trouble started when they tried getting some VMG. 

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2 minutes ago, winchfodder said:

Same old! INEOS great at reaching. Seems they did the same in the Solent for a year. Trouble started when they tried getting some VMG. 

Yeah it worked out terribly so far.. 

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1 hour ago, Nutta said:

It's as likely as anything else. My cat told me anyway, so it's true. If they sandbaggerd in the Christmas Cup, heading home after a days training is even more likely to dredge up sand from somewhere...

This your moggie

 

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17 hours ago, dullers said:

I have never denied climate change. The hysteria and the hype dont meet with real life.  So piss off  with your self righteous take on this and read the posts properly. For your edification.  https://cei.org/blog/wrong-again-50-years-of-failed-eco-pocalyptic-predictions/

I think the people of Tuvala, and all those who lost homes in wild fires and increased hurricane activity would see climate change as pretty real!

I did read your post and have reread it and your position seemed pretty clear to me and my quote was not taken out of context so don't get pissy when someone calls you out when you take a position they think is BS... There are obviously holes in climate science understanding  (as there is in any scientific field) but to complain that the roll out of the climate disaster isn't precisely matching forecasts in some aspects when the broad observations are entirely consistent with predictions are as I said, disingenuous.

But this isn't sailing so I'm out...

 

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22 hours ago, Chris UK said:

Above I have posted a video of INEOS sailing,,,,,,flying! past LR

No you haven’t. You’ve posted a video where the perspective makes it look like the nearer boat is going faster than the further boat, as it tends to. 

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49 minutes ago, chesirecat said:

This your moggie

 

Nah, they call him Fritz. Fritz the cat...

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTpZKXsvwia817vomXbTQo

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21 minutes ago, KingMonkey said:

No you haven’t. You’ve posted a video where the perspective makes it look like the nearer boat is going faster than the further boat, as it tends to. 

Fun sponge 

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1 hour ago, winchfodder said:

Same old! INEOS great at reaching. Seems they did the same in the Solent for a year. Trouble started when they tried getting some VMG. 

Doesn't say a lot for Luna Rossa and American Magic who both haven't beaten Ineos in the Prada Cup.! They must have reached around the course as you say but not sure what the fuck the other boats were doing.? :wub:

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29 minutes ago, KingMonkey said:

No you haven’t. You’ve posted a video where the perspective makes it look like the nearer boat is going faster than the further boat, as it tends to. 

Interesting. Of the challengers ineos seems to have the biggest problem with that. Especially downwind.....but often also upwind in shifty conditions. Thankfully they all agree where the finish line is before the start of the race.

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37 minutes ago, eastcoastlow said:

Unfortunately this is behind a paywall. Can anybody extract the text?

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/americas-cup-should-become-the-f1-of-sailing-05wmq3z32

Along with “Everest of sailing” I think this “F1 of sailing” thing gets a bit old.... trotted out every time the America’s cup rolls around!

The article is a bit better than the title, with some snippets of interest.  Sorry all, it's a bit long:

‘America’s Cup should become the Formula One of sailing’

Sir Jim Ratcliffe is not entirely sure what he said to Ben Ainslie when he stepped aboard his America’s Cup boat in the Hauraki Gulf in the aftermath of a spectacular victory. “But it definitely began with an ‘F’,” Ratcliffe says.

That “f***ing well done” was an exclamation of congratulation, admiration and exhilaration from the petrochemicals billionaire who had just watched Ainslie steer Britannia to a win that required “experience, nerve and balls of steel” to flash across his Luna Rossa rival as the boats flew downwind at more than 50mph.

“Just about the limit of what my heart can cope with,” Ratcliffe says. “The lead changed nine times. That cross was very ballsy, and extremely difficult. You have to have a lot of experience and a very good eye to predict that accurately. It was plus or minus five metres, and when you have two boats doing 45 knots . . .”

Ratcliffe is in awe of these 75ft yachts, skimming above the sea in Auckland with the top of the mast 28 metres above the water. “A boat the height of a ten-storey building sailing on a foil the size of a coffee table at nearly 100km/h, it’s pretty extraordinary without hurting anybody,” he says.

“You get no sense on television how big these boats are. It’s only when you are on one you get a sense of how enormous. Six tonnes, that’s like a big lorry. It’s a lot of energy.”

 

The engineer in him recalls school days studying kinetic energy. “From my O-levels, velocity is the square function so it is four times the speed of the old America’s Cup boats of ten knots but 16 times the energy,” he says. “So when they crash, there’s going to be fallout.”

The idea of a collision is terrifying, which made Ainslie’s nerve and seamanship all the more impressive to seal the win that has carried Team Ineos UK into the final of the America’s Cup challenger selection series, when they will face the Italians in the best-of-13 contest starting next Saturday.

This was not just about the fastest boat but high-class sailing; communication to the team, reading the shifting winds, measuring the gap. “It’s a really fine art,” Ratcliffe says. “It’s the sort of spatial awareness that Lewis Hamilton has, knowing the latest point you can brake.”

The comparison with Formula One is very deliberate, not least because Ineos bought one third of the Mercedes team in December as part of an expanding sporting empire which serves the dual purpose of pushing the company name to an international audience (Ratcliffe no longer wants to joke that the company he built with two friends, with an estimated $60 billion in annual sales, is the biggest in the world that you had never heard of) while providing sporting competition and kicks to a man who can certainly afford them.

 

 
 

Ratcliffe mentions that a Portuguese football club could be next on the Ineos shopping list to add to ownership of OGC Nice, Lausanne Sport and Racing Club Abidjan from the Ivory Coast, plus the successful cycling team and the growing influence in motorsport.

Any more? “The stress of the America’s Cup is quite sufficient at the moment,” he says, though it seems very much the sort of stress Ratcliffe enjoys after coming on shore from his superyacht moored in Auckland, where he was able to serve his quarantine for New Zealand, after sailing over from French Polynesia.

His experience of funding and now watching America’s Cup racing has left him thrilled and wanting more — provided modifications are made to one of sport’s oldest and most arcane competitions.

“The America’s Cup needs to be at the pinnacle of yacht racing, the most exciting yacht racing on the planet, like Formula One is for motor racing,” he says. For that, Ratcliffe believes the boats must stay on foils despite a preference among some Americans to return to keel boats.

“For the modern generation, watching big displacement yachts at 12, 13 knots is like watching paint dry,” Ratcliffe says. “Everyone is on foils these days, kite surfers, windsurfers, quick little dinghies.”

He says the competition also has to stop jumping between different designs, from a variety of catamarans in the past decade back to monohulls. “Formula One doesn’t flip from a petrol engine to diesel, or a six-wheel car to four wheels because you would lose the public,” he says.

image.thumb.png.b7b97d7c59168f8e4d5d9fe24c3ba0fe.png
Ratcliffe is committed to making the sport a successful one
TIMES PHOTOGRAPHER MARC ASPLAND

Sticking to one class of boat would significantly reduce the outlay from his minimum £110 million investment, with Ratcliffe hoping a much cheaper operation could double the number of competing teams from the four involved in the 36th America’s Cup.

“And most importantly of all you need a level playing field,” he says. The competition is mired in obscure rules tilted for the benefit of the defending boat and an invited Challenger of Record. The Kiwi hosts had been designing their boats for months before Ainslie and his team were able to see all the complex technical specifications.

“The America’s Cup, it’s not what I would describe as a successful sport at the moment,” Ratcliffe says. “It’s very much a minority sport. People don’t really understand it. The changes from one race to another are too big. It’s too litigious, a bit complicated, and there aren’t enough people who race. There probably needs to be a governing body. It won’t happen for the next America’s Cup but we have tried to engage people. I don’t think I am breaking any confidence to say the Kiwis are of a similar view.”

So a commitment to stay in the sport? “We are open-minded to it. It’s been great sport so far, we’ve enjoyed it. If we are going to get involved again, we think it needs to be a successful sport not one that is in decline.

“We have had conversations but we do also recognise we are very much the new kids on the block. New Zealand have raced ten times, won three of them. We kicked it off in 1851 but we haven’t been tremendously successful.”

That is an understatement. There has not been a British winner (even the landlocked Swiss claim two wins) but strides have been taken in reaching the Prada Cup final which marks the first time in nearly 40 years a British team will race in the final of the challenger selection series.

It has been a very bumpy journey. Ainslie’s team seemed bereft before Christmas with a boat that could not “take off” onto the foils unless the winds picked up. Humiliation loomed. “It was complete misery, to be honest,” Ratcliffe says. “It was very depressing.”

On top of the difficulties of being a challenging boat and a newly branded team were all the disruptions of Covid. The first build was a write-off pretty much from the start. “We knew before it hit the water that we’d have to scrap it,” Ratcliffe says. “And these things are $30 million (about £21.9 million) a pop.

“We only had one week on the water before we had to commit to hull two. That’s quite stressful for the design guys. On top of the hull, you are designing the rig, sail, foils. So you have all that chaos and drama in a very compressed timetable. We got to Christmas and it was a mess, really.”

The tie-up with Mercedes proved advantageous in all the work done to make improvements, motorsport engineers helping with the foils in particular. The changes brought about a dramatic transformation. And then there is Ainslie, the most successful sailor in Olympic history with medals at five consecutive Olympics including gold at the four Games between 2000 and 2012 in a Laser and Finn.

“Nothing about having a better boat, being lucky,”Ratcliffe says. “The best sailor wins. You can see when he is sailing this extraordinary foiling monohull, you can see why he won a world championship 11 times.”

Anticipation is growing for the next round of racing, and much weather-checking too to see if conditions will be favourable. Despite an unbeaten run of victories in the round robin, Ratcliffe is playing down expectations as the British team prepares to come up against the Italians led by the hugely experienced Australian, Jimmy Spithill.

“It would be very nice if we were to win but I think there is no question that they are the favourites because we have so much to learn,” Ratcliffe says. “We have great sailors, a great atmosphere and spirit in the team, but we don’t have the same experience.

“My heart is going to have to go through it all again. It’s those great sporting events like being there when [Manchester] United beat Bayern Munich [in the Champions League final] in 1999. I didn’t enjoy 90 minutes of that match. It was awful but the three minutes are three minutes you never forget in your lifetime, taken from this miserable place to this high that you can’t describe. I have never kissed so many grown men in my life.

“You never know with sport. Never in a million years did we believe we would have gone 5-0 in the round robin. Odd things do happen so that’s always in the back of your mind. Common sense says we are underdogs. We do not have the Mercedes car. We are the Red Bull or something like that so we have to sail really well to get through.”

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18 minutes ago, teamvmg said:

Why did they put the windward foil down for the 'head-up' at 2'45"?

Guess they wanted the extra stability for the sharp right turn - Control, less slip, no rocket launch.....

Plenty examples to find if you watch some of the vids from the previous racing... Have you been watching?

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1 hour ago, Living_in_a_box said:

I think the people of Tuvala, and all those who lost homes in wild fires and increased hurricane activity would see climate change as pretty real!

I did read your post and have reread it and your position seemed pretty clear to me and my quote was not taken out of context so don't get pissy when someone calls you out when you take a position they think is BS... There are obviously holes in climate science understanding  (as there is in any scientific field) but to complain that the roll out of the climate disaster isn't precisely matching forecasts in some aspects when the broad observations are entirely consistent with predictions are as I said, disingenuous.

But this isn't sailing so I'm out...

 

Any more drivel for me?

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4 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Doesn't say a lot for Luna Rossa and American Magic who both haven't beaten Ineos in the Prada Cup.! They must have reached around the course as you say but not sure what the fuck the other boats were doing.? :wub:

Obviously INEOS can reach both up and down wind. Prada is free to give it ago.

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4 hours ago, chesirecat said:

Shifting after 2.58

At 5:50 they have 4 grinders going on the stbd side. Cant see port side.

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10 hours ago, Filthy Phill said:

Sports commentators always talk about momentum....not sure what Ineos GB have figured out but they sure look like they are the one too beat.

Then, so be it :-)

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7 hours ago, Nutta said:

It's as likely as anything else. My cat told me anyway, so it's true. If they sandbaggerd in the Christmas Cup, heading home after a days training is even more likely to dredge up sand from somewhere...

I agree Nutta as cats no things about relaxing so can spot it.

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17 hours ago, dullers said:

I will sum it up. We dont live in a dictatorship. I dont trust Chinas figures. I am glad you like it in China. 

I think INEOS will win the PRADA cup but that is more hope than science. 

Ah - there's the rub. People don't trust what they don't know. Well I know a lot of people in China but I don't know anyone who knows anyone who has lost a family member to COVID and I have clients in high positions working in office buildings with more than 1,000 people working there.

You can control the media if you want - and don't think for a moment CNN, BBC or any of the rest of them are completely impartial but you cannot control what ordinary people say to other ordinary people.

And when the western social media started to throw scorn on Qingdao testing 7.5m in a week because to 2 or 3 +ve tests I ACTUALLY SPOKE to an umpire friend and colleague who was standing in a long long line in Qingdao waiting to be tested. They were clever - they tested 10 people at a time and if the result was negative - great. If it was +ve they then tested those 10 individually. Who city - no further positives. And when there was a positive test in an area in Shanghai a (western) friend who was driving past posted a video of the two whole city blocks not just in lockdown trusting to human nature not to go out but cordoned off with police and health workers preventing anyone going in or coming out.

Big gatherings - like, for example regattas - you don't attend without proof of a recent nucleic acid test - and trust me (even if you don't trust China) they are not pleasant but not as unpleasant as having to be put on a ventilator. YES I have had them.

Sometimes a dictatorship is useful especially when there are idiots who don't know, don't care or don't believe that the precautions are necessary. Remember freedom also includes the freedom to be stupid, to be selfish and to needlessly put friends, relatives and loved ones at risk OR ultimately through any of those elements just mentioned cause their severe illness, discomfort or even death.

At times like this a chunk of YOU WILL or YOU CAN'T saves a lot more lives than 'it might be a good idea if you.......'.

It is of little consequence to me whether people outside trust what is said to be happening or not, I see it first hand and hear about it first hand from people - what BBC or CNN would call "on the ground".

If China had anything like the disastrous death rates that the UK Government had allowed to happen there would be 1,400,000 dead Chinese and don't think even the Chinese government could cover that up.

Bottom line is I know I am a lot safer here than in the UK or USA and those who knock the likes of China, New Zealand, Taiwan or other countries that have thus far controlled COVID-19 are perhaps a little envious of those countries effective control of the virus infection rates.

Anyway, like i have said before discussion is useful and hopefully expands understanding.

By the Way - wasn't that a great result at Twickenham. First time we Scots have lifted the Calcutta Cup at Twickers in 37 or 38 years. I had a wee dramm, well a large dramm on that one.

SS

 

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8 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Ah - there's the rub. People don't trust what they don't know. Well I know a lot of people in China but I don't know anyone who knows anyone who has lost a family member to COVID and I have clients in high positions working in office buildings with more than 1,000 people working there.

You can control the media if you want - and don't think for a moment CNN, BBC or any of the rest of them are completely impartial but you cannot control what ordinary people say to other ordinary people.

And when the western social media started to throw scorn on Qingdao testing 7.5m in a week because to 2 or 3 +ve tests I ACTUALLY SPOKE to an umpire friend and colleague who was standing in a long long line in Qingdao waiting to be tested. They were clever - they tested 10 people at a time and if the result was negative - great. If it was +ve they then tested those 10 individually. Who city - no further positives. And when there was a positive test in an area in Shanghai a (western) friend who was driving past posted a video of the two whole city blocks not just in lockdown trusting to human nature not to go out but cordoned off with police and health workers preventing anyone going in or coming out.

Big gatherings - like, for example regattas - you don't attend without proof of a recent nucleic acid test - and trust me (even if you don't trust China) they are not pleasant but not as unpleasant as having to be put on a ventilator. YES I have had them.

Sometimes a dictatorship is useful especially when there are idiots who don't know, don't care or don't believe that the precautions are necessary. Remember freedom also includes the freedom to be stupid, to be selfish and to needlessly put friends, relatives and loved ones at risk OR ultimately through any of those elements just mentioned cause their severe illness, discomfort or even death.

At times like this a chunk of YOU WILL or YOU CAN'T saves a lot more lives than 'it might be a good idea if you.......'.

It is of little consequence to me whether people outside trust what is said to be happening or not, I see it first hand and hear about it first hand from people - what BBC or CNN would call "on the ground".

If China had anything like the disastrous death rates that the UK Government had allowed to happen there would be 1,400,000 dead Chinese and don't think even the Chinese government could cover that up.

Bottom line is I know I am a lot safer here than in the UK or USA and those who knock the likes of China, New Zealand, Taiwan or other countries that have thus far controlled COVID-19 are perhaps a little envious of those countries effective control of the virus infection rates.

Anyway, like i have said before discussion is useful and hopefully expands understanding.

By the Way - wasn't that a great result at Twickenham. First time we Scots have lifted the Calcutta Cup at Twickers in 37 or 38 years. I had a wee dramm, well a large dramm on that one.

SS

 

Like I said I will sum it up. We dont live in a dictatorship. I dont trust Chinas figures. I am glad you like it in China. Are you a member of the party? Good results if you are Scots.

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53 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Ah - there's the rub. People don't trust what they don't know. Well I know a lot of people in China but I don't know anyone who knows anyone who has lost a family member to COVID and I have clients in high positions working in office buildings with more than 1,000 people working there.

...

SS

 

Thank you for this report. It aligns with the stories my Chinese colleagues told and tell me.
China as a dictatorship may be a special case, but Taiwan and NZ, as you wrote, are doing pretty well too. It might boil down to cultural differences, like do people live in a society that values societal behavior higher than egocentric individualism (IOW, are people that care about others or are assholes rewarded), paired with trust or mistrust in the institutions.
It's quite sad to see the biggest western societies failing in these regards.

No idea what a Calcutta Cup is, tho ;).

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40 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

.....

No idea what a Calcutta Cup is, tho ;).

The Calcutta Cup is awarded to the winner of an annual rugby match between England and Scotland. The first time it was contested was 1879. So not quite as old as the America's Cup!

The cup itself has an interesting story. It was made in Calcutta and might also be called the 270 Silver Rupees Cup :)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcutta_Cup

 

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30 minutes ago, The Main Man said:

Scotland haven’t won it in England for 38 years. I’m still on a high today.

Well played. We was gang banged.

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2 hours ago, The Main Man said:

Scotland haven’t won it in England for 38 years. I’m still on a high today.

Hearty congratulations to our Scottish friends: today, England - tomorrow, the All Blacks!!

Great result for Townsend who's achieved what a host of foreign coaches couldn't.

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4 hours ago, dullers said:

Are you a member of the party? 

Er- NO~! I'm not Chinese. No political affiliations at all. Just a lover of the truth.B)

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1 minute ago, Indio said:

Hearty congratulations to our Scottish friends: today, England - tomorrow, the All Blacks!!

Great result for Townsend who's achieved what a host of forein coaches couldn't.

I think the Blacks are a somewhat steeper challenge but completely agree with your comment about Gregor Townsend

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16 hours ago, MaxHugen said:

What did we see here..? 

If their difference is really that big, it's going to make the next round of races almost as dull as watching luna Rossa destroy American magic. 

Jimmy would never let Ineos scream past them.. Any excuse for a race.

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Indio said:

Hearty congratulations to our Scottish friends: today, England - tomorrow, the All Blacks!!

Great result for Townsend who's achieved what a host of forein coaches couldn't.

scottish rugby has always been admired in NZ irrespective of the result, you always know they're going to have a go  and  without cheapshots or hidden agendas etc, the only curse they carry is that fleet street mob in time they'll have the AB's and i'll say goodonem for that day

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19 hours ago, Nutta said:

 Happy to be proved wrong, but no one has eliminated any corona type virus yet?

 

SARS COV-1 hasnt been seen in humans since 2004. 

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7 minutes ago, 167149 said:

scottish rugby has always been admired in NZ irrespective of the result, you always know they're going to have a go  and  without cheapshots or hidden agendas etc, the only curse they carry is that fleet street mob in time they'll have the AB's and i'll say goodonem for that day

Scottish Rugby along with Samoa Rugby are the last remainders and reminders of amateur rugby.

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‘America’s Cup should become the Formula One of sailing’

 

Ineos’s Sir Jim Ratcliffe tells Matt Dickinson that sailing’s blue-riband event has to change to raise its popularity

"The changes from one race to another are too big. It’s too litigious, a bit complicated, and there aren’t enough people who race. There probably needs to be a governing body. It won’t happen for the next America’s Cup but we have tried to engage people. I don’t think I am breaking any confidence to say the Kiwis are of a similar view.”

So a commitment to stay in the sport? “We are open-minded to it. It’s been great sport so far, we’ve enjoyed it. If we are going to get involved again, we think it needs to be a successful sport not one that is in decline."

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/americas-cup-should-become-the-f1-of-sailing-05wmq3z32

 

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11 minutes ago, chesirecat said:

‘America’s Cup should become the Formula One of sailing’

 

Ineos’s Sir Jim Ratcliffe tells Matt Dickinson that sailing’s blue-riband event has to change to raise its popularity

"The changes from one race to another are too big. It’s too litigious, a bit complicated, and there aren’t enough people who race. There probably needs to be a governing body. It won’t happen for the next America’s Cup but we have tried to engage people. I don’t think I am breaking any confidence to say the Kiwis are of a similar view.”

So a commitment to stay in the sport? “We are open-minded to it. It’s been great sport so far, we’ve enjoyed it. If we are going to get involved again, we think it needs to be a successful sport not one that is in decline."

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/americas-cup-should-become-the-f1-of-sailing-05wmq3z32

 

The next idiot who wants to transform the Cup into JAR. 

Jim, the Cup has a governing body, the NYSC. And pretty perfect regulations, the DoG.

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3 hours ago, The Main Man said:

Scotland haven’t won it in England for 38 years. I’m still on a high today.

It was a very well deserved win, England were completely out classed and out played.

Ireland were also really impressive today............................. as a 14 man team!!!

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40 minutes ago, Indio said:

Scottish Rugby along with Samoa Rugby are the last remainders and reminders of amateur rugby.

Scottish rugby is fully professional and well funded.

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12 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:
24 minutes ago, chesirecat said:

‘America’s Cup should become the Formula One of sailing’

 

Ineos’s Sir Jim Ratcliffe tells Matt Dickinson that sailing’s blue-riband event has to change to raise its popularity

"The changes from one race to another are too big. It’s too litigious, a bit complicated, and there aren’t enough people who race. There probably needs to be a governing body. It won’t happen for the next America’s Cup but we have tried to engage people. I don’t think I am breaking any confidence to say the Kiwis are of a similar view.”

So a commitment to stay in the sport? “We are open-minded to it. It’s been great sport so far, we’ve enjoyed it. If we are going to get involved again, we think it needs to be a successful sport not one that is in decline."

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/americas-cup-should-become-the-f1-of-sailing-05wmq3z32

 

The next idiot who wants to transform the Cup into JAR. 

Jim, the Cup has a governing body, the NYSC. And pretty perfect regulations, the DoG.

This sounds mighty familiar doesn't it?:rolleyes:

And no surprise it came from him.

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There was a lot of ‘ACWS’ racing in the leadup to EB’s AC32 Valencia and after LE won then it got even bigger in the leadups to AC34 and AC35. One possibly good outcome of a Ratcliffe win may be a return to  racing at that scale. 

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34 minutes ago, chesirecat said:

‘America’s Cup should become the Formula One of sailing’

 

Ineos’s Sir Jim Ratcliffe tells Matt Dickinson that sailing’s blue-riband event has to change to raise its popularity

"The changes from one race to another are too big. It’s too litigious, a bit complicated, and there aren’t enough people who race. There probably needs to be a governing body. It won’t happen for the next America’s Cup but we have tried to engage people. I don’t think I am breaking any confidence to say the Kiwis are of a similar view.”

So a commitment to stay in the sport? “We are open-minded to it. It’s been great sport so far, we’ve enjoyed it. If we are going to get involved again, we think it needs to be a successful sport not one that is in decline."

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/americas-cup-should-become-the-f1-of-sailing-05wmq3z32

 

He thinks when you win the cup you own it.

If he ever wins it he will realise the cup actually owns you...

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29 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

The next idiot who wants to transform the Cup into JAR. 

Jim, the Cup has a governing body, the NYSC. And pretty perfect regulations, the DoG.

What is NYSC?  

If you mean NYYC, I do not believe that they are a governing body of AC.  The winner of the trophy becomes the trustee and must comply with the deed. The deed is governed by NY law.  The deed allows challenger and defender to agree to their own terms with certain restrictions.

It is very rare for the AC challenger and defender to fail to reach terms and have to revert to a DOG match

The deed has been amended a couple of times by New York Court.  But I dont think NYYC has the power to unilaterally amend the deed. In short.....live or die by the sword.

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14 minutes ago, Boybland said:

He thinks when you win the cup you own it.

If he ever wins it he will realise the cup actually owns you...

Yup. Sounds like the mother of all sporting trophies has hooked yet another sucker. I wonder how many challenges he has in him. I guess the biggest spend (and still spending with SGP) is LE, sadly the fracker is not quite in his league ($18 billion plays $86 billion).

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3 minutes ago, EYESAILOR said:

What is NYSC?  

If you mean NYYC, I do not believe that they are a governing body of AC.  The winner of the trophy becomes the trustee and must comply with the deed. The deed is governed by NY law.  The deed allows challenger and defender to agree to their own terms with certain restrictions.

It is very rare for the AC challenger and defender to fail to reach terms and have to revert to a DOG match

The deed has been amended a couple of times by New York Court.  But I dont think NYYC has the power to unilaterally amend the deed. In short.....live or die by the sword.

Supreme Court, not yacht club.  Get real

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11 hours ago, MaxHugen said:

The article is a bit better than the title, with some snippets of interest.  Sorry all, it's a bit long:

‘America’s Cup should become the Formula One of sailing’

Sir Jim Ratcliffe is not entirely sure what he said to Ben Ainslie when he stepped aboard his America’s Cup boat in the Hauraki Gulf in the aftermath of a spectacular victory. “But it definitely began with an ‘F’,” Ratcliffe says.

That “f***ing well done” was an exclamation of congratulation, admiration and exhilaration from the petrochemicals billionaire who had just watched Ainslie steer Britannia to a win that required “experience, nerve and balls of steel” to flash across his Luna Rossa rival as the boats flew downwind at more than 50mph.

“Just about the limit of what my heart can cope with,” Ratcliffe says. “The lead changed nine times. That cross was very ballsy, and extremely difficult. You have to have a lot of experience and a very good eye to predict that accurately. It was plus or minus five metres, and when you have two boats doing 45 knots . . .”

Ratcliffe is in awe of these 75ft yachts, skimming above the sea in Auckland with the top of the mast 28 metres above the water. “A boat the height of a ten-storey building sailing on a foil the size of a coffee table at nearly 100km/h, it’s pretty extraordinary without hurting anybody,” he says.

“You get no sense on television how big these boats are. It’s only when you are on one you get a sense of how enormous. Six tonnes, that’s like a big lorry. It’s a lot of energy.”

 

The engineer in him recalls school days studying kinetic energy. “From my O-levels, velocity is the square function so it is four times the speed of the old America’s Cup boats of ten knots but 16 times the energy,” he says. “So when they crash, there’s going to be fallout.”

The idea of a collision is terrifying, which made Ainslie’s nerve and seamanship all the more impressive to seal the win that has carried Team Ineos UK into the final of the America’s Cup challenger selection series, when they will face the Italians in the best-of-13 contest starting next Saturday.

This was not just about the fastest boat but high-class sailing; communication to the team, reading the shifting winds, measuring the gap. “It’s a really fine art,” Ratcliffe says. “It’s the sort of spatial awareness that Lewis Hamilton has, knowing the latest point you can brake.”

The comparison with Formula One is very deliberate, not least because Ineos bought one third of the Mercedes team in December as part of an expanding sporting empire which serves the dual purpose of pushing the company name to an international audience (Ratcliffe no longer wants to joke that the company he built with two friends, with an estimated $60 billion in annual sales, is the biggest in the world that you had never heard of) while providing sporting competition and kicks to a man who can certainly afford them.

 

 
 

Ratcliffe mentions that a Portuguese football club could be next on the Ineos shopping list to add to ownership of OGC Nice, Lausanne Sport and Racing Club Abidjan from the Ivory Coast, plus the successful cycling team and the growing influence in motorsport.

Any more? “The stress of the America’s Cup is quite sufficient at the moment,” he says, though it seems very much the sort of stress Ratcliffe enjoys after coming on shore from his superyacht moored in Auckland, where he was able to serve his quarantine for New Zealand, after sailing over from French Polynesia.

His experience of funding and now watching America’s Cup racing has left him thrilled and wanting more — provided modifications are made to one of sport’s oldest and most arcane competitions.

“The America’s Cup needs to be at the pinnacle of yacht racing, the most exciting yacht racing on the planet, like Formula One is for motor racing,” he says. For that, Ratcliffe believes the boats must stay on foils despite a preference among some Americans to return to keel boats.

“For the modern generation, watching big displacement yachts at 12, 13 knots is like watching paint dry,” Ratcliffe says. “Everyone is on foils these days, kite surfers, windsurfers, quick little dinghies.”

He says the competition also has to stop jumping between different designs, from a variety of catamarans in the past decade back to monohulls. 

Sticking to one class of boat would significantly reduce the outlay from his minimum £110 million investment, with Ratcliffe hoping a much cheaper operation could double the number of competing teams from the four involved in the 36th America’s Cup.

“And most importantly of all you need a level playing field,” he says. The competition is mired in obscure rules tilted for the benefit of the defending boat and an invited Challenger of Record. The Kiwi hosts had been designing their boats for months before Ainslie and his team were able to see all the complex technical specifications.

“The America’s Cup, it’s not what I would describe as a successful sport at the moment,” Ratcliffe says. “It’s very much a minority sport. People don’t really understand it. The changes from one race to another are too big. It’s too litigious, a bit complicated, and there aren’t enough people who race. There probably needs to be a governing body. It won’t happen for the next America’s Cup but we have tried to engage people. I don’t think I am breaking any confidence to say the Kiwis are of a similar view.”

So a commitment to stay in the sport? “We are open-minded to it. It’s been great sport so far, we’ve enjoyed it. If we are going to get involved again, we think it needs to be a successful sport not one that is in decline.

“We have had conversations but we do also recognise we are very much the new kids on the block. New Zealand have raced ten times, won three of them. We kicked it off in 1851 but we haven’t been tremendously successful.”

That is an understatement. There has not been a British winner (even the landlocked Swiss claim two wins) but strides have been taken in reaching the Prada Cup final which marks the first time in nearly 40 years a British team will race in the final of the challenger selection series.

It has been a very bumpy journey. Ainslie’s team seemed bereft before Christmas with a boat that could not “take off” onto the foils unless the winds picked up. Humiliation loomed. “It was complete misery, to be honest,” Ratcliffe says. “It was very depressing.”

On top of the difficulties of being a challenging boat and a newly branded team were all the disruptions of Covid. The first build was a write-off pretty much from the start. “We knew before it hit the water that we’d have to scrap it,” Ratcliffe says. “And these things are $30 million (about £21.9 million) a pop.

“We only had one week on the water before we had to commit to hull two. That’s quite stressful for the design guys. On top of the hull, you are designing the rig, sail, foils. So you have all that chaos and drama in a very compressed timetable. We got to Christmas and it was a mess, really.”

The tie-up with Mercedes proved advantageous in all the work done to make improvements, motorsport engineers helping with the foils in particular. The changes brought about a dramatic transformation. And then there is Ainslie, the most successful sailor in Olympic history with medals at five consecutive Olympics including gold at the four Games between 2000 and 2012 in a Laser and Finn.

“Nothing about having a better boat, being lucky,”Ratcliffe says. “The best sailor wins. You can see when he is sailing this extraordinary foiling monohull, you can see why he won a world championship 11 times.”

Anticipation is growing for the next round of racing, and much weather-checking too to see if conditions will be favourable. Despite an unbeaten run of victories in the round robin, Ratcliffe is playing down expectations as the British team prepares to come up against the Italians led by the hugely experienced Australian, Jimmy Spithill.

“It would be very nice if we were to win but I think there is no question that they are the favourites because we have so much to learn,” Ratcliffe says. “We have great sailors, a great atmosphere and spirit in the team, but we don’t have the same experience.

What makes the America’s Cup what it is and what separates it from all other sports is precisely what Ratcliffe dislikes in this article. The fact that it is unfair. Besides war, it is the apotheosis of design competition. It’s not about the best sailors, it never has been. I sincerely hope it remains this way. Although a bit of stability in the class of boat would be nice. 

Besides if he wants F1 on water. Go to the TP52’s. They are precisely that. Extremely stable regs, lots of teams, the pinnacle of modern yacht design as we know it, while still being relatable to what boaties have in the marina. 

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5 minutes ago, EYESAILOR said:

What is NYSC?  

If you mean NYYC, I do not believe that they are a governing body of AC.  The winner of the trophy becomes the trustee and must comply with the deed. The deed is governed by NY law.  The deed allows challenger and defender to agree to their own terms with certain restrictions.

It is very rare for the AC challenger and defender to fail to reach terms and have to revert to a DOG match

The deed has been amended a couple of times by New York Court.  But I dont think NYYC has the power to unilaterally amend the deed. In short.....live or die by the sword.

NYSC: New York Supreme Court. 

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I think today is when the boats are inspected for compliance to the class rule. Also any technical changes are now locked down until after the Prada cup. 

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Interesting to go back and watch the world series races, especially day 1 race 4, enrz vs AM, if only because we now have a pretty good handle on what AM could do. At times entz had issues i.e. first leg, at times entz could reel them in seemingly at will, at other AM seems to have pace with the, mainly downwind, but also at times upwind. Certainly entz was faster, but not omnipotent...AM were doing their party piece of capitulating in moments too.

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1 hour ago, 167149 said:

scottish rugby has always been admired in NZ irrespective of the result, you always know they're going to have a go  and  without cheapshots or hidden agendas etc, the only curse they carry is that fleet street mob in time they'll have the AB's and i'll say goodonem for that day

What a load of crap. I prefer t if you just tell us English what a bunch of cunts we are.

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