Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 10.5k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

shes legit ... foil arm looks to be in the front end of the box ... opposite of all other teams ... what are we going to read into that?

ETNZ are probably favorites .....but win or lose....Team New Zealand have firmly established themselves as the all time great AC nation in the modern era.   From the time they first emerged, they have

Posted Images

@chesirecat

Two Articles on Hannah Mills:

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ben-ainslie-brings-olympic-champion-hannah-mills-on-board-for-trailblazing-sailgp-weekend-in-cadiz-qrn2zhrmw

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sailing/2021/10/06/hannah-mills-hints-end-olympic-career-due-exciting-new-sailgp/

Unfortunately I cannot get behind the Article from the Telegraph.

TheTimes.UK meanwhile say that she is tipped to skipper an All-Female Crew at the 2024 Female America's Cup in the newly created AC40 OD Class.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, dg_sailingfan said:

@chesirecat

Two Articles on Hannah Mills:

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ben-ainslie-brings-olympic-champion-hannah-mills-on-board-for-trailblazing-sailgp-weekend-in-cadiz-qrn2zhrmw

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sailing/2021/10/06/hannah-mills-hints-end-olympic-career-due-exciting-new-sailgp/

Unfortunately I cannot get behind the Article from the Telegraph.

TheTimes.UK meanwhile say that she is tipped to skipper an All-Female Crew at the 2024 Female America's Cup in the newly created AC40 OD Class.

Here you go. She's a pocket rocket at 50kilos

Hannah Mills has described the introduction of a new quota system in SailGP ahead of the planned creation of a parallel women’s series in 2024, as a “hugely exciting” development, adding that it almost certainly spells the end of her Olympic career.

Mills, the most successful female sailor in Olympic history, was speaking from Cadiz where she has once again joined up with Sir Ben Ainslie’s SailGP team, having already trialled with them at the rounds in Bermuda and Saint-Tropez this year.

The one-design global racing league announced a new 'gender equity initiative' last autumn, requiring all eight teams to hire at least one female athlete in season two as part of a women’s pathway programme. 

But they were not required to give their recruits a role on board during the racing itself.

That is set to change as of this weekend, with SailGP due to announce some time on Thursday that the F50 catamarans will henceforth race with six crew (or four in light-wind configuration) with at least one athlete onboard each boat being a female athlete from SailGP’s women’s pathway programme.

That requirement will be repeated in seasons three and four, with the female sailors given increasing responsibility on the boats, with the goal being for each team to train up an entire women’s crew ready for season five in 2024.

That would present a clash with Paris 2024 as far as Mills is concerned. But the double Olympic 470 champion admitted the chance to be involved in establishing a professional women’s sailing league was too good to turn down.

“Now there’s a clear pathway and strategy around female involvement that makes it very easy to say ‘Yes, I definitely want to do it’,” she told The Daily Telegraph on Wednesday. “After the Tokyo Games, I wasn’t sure [whether to commit to SailGP]. But now I’m definitely up for it.

“If this feels like it’s got potential and I could make it work then I think that’s a great progression and a step forwards; to establish a professional female sailing league that has legs beyond Olympic sailing for female athletes.”

Thursday's development follows the announcement on Wednesday that Ainslie has taken majority ownership of the British SailGP team, which becomes the first of the existing eight SailGP teams to evolve to a third party-owned “franchise”.

All of the original SailGP teams were effectively underwritten by Oracle billionaire Larry Ellison with the intention being that once the league was up and running, and the sport was commercially sustainable, teams would raise their own sponsorship and become national franchises.

Mills said the same rules would apply to the women’s series, with sponsorship needed to make it viable.

But she added that she was hugely excited by what the next few years held in store, with the planned introduction of a women’s America’s Cup next time around also presenting a huge opportunity. 

SailGP should offer the perfect pathway for aspiring female entrants.

“Obviously it’s incredibly exciting what they’re doing with the women in this next Cup cycle,” said Mills who confessed she would like the skipper/helm role that Ainslie has on the men's boat. “I think the SailGP only helps to aid female sailors who are going to do that. It’s all foiling, even if [SailGP] takes place in catamarans rather than the monohulls they use in the Cup.

“It’s just really positive and I think the more opportunities and pathways for women to learn this type of sailing the better.”

Asked whether that was definitely the end of her Olympic career, Mills replied: “Never say never but it’s very unlikely [I will compete again]. It’s been a journey of emotion the last few months but I could not be more excited.”

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sir Dave Brailsford was at Brackley and he's now taking on responsiblities for all Ineos's sports endeavors.

Here's some background on his modus operandi. I might add micro gains are where its at in Olympic sailing but Merc must be up a level or two on even that.

https://jamesclear.com/marginal-gains

Also Toto and co mentioned Ainslie was the one who was probing Merc to see where they could be most useful and the feedback from the Merc folk in Auckland was they were very impressed with him both as a sportsman and handling all the back room stuff.

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Forourselves said:

Not cool or exciting though are they.

I suppose that is a matter of opinion.

I went to Auckland for the 2000 Louis Vuitton Cup and there were 11 challengers. I found it to be very cool and very exciting.

I went to Valencia for the 2007 Louis Vuitton Cup and there were 11 challengers. I found it to be very cool and very exciting.

What made it cool and exciting was not the boatspeed. For that we have Formula 1 or SailGP. What made it cool and exciting was the number of challengers, the prestart sequences, the boathandling and sailhandling and the very small boatspeed differences which led (often though not always) to close, tactical match racing especially downwind when the trailing boat could blanket the boat ahead. Again, just a matter of opinion.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I suppose that is a matter of opinion.

I went to Auckland for the 2000 Louis Vuitton Cup and there were 11 challengers. I found it to be very cool and very exciting.

I went to Valencia for the 2007 Louis Vuitton Cup and there were 11 challengers. I found it to be very cool and very exciting.

What made it cool and exciting was not the boatspeed. For that we have Formula 1 or SailGP. What made it cool and exciting was the number of challengers, the prestart sequences, the boathandling and sailhandling and the very small boatspeed differences which led (often though not always) to close, tactical match racing especially downwind when the trailing boat could blanket the boat ahead. Again, just a matter of opinion.

 

Don’t get me wrong, I love the old boats, infact personally I watch video of AC 95, 2000, 2003 and 2007 more than I watch the most recent AC. Especially the LV 2000 finals. Those races can not be beaten. The drama and excitement of that series is unbeatable. The boats are elegant and powerful, and the tactics exciting, but whether we like it or not, it’s about speed and thrills now.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, dogwatch said:

Not sure we've really heard a clamour from the sailing $Bs of this world to return the AC to boats that look like yachts. Those interested in such things seem to be happily sailing Js in the Carribean, maxis off Costa Smeralda and so on. 

The $B's moved on as it got commercialised, they are not into flashing the wealth in big public spectacles. Plus, most of those that would be interested are also sailors. Why spend vast sums on a toy you can never be involved in.

They will only come back if the cup stops for a decade or two. Then one of them will consider a shot at it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

LE was on record with Kara Swisher in 2012 that he was going to be on his boat in SF.  Had been training. Then not.  Story was "weight limit" but really "you are 69 and going to bust your ass" 

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, NeedAClew said:

LE was on record with Kara Swisher in 2012 that he was going to be on his boat in SF.  Had been training. Then not.  Story was "weight limit" but really "you are 69 and going to bust your ass" 

And make us lose.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Forourselves said:

whether we like it or not, it’s about speed and thrills now.

Sigh, you are correct. Personally, I thought 11 challengers in match races where boatspeed was within 1% was more thrilling than 3 challengers where boatspeed differences often exceeded 50%, but I guess I am old fashioned that way.

One thing that I think is undeniable: walking around the 11 bases in Auckland and the 11 bases in Valencia with the various nationalities, cuisines, team kit etc. was a lot more interesting.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Sigh, you are correct. Personally, I thought 11 challengers in match races where boatspeed was within 1% was more thrilling than 3 challengers where boatspeed differences often exceeded 50%, but I guess I am old fashioned that way.

One thing that I think is undeniable: walking around the 11 bases in Auckland and the 11 bases in Valencia with the various nationalities, cuisines, team kit etc. was a lot more interesting.

 

Well the Brits certainly don't help on the cuisine part...

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Gissie said:

Well the Brits certainly don't help on the cuisine part...

 

23 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

^_^

 

They had great Vindaloo... Curry is the national dish you know.

 

3 minutes ago, NeedAClew said:

I thought it was toast. Beans on, spaghetti on, cold in a rack, soldiers with your egg. Straya is much better. Mushy peas, various carcinogenic BBQ sausages. 

I love it when Yanks make jokes about British cuisine considering how bad cuisine is in the USA with significantly more obesity, poor quality food and even at the better end, a quarter of the number of starred restaurants per capita. Or is McDonalds now a top rated food experience ;)

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, SimonN said:

 

 

I love it when Yanks make jokes about British cuisine considering how bad cuisine is in the USA with significantly more obesity, poor quality food and even at the better end, a quarter of the number of starred restaurants per capita. Or is McDonalds now a top rated food experience ;)

 

I am not making fun of British cuisine at all. Quite to the contrary: I lived in London for two years, and I thought the food was marvelous. Indian, Cantonese, Caribbean, Malaysian, Lebanese, South African, etc. Even some of the native cuisine like a full English breakfast or fish and chips or a Sunday roast.

Today is the 50th anniversary of the opening of Chez Panisse in Berkeley which arguably did more than any other restaurant to bring about the local, seasonal, farm-to-table movement worldwide so it is not just McDonalds anymore...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, SimonN said:

 

 

I love it when Yanks make jokes about British cuisine considering how bad cuisine is in the USA with significantly more obesity, poor quality food and even at the better end, a quarter of the number of starred restaurants per capita. Or is McDonalds now a top rated food experience ;)

 

Hope you aren't including me in the Yank abuse. We have to suffer the English food heritage, all while being to small to go conquering others.

So we do it the easy way, just let squillions in and hope they start restaurants. And that their food is any good of course.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, P Flados said:

Looks like hand on sheet and wheel. 

On numerous vids, I have seen the helm do this during a turn.  

Its easier to sense the boats loading and balance especially if you are about to take the helm in a maneuver.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/8/2021 at 7:49 AM, chesirecat said:

Here you go. She's a pocket rocket at 50kilos

Hannah Mills has described the introduction of a new quota system in SailGP ahead of the planned creation of a parallel women’s series in 2024, as a “hugely exciting” development, adding that it almost certainly spells the end of her Olympic career.

Mills, the most successful female sailor in Olympic history, was speaking from Cadiz where she has once again joined up with Sir Ben Ainslie’s SailGP team, having already trialled with them at the rounds in Bermuda and Saint-Tropez this year.

The one-design global racing league announced a new 'gender equity initiative' last autumn, requiring all eight teams to hire at least one female athlete in season two as part of a women’s pathway programme. 

But they were not required to give their recruits a role on board during the racing itself.

That is set to change as of this weekend, with SailGP due to announce some time on Thursday that the F50 catamarans will henceforth race with six crew (or four in light-wind configuration) with at least one athlete onboard each boat being a female athlete from SailGP’s women’s pathway programme.

That requirement will be repeated in seasons three and four, with the female sailors given increasing responsibility on the boats, with the goal being for each team to train up an entire women’s crew ready for season five in 2024.

That would present a clash with Paris 2024 as far as Mills is concerned. But the double Olympic 470 champion admitted the chance to be involved in establishing a professional women’s sailing league was too good to turn down.

“Now there’s a clear pathway and strategy around female involvement that makes it very easy to say ‘Yes, I definitely want to do it’,” she told The Daily Telegraph on Wednesday. “After the Tokyo Games, I wasn’t sure [whether to commit to SailGP]. But now I’m definitely up for it.

“If this feels like it’s got potential and I could make it work then I think that’s a great progression and a step forwards; to establish a professional female sailing league that has legs beyond Olympic sailing for female athletes.”

Thursday's development follows the announcement on Wednesday that Ainslie has taken majority ownership of the British SailGP team, which becomes the first of the existing eight SailGP teams to evolve to a third party-owned “franchise”.

All of the original SailGP teams were effectively underwritten by Oracle billionaire Larry Ellison with the intention being that once the league was up and running, and the sport was commercially sustainable, teams would raise their own sponsorship and become national franchises.

Mills said the same rules would apply to the women’s series, with sponsorship needed to make it viable.

But she added that she was hugely excited by what the next few years held in store, with the planned introduction of a women’s America’s Cup next time around also presenting a huge opportunity. 

SailGP should offer the perfect pathway for aspiring female entrants.

“Obviously it’s incredibly exciting what they’re doing with the women in this next Cup cycle,” said Mills who confessed she would like the skipper/helm role that Ainslie has on the men's boat. “I think the SailGP only helps to aid female sailors who are going to do that. It’s all foiling, even if [SailGP] takes place in catamarans rather than the monohulls they use in the Cup.

“It’s just really positive and I think the more opportunities and pathways for women to learn this type of sailing the better.”

Asked whether that was definitely the end of her Olympic career, Mills replied: “Never say never but it’s very unlikely [I will compete again]. It’s been a journey of emotion the last few months but I could not be more excited.”

 

Interesting..increasing responsibility.

BUT CAN'T YOU POST PLAIN TEXT FFS.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/7/2021 at 10:50 PM, Gissie said:

The $B's moved on as it got commercialised, they are not into flashing the wealth in big public spectacles. Plus, most of those that would be interested are also sailors. Why spend vast sums on a toy you can never be involved in.

They will only come back if the cup stops for a decade or two. Then one of them will consider a shot at it.

Happened before - when the Admirals cup got infested with 'professional' sailors and as a result then sadly dumbed down the racing, the owners all moved off into Swan worlds and such like realms and carried on spending just as much $$$$ but were back to enjoying the sport.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, GBH said:

Happened before - when the Admirals cup got infested with 'professional' sailors and as a result then sadly dumbed down the racing, the owners all moved off into Swan worlds and such like realms and carried on spending just as much $$$$ but were back to enjoying the sport.

 

I think this is the part many have missed. The rich are still throwing obscene amounts into sailing, but they are picky about where they will do it. The AC, with its relentless push towards being a commercial product, has no pull whatsoever. As you say, things like that Admirals Cup suffered a similar fate.

One day, when the cup has been on a shelf for a decade or two, after the dream of commercialisation has faded away, we may here the comment again. Set in the bar at the rich fuckers club-

"Hey Bob, doesn't your YC have some old challenge Cup from years ago. Bet I could take if off you."

"Oh that old thing, heard stories about that. Anyway, bring it on you old bastard, you are no where near good enough to beat me."

And then it is game on again, our grandkids ears pick up and the local YC bar talk murmers start to pick up.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

^Agreed. Used to be the richuns got to mingle with great sailors, feel "part of it"  even drive the boat from time to time. 

Now they are obviously paying a pro team that gives them little comraderie and they can't even GET on the boat. So yeah like F1 but that's a different model for the billionaire. They don't do RC44 and TP52 and maxis because they are cheaper, they do it because it's FUN and they get to be part of it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This video about the life of a single suspension bolt is from the Red Bull F1 team not Mercedes AMG Petronas F1, however I thought it was a nifty video. It demonstrates the capabilities that result when one throws an almost unlimited amount of money at something. Forget about the design of the underwater foils (which I assume will stay with the naval architects who are used to CFD in an incompressible fluid unlike the F1 guys) and just think about how this F1 level of design, manufacturing and quality control will benefit Ineos Brittania.  Or don't. Either way it is a cool video. And bear in mind that they do this more than a million times per year.

 

If you don't think the design, engineering, manufacturing and quality control are impressive then can we at least acknowledge that the F1 teams' marketing machines make the AC look amateurish in comparison?

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

This video about the life of a single suspension bolt is from the Red Bull F1 team not Mercedes AMG Petronas F1, however I thought it was a nifty video. It demonstrates the capabilities that result when one throws an almost unlimited amount of money at something. Forget about the design of the underwater foils (which I assume will stay with the naval architects who are used to CFD in an incompressible fluid unlike the F1 guys) and just think about how this F1 level of design, manufacturing and quality control will benefit Ineos Brittania.  Or don't. Either way it is a cool video. And bear in mind that they do this more than a million times per year.

 

If you don't think the design, engineering, manufacturing and quality control are impressive then can we at least acknowledge that the F1 teams' marketing machines make the AC look amateurish in comparison?

 

OK.....very nice video, but no useful information.

Love to know what is so special about them.  Material?  Heat/cold treat?  Shape?  Machining process?

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, NYBOZO1 said:

OK.....very nice video, but no useful information.

Love to know what is so special about them.  Material?  Heat/cold treat?  Shape?  Machining process?

 

It's got a square head, like the two idjiots bumping theirs together above. ^^

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, NYBOZO1 said:

OK.....very nice video, but no useful information.

Love to know what is so special about them.  Material?  Heat/cold treat?  Shape?  Machining process?

 

Heaps of useful info here

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
52 minutes ago, chesirecat said:

Jason Carrington will be needing a stiff drink and a deep breath before taking on B3

Mate, I wouldn't be surprised if Mercedes + the INEOS Britannia Engineers & Boatbuilders put up a temporary facility a Brackley and construct the boat over there and not at Carrington. They have the tools to do that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am quite excited about the engagement of the Mercedes Formula 1 team with the RYS America’s Cup challenge. The Sesquicentennial Regatta in Cowes in 2001 was undoubtedly the best regatta in history (not harmed by the fact that I won my division), and I would dearly love to see an AC there in my lifetime. I said in one of my comments (on Sailing Illustrated) that Mercedes AMG F1 are not bringing nautical architects to the table. They are bringing wind tunnels and project management and resource allocation and engineering principles and materials science and manufacturing quality control and logistics and marketing expertise and other disciplines at a level that are a bit higher than those to which we are accustomed. There is a quite nifty video (four minutes in duration) posted this morning with more detail here:

 

 

I thought I might transcribe it. The team posted it on YouTube so I assume it is available royalty free.

 

 

Geoffrey Willis, Technical Director Ineos Britannia:

“Well, I think there is a lot of similarity between the mindset and the organization you need for success in Formula One and what’s needed for success in the Cup world. It’s really interesting having a whole lot of new technical challenges as well as the challenge of putting an organization together, group of people, and we’ve got a lot of very experienced Cup people that we get to talk to and work with every day. I think for all of us in a new challenge, a new excitement, that’s what drives you, new challenges. James acts as Chief Technical Officer for the whole F1 organization which includes not just the chassis side but also the power unit side and other functions, and I’m responsible for the Applied Science for the non-Formula 1 activity and taking over the role of Technical Director in the Ineos Britannia Team.

 

We’ve got clearly the Cup experience people are really key. And so we’ve made sure people like Martin, people like Giles, but in the design and in the different technical        areas of sail design, hull design, foil design, we’ve got people with very strong Cup backgrounds and what we’re bringing in from the F1 side is very capable engineering and analysis tools in simulation, in aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, materials and design. My task is to make sure I can bring the resources that are appropriate to the team in a way that supports the experience of the Cup engineers and the Cup sailors, and for me that’s a fantastic challenge.

 

On a technical basis there are differences and areas that are specific to the Cup world, but I think whenever you are trying to look at a new problem or look at a new technical challenge, I think it stimulates creativity, it stimulates thinking and in solving one type of problem you can come back to Formula 1 and say, I’ve had to solve a problem in a slightly different way, maybe I can use that way. So you clearly can’t take a piece from the yacht and put it on the car, but actually the thinking that you use to solve that new problem on the yacht, you can maybe bring back to… maybe there’s a different way into my technical problem I’m trying to solve.

 

So F1 technology: there are overlaps; we know clearly we’ve got foils, and in F1 we understand that sort of aerodynamics or hydrodynamics. There are things we aren’t used to in Formula 1; the free surface effects, the fact that you’ve got these foils operating quite close to the surface of the water, and we’ve got flexible lifting aerodynamic devices in the form of sails which, again, are slightly new, but we’ve got lots of flow features which we understand well. But as well as the technical features of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics you’ve got the structural aspects of composite structure hull, very similar in concept to how we build chassis, and then there are lots of systems, hydraulic systems, gearboxes for transferring the power from the grinders, quite a lot of engineering tools, but in fact I think what is more similar is that these are high performance difficult problems to solve, and I think in some ways it’s the mindset and the ability to bring in resources in lots of different directions and this need to have a holistic design to balance off pure performance against what you can achieve in the time scale.

 

Bluntly, we don’t have enough time to do an America’s Cup boat; we never have enough time to do the race car; we are always up against those pressures, and I think a lot of that is what I’m hoping to bring to that experience  from the F1 world into the experience all the Cup guys have got. I think it’s that synthesis and synergy between the two organizations that really makes me excited to be part of it.”

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dg_sailingfan said:

Mate, I wouldn't be surprised if Mercedes + the INEOS Britannia Engineers & Boatbuilders put up a temporary facility a Brackley and construct the boat over there and not at Carrington. They have the tools to do that.

It's one thing to build car sized parts, quite another to build a 75 ft race yacht. Carrington did a good job as far I can tell. I'd say they'll get the gig again. Merc might build the foils though.

3 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I think in some ways it’s the mindset and the ability to bring in resources in lots of different directions and this need to have a holistic design to balance off pure performance against what you can achieve in the time scale.

Gawd, it's this sort of word salad that'll see them the first eliminated. Post-mortem reviews is an area of expertise though....

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Horn Rock said:

It's one thing to build car sized parts, quite another to build a 75 ft race yacht. Carrington did a good job as far I can tell. I'd say they'll get the gig again. Merc might build the foils though.

Every Designer of INEOS Britannia & Merc are now working at Brackley. The Portsmouth Base is completely emptied by INEOS Britannia and is rented to some other Company.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Post mortems of 7 consecutive championships in the most difficult sport in the world? OK. 

The hull will probably constructed by Carrington but the fit out, the hydraulic Systems to Power up the Mainsail of an AC75 Race Yacht could potentially be done by Mercedes alongside the foils.

I was fortunate to see an F1 Car from the inside in the early 2000's and the componentry, Systems,etc they were using then was just mind-boggling at that time. Of Course F1 has evolved and a lot of it might be outdated now.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure this has been posted before.

https://www.cupinsider.com/p/mercedes-boss-wolff-hungry-for-americas

Looks like Toto doesn't like being annoyed.

"Mercedes–AMG Petronas Formula 1 Team CEO Toto Wolff had minimal involvement in his organisation’s contribution to the Ineos Team UK Challenge for the 36th America’s Cup.

That was until he he watched footage of the British AC75 struggling to get airborne during the Christmas Cup regatta in New Zealand last December.

Although on holiday with his family, the agonising plight of Ben Ainslie and his crew out on Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf caught Wolff’s full attention.

“The boat wouldn’t go out of the water properly – and it was really annoying to see that,” he recalls.

When Mercedes engineers got involved in troubleshooting the sailing team’s problems during a break in the racing over the Christmas period, their input triggered a remarkable transformation of the British team’s performance."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

If one were to watch the first 4 minutes of the video one would realize what a moron one was.

Yeah okay, that sort of corporate waffle wins the cup every time. I do now know what the "woody" part in your ID means though. A permanent erection for Ben and his buddies at Mercedes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Horn Rock said:

Yeah okay, that sort of corporate waffle wins the cup every time. I do now know what the "woody" part in your ID means though. A permanent erection for Ben and his buddies at Mercedes.

I'm not sure what you were expecting to see. Sounded like a senior engineer talking to me, And since I am one I feel I am qualified to recognise such. He is hardly likely to get into the maths or design in one of those pieces, but does identify some areas they can help - including some that various posters on here have denied that they could could be of any assistance.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, dg_sailingfan said:

Every Designer of INEOS Britannia & Merc are now working at Brackley. The Portsmouth Base is completely emptied by INEOS Britannia and is rented to some other Company.

BAR Technologies I believe.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Despite the power and expertise at Brackley even they are aware that to testsail the boat you need to be near the water. 
 

the stupid “oh they binned the Portsmouth base” etc posts are just that, bloody stupid.  Once it’s built it’s gonna need sailing, if you already have a ready made facility to launch recover sail at test at you aren’t getting rid of it. 
 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JALhazmat said:

Despite the power and expertise at Brackley even they are aware that to testsail the boat you need to be near the water. 
 

the stupid “oh they binned the Portsmouth base” etc posts are just that, bloody stupid.  Once it’s built it’s gonna need sailing, if you already have a ready made facility to launch recover sail at test at you aren’t getting rid of it
 

 

There is nothing stupid! You are stupid!

Boat 2 of INEOS TEAM UK did not sail at all in the UK! Upon completion it was immediatedly flown to Auckland.

The Italians did the same. Their Boat 2 was constructed at Persico and that isn't excatly near water. It was transfered to Bergamo and then flown to Auckland.

The only Boat of INEOS that did sail in the UK was B1!

And finally American Magic did the same: PATRIOT was built in Bristol, Rhode Island and upon completion flown to Auckland via Chicago and Honolulu.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JALhazmat said:

given the first bit and given his current employment that makes him more successful than people taking shots from the cheap seats does it not? 

Jokes aside, I would love to see the UK do well in the AC. They're assembling a big team and throwing a lot of resources at the problem, but as we all know, that's not a guarantee of success. Not sure what these video snippets are designed to do? Convince themselves they're on track? Convince others? Make Jim feel good? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Horn Rock said:

Jokes aside, I would love to see the UK do well in the AC. They're assembling a big team and throwing a lot of resources at the problem, but as we all know, that's not a guarantee of success. Not sure what these video snippets are designed to do? Convince themselves they're on track? Convince others? Make Jim feel good? 

Why are you sooo pinky? I think these Vids are just the Rollout of their Campaign ahead of the Protocol Announcement next month. That's how it feels!

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, dg_sailingfan said:

Why are you sooo pinky?

I'm "pinky" because I fail to see the point of these vids, unless it is to give the in-house video guys something to do to earn their retainer. Then again I guess I should be grateful they're taking us along on their Cup journey, revealing the holistic, synergies of design balance in the Ineos mindset.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Horn Rock said:

I'm "pinky" because I fail to see the point of these vids, unless it is to give the in-house video guys something to do to earn their retainer. Then again I guess I should be grateful they're taking us along on their Cup journey, revealing the holistic, synergies of design balance in the Ineos mindset.....

As I said it just feels that these Vids are a Rollout of their AC37 Campaign. Not a bad way to do it! Not everyone probably watched their "Inside Tack Reveal Show on October 4th" unless you are a die-hard AC Fan. These Vids feel like trying to reach the Audience who haven't made Sailing their living and educate them!

I've to say I was very, very disappointed how little AC Coverage there was in the UK during AC36!

When Germany had a Team in the Cup in VLC 2007 there was almost Non-Stop Coverage every Race Day for 5 Hours on my two Main TV Channels ARD & ZDF + Live Streams.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, dg_sailingfan said:

These Vids feel like trying to reach the Audience who haven't made Sailing their living and educate them!

Okay I admit it's working for me. I'm adopting a similar philosophy on the vexed, and intractable issue of removing dog hair from the carpet. It's a bringing together of the different components, vacuum, foot scrapping, and carpet rake to achieve a performance in a limited time frame - before the guests arrive, offset against the requirement of food/beverages sufficient for an acceptable outcome in a social paradigm.

I should make videos on this.....

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's unbelievable just how often you post things that are completely wrong. In fact, you do it almost every post.

On 10/22/2021 at 9:31 AM, dg_sailingfan said:

Mate, I wouldn't be surprised if Mercedes + the INEOS Britannia Engineers & Boatbuilders put up a temporary facility a Brackley and construct the boat over there and not at Carrington. They have the tools to do that.

With your vast knowledge of the Brackley set up, please can you tell us where they will put this facility, because there certainly isn't room there. Or do you think there is enough room in the car parks and all teh staff will be asked to walk to work! I would be 100% certain that they will not be building at Brackley. They don't even have the capacity to build everything they need to for the F1 car, so how will they manage anything for the AC?

 

3 hours ago, dg_sailingfan said:

The only Boat of INEOS that did sail in the UK was B1!

Really? So their half size test boat based on t5he Quant 28 doesn't count?

1 hour ago, dg_sailingfan said:

I've to say I was very, very disappointed how little AC Coverage there was in the UK during AC36!

When Germany had a Team in the Cup in VLC 2007 there was almost Non-Stop Coverage every Race Day for 5 Hours on my two Main TV Channels ARD & ZDF + Live Streams.

Did you even begin to consider the time zone issues making live coverage something that wasn't worthwhile because everybody would have been asleep? Or how short the daily sailing time actually was. You cannot compare the 2 events.

Have you ever thought of engaging your brain before operating the keyboard?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, dg_sailingfan said:

There is nothing stupid! You are stupid!

Boat 2 of INEOS TEAM UK did not sail at all in the UK! Upon completion it was immediatedly flown to Auckland.

The Italians did the same. Their Boat 2 was constructed at Persico and that isn't excatly near water. It was transfered to Bergamo and then flown to Auckland.

The only Boat of INEOS that did sail in the UK was B1!

And finally American Magic did the same: PATRIOT was built in Bristol, Rhode Island and upon completion flown to Auckland via Chicago and Honolulu.

So BAR technologies are using the building and you think that’s nothing to do with INEOS challenge for the AC? 


That the sailing team that’s yet to be decided won’t sail together for the next two years  until they first land overseas 6 months Before the cup start date in a  brand new boat that they won’t have tested or fitted out until it arrives at the venue?  

they will fit all foil/sail and systems testing and evaluation into that period? 

And I am the stupid one? :lol:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2021 at 2:43 PM, Horn Rock said:

Okay I admit it's working for me. I'm adopting a similar philosophy on the vexed, and intractable issue of removing dog hair from the carpet. It's a bringing together of the different components, vacuum, foot scrapping, and carpet rake to achieve a performance in a limited time frame - before the guests arrive, offset against the requirement of food/beverages sufficient for an acceptable outcome in a social paradigm.

I should make videos on this.....

having had a german shepherd who just loved to coat blow where ever suited her I'd have to say 100% woolcarpet is your only friend for dog fluff, oh and one of those vacuum heads that spin and suck, got a beauty from nilfisk though it did/does choke up on her indoors long hair, who knew chicks shedded hair ???

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 167149 said:

having had a german shepherd who just loved to coat blow where ever suited her I'd have to say 100% woolcarpet is your only friend for dog fluff, oh and one of those vacuum heads that spin and suck, got a beauty from nilfisk though it did/does choke up on her indoors long hair, who knew chicks shedded hair ???

Mines half German Shepard, half Border Collie. The fucking hairs a nightmare - so hard to get up. On my 2nd vacuum as well - cooked the last one. 

2 hours ago, 167149 said:

her indoors long hair

Since she's had her Pixie cut its been less of an issue. Before it was the shower drain.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2021 at 2:07 AM, Horn Rock said:

I'm "pinky" because I fail to see the point of these vids, unless it is to give the in-house video guys something to do to earn their retainer. Then again I guess I should be grateful they're taking us along on their Cup journey, revealing the holistic, synergies of design balance in the Ineos mindset.....

To me its basic stakeholder management, recognising that the fans are amongst the stakeholders. You can view it as corporate bullshit or you can view it as greater professionalism.

Lets face it one of the biggest problems the AC has in getting & maintaining  attention is the large gaps with nothing happening. This is an attempt to fill that gap. Its not ideal but its all they can do at the moment. Hopefully once the protocol is released they can (slowly) start to get more interesting.

The announcement of the tie-up with Merc-AMG did make into some mainstream media here, so its a start. Feed the media and they may give it all more attention

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

To me its basic stakeholder management, recognising that the fans are amongst the stakeholders.

....

Lets face it one of the biggest problems the AC has in getting & maintaining  attention is the large gaps with nothing happening.

And staff and clients of the sponsors. 

Your thesis on gaps in attention is rather proven by the discussion here of dog grooming tips. Though a connection to Ineos might be found.

 

JS120038469-ainslie-sport_trans_NvBQzQNj 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, enigmatically2 said:

To me its basic stakeholder management,

Why would Jim give a shit? It's not like they're after more sponsors, or really having to please existing ones either. I agree that there's fuck all to talk about currently.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Horn Rock said:

Why would Jim give a shit? It's not like they're after more sponsors, or really having to please existing ones either. I agree that there's fuck all to talk about currently.

Corporate governance nowadays identified stakeholders far beyond the obvious sponsors or shareholders. And plainly he does give a shit, because they are doing it

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, enigmatically2 said:

Corporate governance nowadays identified stakeholders far beyond the obvious sponsors or shareholders. And plainly he does give a shit, because they are doing it

In every project, stakeholders have a say in project matters. Fans haven't (although some are delusional and think they have).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

In every project, stakeholders have a say in project matters. Fans haven't (although some are delusional and think they have).

Depends on the objectives. They have no contribution to the sporting success, but if there are corporate objectives (e.g. raising awareness) then they can. The sailing audience is small, but they have often been targetted by high end sponsors for being influential. So who knows. 

I did wonder whether in this case it is actually Merc-AMG raising awareness of their advanced engineering outfit so that other organisations may want to employ them

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, enigmatically2 said:

Depends on the objectives. They have no contribution to the sporting success, but if there are corporate objectives (e.g. raising awareness) then they can. The sailing audience is small, but they have often been targetted by high end sponsors for being influential. So who knows. 

I did wonder whether in this case it is actually Merc-AMG raising awareness of their advanced engineering outfit so that other organisations may want to employ them

 

Then they are the target audience or customers, but not stakeholders.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

Then they are the target audience or customers, but not stakeholders.

In some forms of governance they may now referred to as stakeholders to be managed via the information management or communication plans.

But in more traditional English usage I would agree with you.

 

It is an irrelevant distinction for this forum though

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

In some forms of governance they may now referred to as stakeholders to be managed via the information management or communication plans.

But in more traditional English usage I would agree with you.

 

It is an irrelevant distinction for this forum though

It is :)

Link to post
Share on other sites