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Does Replacing Teak with a Substitute Wood Devalue a Boat?


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We have some teak that has cracks and splits beyond repair.  The gaps are too large to fix, other than making up a mix of teak sawdust and epoxy.  It will always be obvious.

We have talked about replacing the teak with tigerwood or cumaru or some other exterior grade wood.  But then I started wondering if this would devalue the boat.  Kinda like what new parts do to a classic car.

Is this a legitimate concern?

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1 hour ago, Jules said:

We have some teak that has cracks and splits beyond repair.  The gaps are too large to fix, other than making up a mix of teak sawdust and epoxy.  It will always be obvious.

We have talked about replacing the teak with tigerwood or cumaru or some other exterior grade wood.  But then I started wondering if this would devalue the boat.  Kinda like what new parts do to a classic car.

Is this a legitimate concern?

you already have the answer.

as for the question, i think it depends what kind of boat we're talking about.

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2 hours ago, Mark Set said:

as for the question, i think it depends what kind of boat we're talking about.

1986 Aloha 32.  Not exactly comparable to a 1969 Boss 302 but I was just wondering what the consensus was to replacing teak with a substitute in general was.

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8 minutes ago, Jules said:

1986 Aloha 32.  Not exactly comparable to a 1969 Boss 302 but I was just wondering what the consensus was to replacing teak with a substitute in general was.

Personally I'd pay more for a boat with no exterior wood at all.  

For a boat like that little cosmetic details aren't going to impact the value much one way or another so long as they're functional and not an eyesore.  

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5 hours ago, Jules said:

We have some teak that has cracks and splits beyond repair.  The gaps are too large to fix, other than making up a mix of teak sawdust and epoxy.  It will always be obvious.

We have talked about replacing the teak with tigerwood or cumaru or some other exterior grade wood.  But then I started wondering if this would devalue the boat.  Kinda like what new parts do to a classic car.

Is this a legitimate concern?

 

How many cars are actually in the 'it will loose value if you change that' bucket rather than 'it would be worth more if that hadn't been changed bucket'?

My only experience of classic cars was a GT6, and it (and most other Trimpuh sport 6's i saw) were definitely in the second category, it had already been modified enough that any changes I made would not reduce its value. The ones that were actually in 'original'  state were seldom if ever driven, but they certainly looked pretty.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, JohnMB said:

 

.... The ones that were actually in 'original'  state were seldom if ever driven, but they certainly looked pretty.

 

 

And the seldom driven may not have been by choice...especially on a rainy day, love lucas electrics...they paid my way through college

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I suppose it also depends on where the to be replaced/repaired timber is? 

Deck? Galley?  And I suppose it would depend on what you proposed replacing it with and how much epoxy/teak dust filler you'd be using and how good you are at using said filler..so many questions ...a pic would be good.

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46 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I'm impressed that you know what a 1969 Boss 302 is. :D

Believe it or not, I did a lot of the restoration on this baby, including a new front end.  But the 351 Cleveland, 4-bolt main engine my son blew, it went to a custom shop.  It still hurts.
mach1.jpg.97472eda2a524b4f4b36dc86a6e575fb.jpg

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47 minutes ago, JohnMB said:

How many cars are actually in the 'it will loose value if you change that' bucket rather than 'it would be worth more if that hadn't been changed bucket'?

Most of them nowadays.

The "originality" and "documentation" thing has been taken to absurd levels by investment rather than car guy buyers

Watch one of the big auctions - those clowns will be gathered around the trunk looking at three ring binders of old documents rather than looking at the car.

They will pay big premiums for things like a "correctly date coded" engine - not the original engine that came in that car mind you, just one that COULD have been original because it was cast in the period immediately preceding the build of the car - one cast a month later could lower the value of the car by tens of thousands.

It's absurd and stupid and has accomplished nothing but to price real car enthusiasts out of the market. The one saving grace is that they are going to lose their shirts when the Boomers start croaking because Gen X, Y & Millennials mostly don't give a shit about the cars.

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I’d replace the teak with teak. I have a bunch (650 pieces) of 2”x1/2” x various lengths 4’-8’ for replacement decking in case you’re looking for a good deal on teak. Nice clean teak from Burma. Not that plantation crap.

PM me if interested, I’m not looking to kill anyone on pricing, just want to start unloading a couple tons of teak ... boat shop stuff laying around not rotting for a while here in NJ.

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8 minutes ago, Jules said:

Believe it or not, I did a lot of the restoration on this baby, including a new front end.  But the 351 Cleveland, 4-bolt main engine my son blew, it went to a custom shop.  It still hurts.
mach1.jpg.97472eda2a524b4f4b36dc86a6e575fb.jpg

Calypso Coral?

Haven't seen one of those on the road for years.

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1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

My brorthere hade oune, notte neareley so shiney, a fiew denttes hearre an theire,  A regullare beaste it wase, we hade a blaste in it.                       :)

I was more into British sports cars (had a few Bs, BGT, A and TR6) as I felt they were more "refined" (what did I know - long haired kid, blue jeans, tweed jacket with patched elbows and wire framed glasses thought myself an intellectual, I did. I don’t think the zits lent any gravitas to my delusions). My elder sister was more pure play assertive - she was nurse but no pushover. She drove one of these. Nothing subtle about laying a patch in third on the highway - that was passing with authority.

image.png.9bb8897b8b1ff7f1e636d05e6482c481.png

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19 minutes ago, KC375 said:

I was more into British sports cars (had a few Bs, BGT, A and TR6) as I felt they were more "refined" (what did I know - long haired kid, blue jeans, tweed jacket with patched elbows and wire framed glasses thought myself an intellectual, I did. I don’t think the zits lent any gravitas to my delusions).

Should have smoked a pipe - that would have done it. :D

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7 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Should have smoked a pipe - that would have done it. :D

You know,  I was at least self aware enough to know I just looked to young to pull off the pipe thing. But I did think about it.  (I smoked a few other things). My older brother - who I was probably trying to imitate - pulled off the pipe thing with élan, I think his fully formed mustache helped, and an extra 7 years.

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3 minutes ago, KC375 said:

You know,  I was at least self aware enough to know I just looked to young to pull off the pipe thing. But I did think about it.  (I smoked a few other things). My older brother - who I was probably trying to imitate - pulled off the pipe thing with élan, I think his fully formed mustache helped, and an extra 7 years.

Selfe awarreness is evereythinge, you our to steppes aheade of so manney.                         :)

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Teak is neat but the costs are eyewaytering.  I have a 2x4 piece of rough sawn teak that was four feet long that cost $80.00.  I have also purchased teak planks that cost far more than I would want to pay again. (Somewhere along the line of the bicycle rule of D-1 or in other words, never take the spouse along when purchasing teak.)

I am wondering if cypress would be a reasonable, workable alternative.  

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8 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Excuse me, are you lost?  Do you need directions? 

Opps..wrong forum. Wooden boat has the same sort of page. So sorry.

I post wooden boaty stuff in WBF . I keep politics for here ..where I can tell dick heads to fuck off. 

 

 

:D

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43 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

Opps..wrong forum. Wooden boat has the same sort of page. So sorry.

I post wooden boaty stuff in WBF . I keep politics for here ..where I can tell dick heads to fuck off. 

 

 

:D

I thought you got punted from the WBF?  Have you done a randumb and made a comeback under a new name?

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Unless it's really, really special and worth it, you'll be lucky to get back 10 cents on the dollar for anything you throw into it.

I used hardware store stuff when I redid all my cabinetry. I even used recycled wood beams cut down and planed into usable sizes. The surveyor thought it had been done by a professional lol.

 

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If you cant stomach teak pricing , go to one of the lumberyards selling tropical hardwood deck lumber. It lasts outdoors, comes in various sizes and is reasonably priced. Its sold under about 25 names, but its mostly a cousin to teak. 

Aloha was built to several finish levels, some have a LOT of teak and shiny parts. I'd replace teak with teak if it was my boat. I just feel sad when I see a boat with douglas fir where teak used to be.

Dont get me started on vintage / classic cars fuck ups. Hot rods built on a Ford model A body with a chevy smallblock...... oy vey

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15 hours ago, Jules said:

Believe it or not, I did a lot of the restoration on this baby, including a new front end.  But the 351 Cleveland, 4-bolt main engine my son blew, it went to a custom shop.  It still hurts.
mach1.jpg.97472eda2a524b4f4b36dc86a6e575fb.jpg

That's a '71, though.

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17 hours ago, KC375 said:

And the seldom driven may not have been by choice...especially on a rainy day, love lucas electrics...they paid my way through college

Ah yes, the tragedy of British 'sports' cars.  A pretty exterior bedeviled inside by the evil Lucas and British automotive engineering expertise.  MG, Jaguar, Lotus, Rover, Triumph, why do we never learn?

The field of broken, nay shattered dreams is littered with those that were sucked in by that allure, even to this day. 

When I was young, I desperately wanted to possess a TR-6.  I came perilously close once to trading my most excellent AMC Pacer even-Steven for a TR-6.  It never aroused my suspicions that  owner of the Triumph was extremely eager to consummate the trade.  Fortunately the fates were on my side for once.  Due to the non-availability of repair parts (another red flag that I blindly ignored), and the possibly the guilt feelings of the owner, the deal fell apart and I never achieved the dream and thereby avoided the inevitable headaches and heartache.  I did however sell the guy my Schwinn Super Sport 10 speed racing bike.  Many years later my brother succumbed to the desire and bought a 'restored' TR-6.  And beautifully restored it was, at least on the surface.    I desperately tried to warn him of his folly but he was to enamored of the car to hear my pleas.  The classic green color, those big wheels and tires, convertible top (leaky of course, as he found out)!  He even had the restorer move the seat rails back to accommodate his above average height.  After a couple of years and  a lot of cursing, a lot  money, and a lot of time with the car sitting in his driveway or at the local garage, he regretted his foolish impulse and sold it to our equally tall nephew.  Poor kid, he never really talked about the car, and now he rarely talks to my brother come to think of it.  Apparently the gene for such foolishness runs in our family, along with the gene for excessive height.

And I did own a '79 Mustang GT with a stock 302 V8, 5 speed manual trans, which was more than dangerous enough in that little, light vehicle.

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2 hours ago, crankcall said:

If you cant stomach teak pricing , go to one of the lumberyards selling tropical hardwood deck lumber. It lasts outdoors, comes in various sizes and is reasonably priced. Its sold under about 25 names, but its mostly a cousin to teak. 

This. I've used Ipe and Sapele successfully as teak substitutes. Ipe is far harder but not as attractive.

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4 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Ah yes, the tragedy of British 'sports' cars.  A pretty exterior bedeviled inside by the evil Lucas and British automotive engineering expertise.  MG, Jaguar, Lotus, Rover, Triumph, why do we never learn?

The field of broken, nay shattered dreams is littered with those that were sucked in by that allure, even to this day. 

When I was young, I desperately wanted to possess a TR-6.  I came perilously close once to trading my most excellent AMC Pacer even-Steven for a TR-6.  It never aroused my suspicions that  owner of the Triumph was extremely eager to consummate the trade.  Fortunately the fates were on my side for once.  Due to the non-availability of repair parts (another red flag that I blindly ignored), and the possibly the guilt feelings of the owner, the deal fell apart and I never achieved the dream and thereby avoided the inevitable headaches and heartache.  I did however sell the guy my Schwinn Super Sport 10 speed racing bike.  Many years later my brother succumbed to the desire and bought a 'restored' TR-6.  And beautifully restored it was, at least on the surface.    I desperately tried to warn him of his folly but he was to enamored of the car to hear my pleas.  The classic green color, those big wheels and tires, convertible top (leaky of course, as he found out)!  He even had the restorer move the seat rails back to accommodate his above average height.  After a couple of years and  a lot of cursing, a lot  money, and a lot of time with the car sitting in his driveway or at the local garage, he regretted his foolish impulse and sold it to our equally tall nephew.  Poor kid, he never really talked about the car, and now he rarely talks to my brother come to think of it.  Apparently the gene for such foolishness runs in our family, along with the gene for excessive height.

As you noted – you may have dodged disaster by keeping your Pacer. A key thing buying the TR6 is to have a full grown/well fed adult step on the rear bumper while you watch the gap between the top back edge of the door and the rear quarter panel. It will grow a disturbing amount – the trick is to know what is acceptable. As I recall more than a thumb width suggested major framework to do. Something about the underslung frame (passing below the live rear axel) made it particularly prone to corrosion. Body panels were easy enough to patch or source but frame splicing moved the resto cost to a new orbit.

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3 hours ago, crankcall said:

 Hot rods built on a Ford model A body with a chevy smallblock...... oy vey

????

That's what a Hot Rod IS.

Well, that or a Deuce - with a Chevy small block.

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21 hours ago, Jules said:

1986 Aloha 32.  Not exactly comparable to a 1969 Boss 302 but I was just wondering what the consensus was to replacing teak with a substitute in general was.

Drop a boss 302 V8 into the Aloha 32 and you could significantly improve your motoring speed.

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4 hours ago, crankcall said:

If you cant stomach teak pricing , go to one of the lumberyards selling tropical hardwood deck lumber. It lasts outdoors, comes in various sizes and is reasonably priced. Its sold under about 25 names, but its mostly a cousin to teak. 

Aloha was built to several finish levels, some have a LOT of teak and shiny parts. I'd replace teak with teak if it was my boat. I just feel sad when I see a boat with douglas fir where teak used to be.

Dont get me started on vintage / classic cars fuck ups. Hot rods built on a Ford model A body with a chevy smallblock...... oy vey

or get one of the african mahogany clones...   around here,  people have been using white oak ,   but Jules you know more about types of woods than most people on this board...    you might find some deals on teak on craigslist

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2 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Ah yes, the tragedy of British 'sports' cars.  A pretty exterior bedeviled inside by the evil Lucas and British automotive engineering expertise.  MG, Jaguar, Lotus, Rover, Triumph, why do we never learn?

The field of broken, nay shattered dreams is littered with those that were sucked in by that allure, even to this day. 

When I was young, I desperately wanted to possess a TR-6.  I came perilously close once to trading my most excellent AMC Pacer even-Steven for a TR-6.  It never aroused my suspicions that  owner of the Triumph was extremely eager to consummate the trade.  Fortunately the fates were on my side for once.  Due to the non-availability of repair parts (another red flag that I blindly ignored), and the possibly the guilt feelings of the owner, the deal fell apart and I never achieved the dream and thereby avoided the inevitable headaches and heartache.  I did however sell the guy my Schwinn Super Sport 10 speed racing bike.  Many years later my brother succumbed to the desire and bought a 'restored' TR-6.  And beautifully restored it was, at least on the surface.    I desperately tried to warn him of his folly but he was to enamored of the car to hear my pleas.  The classic green color, those big wheels and tires, convertible top (leaky of course, as he found out)!  He even had the restorer move the seat rails back to accommodate his above average height.  After a couple of years and  a lot of cursing, a lot  money, and a lot of time with the car sitting in his driveway or at the local garage, he regretted his foolish impulse and sold it to our equally tall nephew.  Poor kid, he never really talked about the car, and now he rarely talks to my brother come to think of it.  Apparently the gene for such foolishness runs in our family, along with the gene for excessive height.

And I did own a '79 Mustang GT with a stock 302 V8, 5 speed manual trans, which was more than dangerous enough in that little, light vehicle.

Back in the late 1970's a friend had a British roadster - can't remember which one.    Several times I had to go pick her up when the car stranded her.

 

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Depending on what you replaced the teak with, I think many buyers would be happy.  I personally love teak on a boat or anywhere else.  My living room floor is teak, but on a boat many people don't want the hassle of the upkeep and don't like the silver color that teak gets with age and exposure to the sun. Now if it was some classic yacht, that would be a different story, but that's not the case.

 

House LR rs.jpg

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5 minutes ago, slap said:

Back in the late 1970's a friend had a British roadster - can't remember which one.    Several times I had to go pick her up when the car stranded her.

 

I think that many people that have had an experience with such cars have had a similar story.  

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20 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Calypso Coral?

That color sounds right.  When we picked it up, the paint was in pretty good shape.  But we found out later, when the engine threw a rod, someone had tinkered with it and failed to leave the proper gap between connecting rods.  Perfectly good 351 Cleveland block shot.  After that, keeping it original wasn't so important.

My son owned it for about 10 years, then finally sold it.  Too much upkeep.

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34 minutes ago, IStream said:

That's all just part of the "charm" of owning a British sports car.

I knew somebody would come up with the "charm" defense!  :D

Did you ever own one?

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

This. I've used Ipe and Sapele successfully as teak substitutes. Ipe is far harder but not as attractive.

I'm partial to tigerwood.  I just made a bathroom counter top out of it and find that wood gorgeous. 

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25 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

I knew somebody would come up with the "charm" defense!  :D

Did you ever own one?

Hell no! I preferred the Italian convertibles. They didn't leak as badly (water in or oil out) and they were more likely to get you home. Perhaps on only three cylinders, but still.

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9 minutes ago, IStream said:

Hell no! I preferred the Italian convertibles. They didn't leak as badly (water in or oil out) and they were more likely to get you home. Perhaps on only three cylinders, but still.

Haha.

My first car was a Chrysler product made in France.  A Simca, with a whopping 1,000 cc rear engine.  It left me stranded many times, but it was about 10 years old when I owned it, when cars weren't made to last that long.  I had to put oil in it about as often as I did gas.  The up side was that with the 1 liter engine, a tank of gas and a quart of oil both lasted a while.

The one below isn't mine but that's exactly what mine looked like except without the fog lights.

S_642001-MLU20266401388_032015-O.jpg

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Since we've drifted into cars - here's one to lust over.

I've pretty much lost my taste for hyper-exotics. They have become so common and so "production" that they've just lost the magic they had in the days of the Miura and Daytona.

When you see people driving McLarens in the rain you know things have changed - for the worse.

However!

Now this is coming for a few dozen lucky 1%'rs

https://ca.video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-iba-1&hsimp=yhs-1&hspart=iba&p=de+tomaso+p72#id=4&vid=9e5c55455ac9dc6d0583c5002d04a1e2&action=click

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1 hour ago, Jules said:

That color sounds right.  When we picked it up, the paint was in pretty good shape.  But we found out later, when the engine threw a rod, someone had tinkered with it and failed to leave the proper gap between connecting rods.  Perfectly good 351 Cleveland block shot.  After that, keeping it original wasn't so important.

My son owned it for about 10 years, then finally sold it.  Too much upkeep.

the 351 cleaveland is a hell of an engine,  put the  351 windsor heads on them and you're good to go...  ( windsor had the bigger valves)   ..  he also had it pumped up to 13.5 - 1 ,  had it in a 71 gran torino..      that fucker would put back into the seat

not his car, but his was just like it..

1970_ford_torino_cobra_sportsroof_chiole

 

 

Ed,  you need to move to more sustainable floors,    we have bamboo and it looks great..

 

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2 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

the 351 cleaveland is a hell of an engine,  put the  351 windsor heads on them and you're good to go...  ( windsor had the bigger valves)   ..

That's some real Internet quality advice there Dreade.

Luckily anyone capable of actually bolting a head on an engine will know enough to ignore it.

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14 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

Ed,  you need to move to more sustainable floors,    we have bamboo and it looks great..

 

I looked at bamboo and it looks very nice but I wanted teak, it's more unusual, and I am far from water and boats here, so it makes me feel nautical.  Notice all of the seascapes on the wall, and there are more now.  In my defense, it's made from small pieces, (avg 1"w x 4-6"l ), glued together into 2 meter lengths x about 6" wide so it's using wood that would usually go to waste.  That was expensive enough, I couldn't afford one piece lengths.

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28 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

That's some real Internet quality advice there Dreade.

Luckily anyone capable of actually bolting a head on an engine will know enough to ignore it.

tell that to my friend...   it was quite the  car,  

 

oops,  what I meant to say    Ok, boomer..

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Exactly.

Those are Boomer engines.

The canted valve heads are what made the Cleveland what it was - the same basic valve layout as the Chevy big block.

The Windsor was just a larger displacement 302.

If your friend made it work it was despite that head swap, not because of it.

 
"both are small blocks. They both take small block bellhousings. The main differences are the heads. The cleveland has a canted valve lay out, with HUGE ports and valves. There are 2 different CLEVELANDS that is there were 2v and 4v. Both had more than generous ports, and valves. The big cleveland had 2.19" intake valves, and 1.71" exhaust valves. The intake ports could easily fit a lime into them.

Also the mains were smaller on the cleveland...2.75" I do believe. The 351C was only made 70-74 so the parts for it are just not as abundant as the more readily available 351 Windsor (go to australia where the Cleveland was built till the 80's and it is the opposite.) Because there are so many more Windsors out there than clevelands, the windsor got more attention with the aftermarket. Also a reason the aftermarket was so strong to the Windsor was because it was MUCH HARDER to make these go fast from the factory where as the Cleveland was much easier."

 
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7 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Ah yes, the tragedy of British 'sports' cars.  A pretty exterior bedeviled inside by the evil Lucas and British automotive engineering expertise.  MG, Jaguar, Lotus, Rover, Triumph, why do we never learn?

The field of broken, nay shattered dreams is littered with those that were sucked in by that allure, even to this day. 

When I was young, I desperately wanted to possess a TR-6.  I came perilously close once to trading my most excellent AMC Pacer even-Steven for a TR-6.  It never aroused my suspicions that  owner of the Triumph was extremely eager to consummate the trade.  Fortunately the fates were on my side for once.  Due to the non-availability of repair parts (another red flag that I blindly ignored), and the possibly the guilt feelings of the owner, the deal fell apart and I never achieved the dream and thereby avoided the inevitable headaches and heartache.  I did however sell the guy my Schwinn Super Sport 10 speed racing bike.  Many years later my brother succumbed to the desire and bought a 'restored' TR-6.  And beautifully restored it was, at least on the surface.    I desperately tried to warn him of his folly but he was to enamored of the car to hear my pleas.  The classic green color, those big wheels and tires, convertible top (leaky of course, as he found out)!  He even had the restorer move the seat rails back to accommodate his above average height.  After a couple of years and  a lot of cursing, a lot  money, and a lot of time with the car sitting in his driveway or at the local garage, he regretted his foolish impulse and sold it to our equally tall nephew.  Poor kid, he never really talked about the car, and now he rarely talks to my brother come to think of it.  Apparently the gene for such foolishness runs in our family, along with the gene for excessive height.

And I did own a '79 Mustang GT with a stock 302 V8, 5 speed manual trans, which was more than dangerous enough in that little, light vehicle.

Gotta disagree. My first car was a '69 Triumph GT6+ and I wish I'd never sold it. Great fun. Never left me stranded.

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1 hour ago, monsoon said:

Gotta disagree. My first car was a '69 Triumph GT6+ and I wish I'd never sold it. Great fun. Never left me stranded.

My gt6 was also very reliable. Liked it a lot. Of course I was running electronic ignition not Lucas points, but pretty much all the spitfires, gt6s and heralds did that mod.(assuming you intended to drive the car that is)

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12 minutes ago, JohnMB said:

My gt6 was also very reliable. Liked it a lot. Of course I was running electronic ignition not Lucas points, but pretty much all the spitfires, gt6s and heralds did that mod.(assuming you intended to drive the car that is)

Yah...  I really, really liked that car. But I was a bit sports car mad in my youth. The GT6, a Fiat 124 Spider, a 914, a '69 Mustang fastback. Skip by 30 years and now having a bit of spare change I looked for a decent GT6. But most are rust buckets and if not are unreasonably expensive. Same for 914s which I also investigated. Due, I suppose, to all the other late-stage boomers like me looking for a bit of their youth. I 'settled' for a '02 Boxster. Crazy cheap for what they are.

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1 hour ago, monsoon said:

Yah...  I really, really liked that car. But I was a bit sports car mad in my youth. The GT6, a Fiat 124 Spider, a 914, a '69 Mustang fastback. Skip by 30 years and now having a bit of spare change I looked for a decent GT6. But most are rust buckets and if not are unreasonably expensive. Same for 914s which I also investigated. Due, I suppose, to all the other late-stage boomers like me looking for a bit of their youth. I 'settled' for a '02 Boxster. Crazy cheap for what they are.

A number of years ago I started getting the itch to get another motorcycle.   Came to the conclusion that it wasn't the best choice anymore.   And I knew enough to stay away from the British or Italian roadsters, so I ended up with this:

my_miata-small-2.jpg

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6 hours ago, IStream said:

Hell no! I preferred the Italian convertibles. They didn't leak as badly (water in or oil out) and they were more likely to get you home. Perhaps on only three cylinders, but still.

And Italians were much quicker.

They had to be to get there before dark,  because you could be pretty sure the lights wouldn't work,  and if they did you probably had to have the blinkers or wipers on to make them go!

I had a Fiat and 2 Alfas,  & and yes I keep looking longingly at old ones,  but the wife has banned me getting close enough to touch.

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Yeah, I keep thinking about getting a late-60s/early-70s 124 Spider but I think that if I ever get serious, I'll buy a Mazda MX5. They've pretty much perfected the formula, to the point that Fiat is rebadging them with a few suspension tweaks.

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3 hours ago, monsoon said:

Gotta disagree. My first car was a '69 Triumph GT6+ and I wish I'd never sold it. Great fun. Never left me stranded.

I gotta disagree to.  Had a ‘77 B that was my daily driver for 11 years.  Once you got the grounds cleaned, and the wiring back to original, the electrically system was just fine.  Yes I got stranded every now and again, but that was typically due to bad replacement parts ( a run of bad alternators in particular).

Wife commutes in a ‘17 Miata  RF.  What a great little car.  Heel and toe downshifts are so easy and intuitive, you think your Senna or Schumacher...but it doesn’t have that old British sports car smell of leather and warm oil :D

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On 12/5/2019 at 10:01 AM, Jules said:

We have some teak that has cracks and splits beyond repair.  The gaps are too large to fix, other than making up a mix of teak sawdust and epoxy.  It will always be obvious.

We have talked about replacing the teak with tigerwood or cumaru or some other exterior grade wood.  But then I started wondering if this would devalue the boat.  Kinda like what new parts do to a classic car.

Is this a legitimate concern?

I got tired of dealing with the teak in the head, sanded it, painted it with exterior latex gloss white porch paint, and it has been looking fine for a decade or so now. Unless you are running a boat museum just do whatever you like.

I don't really care if anyone else likes it unless said person is showing up with teak oil and some rags.

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Most folks buying a boat from the mid 80’s just want one that’s been taken care of.  If it’s exterior teak, then as long as you replace in “matching” sets with the wood (or stainless or starboard, or suitable wood, etc), your good.

If it’s interior trim, then yeah, maybe go with teak...if it’s joinery that has a teak veneer laminated to it, patch so it’s smooth, and paint white as KIS suggests for that classic “Herreshoff” look...

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9 minutes ago, Crash said:

Most folks buying a boat from the mid 80’s just want one that’s been taken care of.  If it’s exterior teak, then as long as you replace in “matching” sets with the wood (or stainless or starboard, or suitable wood, etc), your good.

If it’s interior trim, then yeah, maybe go with teak...if it’s joinery that has a teak veneer laminated to it, patch so it’s smooth, and paint white as KIS suggests for that classic “Herreshoff” look...

What started out as some nutty concern that my boat might be devalued because I didn't stick to time honored standards has exposed the silliness of thinking anyone would really care if an Aloha was "upgraded" when the nutty owner replaced the teak with tigerwood. 

I guess it shows how ownership clouds the mind as to the value of what we own.

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Depends on how you like your boat to look while you own it, and if you ever plan on selling it.  Do you want it to look like some Home Depot low budget Melamine and white Latex paint DIY kitchen remodel from a Saturday episode on HGTV, or do you want it to look like the rest of the boat did 40 years ago?  I've seen a lot of these "on the cheap YouTube kids" that absolutely ruin the resale values of an already piece of shit boat.  Just digging a deeper hole with every brush stroke.  By the way, teak turns reddish brown with varnish, and I spent many a painstaking hour mixing and matching gloss and satin Epifanes.  Some of these are old pics, but today you couldn't tell what's new teak, and what came from the factory in 1977.

These were not in the original drawings, but I bet they would be now.  Just ask Bob...

 

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Yeah, I keep thinking about getting a late-60s/early-70s 124 Spider but I think that if I ever get serious, I'll buy a Mazda MX5. They've pretty much perfected the formula, to the point that Fiat is rebadging them with a few suspension tweaks.

The FIAT MX5 is much sexier than the Mazda version too.

Italian flair and all that.

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29 minutes ago, jamhass said:

Damn, now I'm regretting having just sold my '57.  Are those twin cam wheels?

One summer I worked with a guy who stuffed a Chevy small block in one of those.

Made his own Cobra - after a fashion.

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

The FIAT MX5 is much sexier than the Mazda version too.

Italian flair and all that.

I love that you love 1/2 tonners, but your wrong here :rolleyes:  The original 124 spider is a great looking car.  The Mazda based version is a caricature of that car.  The Mazda MX-5 looks like what it is, a Japanese sports car.  I agree it's not beautiful, but it is stays in the design ethos.  

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On 12/5/2019 at 10:25 PM, Sail4beer said:

I’d replace the teak with teak. I have a bunch (650 pieces) of 2”x1/2” x various lengths 4’-8’ for replacement decking in case you’re looking for a good deal on teak. Nice clean teak from Burma. Not that plantation crap.

PM me if interested, I’m not looking to kill anyone on pricing, just want to start unloading a couple tons of teak ... boat shop stuff laying around not rotting for a while here in NJ.

Damn, I'm jealous.  I thinking about getting a conex full and shipping it over here and I'll line my man cave with teak!

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On 12/5/2019 at 6:24 PM, KC375 said:

I was more into British sports cars (had a few Bs, BGT, A and TR6) as I felt they were more "refined" (what did I know - long haired kid, blue jeans, tweed jacket with patched elbows and wire framed glasses thought myself an intellectual, I did. I don’t think the zits lent any gravitas to my delusions). My elder sister was more pure play assertive - she was nurse but no pushover. She drove one of these. Nothing subtle about laying a patch in third on the highway - that was passing with authority.

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No pipe? You really needed a pipe to carry off the image. Ask me how I know. I wasn't in to British sports cars, had a Fiat 124 Spider that spent a lot of time getting valve and ring jobs. Only 1400 cc but very willing little engine. No one told me you weren't supposed to keep ending speed above 4000 rpm all the time.

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8 hours ago, Crash said:

Most folks buying a boat from the mid 80’s just want one that’s been taken care of.  If it’s exterior teak, then as long as you replace in “matching” sets with the wood (or stainless or starboard, or suitable wood, etc), your good.

If it’s interior trim, then yeah, maybe go with teak...if it’s joinery that has a teak veneer laminated to it, patch so it’s smooth, and paint white as KIS suggests for that classic “Herreshoff” look...

I actually like the white paint a lot. It was an experiment, I wasn't even sure if it would stick, but it ended up working quite well. "Porch paint" is designed to get wet and take a lot of abuse. It makes the head seem a lot more spacious now and cleans up easier and is about 1000 times easier to maintain than varnish.

 

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My high school job and a brief while afterward was autobody. Small rural shop , we did more rust buckets than collision work and were known as the guys that took the sag and wobble out of british body construction. Fitting new sub frames into Healys became the bread and butter work.

You never jacked up a convertible without the doors closed, they sure wouldn't open or close after if the car wasn't 'level'. You could make a british wiring harness bullet proof, you needed a week and a big tube of silicone and shrink warp , and electrical isolation paste. The bigger problem was garages that did the "i made it work fix" , it did briefly. 

I get really sad when I think about the 60's and 70's muscle cars that we scraped, guy puts a barracuda or GTO up a maple tree and the cost to repair was about 3k in 1975, and a used cuda or gto was about 3K so guys just let them go. 

My favorite was a 36 plymouth the guy had put a 383 engine in from his crashed super bee . I forget the trim level of the super bee but he said his '68 had the 440 heads and manifolds bolted into the 383 from the factory. With the headers the ground shook. Was about 330hp..... which now you get in a car off the dealers lot all the time. 

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9 hours ago, thereefgeek said:

Wow, two inches wide by half inch thick eh?  That's quite the score.

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That and a couple thousand other pieces...nice work by the way

I miss some of the long, wide, thick boards I’ve sold off in the past  but for the work I do I have all I’ll need til I die.

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5 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Damn, I'm jealous.  I thinking about getting a conex full and shipping it over here and I'll line my man cave with teak!

Hit me up! I’ve got 1,200+ 1 1/2”x1”x45” pieces that I use to make cockpit grates, shower grates, welcome Matt’s and evening a nice long teak wheelchair ramp for a friend. Also have hundreds of the same dimension in 18-24” lengths. When it comes out of my Grizzly Planer with the helical head blades, the finish is so smooth and polished that there is no need to sand at all. 

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17 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Exactly.

Those are Boomer engines.

The canted valve heads are what made the Cleveland what it was - the same basic valve layout as the Chevy big block.

The Windsor was just a larger displacement 302.

If your friend made it work it was despite that head swap, not because of it.

 
"both are small blocks. They both take small block bellhousings. The main differences are the heads. The cleveland has a canted valve lay out, with HUGE ports and valves. There are 2 different CLEVELANDS that is there were 2v and 4v. Both had more than generous ports, and valves. The big cleveland had 2.19" intake valves, and 1.71" exhaust valves. The intake ports could easily fit a lime into them.

Also the mains were smaller on the cleveland...2.75" I do believe. The 351C was only made 70-74 so the parts for it are just not as abundant as the more readily available 351 Windsor (go to australia where the Cleveland was built till the 80's and it is the opposite.) Because there are so many more Windsors out there than clevelands, the windsor got more attention with the aftermarket. Also a reason the aftermarket was so strong to the Windsor was because it was MUCH HARDER to make these go fast from the factory where as the Cleveland was much easier."

 

I have a marinized Windsor 351 fuel injected motor sitting in my shop waiting on the right boat to put it in. Not really a mobo guy so I guess it will go to someone else one day. I could just go buy and old Ford station wagon and drop it in. I could drive the Adirondacks and Rockies all day uphill with a full load with that camshaft! 

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

Hit me up! I’ve got 1,200+ 1 1/2”x1”x45” pieces that I use to make cockpit grates, shower grates, welcome Matt’s and evening a nice long teak wheelchair ramp for a friend. Also have hundreds of the same dimension in 18-24” lengths. When it comes out of my Grizzly Planer with the helical head blades, the finish is so smooth and polished that there is no need to sand at all. 

Very tempting but by the time I paid to have it crated up and sent here, the cost would be quite high.  

I had my father's watchmaker's bench shipped here some years ago after he passed away.  It had a lot of sentimental value because I worked for him for years, starting at age 11.  The bench and a few other items which weighed under 500 lbs total, cost about $3,000 to bring over.  And that was more than 10 years ago.

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